America and West Indies
June 1739

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Institute of Historical Research

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K. G. Davies (editor)

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1994

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112-130

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'America and West Indies: June 1739', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 45: 1739 (1994), pp. 112-130. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=115267 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Contents

June 1739

193
June 1
Thomas Lowndes to Thomas Hill. As soon as the violence of my present distemper abates I will execute (and I hope) to the satisfaction of the Commissioners for Trade and Plantations the business I have undertaken. Their lordships may depend upon it the New England men may be taught their duty to HM and their charter kept most inviolate. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 1 June 1739. [CO 323/10, ff 147, 148d]
194
June 1
Georgia Office
Benjamin Martyn to William Stephens by Rev George Whitefield. The Trustees, having granted to Mr Whitefield 500 acres of land in trust for an orphan-house at Savannah, desire that he be put in possession of the town-lot and farm surrendered by Robert Hows and that the remaining 450 acres be surveyed for him. Necessary repairs are to be made to the parsonage-house at Savannah. Trustees have ordered that a sum not exceeding 10l be laid out in building a vestry-room adjoining the church at Savannah which may be convenient for juries to retire to. PS. Ten acres of land must be set out for the orphan-house in or near Savannah. Entry. 1½ pp. [CO 5/667, pp 236–237]
195
[June 1]
Petition of Henry Crawford, William Sinclair, Alexander Crawford, David Barclay, Alexander Southerland, Alexander Strachan, Edward Wilson, James Woodcock, Henry Long, Alexander Mountier, John David Prean & Co, James Graham, Peter & Robert Baldwin, Peter Bedlow, David Bravo, Isaac Lamego, Mary Carter and Joannah Gerrard, all of Jamaica, merchants and traders interested in Union and cargo, to the King. Goods to the value of 9986l 10s 6d were shipped at Port Royal on Union, Henry Bennett master, to be disposed as and where the supercargo should think proper. The ship sailed on 23 July 1738. Hearing that there were two Spanish guardacostas cruising off Cuba, the supercargo was ordered to land goods at Port Antonio which would not be saleable on the French coast, and to take on such Negroes as were ready. This was done and the Union then sailed for the French coast. Driven northwestward, she was taken by guardacostas ten leagues from Spanish coast without having attempted to trade, carried to Havana, and with her cargo condemned as prize. Pray for application to Crown of Spain for relief. Signed, James Knight, agent for the petitioners. 2¼ pp. Endorsed, Delivered to Mr Knight, 1 June 1739. [CO 137/48, ff 55–57d]
196
June 2
Antigua
Governor William Mathew to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations sending duplicates of three Acts passed in Nevis, duplicate minutes of Council and Assembly of Montserrat for quarter ending 25 March last, and minutes of Council of St Christopher's to 1 March last. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 26 July, Read 31 August 1739.[CO 152/23, ff 227, 227d, 230, 230d]
197
June 2
Palace Court
Minutes of Trustees for Georgia. Received, by Rev Mr Burton, an anonymous benefaction of 10l for maintenance of catechist in Georgia. Sealed granted of 500 acres of land in Georgia to Rev George Whitefield for maintenance of orphan-house. Received, by Earl of Egmont, 400 copies of Church Catechism, an anonymous benefaction. Entry. 1 p. [CO 5/687, p 120; entry of grant, dated 2 June, in CO 5/670, pp 393–397]
198
June 5
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to Duke of Newcastle enclosing the following which is in usual form. Signed, Monson, E Ashe, J Brudenell, R Plumer. 1 p. Enclosed:
198 i Draft of commission for Robert Byng to be governor of Barbados. 14 pp. [CO 5/198, ff 98–109d; entry in CO 29/16, pp 76–95; another entry of covering letter of same date, possibly cancelled, at CO 29/16, p 75]
199
June 6
Palace Court
Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. Resolved: that William Williamson be appointed recorder of Savannah in room of Thomas Christie; that Thomas Christie be appointed third bailiff of Savannah; and that Thomas Jones be appointed overseer of the Trust's servants in the northern division of Georgia. Resolved that John West have licence to dispose of his lot to such person as Mr Stephens shall approve of and return home on account of sickness. Agreed to a report that Robert Hows had surrendered his 50-acre lot to the Trustees to be a part of the 500 acres granted to Mr Whitefield. Read letter to Col Oglethorpe, which after several alterations was approved to be sent. Entry. 1½ pp. [CO 5/690, pp 225–226]
200
June 6
James Abercromby to Harman Verelst acknowledging letter. The people were conveyed immediately to Savannah to save expensive maintenance at Charleston. Such commissions can be executed only by second hand and must be paid for. Signed. 1 small p. Addressed. Endorsed, Recd. 13 July 1739, Answered 14 ditto. [CO 5/640, ff 323–324d]
201
[June 6]
Proposal for coining a new paper currency in South Carolina. To accomplish the plan land-titles must first be settled; to do so by compulsion might cause disturbances. When titles have been settled an Act should be passed to stamp 220000l of paper currency, the value thereof to be at the proclamation standard and unvariable. Of this 120000l would be exchanged for old bills and 100000l would be lent at eight per cent interest for twenty years on the security of land of double the value of the sum lent. Interest and one twentieth of the principal to be repaid annually in gold or silver; the interest to be applied to sinking the 120000l of issued bills and the principal to be lent out again. The whole 220000l to be sunk in twenty years. The British merchants are against paper currency in any shape but this is no reason why Carolina should not have one when it is next to impossible for the American people to trade without it. Under this plan the bills would be more secure and more valuable than any ever have been in America. Duties and taxes would then be a clear fund to defray the expenses of government and to assist new settlers. 2 pp. Endorsed, (1) Delivered in at the board by Governor Glen (2) Recd., Read 6 June 1739. [CO 5/367, ff 5–6d]
202
June 8
Whitehall
Duke of Newcastle to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Prepare an instruction for Robert Byng, governor of Barbados, relating to his appointments conformable to that prepared for late Viscount Howe. Signed, Holles Newcastle. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd. 11 June, Read 14 June 1739. [CO 28/25, ff 84, 84d, 88, 88d]
203
June 8
Whitehall
Thomas Hill to Francis Fane sending eight Acts passed in Jamaica in July 1738 for his opinion thereon in point of law, viz Acts for building barracks and cutting roads; for perpetuating such parts of the late barracking laws as vested land in the Crown and for confirming titles; for forming free Negroes, mulattos, and Indians into companies for destroying the rebellious Negroes; for establishing free school in parish of Westmoreland and for enforcing the will of Thomas Manning, deceased; for enabling the inhabitants of the parish of Westmoreland to maintain a minister during the indisposition of mind of Rev John Dickson, present rector; to entitle Susanna Angier, mulatto, of Kingston, and Mary and Frances Angier, her children, to the same rights as English subjects born of white parents; to give the same rights to Ann Dufresnay, free mulatto, wife of Samuel Dufresnay; to augment salary of Governor Trelawny. Entry. 3 pp. [CO 138/18, pp 293–296]
204
June 8
Francis Fane to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. I have considered the case of Mr Hammerton relating to his claim of the office of register of South Carolina; I think he is well entitled to it by virtue of his grant from the Crown, and notwithstanding there does not appear to be any commission of register granted by the Lords Proprietors till 1700, yet as the Acts of 1694 and 1698 have directed what is to be done by such an officer I think it is very probable that such an officer was appointed before or at the time those Acts were passed. I think therefore it appears to be an ancient office and held and exercised by the secretary during the Lords Proprietors' time, and by the Acts of 1694 and 1698 it was his duty to register all patents and grants for lands, sales, conveyances and mortgages of lands and all other writings that were required to be registered. By the grant of the Lords Proprietors to Mr Bertie in 1725, he is empowered to do and perform not only the particular matters and things therein mentioned but also all other acts usually done by the former secretaries. The present grant to Mr Hammerton pursues the very words of Mr Bertie's grant as to the description of the offices and empowers the grantee not only to do and perfrom the several matters and things therein particularly specified but also all other acts usually done by the former secretaries, and it appears by the papers referred to me that the whole business of register and secretary was exercised by the secretary without any molestation from 1700 till Mr Johnson was appointed in 1733. This being the case, I think Mr Hammerton is entitled to hold and enjoy his grant in as full an extent as any of his predecessors have done in the time of the Lords Proprietors. Signed. 1½ pp. Endorsed, Recd., Read 8 June 1739. [CO 5/367, ff 9–10d]
205
June 11
Georgia Office
Harman Verelst to James Oglethorpe by HMS Tartar, Capt Townshend, and the Two Brothers, Capt Thomson. On 29 April last the Trustees received your letters dated 16 and 17 January by Capt Thomson and on 14 May your letter dated 12 March by Capt Yeomans. As to Mr Causton's behaviour the Trustees look upon it as very extraordinary and are much dissatisfied therewith but hope his bail and effects may be sufficient to make good any deficiency in his accounts and desire he may not be released until satisfaction be made for what is charged upon him. The Trustees have received a long letter from Mr Causton dated 14 January which they will answer by Capt Thomson who sails for Georgia soon after Whitsuntide. The Trustees received two letters from Mr Jones dated 8 and 17 and 23 February wherein he writes that a balance is mentioned by Mr Causton as due to himself, but the surcharges Mr Causton is undoubtedly answerable for the Trustees are well satisfied will soon overbalance any cash stated to be paid by him more than he received, he having nothing to the Trustees' Knowledge to overpay with but what he received from the Trust or produced therefrom; and the Trustees will write to Mr Jones by Capt Thomson approving of his conduct and encouraging him to persevere in his duty.
