America and West Indies
September 1739

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Institute of Historical Research

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K. G. Davies (editor)

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1994

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174-191

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'America and West Indies: September 1739', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 45: 1739 (1994), pp. 174-191. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=115270 Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


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September 1739

362
September 1
Virginia
Lieut-Governor William Gooch to Duke of Newcastle acknowledging receipt on 29th of last month of HM's warrant for granting letters of marque against the Spaniards, accompanied with the commands of 15 June, which have been published throughout the colony. I have not yet had any application made to me for commissions, occasioned by the scarcity of seamen and not any dislike to the undertaking. But I hope the early intelligence of HM's resolutions, while unexpected by the Spaniards, will give HM's ships of war stationed in America an opportunity of humbling that proud and deceitful nation. I forbear troubling you on the subject of your letter of 21 May, having written at large to Lord Albemarle and desired him to show it to you, that if necessary it may be laid before HM. Signed. 1½ small pp. Endorsed, R, 20 November. [CO 5/1337, ff 206–207d]
363
September 3
Lieut-Governor William Gooch to Earl of Albemarle. It is with equal concern and surprise that I received your letter of 24 May with one from the Duke of Newcastle, wherein I find myself taxed with want of respect to you as governor in appointing Mr Randolph to execute the office of adjutant without notifying to you either the vacancy or the appointment; whereas I was so far from having a design to conceal the disposal of that office from you, though I might omit, not being used to it, to acquaint you with it, that it was done with an intention to oblige you by giving it to a gentleman well known and esteemed by Mr Hanbury who is so deservedly in your favour. But as this does not answer the purport of his grace's letter, occasioned by your laying too great stress upon the word governor, by which I meant in my letter referred to the commander-in-chief on the spot, I hope what follows will show that only could be my meaning and, by justifying what I have done, clear me of the imputation of disregard to you. I am so well acquainted with the practice of this government for sixty years past that I can assure you there is not one instance in all that time of a lieut-governor being controlled by the chief governor in the disposal of any office of trust or profit whenever such became vacant, though some of those chief governors, as Lord Culpeper and Lord Effingham, had been in Virginia, knew the offices, and had friends and acquaintance in the country to gratify. And the reason is very evident, because the letters patent by which they were constituted devolve the whole power of government upon the person who is commander-in-chief on the place as well in their absence as on their deaths, and if you will be pleased to recollect you will find no power given you by your commission to exercise any act of government in this colony during your residence elsewhere, and consequently that upon the vacancy of any office you cannot while you remain out of the government give a commission to anyone to execute any office of trust or profit here.
But there is another obstacle to be surmounted before you can dispose of any place in the government, which is that by the King's instructions and the laws of the country the advice and consent of the Council must be first obtained, who have always a large share in the application and with whom the appointment is debated and approved before it is fixed, and how such consent can be had at a thousand leagues distance and how unlikely it is to succeed when every member of that board has a possibility of being president, on whom the same powers devolve on the death or absence of the lieut-governor, is worth considering. Nor will you hesitate in believing that whoever is commander-in-chief will certainly insist, as it is his duty, on the King's letters patent under the Great Seal as a superior authority to any other command.
You, I am persuaded, will likewise consider how absolutely necessary rewards as well as punishments are to maintain authority in any government, that there is not an example in history of any well-constituted state even before Christianity that subsisted without them, that it would be subverting the fundamental principles of government to take away from the chief officiating magistrate the power of rewarding merit and would be leaving him a province rather like that of an executioner to inflict punishments than the representative of a good king to confer benefits, and in the present case it would be making a mere cipher of the lieut-governor and Council, who have the whole concerns of the colony under their care, to fill up places only provisionally and would open a gap for the most unworthy if they happen to have friends at home to look upon their superiors with disdain and bid them defiance. Besides, such provisional appointments to places will never conciliate men's affections to government; on the contrary, should they be disappointed, lasting seeds of rancour and resentment will increase and thrive from a jealousy that their cause was not heartily espoused. And I must add that if a lieut-governor consulting the Council has no right to put men into place he can have none to turn them out, and yet he is made answerable for the behaviour of the Naval Officers and liable by the Acts of Trade if they are not duly executed to forfeit 1000l and rendered incapable of serving the Crown.
