East > Foedera With Syllabus

The text of Rymer's Foedera (1704-1735), combined with an English summary.

Rymer's Foedera Volume 8

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Covers the period July 1397 to February 1413, the end of the reign of Richard II and the entire reign of Henry IV. Included in this volume are several documents relating to Geoffrey Chaucer and many documents concerning the struggles between Owain Glyn Dŵr and Henry IV and his sons.

Rymer's Foedera Volume 9

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Covers the period March 1413 to July 1420: almost the entire reign of Henry V. There are many documents concerning the preparations for the invasion of France, Henry's continuing military successes there, and negotiations over his marriage to Catherine of Valois.

Rymer's Foedera Volume 10

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Covers the period July 1420 to October 1441: the end of the reign of Henry V and the minority of Henry VI. The minority of the new king saw power struggles over the regency and raised questions of how his father's conquests in France could be maintained.

Rymer's Foedera Volume 11

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Covers the period November 1441 to February 1475: the regnal majority of Henry VI and much of the reign of Edward IV. There are documents relating to Henry's gradual loss of territory in France, John Cade's rebellion, the king's infirmity and the protectorate of the Duke of York, and the accession of Edward IV in 1461. During the brief restoration of Henry in 1470-1 entries are marked "Readeptionis" ("of the recovery") in the regnal dating.

Rymer's Foedera Volume 12

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Covers the period April 1475 to February 1502, and thus the end of the reign of Edward IV, the brief reigns of Edward V (represented by 13 documents) and Richard III, and the first seven years of the House of Tudor, under Henry VII.