The Trustees are obliged to you for discountenancing the attempt at Savannah for creating new expenses, and on 18 April they received (by the hands of Mr Benjamin Ball to whom it was transmitted by Mr Robert Williams) a copy of the representation produced by the clamour of the inhabitants in that part of the province. Mr Williams is not arrived to solicit it but his and all other solicitations for complying therewith will be fruitless, the Trustees being determined not to grant an absolute fee simple in the tenure of lands in Georgia nor any use of Negroes there; and in order to put a stop to all future applications of this nature a full answer to this representation will be sent over by Capt Thomson for the magistrates to acquaint all the inhabitants therewith. The petition from the people of Darien and the evidence of white men's capacity for labour which you sent over are much approved of by the Trustees and they are very well pleased with your observations relating to the use of Negroes. The Trustees hope that their answer to this representation will clear the province of those inhabitants who have been and resolve still to continue idle and will encourage the industrious to pursue their labour and reap the happy fruits thereof.
The Trustees have received your account of the presents which you gave to the Indians on their account and of cash advanced for the Trust; that part whereof which you gave the Indians out of goods of your own which you carried over from England being not valued by you, the Trustees have rated them at the same prices they have paid to others for goods of the like nature and find that they amout to 64l 14s 6d, and the other part of your account which you have advanced for the Trust amounting to 93l 14s 6d, and making together 157l 15s, the Trustees have therefore ordered fifteen tons of strong beer in barrels to be bought and sent you by the Two Brothers and the freight thereof to be also paid by them and have directed the amount to be charged as a payment to you on account of the above particulars which they appeared debtor to you for. Your agreement for building a chapel at Frederica the Trustees approve of and hope it will be finished with expedition, the bricklayers' work thereof amounting to 47l 0s 6d besides the 30000 bricks and carpenters' work thereof amounting to 50l; and the Trustees desire that there may be no pews but for the minister and the magistracy and the rest to be benches as is at Tonbridge chapel, which will be more capacious and less subject to disputes for places; and they desire that the house for the minister at Frederica may be also built with expedition.
Mr Causton's certificate to Robert Williams will come before the commissioners for examining and stating in Georgia the public debts, the Trustees having sent over a copy of it for that purpose, the original thereof amounting to 587l 13s having been demanded payment of here but refused until examined and stated in Georgia. The Trustees received by Capt Hugh Mackay Lieut-Col Cochran's accounts with the store, the one making him debtor for your regiment 830l 12s 4d and the other making him debtor on his own account 105los 11d, which together amounts to 935l 13s 3d, the same which you mention in your letter. In the account of 105l 0s 11d a credit is entered to be given to the lieut-colonel of 198l for 11 pipes of wine at 18l each received of him into the Trustees' store. The Trustees are much obliged to you for your kind assistance in risking your own money for the support of the colony during the uncertain state of their affairs and will readily reimburse you what shall appear due upon the examination of the account when it arrives, but the Trustees hope there will never be any other occasion for exposing any of their friends to the like hazard; and as Capt Thomson will scarcely reach Georgia till within a month of Michaelmas the Trustees have computed on your continuing to pay the expenses of the colony till that time not exceeding 2500l for six months, whereon by comparing with the amount for the past expenses you have defrayed they hope a saving will be, for they are careful to make this year's grant to last as long as possible, apprehending that no further supply will be obtained. And the Trustees when they receive your subsequent account of the expenses of the colony to Michaelmas next will thankfully reimburse you what shall appear due upon the examination thereof when it arrives. The Trustees have settled an estimate of the expenses of the colony to commence at Michaelmas next and will send the same by Capt Thomson with sola bills and halfpence to defray part thereof and will continue to send more sola bills and halfpence by other ships for the residue within proper times; and the Trustees resolving to have no store, all their payments for salaries, allowances, or maintenance and clothing of servants will be made in ready money: the menservants at 8d a day each, the women at 6d a day each, and the children above six years old at 4d a day each one with another (those under six years old their parents being to maintain). Overseers are to be appointed to task their weekly labour and they are to be paid weekly at the above rates to find themselves with provisions and clothing if they perform their taskwork, and if not to be paid in proportion to the work they have done.