If you will further consider the few places the government has to dispose of compared with the many granted by the Crown to the college and the secretary, the first by charter under the Great Seal for ever, the latter for life, insomuch that there has not been above five disposed of by the government during my time, it will appear there is little ground to deprive the person entrusted with the administration of the assistance he may want, from the friends of those few, to serve HM in the public emergencies, especially in the General Assemblies where more than ordinary address is required to soothe the passions and direct the minds of a multitude not easily prevailed on to give up their own private views and interests to the public utility. As you, therefore, was never informed to whom this power is committed, so securely lodged in the hands of the commander-in-chief in the country and the Council, and as it is impossible to carry on the King's business under the restriction mentioned by the Duke of Newcastle, I trust you, reflecting upon what I have laid before you, will not insist on having anything done so destructive to HM's service; for if that was not the consequence, and I have no other purpose nor interest in it, I should not offer one word against what has been moved for provided all other difficulties could be got over. I must beg you to show this letter to his grace, that if necessary it may be laid before HM. I have not imparted my letters to anybody because I am sensible they would give great uneasiness, particularly to the Council as it is striking at the root of the special privilege they have always enjoyed as already set forth, and in my apprehension no less than a revocation of letters patent and a repeal of our laws. And now, as I am not conscious of having done anything intentionally to disoblige you, I must entreat you to continue to honour me with a share in your favour which I shall endeavour to deserve by cheerfully obeying your commands. Signed. 6½ small pp. [CO 5/1337, ff 208–211d; copy at ff 212–215d]
364
September 4
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to Governor Alured Popple acknowleding letters of 27 September and 25 November 1738 and 10 May 1739. We have transmitted to Duke of Newcastle the address to HM referred to in your letter of 27 September, and as the matters therein contained are under HM's consideration your brother will give you an account of such measures as shall be taken for the security of the Bermuda islands with regard to warlike stores and the augmentation you propose of fifty men to your company. We have written to the Commissioners of the Customs for their advice with respect to the inconvenience you complain of in your letter of 25 November arising from your 73rd instruction directing you not to suffer vessels to load or unload anywhere but in Castle or St George's Harbour only; and as soon as we receive their answer we shall take the matter into consideration and give you our sentiments thereon. We thank you for the account you send us in your letter of 10 May of the state of the Council. We hope you will continue to inform us of the death or absence of any member of that board. We shall impatiently expect your answers to the queries relating to the state of your government, more especially at this time when the probability of a rupture with Spain makes it highly necessary for us to be thoroughly apprised of the true state of all HM's plantations in America. We have received the four Acts you mention and shall in due time consider the same with your remarks thereon. As to what you have done with regard to the French ship which was forced upon your islands, we approve of your conduct in the hospitality and assistance you showed to the poor sufferers, especially as you have taken care to prevent all unfair trading. The Bahama Act which you complain of we have now under our consideration and as soon as we have formed our judgment upon it you shall be apprised of what we have done in the matter. Entry. Signatories, M Bladen, J Brudenell, R Plumer. 3 pp. [CO 38/8, pp 306–309]
365
September 5
Whitehall
Same to Committee of Privy Council. The change in the 26th article of Governor Byng's instructions is to enable him to assent to an Act of the Assembly of Barbados, which must be passed at its first session after his arrival, to settle a salary upon him for the whole of his government additional to the 2000l sterling out of the 4½ per cent duty. Entry. Signatories, M Bladen, J Brudenell, R Plumer. 2¼pp. [CO 29/16, pp 199–201]
366
September 5
Whitehall
Same to Lieut-Governor William Gooch acknowledging letters of 7 November 1738, 15 and 22 February and 15 May 1739. In answer to your complaint of hostilities by the Six Nations upon the Cherokee and other Indians in friendship with the English, the governor of New York has ordered the commissioners for Indian affairs to make inquiry therein. We recommend you to keep the best terms you can with the Five Nations as their friendship is of great importance to the British interest and much courted by the French who are daily endeavouring to debauch them from us. Mr Fane has no objection in point of law to any of the Acts transmitted in yours of 22 February 1739: we shall let them lie by probationary for some time in order to see whether anything may arise that may make it necessary either to confirm or repeal them. The Commissioners of Customs here are of opinion your last Act for regulating the staple of tobacco was detrimental to the King's revenue; your agent will send you the papers. We have not yet considered the project for serving the French with 15000 hogsheads of tobacco yearly, nobody having attended the board upon that occasion either for or against the said project, but we are not without apprehensions that the same may not be strictly agreeable to the Acts of Trade and Navigation. The last box of papers received from you cost 11l 16s 1d in postal charge from an outport. Please direct the captain not to deliver packets until he anchors in the Thames. Entry. Signatories, M Bladen, J Brudenell, R Plumer. 3¼pp. [CO 5/1366, pp 322–325; draft in CO 5/1335, ff 177–178d]
