House of Lords Journal Volume 34
November 1774

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History of Parliament Trust

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Year published

1767-1830

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266-273

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 34: November 1774', Journal of the House of Lords volume 34: 1774-1776 (1767-1830), pp. 266-273. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=113669 Date accessed: 19 September 2014.


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Anno 15o Georgii Tertii.

Die Martis, 29o Novembris 1774, Annoque Regni Serenissimi Domini Nostri Georgii Tertii, Dei Gratia, Magnæ Britannia, Francia, & Hib’niæ Regis, Fidei Defensoris, &c. Decimo Quinto; in Superiori Domo Parliamenti Magna Britannia apud Westmonaster convenere, Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales, quorum Nomina subscribuntur, & præsentes fuerunt:

REX.

Archiep. Cantuar. Dux Gloucester. Ds. Le Despencer.
Archiep. Ebor. Ds. Cathcart.
Ds. Apsley, Cancellarius.
Epus. Norvicen. Ds. Trevor.
Epus. Landaven. Ds. Edgecumbe.
Epus. Petriburg. Comes Gower, Præses. Ds. Bruce.
Epus. Cestrien. Dux Beaufort. Ds. Vere.
Epus. Litch. & Cov. Dux Marlborough. Ds. Hyde.
Dux Ancaster, Magnus Camerarius. Ds. Lyttelton.
Ds. Boston.
Dux Portland.
Dux Chandos.
Dux Bridgewater.
March. Rockingham.
Comes Talbot, Senescallus.
Comes Hertford, Camerarius.
Comes Suffolk.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Winchilsea.
Comes Sandwich.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Scarbrough.
Comes Rochford.
Comes Abercorn.
Comes Galloway.
Comes March.
Comes Marchmont.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Dartmouth.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Bristol.
Comes Sussex.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Pomfret.
Comes Kerr.
Comes waldegrave.
Comes Orford.
Comes Bucks.
Comes Egremont.
Comes Fauconberg.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Spencer.
Comes Hillsborough.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Bolingbroke.
Viscount Falmouth.
Viscount Torrington.

The King Present.

His Majesty being seated on the Throne, adorned with His Crown and Regal Ornaments, and attended by His Officers of State, (the Lords being in their Robes), commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to let the Commons know, “It is His Majesty’s Pleasure that they attend Him immediately in this House:”

Who being come,

The Lord Chancellor said:

Direction to the Commons to chuse a Speaker.

“My Lords, and Gentlemen,
“His Majesty has been pleased to command me to acquaint you, That he will deser declaring the Causes of calling this Parliament till there shall be a Speaker of the House of Commons; and therefore, it is His Majesty’s Pleasure, That you, Gentlemen of the House of Commons, do immediately repair to the Place where the Commons usually fit, and there chuse a fit Person to be your Speaker; and that you present such Person, who shall be so chosen, to His Majesty here for His Royal Approbation To-morrow, at Two of the Clock.”

Then His Majesty was pleased to retire.

And the Commons withdrew.

PRAYERS.

The Lord Chancellor takes the Oaths.

The Lord Chancellor singly, in the First Place, at the Table, took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

Certificate of the Return of the 16 Peers for Scotland read.

The Deputy Clerk of the Crown in Chancery delivered in a Certificate of the Names of the Sixteen Peers, who are chosen, summoned, and certified, to fit and vote in this House, for that Part of Great Britain called Scotland; and the same having been compared at the Table with the Original Return, and found to agree therewith, was read by the Clerk, and is as follows; (videlicet),

“May it please your Lordships,

“These are the Names of the Sixteen Peers who, according to the Act in that Case made and provided, are chosen, summoned, and certified, to be Members of the House of Lords, for and on. the Behalf of that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, in the Parliament of Great Britain, which is to meet on Tuesday the 29th Day of this instantis November:

Alexander Duke of Gordon.

Thomas Earl of Cassillis.

John Earl of Strathmore.

James Earl of Abercorn.

John Earl of Galloway,

John Earl of Loudoun.

George Earl of Dalhousie.

John Earl of Breadalbane.

George Earl of Aberdeen.

William Earl of March.

Hugh Earl of Marchmont.

Neil Earl of Rosebery.

John Earl of Bute.

David Lord Viscount Stormont.

Charles Lord Viscount Irwin; and

Charles Lord Cathcart.

“Witness my Hand, this 29th Day of November 1774.

“John Yorke,

“Clerk of the Crown in Chancery.