The Trustees are pleased with the relation you give them of the silk and wine and hope they will succeed to answer the expectations of the public for the great charges they have been at in settling and supporting the colony. The Trustees are very glad Mr Thomas Jenys has the same warm inclination to Georgia as his late brother had. As to his account with the Trust, it was want of the account of the duty on rum he received which occasioned the Trustees not to settle for payment the certified account sent over to them, but when that is received and the Trustees' letter to him answered (which by your letter may be soon expected) all possible dispatch will be given to the payment of what shall appear due. Mr Whitefield left London last Monday in his way to Philadelphia, thence to Virginia, and so to Georgia. He collected here towards building an orphan-house at Savannah in Georgia and cultivating 500 acres of land for the use thereof and maintaining the orphans 966l, towards building a place of worship for the Salzburghers 76l, and for the poor in general 148l: all which he has taken over with him to apply for the said several purposes and amount together to 1190l as by his letter to the accountant dated 4th instant. One Mr Seward goes with him with his own money to go on with the settling the orphan-house, and Mr Whitefield has agreed to officiate at Savannah without any expense to the Trustees, wherefore on his arrival Mr Norris is directed to officiate at Frederica. PS. Before this letter was sealed the accounts and letter from the executors of the late Mr Jenys were received which will be laid before the first Common Council. Entry. 3½ pp. [CO 5/667, pp 238–241]
206
June 12
Kensington
Order of King in Council approving Act passed in New York in 1737 for confirming exchange of lands in Oyster Bay between Sampson Hawxhurst and John Pratt deceased. Copy, certified by W Sharpe. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 22 September, Read 16 October 1740. [CO 5/1059, ff 143–144d]
207
June 12
Kensington
Same approving draft commission to Robert Byng to be governor of Barbados. Copy, certified by W Sharpe. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 22 September, Read 16 October 1740. [CO 28/25, ff 159, 159d, 162, 162d]
208
June 12
Kensington
Same, on report from Committee for Plantation Affairs, appointing James Murray to be of the Council in North Carolina in the room of Edmund Porter, deceased. Copy, certified by W Sharpe. 1½ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 22 September, Read 16 October 1740. [CO 5/296, ff 9–10d]
209
June 12
Kensington
Same, on report from Committee for Plantation Affairs, approving draft commission to James Glen to be governor of South Carolina in same style as commissions to former governors notwithstanding Mr Oglethorpe's commission to be general of the forces in South Carolina and Georgia. Mr Glen is accordingly commissioned captain- (not lieutenant-) general, being the usual style. Seal. Signed, W Sharpe. 2½ pp. Enclosed:
209 i Draft commission to James Glen. 20 pp. [CO 5/198, ff 38–51d; copy of Order, endorsed Recd. 22 September, Read 16 October 1740, in CO 5/368, ff 29–30d]
210
June 12
Kensington
Same approving draft commission for Henry Medley, commander of HMS Romney, to be governor of Newfoundland. Seal. Singned, W Sharpe. 1 p. Enclosed:
210 i Draft of commission to Henry Medley. 5¼ pp. [CO 5/198, ff 12–17d; copy, endorsed Recd. 22 September, Read 16 October 1740, in CO 194/11, ff 3, 3d, 6, 6d]
211
June 12
Kensington
Same approving draft instructions to same. Seal. Signed, W Sharpe. 1 p. Enclosed:
211 i Draft instructions to Henry Medley, governor of Newfoundland. 33 pp. [CO 5/198, ff 18–37d; copy of Order, endorsed Recd. 22 September, Read 16 October 1740, in CO 194/11, ff 4–5d]
212
June 13
Palace Court
Minutes of Trustees for Georgia. Received receipt from the bank for 187l 4s 1d paid in by Ald Heathcote. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/687, p 121]
213
June 14
Whitehall
Order of Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs referring the enclosed to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Seal. Signed, W Sharpe. ¾ p. Endorsed, Recd. 19 June, Read 20 June 1739. Enclosed:
213 i Petition of Andrew Lesly and eleven others of Antigua to the King praying for disallowance of an Act lately passed in Antigua to reduce the rate of interest from ten per cent to six. Signed, for the petitioners, Ferdinand John Paris. 1½ pp. [CO 152/23, ff 221–222d, 225d]
214
June 15
Kensington
Warrant to Governor William Mathew to admit Benjamin King to be of the Council in Antigua. Entry. ¾ p. [CO 324/37, pp 128–129]
215
June 15
Whitehall
Duke of Newcastle to Governor Edward Trelawny, President James Dottin, Governor William Mathew, Governor Alured Popple, Governor John Tinker, Governor Jonathan Belcher, Governor Richard Philipps, Lieut-Governor George Clarke, Governor Lewis Morris, Lieut-Governor William Gooch (with addition), Lieut-Governor William Bull (with addition), Governor Gabriel Johnston, Deputy Governor Samuel Ogle, Deputy Governor George Thomas, Governor Henry Medley, Governor and Company of Rhode Island, Governor and Company of Connecticut (Circular). As it was stipulated by the convention concluded between HM and the King of Spain on 14 January last (NS) that the sum of 95000l sterling should be paid at London within the term of four months to be reckoned from the day of the exchange of the ratifications of the said convention, as a balance due on the part of Spain to the Crown and subjects of Great Britain; and as the said term of four months from the exchange of the ratifications of the said convention did expire on 25 May last and the payment of the said sum of 95000l sterling agreed by the said convention has not been made according to the stipulation for that purpose, by which means the convention abovementioned has been manifestly violated and broke and HM's subjects remain without any satisfaction or reparation for the many great and grievous losses sustained by them, HM has thought himself obliged to take such measures on his part as are necessary for the support of the honour and dignity of his Crown, the security of the just rights of his subjects, and the good and safety of his dominions, and has therefore ordered the ships and effects of the King of Spain and his subjects to be seized and taken wherever they shall be met with: with which I am commanded to acquaint you, that you may cause the same to be made known in all places under your government to the end that HM's subjects in those parts may be upon their guard to prevent any mischief they might otherwise suffer from the Spaniards in revenge for the measures which HM is obliged to take to do himself and his subjects justice, and that they may in their several stations annoy the subjects of Spain in the best manner they are able.
And I send you herewith by the King's order HM's warrant under his royal sign manual authorizing and empowering you to grant commissions of marque and reprisal for fitting out private ships of war against the ships, goods and subjects of the King of Spain, and it is HM's pleasure that you should be very rigorous and severe in preventing any ammunition or stores of any kind from being carried to the Spaniards and you are to use all proper methods that may be most effectual for this purpose.
Addition to Lieut-Governor Gooch: As HM thinks the Spaniards may possibly make some attempt upon Georgia it is HM's pleasure that, if you should be acquainted by Mr Oglethorpe that he has received certain intelligence that an attempt is designed to be made by the Spaniards against Georgia, you should in that case give him all the assistance that may be in your power for the defence of that colony.