367
September 5
Whitehall
Same to Col George Thomas acknowledging letter of 3 August 1738 which has been sent to Duke of Newcastle. You have behaved with great prudence. Entry. Signatories. M Bladen, J Brudenell, R Plumer. 1 p. [CO 5/1294, p 116]
368
September 5
Maj-Gen Richard Philipps to Duke of Newcastle enclosing short state of Nova Scotia and its defenceless condition. Signed. 1 small p. Enclosed:
368 i A state of the province of Nova Scotia by Maj-Gen Richard Philipps, governor. That it is situated between the province of New England and the French settlement in the island of Cape Breton and has the French settlement of Canada upon the back of it, between which and the other settlements on the River Mississippi there is a communication. That there is one regiment of foot in the said province consisting of 10 companies whereof 5 are quartered at Annapolis Royal, 4 at Canso, and 1 at Placentia in Newfoundland, each company consisting of 31 private men except the two youngest which are but 30 each, making in all only 300 men. That the inhabitants of this province are French papists who by the treaty of Utrecht were permitted to remain there and are in number no less than 1500 men able to bear arms, who in case of a rupture with France would be ready to join in any attempt that those of Cape Breton and Canada in conjunction with the Indians may make for the reduction of the province to the dominions of France. That there is no place in all the said province that can be called a fortification except a small fort at Annapolis Royal built of earth with four bastions faced with picquets to keep it together and surrounded with a small shallow dry ditch about six feet deep and is situated on the side of a river flowing from the Bay of Fundy about a mile over, which within forms a large basin of twenty miles circumference with a channel of depth sufficient to receive men-of-war from 20 to 50 guns within cable-length of the fort. Canso, which is distant from Annapolis Royal 130 leagues and is situated within two leagues of the island of Cape Breton possessed by the French and within 20 short leagues of Louisbourg, their main settlement on the said island where they have been for several years past fortifying the town and harbour at a vast expense. Their garrison consists of 6 companies of regular troops of 60 men in each and a company of Swiss of 120 men. There is besides another company at St Peter's about 4 leagues from Canso and another at the island of St John's 30 leagues north of this place, which they have lately taken possession of although properly belonging to the province of Nova Scotia.
That notwithstanding this dangerous situation of Canso there are neither fortifications nor forts belonging to it and the French of Cape Breton have all along looked upon this place with an envious eye, being most advantageously situated for carrying on the cod and whale fishery and of late years has made a considerable figure in these great branches of trade. That there are no barracks to lodge the four companies of the regiment nor storehouses to secure their provisions other than what has been slightly erected by the officers commanding there, for want whereof the soldiers have been reduced to the greatest extremity and several of them have actually perished. That this place, which is of so great importance to the crown of Great Britain and subjects, will inevitably fall into the hands of France upon a rupture if it be not strengthened by vessels of force, a good fortification with stores of war, and an additional number of men at least in proportion to the neighbouring French settlements; and if this should be reduced it will endanger the loss of the whole province of Nova Scotia and sensibly affect HM's other colonies in regard the inhabitants of many of them are concerned in carrying on the fishing trade as well as HM's subjects in England. That these aforesaid French settlements are full of people and will in case of a war be a great annoyance to the settlements in Nova Scotia as they can at pleasure send out privateers and intercept our supplies and destroy our fishing vessels. That the low establishment of this regiment, and even those divided as aforesaid, are scarce enough for common duty in time of peace but very insufficient for defence of these places in war, which being very well known to the neighbouring French may induce them to make one of their first enterprises upon this place whenever we have a rupture with them; and there is too much reason to fear they may succeed considering that the four companies at Canso are so entirely separate that those at Annapolis can scarce hear from them in a twelvemonth, there being no vessel whatever allowed for keeping up a necessary correspondence with them or any other part of the province. It is, therefore, finally submitted whether, in case of a rupture with France, it may not be advisable to augment the land forces now there and also to send a naval force thither as likewise to cause some fortifications to be erected and a proper supply of ordnance stores to be sent over. Signed. 2½pp. [CO 217/39, ff 204–207d; copy of enclosure, endorsed (1) Recd. June 1740 (2) Left at the office by Maj-Gen Philipps, in CO 217/8, ff 78–79d]