Hugh Viscount Falmouth. George Viscount Torrington.

Philip Lord Bishop of Norwich.

Shute Lord Bishop of Landaff.

John Lord Bishop of Peterborough.

William Lord Bishop of Cheiler.

Brownlow Lord Bishop of Litchfield and Coventry.

Francis Lord Le Despencer. Charles Schaw Lord Cathcart. Robert Lord Trevor. George Lord Edgecumbe. Thomas Bruce Lord Bruce. Vere Lord Vere. Thomas Lord Hyde. Thomas Lord Lyttelton. William Lord Bolton.

D. Gloucester take the Oaths, &c.

His Royal Highness the Duke of Gloucester took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

After which,

Other Lords take the Oaths.

The Lords following did the same; (videlicet),

Frederick Lord Archbishop of Canterbury.

Robert Lord Archbishop of York.

Granville Leveson Earl Gower, Lord President of the Council.

Henry Duke of Beaufort.

George Duke of Marlborough.

Peregrine Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven, Lord Great Chamberlain of England.

William Henry Duke of Portland.

James Duke of Chandos.

Francis Duke of Bridgewater.

Charles Marquis of Rockingham.

William Earl Talbot, Lord Steward of the Household.

Francis Seymour Earl of Hertford, Lord Chamberlain of the Household.

Henry Earl of Suffolk and Berkshire, a Principal Secretary of State.

Basil Earl of Denbigh.

George Earl of Winchilsea and Nottingham.

John Earl of Sandwich.

Frederick Earl of Carlisle.

Richard Earl of Scarbrough.

William Henry Earl of Rochford, a Principal Secretary of State.

James Earl of Abercorn.

John Earl of Galloway.

William Earl of March and Ruglen.

Hugh Earl of Marchmont.

Washington Earl Ferrers.

William Earl of Dartmouth.

Charles Earl of Tankerville.

George William Earl of Bristol.

Henry Earl of Sussex.

Philip Earl Stanhope.

George Earl of Pomfret.

John Earl Ker.

John Earl Waldegrave.

George Earl of Orford.

John Earl of Buckinghamshire.

George Earl of Egremont.

Henry Earl Fauconberg.

William Earl of Radnor.

John Earl Spencer.

Wills Earl of Hillsborough.

George Viscount Townshend.

Frederick Viscount Bolingbroke and Saint John.

Hugh Viscount Falmouth.

George Viscount Torrington.

Philip Lord Bishop of Norwich.

Shute Lord Bishop of Landaff.

John Lord Bishop of Peterborough.

William Lord Bishop of Litchfield and Coventry.

Francis Lord Le Despencer.

Charles Schaw Lord Cathcart.

Robert Lord Trevor.

George Lord Edgecumbe.

Thomas Bruce Lord Bruce.

Vere Lord Vere.

Thomas Lord Hyde.

Thomas Lord Lyttelton.

William Lord Boston.

E. Winchilsea takes his Seat.

This Day George Earl of Winchilsea and Nottingham sat first in Parliament, After the Death of his Uncle Daniel Earl of Winchilsea and Nottingham; his Lordship having first at the Table taken the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also taken and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

Garter King at Arms delivered in at the Table his Lordship’s Pedigree, pursuant to the Standing Order.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Mercurii, tricesimum diem instantis Novembris, hora undecima Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Die Mercurii, 30o Novembris 1774.

REX.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar. Dux Gloucester. Ds. Le Despencer.
Epus. Londin. Dux Cumberland. Ds. Abergavenny.
Epus. Duresin. Ds. Apsley, Cancellarius. Ds. Cathcart.
Epus. Norvicen. Ds. Trevor.
Epus. Landaven. Ds. Cadogan.
Epus. Petriburg. Comes Gower, Præses. Ds. Edgecumbe.
Dux Grafton, C. P. S. Ds. Bruce.
Epus. Cestrien. Ds. Ponsonby.
Epus. Litch. & Cov. Dux Richmond. Ds. Hyde.
Epus. Meneven. Dux Beaufort. Ds. Mansfield.
Epus. Roffen. Dux Marlborough. Ds. Lyttelton.
Dux Ancaster, Matnus Camerarius. Ds. Wycombe.
Ds. Boston.
Dux Portland. Ds. Milton.
Dux Chandes. Ds. Camden.
Dux Dorset. Ds. Sundridge.
Dux Bridgewater.
March. Rockingham.
Comes Talbot, Senescallus.
Comes Hertford, Camerarius.
Comes Suffolk.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Stamford.
Comes Winchilsea.
Comes Sandwich.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Scarbrough.
Comes Rochford.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Abercorn.
Comes Galloway.
Comes March.
Comes Marchmont.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Bristol.
Comes Sussex.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Ker.
Comes Ashburnham.
Comes Brooke.
Comes Bucks.
Comes Egremont.
Comes Cornwallis.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes Fauconberg.
Comes Northington.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Spencer.
Comes Hillsborough.
Viscount Montague.
Viscount Say & Sele.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Weymouth.
Viscount Bolingbroke.
Viscount Falmouth.
Viscount Torrington.
Viscount Wentworth.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.