Addition to Lieut-Governor Bull: As the King thinks the Spaniards may possibly make some attempt upon Carolina or Georgia HM has been pleased to order a sufficient number of ships for the defence of those colonies. You will therefore, should you discover that any preparations are making by the Spaniards for that purpose, give forthwith notice thereof to the commanders of such of HM's ships as may be nearest to you, that they may come to your assistance. And it is HM's pleasure that, if you should be acquainted by Mr Oglethorpe that he has received certain intelligence that an attempt is designed to be made against Georgia, you should in that case given him all the assistance that may be in your power for the defence of that colony. Entry. 8 pp. Enclosed:
215 i Kensington, 15 June 1739. Royal warrant to same. Whereas several unjust seizures have been made and depredations carried on in the West Indies by Spanish guardacostas and ships acting under the commission of the King of Spain or his governors, contrary to the treaties subsisting between us and the Crown of Spain and to the law of nations, to the great prejudice of the lawful trade and commerce of our subjects, and many cruelties and barbarities have been exercised on the persons of such of our subjects whose vessels have been so seized by the said Spanish guardacostas; and whereas frequent complaint has been made to the court of Spain of these unjust practices and no satisfaction or redress been procured; and whereas a convention for making reparation to our subjects for the losses sustained by them on account of the unjust seizures and captures abovementioned was concluded between us and the King of Spain on 14 January last (NS), by which convention it was stipulated that a certain sum of money should be paid at London within a term specified in the said convention as a balance due on the part of Spain to the Crown and subjects of Great Britain, which term did expire on 25 May last and the payment of the said sum agreed by the said convention has not been made according to the stipulation for that purpose, by which means the convention abovementioned has been manifestly violated and broke by the King of Spain and our subjects remain without any satisfaction or reparation for the many great and grievous losses sustained by them: we have thought fit, for the vindicating of the honour of our Crown and for procuring reparation and satisfaction for our injured subjects, to order reprisals to be made upon the Crown and subjects of Spain, and we do therefore by virtue of these presents authorize and empower you to issue forth and grant commissions of marque and reprisals to any of our loving subjects or others who shall apply to you for the same and whom you shall deem fitly qualified in that behalf for arming and fitting out private ships of war for the apprehending, seizing and taking the ships, vessels and goods belonging to the King of Spain, his vassals and subjects, or any inhabiting within his countries, territories and dominions in the West Indies, provided always that before any such commission or commissions be issued forth security be given upon every such commission as hath been used in such cases, and you shall insert in every commission to be granted by you all such clauses and give such directions and instructions to the person or persons to whom you shall grant such commission as have been usual in cases of the like nature, and for so doing this shall be your warrant. Entry. 7 pp. [CO 324/37, pp 131–145; draft of addition to Bull in CO 5/388, ff 162–163d; copy of no i, endorsed North Carolina, in CO 5/306, ff 135–136d]
216
June 15
Whitehall
Duke of Newcastle to James Oglethorpe. Same as first paragraph of nono 215. And you will put yourself into as good a posture of defence as possible to oppose any attempts that may be made against Georgia by the Spaniards, taking care to get the earliest intelligence you can of their designs. And as the King thinks they may possibly make some attempt upon Georgia or Carolina HM has been pleased to order a sufficient number of his ships for the defence of those colonies. You will therefore, should you discover that any preparations are making by the Spaniards for that purpose, give forthwith notice thereof to the commander of such of HM's ships as may be nearest to you that they may come to your assistance, and you will likewise at the same time acquaint the governors of Virginia and Carolina therewith, who have HM's directions to give you any assistance that may be in their power. Draft. 4 pp. [CO 5/388, ff 160–161d; entry in CO 324/37, pp 146–148]
217
June 15
Whitehall
Same to Governor Edward Trelawny (Private) acknowledging several letters. I can assure you of HM's entire approbation of your zeal and attention to his service and of your care for the good of the island under your government. I cannot but particularly congratulate you upon the good success that you have had in reducing the rebellious Negroes to reasonable terms, of which you give an account in your last despatch. The manner in which the Council and the House of Representatives of Jamaica express themselves in their several addresses to you upon this subject is an evident proof of the importance of this service, and indeed it seems (in the present conjuncture especially) it may be attended with great advantage to the public. You will see by my other despatch which you will receive herewith that the behaviour of the Court of Spain in so notoriously breaking the late convention by the non-payment of the 95000l has opened a new scene of affairs and obliged HM to take new measures for doing himself and the nation justice. In these circumstances I need use no arguments to convince you how necessary it will be for you to be always upon your guard against any attempt that may be made upon you by the Spaniards; and I doubt not but you will in your station exert your utmost endeavours to execute the King's orders to you upon this occasion in such a manner as may be for your own reputation and the good of the service in general. The people of Jamaica in particular and all the sugar colonies in general cannot but be convinced of the attention that the legislature have showed to their interests in passing an Act this session of Parliament for the exportation of sugars directly to foreign markets. I was hearty in my wishes and endeavours for the good success of this bill whilst it was depending and hope it will be attended with all the good consequences that can be expected from it. As for what more particularly relates to yourself, I mean your application that the independent companies at Jamaica may be formed into a regiment of which you hope in that case HM would be pleased to give you the command, as this point has not yet been considered I can only assure you that as no one can wish you better than I do I shall at all times be ready to join with your friends in forwarding as far as lies in my power the success of any request that you make. PS. I doubt not but you will do your best to revenge the injuries your countrymen have suffered from the Spaniards now that you have full power and liberty to do it. My brother sends you his compliments and best wishes. Pray, mine to Dr Wigan. Draft. 4 pp. [CO 137/56, ff 219–221d]
218
June 15
Whitehall
Same to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations enclosing the following. You are to lay before the Houses of Lords and Commons next session the accounts desired; and in case you should not have already received such accounts from the colonies you should endeavour to procure them. Signed, Holles Newcastle. 1 p. Endorsed, Recd. 16 June, Read 20 June 1739. Enclosed:
218 i Resolution, dated 13 June 1739, of House of Lords requesting account of what rates all gold and silver coins were purchased at and sold for per oz in the British colonies in 1700, 1710, 1720, 1730, and at this time. Copy. Signatory, William Cowper, Parliamentor. 1 p.
218 ii Resolution, dated 13 June 1739, of House of Lords requesting an account of the amount of paper bills of credit subsisting in the colonies in 1700 and what has been created since 1700, with the amount of the value in money of Great Britain and what provision has been made for sinking the said bills, the amount sunk, and the bills passing in payment at this time. Copy. Signatory, as no 218i. 1½ pp.
218 iii Resolutions, dated 13 June 1739, of House of Commons to same effect as nos 218i and 218ii. Copy. Signatory, N Hardinge, Clerk of House of Commons. 1 p. [CO 323/10, ff 150–153d, 155]
219
June 15
New York
Lieut-Governor George Clarke to Duke of Newcastle. A few days ago I received a letter from the commissioners for Indian affairs at Albany, a copy whereof I send you wherein you may observe, if the intelligence be true, that the French are going to settle on Wood Creek which lies between a fort they lately built at Crown Point and Albany. Whereupon I wrote to the commissioners, a copy of which letter I likewise send you; but as I do not conceive that anything I can represent to the French will divert them from making those settlements if they really intend to make them, I thought it my duty to inform you of it. The lands whereon the French propose to settle were purchased from the Indian proprietors (who have all along been subject to and under the protection of the Crown of England) by one Godfrey Dellius and granted to him by patent under the seal of this province in 1696, which grant was afterwards resumed by Act of Assembly whereby they became vested in the Crown. On part of these lands I proposed to settle some Scotch Highland families who came hither last year, and they would have been now actually settled there if the Assembly would have assisted them, for they are poor and want help. However, as I have promised to give them lands gratis, some of them about three weeks ago went to view that part of the country, and if they like the lands I hope they will accept of my offer (if the report of the French designs do not discourage them), depending upon the voluntary assistance of the people of Albany whose more immediate interest it is to encourage their settlement in that part of the country. About three weeks ago I sent to the Lords of Trade a map wherein the French fort at Crown Point was laid down. It was the only one I had nor can I get another. If that arrives safe, as I hope it will, and you will order it to be laid before you, you will have a clearer view of its situation than I can otherwise give. Signed. 2 small pp. Endorsed, R, 20 August. Enclosed:
219 i New York, 14 June 1739. Same to commissioners for Indian affairs. I have your letter of the 7th instant wherein you inform me that the Intendant, with forty bateaux and four Frenchmen in each bateau, was going from Canada to Crown Point in order to settle some French families along Wood Creek. I would by any means prevent them, and at present I know none better than that you send a man or two to take a formal possession of those lands by making a hut and erecting a flag thereon, instructing them if any of the French come thither to inform them that those lands belong to the King of Great Britain, that they were above forty years ago purchased from the Indians by HM's subjects and granted to them, and to forbid the French to make any settlements thereon, representing to them that if they make any such attempt it would be an open infraction of the treaties subsisting between the two Crowns. And that this opposition may have the greater weight you will do well to call the sachems or principal rulers of the Indians together and acquaint them with the steps the French are taking, and to make them sensible that if they succeed in making those settlements they will be in danger of being dispossessed by them of all the lands they now claim, it being the custom of the French to take that by force which we purchase from them for valuable considerations. Having thus made the Indians sensible of the ill consequences that will attend them from this encroachment of the French, you are to induce them to go to Crown Point or where else the command officer of the French should be, and in the name of their whole nation to forbid them to make any settlement on those or any other of their lands. I leave it to you to give what further instructions (to the men you send to take possession) you think may most effectually answer the end proposed. Signed. Copy. 1½ small pp.
219 ii Albany, 7 June 1739. Commissioners for Indian affairs to Lieut-Governor Clarke. We are informed by an Indian who came hither from Canada that the Intendant, with thirty bateaux with four Frenchmen in each, was going to Crown Point and from thence designed to go to settle sundry French families on land along Wood Creek, being the same where you intended to place the Scotch Highlanders. We thought it our duty to send an express to go up as far as the fork where Fort Anne was, where we are told that Leber and some other French are now. If this report be true, which we are of opinion will prove so, we should be glad to know your pleasure what must be done in case the French attempt to settle those lands and encroach so far on HM's empire in taking possession of his frontiers in these parts. As soon as our messenger returns we shall acquaint you with his report. Copy. Signatories, Philip Livingston, Edward Clarke, Edward Holland, Dirck Ten Broeck. 1 small p. [CO 5/1094, ff 104–109d]
220
June 15
New York
Lieut-Governor George Clarke to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations sending copy of a letter received from the commissioners for Indian affairs with answer. The lands that the French talk of settling were purchased from the Indians and granted by patent under the seal of this province in 1696 to one Godfrey Dellius, which was afterwards resumed by Act of Assembly whereby they became vested in the Crown. And I presume to hope upon a representation of the matter at the court of France that orders will be given to the governor of Canada not to make any settlement on this side of the lake. These lands you will perceive by the map I sent you lie between the French fort at Crown Point and Albany where I intend to settle some Scotch Highland families who came hither last year, having promised to give them lands gratis. Some of them went about three weeks ago to view the lands but are not yet returned, but I doubt when they are informed of the designs of the French they will be discouraged. It is the interest of the province in general, and more particularly of the people of Albany, to encourage those Scotch to settle there by giving them some assistance for they are very poor; yet I find no disposition in the Assembly to do it. What the people of Albany will do by a voluntary contribution is yet uncertain. I write to the Duke of Newcastle mentioning to him the map I sent you whereby he will see the situation of Wood Creek. I hope you will take the matter into your consideration and give me directions how to act herein. The only information the commissioners for Indian affairs have at present is from an Indian and such intelligence is not always to be depended on. However, as there is some probability that the French will now or soon make such an attempt I thought it my duty to lay this before you. Signed. 1½ small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 1 August, Read 3 August 1739. Enclosed:
220 i Albany, 7 June 1739. Commissioners for Indian affairs to Lieut-Governor Clarke. Copy of no 219ii. 1 small p.
220 ii New York, 14 June 1739. Lieut-Governor Clarke to commissioners for Indian affairs. Copy of no 219i. 1½ small pp. [CO 5/1059, ff 104–107d]
221
June 18
Whitehall
Order of Committee of Council for Plantation Affairs referring eight Acts passed in Pennsylvania to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations for report. Seal. Signed, W Sharpe. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd. 23 June, Read 27 June 1739. [CO 5/1269, ff 55–56d]
222
June 18
Whitehall
Same directing Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to write to the commander-in-chief of South Carolina requiring him strictly to adhere to his instructions in the manner of granting lands. Seal. Signed, W Sharpe. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 21 June 1739. [CO 5/367, ff 30–31d]
223
June 18
Jamaica
Governor Edward Trelawny to Duke of Newcastle notifying death of Mr Mill, receiver-general. In case HM thinks fit to grant a new patent I recommend John Stewart, lieut-governor, to succeed him as a gentleman of know integrity and ability that will give entire satisfaction to the whole island. I could wish this office might not be for life. As the whole money of the island passes through his hands it would be better that such an officer might be dependent; but if HM does grant it for life he cannot do it to a worthier person than Mr Stewart. Signed. 1¼ pp. Endorsed, R, 8 September. [CO 137/56, ff 234–235d]
224
June 18
Frederica
Gen James Oglethorpe to Duke of Newcastle. Though I have nothing new to aquaint you I would not omit writing. The Spaniards are quiet: they have made several attempts to gain the Creek Indians from us but the chiefs of that nation who were in England are so grateful for the gracious reception HM gave them that I am persuaded the nation will continue fixed in their fidelity to HM notwithstanding all the endeavours the Spaniards have used, both by gifts and threats, to animate them against the English. Signed. 1½ pp. Endorsed, R, 11 October. [CO 5/654, ff 213–214d]
225
June 19
Johnson's Court
Hugh Mackay to Harman Verelst urging the need to keep up the scoutboats at Amelia and St Andrews. The more such boats the Trustees have the safer the colony will be. Signed. 1½ pp. Annotated, Georgia scoutboat consists of patroon and 10 men and provisions for them, 258l 15s 1d 8 hands for boat at St Andrews for provisions and shoes at 6l each, 48l Addressed. [CO 5/640, ff 325–326d]
226
June 20
Boston
Josiah Willard to Thomas Hill. I have sent you by Delight via Bristol the public papers of Massachusetts for half-year ending in February last, also minutes of Council and Assembly. Signed. ½ small p. Endorsed, Recd. 8 August, Read 29 August 1739. Enclosed:
226 i Account of William Foye, treasurer and receiver-general of HM's revenue in Massachusetts, 25 May 1737 to 25 May 1738. Copy, examined on 25 May 1739 by J Willard. 23½ pp.