PRAYERS.

D. Cumberland takes the Oaths, &c.

His Royal Highness Henry Duke of Cumberland took the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

Other Lords take the Oaths.

The Lords following did the same:

Augustus Henry Duke of Grafton, Lord Privy Seal.

Charles Duke of Richmond.

John Frederick Duke of Dorset.

Charles Earl of Peterborough and Monmouth,

George Harry Earl of Stamford.

William Anne Holies Earl of Essex.

George Bussy Earl of Jersey.

John Earl of Ashburnham.

George Earl Brooke, and Earl of Warwick.

Charles Earl Cornwallis.

Philip Earl of Hardwicke.

Robert Earl of Northington.

Anthony Joseph Viscount Montague.

Richard Viscount Say & Sele.

Thomas Viscount Weymouth.

John Viscount Dudley & Ward.

Richard Lord Bishop of London.

John Lord Bishop of Durham.

George Lord Abergavenny.

Charles Lord Cadogan.

William Lord Ponsonby.

William Lord Mansfield.

William Lord Wycombe.

Joseph Lord Milton.

Charles Lord Camden.

John Lord Sundridge.

V. Wentworth takes his Seat.

This Day Thomas Viscount Wentworth sat First in Parliament After the Death of his Father Edward Viscount Wentworth, his Lordship having First, at the Table, taken the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also taken and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration; pursuant to the Statutes.

Bps of St. Davids and Rochester take their Seats.

This Day James Lord Bishop of St. Davids, and John Lord Bishop of Rochester, sat first in Parliament; their Lordships having First, at the Table, taken the Oaths, and made and subscribed the Declaration, and also taken and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure to robe.

The House was resumed.

King present.

His Majesty being seated on the Throne, adorned with His Crown and Regal Ornaments, and attended by His Officers of State, (the Lords being in their Robes), commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to let the Commons know, “It is His Majesty’s Pleasure that they attend him immediately in this House.”

Who being come,

Sir Fletcher Norton said,

Sir Fletcher Norton Speaker of H. C. presented and approved.

“Most Gracious Sovereign,
“Your Majesty’s dutiful Subjects, the Commons of this Your Realm in Parliament Assembled, have, in pursuance of Your Majesty’s Direction, and of their ancient Right, elected One of their Members to be their Speaker for this Parliament; and their Choice, Sir, having Once more fallen upon me for this high and important Trust, they now present me to Your Majesty for Your Judgement upon their Election. Needless will it be in me, Sir, to mention on this Occasion, with regard to myself, what I fear cannot but be too well known to Your Majesty: It therefore best becomes me, with Silence and Submission, to resign myself to Your Royal Determination.”

Then the Lord Chancellor, receiving Directions from His Majesty, said,

“Sir Fletcher Norton,
“You have appealed to the King’s own Experience and Knowledge for the Decision of the weighty Affair now under His Consideration, and it is from thence His Majesty has formed his Judgement.

“After having had such clear Demonstration of your Abilities, Zeal, and Application, in the Service of Himfelf and of your Country, in the last Parliament, His Majesty commands me to let you know, That He entirely approves the Choice which His faithful Commons have made, and allows and confirms you to be their Speaker.

After which,

Mr. Speaker said,

“Since Your Majesty has been pleased to confirm the Choice Your Commons have made of me to be their Speaker, it is my Duty, Sir, with all Humility, to conform myself to their Appointment and Your Royal Approbation of it; begging Your Majesty’s favourable Acceptance of my humblest Acknowledgements for this fresh instance of Your Majesty’s Grace towards myself, and that Your Majesty would vouchsafe to pardon my Failings and Infirmities, at least not to impute them in any wife to Your faithful Commons. And that Your Commons in Parliament may be the better enabled to discharge their Duty to Your Majesty and their Country. I do in their Name, and on their Behalf, by humble Petition to Your Majesty, lay Claim to all their ancient Rights and Privileges; particularly that they, their Servants, and Estates, may be free from Arrests and all other Molestation. That they may enjoy Freedom of Speech in their Debates, and have Liberty of Access to Your Royal Person on all Occasions; and that all their Proceedings may receive from Your Majesty the most favourable Interpretation.”