226 ii Abstract of foregoing account in bills of new and old tenor. Copy, examined as no 226i. 1 p. [CO 5/881, ff 116–117d, 119–134d]
227
June 20
Palace Court
Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. Resolved that one of the best forfeited lots at Savannah be granted to Thomas Jones; that Henry Parker be removed from being first bailiff of Savannah and Thomas Christie appointed in his room. Seal to be affixed to appointments of William Williamson, Thomas Christie, John Fallowfield and Thomas Jones. Resolved that the sum of 258l 15s 1d be inserted in the estimate for 1739–1740 for a scoutboat and 48l for a boat at St Andrews. Resolved that 200l be paid to Col Oglethorpe for bill he took up from Mr Jenys. Bill for 636l 17s 3d to executors of late Paul Jenys referred to committee of accounts. Samuel Davison appointed overseer of Trust's servants in southern parts of Georgia. Mr Holland and the accountant reported the Trust's present financial state. Ordered that 2 tons of halfpence be sent to Georgia and that 1000l be paid to Ald Heathcote to be accounted for; signed draft on the bank for same. Petition and memorial of Capt William Thomson were read concerning account certified by Thomas Causton and the disposal of German servants in Georgia; referred to commissioners in Georgia and committee of accounts. Resolved that the supply by Col Oglethorpe to William Stephens be not accounted part of the 50l ordered to be paid to him; and that 25l be paid him before the estimate takes place. Resolved that Peter Emery be appointed pilot at Tybee. Entry. 6½ pp. [CO 5/690, pp 227–233]
228
June 20
Palace Court
Minutes of Trustees for Georgia. Ordered secretary to sign a memorial to Lords of Treasury desiring issue of the 20000l granted in last session of Parliament for further settling Georgia. Petition to the King for licence for Two Brothers, William Thomson, to sail, ordered to be sealed. Read instructions to magistrates of Savannah with answer to complaint about tenure of lands. Received large Common Prayer Book for use of minister at Frederica, benefaction of Dr Hales. Entry. 1½ pp. [CO 5/687, pp 122–123; entry of memorial and petition, both dated 20 June, in CO 5/670, p 398]
229
June 20
Trustees for Georgia to Magistrates of Savannah. The Trustees have received by the hands of Benjamin Ball of London, merchant, an attested copy of a representation signed by you the magistrates and many of the inhabitants of Savannah on 9 December last for altering the tenure of the lands and introducing Negroes into the province, transmitted from thence by Robert Williams. The Trustees are not surprised to find unwary people drawn in by crafty men to join in a design of extorting by clamour from the Trustees an alteration in the fundamental laws framed for the preservation of the people from those very designs. But the Trustees cannot but express their astonishment that you, the magistrates appointed by them to be guardians of the people by putting those laws in execution, should so far forget your duty as to put yourselves at the head of this attempt. However, they direct you to give the complainants this answer from the Trustees: that they should deem themselves very unfit for the trust reposed in them by HM on their behalf if they could be prevailed upon by such an irrational attempt to give up a constitution framed with the greatest caution for the preservation of liberty and property and of which the laws against the use of slaves and for the entail of lands are the surest foundations. And the Trustees are the more confirmed in their opinion of the unreasonableness of this demand, that they have received petitions from the Darien and other parts of the province representing the inconveniences and dangers which must arise to the good people of the province from the introduction of Negroes. And as the Trustees themselves are fully convinced that, besides the hazard attending of that introduction, it would destroy all industry among the white inhabitants and that by giving them a power to alien their lands the colony would soon be too like its neighbours, void of white inhabitants, filled with blacks, and reduced to be the precarious property of a few, equally exposed to domestic treachery and foreign invasion, and therefore the Trustees cannot be supposed to be in any disposition of granting this request. And if they have not before this signified their dislike of it their delay is to be imputed to no other motive but the hopes they had conceived that time and experience would bring the complainants to a better mind. And the Trustees readily join issue with them in their appeal to posterity who shall judge between them who were their best friends: those who endeavoured to preserve for them a property in their lands by tying up the hands of their unthrifty proprietors, or they who wanted a power to mortgage or alien them; who were the best friends to the colony, those who with great labour and cost had endeavoured to form a colony of HM's subjects and persecuted Protestants from other parts of Europe, had placed them on a fruitful soil and strove to secure them in their possessions by those arts which naturally tend to keep the colony full of useful and industrious people, capable both to cultivate and defend it; or those who, to gratify the greedy and ambitious view of a few Negro-merchants, would put it into their power to become sole owners of the province by introducing their baneful commodity which it is well known by sad experience has brought our neighbours' colonies to the brink of ruin by driving out their white inhabitants who were their glory and strength to make room for blacks who are now become the terror of their unadvised masters. Entry. 1½ pp. [CO 5/670, pp 403–404]
230
June 22
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to President William Bull. The Committee of Council, being informed that the instructions given to the governor of South Carolina relating to his making grants of lands in the province have not been strictly observed, have ordered us to write to you, the present commander-in-chief of that province, to require you strictly to adhere to your instructions in the manner of granting lands and to take care that no other surveys be made than such as are pursuant to the orders and instructions given by HM. Entry. Signatories, Monson, Edward Ashe, M Bladen, R Plumer, ¾ p. [CO 5/401, pp 328–329]
231
June 22
Georgia Office
Harman Verelst to Capt Townshend sending packet to be delivered to Georgia, if possible; if not, to South Carolina. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 241]
232
June 22
Georgia Office
Same to Peter Stone sending packet to be put on board HMS Tartar. Expenses will be paid. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p. 242]
233
June 22
Georgia Office
Benjamin Martyn to Rev George Whitefield. The Trustees have no doubt but your zeal for instructing the poor people at Savannah will prompt you to take the first opportunity of returning to them, especially since the southern part of the province is and will be without a minister till your arrival there, Mr Norris being detained at Savannah during your absence. They have therefore ordered me to acquaint you that the Two Brothers, Capt Thomson, having obtained a licence, will sail from the river next Wednesday or Thursday, and the ship in which are your things lies alongside of the Two Brothers. It is very uncertain when the embargo will be taken off and there is no appearance of your ship's being in any forwardness. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 242]
234
June 22
Savannah
William Stephens to Harman Verelst. Your favour of 15 February came to my hands here 6th inst and not sooner as you will find it particularly noted in my journal of that day to which I refer. Copy of the minutes on Mr Cooksey's petition which was enclosed I observe duly and it will at any time be a rule whenever occasion may require it. The letters enclosed I dispatched forward to the general the next day which is all that I apprehend needful to be said in answer, only I must not forget to desire you will do me the friendly office of returning my humble thanks to the Trustees for their kind disposition to gratify the request I made them concerning Joseph Watson's land which at present I ask leave to waive saying more of till I have spoke with the general again and can learn whether or not I may depend on that land which was partly fixed on the last time I saw him at the mouth of Vernon River, as you may find the particulars of what passed there in my notes of 19 April. I hope I shall not fall between two stools. I am next to acknowledge the receipt of that packet which came by Capt Shubrick and was brought from Frederica by Messrs Norris and Brownfield who returned thence together and put it into my hands on 10th inst, wherein I found divers letters for serveral people in these parts which proper care was taken of. And then I also met with yours of 3 March signifying to me the pleasure of the Trustees especially relating to the issuing of 500l in sola bills by Messrs Causton, Parker and myself or any two of us, with particular orders that Mr Parker and I should make out an account showing to whom and for what services each respective issue is made of the 500l agreeable to the aforesaid directions, which account he and I are to send to the Trust signed by both of us together with a list of the bills so issued in order to be discharged therefrom; and likewise in the same manner the issuing 710l by Messrs Jones, Parker and myself together with the produce of 15 tuns of beer two of us three are to account for to the Trustees and show thereby in what services agreeable to the foregoing instructions the produce of the beer and said bills have been applied. From all this put together I was led to think that something was required of those who signed the said bills that deserved their further particular care as they were to be accountable, but from what Parker tells me Mr Jones said to him I am informed nothing is expected from him and me than to sign to the issuing of them and the rest Mr Jones is to take on himself: which answer Mr Parker was not so well satisfied with as to persuade himself to meddle rashly in a matter of so great consequence without being better advised. And as to myself no question has yet been asked me about it nor (possibly) every may; if not I shall have no cause of being displeased nor give any occasion I hope of displeasure to anyone else, which I fear might be the case if I should refuse signing those bills or sign them without further regard to what uses they were issued. I cannot avoid saying that so difficult a piece of conduct is a little too abstruse for my simple unwariness to get through without great hazard of blame which I would most gladly avoid. It will appear too plainly by my journal what steps have been taken by a person to render my service suspected, whom I never to my knowledge provoked to use me or mine ill by any unfair action or show of disregard; on the contrary I have never failed to behave with a friendly familiarity towards him, sought all occasions of conference for promoting those ends we came here for, and whenever he pleased to ask my attendance on any business I am sure he never sent to me in vain. But in that, for a while past, he spares me or himself any trouble, for ever since that memorable day of 21st ult, when he found himself deflated in fixing so vile a crime on my son which it behoved me to see thoroughly canvassed, he will hardly vouchsafe to take any notice of what I say to him nor has he in return to many neighbourly visits I made him (intending thereby to wipe out all remembrance of what was past) once set foot within my doors but by all outward carriage appears determined to keep me at a distance, nor should I intrude where I find I am no longer welcome. I am very sensible it is with good reason expected that I and everyone else who act in behalf of the Trust should contribute all we can to countenance and support Mr Jones in carrying on the affair he has committed to his charge and I can take to myself the satisfaction to say with a good conscience that I have to my utmost endeavoured to discharge my duty in so doing; but his unhappy temper will not allow him to look upon anybody (howsoever well inclined) without jealousy and suspicion of ill designs, and who knows how far that may carry him into secret accusations? to which, if we add that haughty and morose carriage, it cannot be wondered at if people on the other side look on him with less respect than otherwise might be due. Pardon me, sir, for this freedom I take in the fullness of my heart to give a short sketch of the present situation I am in, not desiring to exhibit a charge against one man nor to give any disturbance in the present course of business which I well know is of the greatest consequence. My meaning only is that when I see an angry man brandishing weapons I think it time to look about in my own defence. But enough of that.