Which done,

The Lord Chancellor, by His Majesty’s further Commands, said,

“Mr. Speaker,

“The King has the greatest Confidence in the Duty and Affection of this House of Commons to His Person and Government, and an high Opinion of that Wisdom, Temper, and Prudence, which they will use ia all their Proceedings; and His Majesty does most readily grant and allow to them all their Privileges, in as full and ample a Manner as they have at any Time been granted or allowed by His Majesty, or any of His Royal Predecessors.
“There is One Suit, Sir, which you have made on your own Behalf: His Majesty has received the surest Pledge that no Person in your Station ever stood less in need of it than yourself: But that you may want no Support in sustaining the Burden of that important Trust which is reposed in you, His Majesty has directed me to assure you, That He will put the most favourable Construction both on your Words and Actions.

Then His Majesty was pleased to speak as follows:

His Majesty’s Speech.

“My Lords, and Gentlemen,
“It gives Me much Concern that I am obliged, at the Opening of this Parliament, to inform you that a most daring Spirit of Resistance and Disobedienee to the Law full unhappily prevails in the Province of The Massachusetts Bay, and has in divers Parts of it broke forth in fresh Violences of a very criminal Nature. These Proceedings have been countenanced and encouraged in other of My Colonies, and unwarrantable Attempts have been made to obstruct the Commerce of this Kingdom by unlawful Combinations. I have taken such. Measures, and given such Orders, as I judged most proper and effectual for carrying into Execution the Laws which were passed in the last Session of the late Parliament, for the Protection and Security of the Commerce of My Subjects, and for the restoring and preserving Peace, Order, and good Government, in the Province of The Massachusetts Bay. And you may depend on My firm and stedfast Resolution to withstand every Attempt to weaken or impair the supreme Authority of, this Legislature over all the Dominions of My Crown, the Maintenance of which I consider as essential to the Dignity, the Safety, and the Welfare of the British Empire, assuring Myself that, while I act upon these Principles, I shall never fail to receive your Assistance and Support.
“I have the greatest Satisfaction in being able to inform you, that a Treaty of Peace is concluded between Russia and the Porte. By this happy Event the Troubles which have so long prevailed in One Part of Europe are composed, and the general Tranquillity rendered compleat. It shall be My constant Aim and Endeavour to prevent the breaking out of fresh Disturbances; and I cannot but slatter Myself I shall succeed, as I continue to receive the strongest Assurances from other Powers of their being equally disposed to preserve the Peace.
“Gentlemen of the House of Commons,
“I have ordered the proper Estimates for the Service of the ensuing Year to be laid before you; and I doubt not but that in this House of Commons, I shall meet with the same affectionate Confidence, and the same Proofs of Zeal and Attachment to My Person and Government, which I have always, during the Course of My Reign, received from My faithful Commons.

“My Lords, and Gentlemen;

“Let Me particularly recommend to You at this Time to proceed with Temper in your Deliberations, and with Unanimity in your Resolutions. Let My People in every Part of My Dominions be taught by your Example to have a due Reverence for the Laws, and a just Sense of the Blessings of Our excellent Constitution. They may be assured, that on My Part I have nothing so much at Heart as the real Prosperity and lasting Happiness of all My Subjects.

Then His Majesty was pleased to retire;

And the Commons withdrew.

The House was adjourned during Heasure to unrobe.

The House was resumed.

Bill pro forma read.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, An Act for the better regulating Select Vestries.”

His Majesty’s Speech reported.

The Lord Chancellor reported His Majesty’s Speech.

And the same being read by the Clerk,

Motion for Address:

Moved, “That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, to return His Majesty the Thanks of this House for His most Gracious Speech from the Throne.

“To declare our Abhorrence and Detestation of the daring Spirit of Resistance and Disobedience to the Laws, which so strongly prevails in the Province of The Massachusetts Bay; and of the unwarrantable Attempts in that and other Provinces of America, to obstruct, by unlawful Combinations, the Trade of this Kingdom.

“To return His Majesty our humble Thanks for having been pleased to communicate to us, that He has taken such Measures and given such Orders as His Majesty has judged the most proper and effectual for the Protection and Security of the Commerce of His Majesty’s Subjects, and for carrying into Execution the Laws which were passed in the last Session of the late Parliament relative to the Province of The Massachusetts Bay: To express our entire Satisfaction in His Majesty’s firm and stedfast Resolution to continue to support the supreme Authority of the Legislature over all the Dominions of His Crown; and to give His Majesty the strongest Assurances that we will chearfully co-operate in all such Measures as shall be necessary to maintain the Dignity, Safety, and Welfare of the British Empire.

That as this Nation cannot be unconcerned in the common Interests of Europe, we have the greatest Satisfaction in being acquainted with the Conclusion of the Peace between Russia and the Porte; that we consider in His Majesty’s Endeavours to prevent, as far as possible, the breaking out of fresh Disturbances; and from the Assurances given to His Majesty by other Powers, we have the pleasing Expectation that nothing is likely to intervene that may interrupt the present happy Tranquillity in Europe.

“That it is no less our Duty than our Inclination to proceed with Temper and Unanimity in our Deliberations and Resolutions, and to inculcate by our Example a due Reverence for the Laws, and a just Sense of the Excellency of our Constitution; and, impressed with the deepest Gratitude for the many Blessings we have enjoyed during the Course of His Majesty’s Reign, to testify with unaffected Zeal at, this Conjuncture, our inviolable Fidelity to His Majesty, and our serious Attention to the Public Welfare.”

Amendment proposed, and disagreed to:

Then an Amendment was proposed to be made to the said Motion, by inserting after the Word (“Throne”) at the, End of the First Paragraph thereof, these Words:

(“And to desire His Majesty would be graciously pleased to give Direction for an early Communication of the Accounts which have been received concerning the State of the Colonies, that we may not proceed to the Consideration of this most critical and important Matter, but upon the fullest Information; and when we are, thus informed, we mail, without Delay, apply ourselves with the most earnest and serious Zeal, to such Measures as shall tend to secure the Honour of His Majesty’s Crown, the true Dignity of the Mother Country, and the Harmony and Happiness of all His Majesty’s Dominions.”)

Which being objected to:

After long Debate:

The Question was put, “Whether these Words shall be inserted in the said Motion?”

It was resolved in the Negative.

Protest there upon.

DISSENTIENT,
“Because we cannot agree to commit ourselves with the careless Facility of a common Address of Compliment, in Expressions which may lead to Measures in the Event fatal to the Lives, Properties, and Liberties of a very great Part of our Fellow-Subjects. We conceive that an Address upon such Objects as are before us, and at such a Time as this, must necessarily have a considerable Influence upon our future Proceedings, and must impress the Public with an Idea of the general Spirit of the Measures which we, mean to support. Whatever Methods we shall think it adviseable to pursue, either in Support of the mere Authority of Parliament, which seems to be the sole Consideration of some, or for reconciling that Authority with the Peace and Satisfaction of the whole Empire, which has ever been our constant and invariable Object, it will certainly add to the Weight and Efficacy of our Proceedings if they appear the Result of full Information, mature Deliberation, and temperate Enquiry. No Materials for such an Enquiry have been laid before us, nor have any such been so much as promised in the Speech from the Throne; or even in any verbal Assurance from Ministers. In this Situation we are called upon to make an Address, arbitrarily imposing Qualities and Descriptions upon Acts done in the Colonies, of the true Nature and just Extent of which we are as yet in a great Measure unapprized: A Procedure, which appears to us by no means consonant to that Purity, which we ought ever to preserve in our judicial, and to that Caution which ought always to guide us in our deliberative Capacity.
“Because this Address does in Effect imply an Approbation of the System adopted with regard to the Colonies in the last Parliament. This unfortunate System. conceived with so little Prudence and pursued with so little Temper, Consistency, or Foresight, we were in Hopes would be at length abandoned, from an Experience of those Mischiefs which it has produced, in Proportion to the Time in which it was continued, and the Diligence with which it has been pursued; a System which has created the utmost Confusion in the Colonies, without any rational hope of Advantage to the Revenue, and, with certain Detriment to the Commerce of the Mother Country; and it affords us a melancholy Prospct of the Disposition of Lords in the present Parliament, when we fee the House, under the Pressure of so severe and uniform an Experience, again ready, without any Enquiry, to countenance, if not to adopt, the Spirit of the former fatal Proceedings. But whatever may be the mischievous Designs or inconsiderate Temerity which leads others to this desperate Course, we with to be known as Persons who have ever disapproved of Measures so pernicious in their past Effects and their future Tendency; and who are not in, Haste, without Enquiry or Information, to commit ourselves in Declarations, which may precipitate our Country into all the Calamities of a Civil War.