What further relates to myself as to my future support here, I have in some of my former letters given you sufficient trouble not to enlarge upon the same again now, not doubting but the honourable gentlemen whom I have so hearty a desire to serve effectually to good purpose have ere this time thought it worth consideration so as to enable me to perform it. My son is preparing for his voyage to England in pursuance of what I wrote in my last of 19th ult and for the reasons then given. I hope he may by good providence arrive there in September, and if he shall be thought worthy of being asked any questions by the Trustees, though he may be defective in eloquence, I dare pawn my own credit he will not be so in the veracity of what he says for I know he detests falsehood. We shall part with expectation of meeting again here in few months (God willing) to carry on our work with comfort. My Thomas Eyre, I learnt upon inquiry, was living and well at St Simons, and having some occasion to write to Lieut Dunbar there I enclosed the letter to him which was sent from Mr Eyre who is of the Trust, to whom I offer my compliments of due respect. I acquainted Edward Bush with the leave given him by the Trust to dispose of his lot by will to one of his daughters in case he dies without issue male. In my last of 19 May I sent copy of my journal etc as usual and do the same now to 21st enclosed. Signed. 2½ pp. Addressed. Endorsed, Recd. 3 September 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 327–328d]
235
June 25
Charleston
Lieut-Governor William Bull to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Mr Michie, deputizing for Mr Hammerton in the secretary's office, resigned because the allowance made to him was insufficient recompense for his services. As Mr Michie is well qualified I have appointed him to be secretary in Mr Hammerton's absence or until Mr Hammerton deputes another. Account of duties enclosed. The duties have been applied to several good uses, viz maintaining the clergy, repairing and enlarging fortifications and other necessary purposes. The duty on Negroes is applied to settling newcomers in laying out lands and purchasing tools and provision for them. This has been a great advantage to South Carolina by increasing our strength and will in time be an addition to revenue by quitrents. Signed. 1½ small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 12 September, Read 23 October 1739. Enclosed:
235 i Accounts of duties arising at Charleston and of expenditure of same, 29 March 1735 to 29 September 1737. Duty on sundry goods and merchandize imported; duty on same appropriated for building and repairing fortifications; duty on rum imported, stating number of gallons and place from which imported; duty on Negroes imported, stating number of Negroes and number under age; duty on sole leather exported, stating weight; duty on deerskins exported, stating number of heavy and light skins; accounts of expenditure of these revenues. Signed, William Bull, S John, deputy auditor. 105 pp. [CO 5/367, ff 53–109d]
236
June 27
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to Committee of Privy Council reporting on 49 Acts passed in Massachusetts in 1735, 1736 and 1737. No objection in point of law and no other objection to 47 of them, titles of which are stated. Two other Acts relating to emission of bills of credit of a new tenour are not agreeable to HM's instructions, but considering they are temporary and considering we have already laid before HM the sentiments of British merchants relating to paper currency in Massachusetts, together with methods for reduction of old bills and establishing new ones on better foundation, we shall not at present propose repeal of these laws. Entry. Signatories, Monson, M Bladen, J Brudenell, R Plumer. 12 pp. [CO 5/917, pp 269–280]
237
June 27
New Providence
Extract of letter to Governor Richard Fitzwilliam reporting difficulties in the supply of provisions for the garrison by Mr Godin and Mr Seaman. Copy. 1 small p. Endorsed, R, from Mr Fitzwilliam, 9 December 1739. [CO 23/14, ff 302–303d]
238
June 27
Palace Court
Minutes of Common Council of Georgia. Read petition of Ann Emery, wife of Peter Emery, widow of Michael Germain; resolved that her daughter may succeed to 50-acre lot in Savannah in case her son should die first; that a 50-acre lot be granted to Peter Emery on Tybee; and that the petitioner may have licence to sell beer there but not the advance of money she requested. Read petition of Mary Crowder, widow of Joseph Crowder of Savannah, for rent owed to her by Henry Parker; rejected. Read petition of Isaac Young for assistance, he never having had his full grant of 100 acres run out; Mr Stephens to inquire into this negligence but no money to be advanced. Read proposals of Andrew Duche for a patent for sole making of porcelain and praying for materials to be sent to him; resolved to lay out 12l in purchase of materials but the Trustees can say nothing to the other part of the proposal until they have seen his work. Read memorial of John Hammerton, receiver-general of quitrents in South Carolina, proposing to provide 200l in Charleston for the like sum paid to him here; agreed. Read letter from Samuel Holmes, brickmaker in Georgia, desiring credit for servants; resolved that he may have two on condition of maintaining them and teaching them the business. Thomas Jones appointed overseer of the Trust's servants in northern parts of Georgia (notwithstanding order of last Common Council revoking his appointment) and Samuel Davison overseer of servants in the southern part, both to enter into recognizances that they will not employ the Trust's servants on their own lands. Resolved that 200 copies of the Trustees' answer to the representation from Savannah about tenure of land and Negroes be printed and sent to Georgia. Resolved that, if Robert Howes shall appear indebted to the Trustees, no proceedings be made against him until further direction. Resolved that William Stephens, Thomas Christie and Thomas Jones, or any two of them, are to issue sola bills in Georgia. Resolved that gunpowder and shot be purchased and sent over as part of the presents to Indians. Read memorial from Peter Simond for an advance on the 1667l 8s 9d due to him; resolved to advance 1200l on his note to answer any sum short of that in case the commissioners in Georgia should report that any less sum is due. Read petition from Pytt & Tuckwell for an advance on the 407l 5sd due to them; resolved to advance 300l to them on like terms. Resolved that any five of the Common Council draw on the bank, after the 20000l from Parliament shall have been received, for these sums and for the payment to Mr Hammerton. Resolved that a grant of 500 acres at Augusta be made to Kennedy O'Brien. Entry. 8 pp. [CO 5/690, pp 234–241]
239
June 27
Palace Court
Minutes of Trustees for Georgia. Dr Hales acquainted the Trustees that Rev Mr Vallois, rector of East Tisted, Hants, and an anonymous benefactor had paid for New Testaments and religious books in German for the use of the Palatines at Savannah. Sealed answer to representation from Savannah concerning tenure of land and use of Negroes. Sealed appointments of Thomas Christie, John Fallowfield, Thomas Jones and William Williamson to offices in Georgia. Entry. 1½ pp. [CO 5/687, pp 124–125; entry of appointments in CO 5/670, pp 399–402]
240
June 28
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to the King. In obedience to Order of 22 March last we have prepared draft of additional instruction for governor of South Carolina to recommend to the Council and Assembly of that province to pass Act for emitting 210000l in paper bills of credit not liable to the objections contained in Order. Entry. Signatories, Monson, R Plumer, J Brudenell, M Bladen. 1¼ pp. Enclosed:
240 i Draft of instruction. Objections are to clause of the Act directing the treasurer to discount or allow ten per cent on all duties inwards paid in silver or gold, which is evidently against the intention of the Queen's proclamation of 18 June 1704, enacted into law in 1707, to prevent the drawing money from one colony to another by setting an unequal value thereupon; and to the provision for creating security for an old debt of 100000l in paper money now current in that province out of the interest arising by the loan of 110000l part of the new bills. There is no clause to oblige the borrowers to repay any part of the principal towards the sinking of the said bills. Entry. 2½ pp. [CO 5/401, pp 330–333]
241
June 28
Whitehall
Thomas Hill to Francis Fane sending eight Acts passed in Pennsylvania for opinion in point of law. If they are not repealed within six months after the date of delivery to the Privy Council (as these were on 15th inst) it is not in the power of the Crown to repeal them afterwards. Titles stated. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/1294, pp 114–115]
242
June 28
Bermuda
Governor Alured Popple to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, by Mr Dinwiddie, surveyor-general of the southern district of the continent of America, Jamaica and the Bahamas. Bearer was sent by the Commissioners of the Customs to make an inspection into the state of the revenue, particularly the 4½ per cent in Barbados and the Leeward Islands. His short stay here will not give me leave to get duplicates of my last letters transcribed to send by him but, there being many things in them which relate to the interest of this little colony, I beg you will give him an opportunity of explaining what may appear in any degree doubtful. My letter of 25 November last relates to an article of my instructions which has ever given some uneasiness here as it obliges all vessels to load and unload in St George's or the Castle Harbour. As Mr Dinwiddie has many years been collector of the Customs here and perfectly understands what I endeavoured to explain to you in my aforesaid letter I beg you will give him an opportunity of attending the board upon this subject or any other that relates to this island. Signed. PS. I hope you have received my letter of 16th of last month sent by Capt Dickenson. 2 small pp. Endorsed, Recd., Read 8 November 1739. [CO 37/13, ff 126, 126d, 131, 131d]
243
June 30
Jamaica
Governor Edward Trelawny to Duke of Newcastle. I acquainted you in March last of the rebellious Negroes situated in the leeward parts of the island having submitted upon terms, the conditions of which I transmitted at the same time. I have the pleasure now to acquaint you that the rebels to the windward, upon our party's being in possession of their provision-ground, submitted likewise on the 23rd inst upon pretty much the same terms, only that they are obliged to deliver up the slaves that have not been with them above three years and receive a garrison of soldiers that can command them, though indeed I do not believe they will ever revolt as it cannot be their interest to do it, they receiving greater advantages than we do by the agreement though those we receive are very great. We are not only delivered from an enemy that was in possession of such fastnesses that it was almost impossible to force, if well-defended, and were places of refuge to our runaway slaves who continually increased their numbers, but they will be a great addition of strength and the most useful people we can have in going after any slaves that may rise in rebellion hereafter. The windward rebels that have last submitted, by the account their captain gave me by notches on a stick, amount to 470 persons, men, women and children. Those to the leeward by a register taken of them are about the same number. There are besides some skulkers in small bodies of ten or twelve which we cannot now fail to reduce. It will be very fortunate, if there should be a war, to have got rid beforehand of the intestine enemy; but I offer as my opinion that we are not so entirely to trust to our agreement with them as not to be upon our guard against any treachery and that the forces we have now should be looked upon but as sufficient for that purpose; and that to defend ourselves against a foreign invasion it will be necessary to have a considerable reinforcement. But you will judge better what force will be proper to be sent in that case and whether we should act upon the defensive only or be enabled to make descents upon the enemy which we are conveniently situated for. I only acquaint you to the best of my judgment, as it is my duty, with our circumstances and what I imagine may be necessary; you will know best what measures to take. Signed. 3 pp. Endorsed, R, 1 September. [CO 137/56, ff 236–237d]
244
June 30
Antigua
Governor William Mathew to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations enclosing the following. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, Recd. 29 August, Read 31 August 1739. Enclosed:
244 i State of the Council of St Christophers's on 28 June 1739 with names of six persons proper to supply vacancies. Gilbert Fleming, lieut-general, absent by HM's leave; Joseph Estridge and Sir Charles Payne Bt, present; John Garnet, in Carolina absent without leave 4½ years; William McDowall and Peter Soulegre, absent many years, I suppose on HM's leave; Charles Pym, present; Edward Mann, absent several years; John Douglass, Abraham Payne, Joseph Phipps, present; John Williams, dead since last list; Charles Dunbar, resides always at Antigua; Mathew Mills, Rev Walter Thomas, Edward Jessup, present, appointed by HM since last list. Six persons proper to supply vacancies: Drewry Ottley, James Verchile jnr, Richard Willson, Benjamin Macklean jnr, Ralph Payne, William Ottley. Signed, William Mathew. 1 p.
244 ii State of Council of Nevis at same date. Gilbert Fleming, lieut-general, and William Hanmer, lieut-governor, absent; Michael Smith, James Symonds, James Browne, present; William Pym Burt, resides mostly at St Christopher's; Carew Broadbelt, present; Thomas Butler, many years in England; Daniel Smith, absent without my leave; Charles Bridgewater jnr, present; Charles Dunbar, almost constantly at Antigua; Thomas Pym, formerly appointed by Mr Mathew, went to England without his leave and therefore on his return suspended by him till HM's pleasure be known; William Clarke, formerly appointed by Mr Mathew, now in England with his leave; John Williams jnr, ordered by Mr Mathew to be sworn, there being but five Councillors present. Six persons proper to supply vacancies: Thomas Herbert, Edward Abbot, John Woodley, Roger Pemberton, Josias Webb, James Earl. Signed, William Mathew. 1 p.
244 iii State of Council of Montserrat at same date. Gilbert Fleming, lieutgeneral, and Thomas Digges, lieut-governor, absent; George Wyke, Richard Cooke, present; Anthony Hodges, many years in England; Nathaniel Webb, present; John Roberts, never attended; Charles Dunbar, almost constantly at Antigua; George Wyke jnr, John Osborne, John Webb, present except John Osborne, now returned to settle at Antigua, and these were appointed by Mr Mathew. Six persons proper to supply vacancies: Peter Lee, Nicholas Daniel, William Earl, Charles Daly, George French, Bedingfield Bramley. Signed, William Mathew. ¾ p.
244 iv State of Council of Antigua at same date. Gilbert Fleming, lieut-general, absent; Edward Byam, lieut-governor, present; Sir William Codrington Bt, dead since last list; Valentine Morris, Nathaniel Crump, John Frye, present; George Lucas, not returned from England on Mr Mathew's leave; John Vernon, in England on Mr Mathew's leave; Josiah Martin, in New York on Mr Mathew's leave; Charles Dunbar, present; Samuel Byam, dead since last list; John Gunthrope, appointed by Mr Mathew to make up seven of the Council; Rev Francis Byam, appointed by Mr Mathew to make up seven. Six persons proper to supply vacancies: Thomas Kerby, Jacob Morgan, Richard Oliver, Henry Lyons, Thomas Watkins, Jonas Langford. Signed, William Mathew. 1 p. [CO 152/23, ff 232–235d]