“Richmond.

“Wycombe.

“Rockingham.

“Stamford.

“Camden.

“Ponsonby.

“Portland.

“Torrington.

“Stanhope.

Then it was moved, “To agree to the said Motion for an Address as at First proposed.”

Which being objected to:

The Question was put thereupon:

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Then the Lords following were appointed a Committee to prepare an Address pursuant to the said Motion; (videlicet),

Ld. President. L. Abp. Canterbury. L. Le Despencer.
Ld. Privy Seal. L. Cathcart.
D. Marlborough. L. Bp. London. L. Trevor.
D. Ancaster. L. Bp. Durham. L. Edgecumbe.
D. Chandos. L. Bp. Norwich. L. Bruce.
D. Bridgewater. L. Bp. Landaff. L. Hyde.
L. Bp. Peterborough. L. Mansfield.
Ld. Steward. L. Lyttelton.
Ld. Chamberlain. L. Sundridge.
L. Bp. Chester.
E. Suffolk. L. Bp. St. Davids.
E. Denbigh. L. Bp. Rochester.
E. Peterborough.
E. Winchilsea.
E. Sandwich.
E. Carlisle.
E. Rochford.
E. Jersey.
E. Dartmouth.
E. Abercorn.
E. Marchmont.
E. Bristol.
E Waldegrave.
E. Bucks.
E. Hardwicke.
E. Northington.
E. Hillsborough.
V. Say & Sele.
V. Townshend.
V. Weymouth.
V. Bolingbroke.
V. Falmouth.
V. Wentworth.
V. Dudley & Ward.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet immediately in the Prince’s Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, and the Committee withdrew to prepare the Address.

After some Time the House was resumed:

Address reported.

And the Earl of Hillsborough reported from the Committee an Address drawn by them as follows; (videlicet),

“Most Gracious Sovereign,
“We, Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal Subjects the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, in Parliament assembled, beg Leave to return Your Majesty our humble Thanks for Your Most Gracious Speech from the Throne.
“We think it our indispensable Duty to declare on this Occasion our Abhorrence and Detestation of the daring Spirit of Resistance, and Disobedience to the Laws, which so strongly prevails in the Province of The Massachusetts Bay; and of the unwarrantable Attempts in that and other of Your Majesty’s Provinces in America, to obstruct by unlawful Combinations the Trade of this Kingdom.
“We thankfully acknowledge, at the same Time, the Communication it has pleased Your Majesty to make to us of Your having taken such Measures, and given such Orders, as Your Majesty judged the most proper and effectual, for the Protection and Security of the Commerce of Your Majesty’s Subjects, and for the carrying into Execution the Laws which were passed in the last Session of the late Parliament relative to the Province of The Massachusetts Bay. And in the utmost Reliance on Your Majesty’s firm and stedfast Resolution to continue to support the supreme Authority of the Legislature over all the Dominions of Your Crown, Your Majesty may be assured that we will chearfully co-operate in all such Measures as shall be necessary to maintain the Dignity, the Safety, and the Welfare, of the British Empire.
“As this Nation cannot be unconcerned in the common Interests of Europe, it is with the greatest Satisfaction we are acquainted with the Conclusion of the Peace between Russia and the Porte; we have the fullest Confidence m Your Majesty’s Endeavours to prevent, as far as possible, the breaking out of fresh Disturbances; and from the Assurances given to Your Majesty by other Powers, we have the pleasing Expectation that nothing is likely to happen that may interrupt the present happy Tranquillity in Europe.
“We beg Leave humbly to assure Your Majesty that it will be no less our Duty than our Inclination, to proceed with Temper and Unanimity in our Deliberations and Resolutions, and to inculcate, by our Example, a due Reverence for the Laws, and a just Sense of the Excellency of our Constitution. Impressed with these Sentiments, and with the deepest Gratitude for the many Blessings we have enjoyed during the Course of Your Majesty’s Reign, it will be our principal Care to testify, with unaffected Zeal at this Conjuncture, our inviolable Fidelity to Your Majesty, and our serious Attention to the Public Welfare.”

Which Address being read by the Clerk:

It was moved, “To agree with the Committee in the said Address.”

Which being objected to:

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Ordered, That the said Address be presented to His Majesty by the whole House.

Ordered, That the Lords with White Staves do wait on His Majesty, humbly to know what Time His Majesty will please to appoint to be attended therewith.

Standing Orders to be considered.

Ordered, That all the Lords be summoned to attend the Service of this House on Tuesday next, to consider of the Standing Orders of this House.

Committee of Privileges.

Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Orders and Customs of this House, and Privileges of Parliament, and of the Peers of Great Britain and Lords of Parliament.

D. Gloucester. L. Abp. Canterbury. L. Le Despenser.
D. Cumberland. L. Abergavenny.
Ld. Chancellor. L. Bp. London. L. Cathcart.
Ld. President. L. Bp. Durham. L. Trevor.
Ld. Privy Seal. L. Bp. Norwich. L. Cadogan.
D. Richmond. L. Bp. Landaff. L. Edgecumbe.
D. Beaufort. L. Bp. Peterborough. L. Bruce.
D. Marlborough. L. Bp. Chester. L. Ponsonby.
D. Ancaster. L. Bp. Litch. & Cov. L. Hyde.
D. Portland. L. Mansfield.
D. Chandos. L. Bp. St. Davids. L. Lyttelton.
D. Dorset. L. Bp. Rochester. L. Wycombe.
D. Bridgewater. L. Boston.
M. Rockingham. L. Milton.
Ld. Steward. L. Sundridge.
Ld. Chamberlain.
E. Suffolk.
E. Denbigh.
E. Stamford.
E. Winchilsea.
E. Sandwich.
E. Carlisle.
E. Scarbrough.
E. Rochford.
E. Jersey.
E. Abercorn.
E. Galloway.
E. March.
E. Marchmont.
E. Tankerville.
E. Bristol.
E. Sussex.
E. Stanhope.
E. Ker.
E. Ashburnham.
E. Brooke.
E. Bucks.
E. Egremont.
E. Cornwallis.
E. Hardwicke.
E. Fauconberg.
E. Northington.
E. Radnor.
E. Spencer.
E. Hillsborough.
V. Montague.
V. Say & Sele.
V. Townshend.
V. Weymouth.
V. Bolingbroke.
V. Falmouth.
V. Torrington.
V. Wentworth.
V. Dudley & Ward.

Their Lordships, or any Seven of them, to meet on Monday next, at Ten o’Clock, in the House of Peers, and every Monday after, and to adjourn as they please.

Committee for the Journals.

Lords Sub-Committees appointed to consider of the Orders and Customs of this House, and of the Privileges of the Peers of Graff Britain and Lords of Parliament, and to peruse and perfect the Journals of this and former Sessions of Parliament.

Ld. President. L. Abp. Canterbury. L. Le Despencer.
Ld. Privy Seal. L. Abergavenny.
D. Richmond. L. Bp. London. L. Cathcart.
D. Beaufort. L. Bp. Durham. L. Trevor.
D. Marlborough. L. Bp. Norwich. L. Cadogan.
D. Ancaster. L. Bp. Landaff. L. Edgecumbe.
D. Portland. L. Bp. Peterborough. L. Bruce.
D. Chandos. L. Ponsonby.
D. Dorset. L. Bp. Chester. L. Hyde.
D. Bridgewater. L. Bp. Litch. & Cov. L. Mansfield.
M. Rockingham. L. Lyttelton.
Ld. Steward. L. Bp. St. Davids. L. Wycombe.
Ld. Chamberlain. L. Bp. Rochester. L. Boston.
E. Suffolk. L. Milton.
E. Denbigh. L. Sundridge.
E. Stamford.
E. Winchilsea.
E. Sandwich.
E. Carlisle.
E. Scarbrough.
E. Rochford.
E. Jersey.
E. Abercorn.
E. Galloway.
E. March.
E. Marchmont.
E. Tankerville.
E. Bristol.
E. Sussex.
E. Stanhope.
E. Ker.
E. Ashburnham.
E. Brooke.
E. Bucks.
E. Egremont.
E. Cornwallis.
E. Hardwicke.
E. Fauconberg.
E. Northington.
E. Radnor.
E. Spencer.
E. Hillsborough.
V. Montague.
V. Say & Sele.
V. Townshend.
V. Weymouth.
V. Bolingbroke.
V. Falmouth.
V. Torrington.
V. Wentworth.
V. Dudley & Ward.

Their Lordships, or any Three of them, to meet when, where, and as often as they please.

Stoppages in the Streets, Order to prevent.

The House taking Notice, “That there is such an Interruption by Hackney Coaches, Carts, and Drays, in the Streets and Passages leading to this House, that the Lords and others are frequently hindered from coming thereto:”

It is thereupon Ordered, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, in Parliament assembled, That the High Steward of the City of Westminster, or his Deputy, together with the Justices of the Peace of the said City, shall, by their strict Care and Directions to the Constables and other Officers within their Jurisdiction, take special Order, That no empty Hackney Coaches be suffered to make any Stay between Whitehall and the End of Abingdon Street in Westminster, from Twelve of the Clock at Noon until Five of the Clock in the Afternoon of the same Day, during the Sitting of this Parliament; and that no Carriages, Drays, or Carts, be permitted to stop in the Streets and Passages between the End of Market Lane in Pall Mall, and the End of Abingdon Street between the Hours aforesaid; or to pass through the Old Palace Yard from One of the Clock in the Afternoon, until One Hour after the Rising of this House, during the Sitting of this Parliament; and that all Carriages, Drays, or Carts, hereby permitted to pass through the said Streets and Passages, be obliged to go One after another, in the Manner following; (that is to say), All Carriages, Drays, or Carts, going towards Westminster, to keep on the Side of the Street or passage next to Saint James’s Park; and all those going the contrary Way, to keep on the other Side of the Street; and upon no Account whatsoever to presume to go Two or more a-breast during the Sitting of this Parliament; and herein special Care is to be taken by the said Deputy Steward, Justices of the Peace, Constables, and all other Officers herein concerned, as the contrary will be answered to this House: And it is further Ordered; That the High Bailiff of the City of Westminster, and the Justices of the Peace for the City and Liberty thereof, or some of them rending in Westminster, be served with the Order of this House, made this Day, for the Purposes aforesaid.

Receivers and Triers of Petitions.

Les Recevours des Petitions de la Grande Bretagne et d’Ireland.

Messire William De Grey Chevalier et Chief Justicer de Banc Commune.

Messire Henry Gould Chevalier et Justicer.

Messire Thomas Anguish Ecuyer.

Et ceux qui veulent deliver leur Petitions les baillent dedans fix Jours prochainement ensuivant.

Les Recevours des Petitions de Gascoigne et des autres Terres et Pais de par la Mer et des Isles.

Messire Sydney Stafford Smythe Chevalier et Chief Baron de I’Exchequer du Roy.

Messire Richard Adams Chevalier et Justicer.

Messire Jean Browning Ecuyer.

Et ceux qui veulent deliver leurs Petitions les baillent dedans six Jours prochainement ensuivant.

Les Triours des Petitions de la Grande Bretagne et d’Ireland.

Le Duc de Richmond.

Le Duc de Beaufort.

Le Duc de Marlborough.

Le Duc de Ancaster.

Le Marquis de Rockingham.

Le Count de Denbigh.

Le Count de Winchilsea.

Le Count de Carlisle.

Le Count de Abercorn.

Le Count de Marchmont.

Le Count de Hardwicke.

Le Viscount Montague.

Le Viscount Say & Sele.

Le Viscount Townshend.

Le Baron Le Despencer.

Le Baron Cathcart.

Le Baron Cadogan.

Le Baron Bruce.

Le Baron Hyde.

Le Baron Lyttelton.

Le Baron Boston.

Touts eux ensemble ou quatres des Seigneurs avantditz; appellant aux eux les Serjeants du Roy quam fera Besoigne; tiendront leur Place en la Chambre du Tresorier.

Les Triours des Petitions de Gascoigne et des, autres Terres et Pais de par la Mer et des Isles.

Le Duc de Portland.

Le Duc de Chandos.

Le Duc de Dorset.

Le Duc de Bridgewater.

Le Count de Stamford.

Le Count de Sandwich.

Le Count de Scarbrough.

Le Count de Galloway.

Le Count de Sussex.

Le Count de Buckinghamshire.

Le Count de Radnor.

Le Count de Hillsborough.

Le Viscount Weymouth.

Le Viscount Falmouth.

Le Viscount Wentworth.

Le Viscount Dudley & Ward.

Le Baron Abergavenny.

Le Baron Trevor.

Le Baron Edgecumbe.

Le Baron Ponsonby.

Le Baron Wycombe.

Le Baron Sundridge.

Touts eux ensemble ou quatres des Seigneurs avantditz; appellant aux eux les Serjeants du Roy quam sera Besoigne; tiendront leur Place en la Chambre du Chamberlain.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, primum diem Decembris jam prox. sequen. hora undecima Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.