369
September 5
Virginia
Alexander Spotswood to Duke of Newcastle soliciting HM's leave to return home after ten years of service as deputy postmaster-general of British dominions in America. Passage requested for self and family in one of the Admiralty's station-ships. Signed. 1 small p. Endorsed, R, 16 November. [CO 5/1337, ff 216–217d]
370
September 5
Palace Court
Minutes of Trustees for Georgia. Sealed resolutions relating to grants and tenures of lands in Georgia. Sealed deed poll relating to forfeited lots. Ordered that 500 copies of the resolutions be printed. Entry. ¾ p. [CO 5/687, p 136; entry of resolutions and deed poll, dated 29 August, in CO 5/670, pp 414–419]
371
September 5
Georgia Office
Benjamin Martyn to Andrew Stone. The Trustees for Georgia, observing in the King of Spain's manifesto, p 19, the following paragraph, viz 'This contravention is not unlike that of Florida in 1735 when it was agreed that all things should remain in statu quo till the limits were regulated by the two governors. The English governor nevertheless went on in extending his plantations and committed several hostilities against the Spaniards and his Catholic Majesty's Indian vassals,' and supposing this must refer to the treaty which was settled between Col Oglethorpe and the governor of Augustine, they think it incumbent on them to desire you will lay before the Duke of Newcastle the errors which they find in that paragraph of the manifesto. In the first place no treaty was made there in 1735; it was in the month of October 1736, Col Oglethorpe not arriving in the colony till February 1736. In the second place there is no article in the treaty that all things should remain in statu quo; but it was agreed that the island of St George, which commanded the Spanish outguard, should be dispeopled and left unpossessed by the subjects of either nation as a barrier between them, and that as to what regarded the differences which were or might arise concerning the limits of the two respective governments and dominions of the two crowns, the said differences should not be touched upon but rather laid aside to be decided and determined till the two respective courts should resolve and determine them and that no hostilities should in the meantime be committed by either side. The Trustees conceive this article could be no restriction upon them from fortifying their settlements already made and they think it proper his grace should be acquainted that no plantations have been extended beyond the island which was dispeopled. Nor has Gen Oglethorpe committed any hostility against the Spaniards and his Catholic Majesty's Indian vassals, but on the contrary Col Oglethorpe has always taken the most effectual methods to prevent the free Indians as well as those which are subjects to HM offering any violence to the Spaniards or their Indians in revenge for injuries which they had received in the murder of several of their nations, and has kept boats at an expense to the Trust to hinder their passing over the river which is the boundary of the two provinces. Signed. 3 small pp. [CO 5/654, ff 221–222d; entry in CO 5/667, pp 279–280]
372
September 5
Fort Augusta
James Oglethorpe to Harman Verelst. I am just arrived at this place from the assembled estates of the Creek nation. They have very fully declared their rights to and possession of all the land as far as the River St Johns and their concessions of the seacoasts, islands and other lands to the Trustees, of which they have made a regular act. If I had not gone up the misunderstandings between them and the Carolina traders, fomented by our two neighbouring nations, would probably have occasioned their beginning a war which I believe might have been the result of this general meeting; but as their complaints were reasonable I gave them satisfaction in all of them and everything is entirely settled in place. It is impossible to describe the joy they expressed at my arrival: they met me forty miles in the woods and laid provisions on the roads in the woods. The express being just going to Charleston I can say no more but that I have had a burning fever of which I am perfectly well recovered. I hope the Trustees will accept of this as a letter to them. Signed. 1½small pp. Endorsed, Recd. 30 November 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 371–372d]
373
September 6
Kensington
Order of King in Council approving drafts of instructions to James Glen, governor of South Carolina, with some alterations proposed by Mr Glen and recommended by Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Copy, certified by W Sharpe. 3¼ pp. Endorsed, Recd. 22 September, Read 16 October 1740. Enclosed:
373 i Kensington, 7 September 1739. Draft instructions to James Glen. 88 pp. [Order in CO 5/368, ff 31–32d; instructions in CO 5/198, ff 52–97d]
374
September 6
Admiralty
Josiah Burchett to Thomas Hill enclosing copy of account received from Capt Warren of the weakness of the garrison at Canso and strength of the French at Cape Breton. Signed. ½ small p. Endorsed, Recd., Read 6 September 1739. Enclosed:
374 i HMS Squirrel, Boston, 9 July 1739. A state of the French fishery at Cape Breton by Capt P Warren.
The French have at present in the different parts of the Island Cape Breton 500 shallops who employ 5 men each, that is to say 3 in the shallop to catch the fish and 2 on shore to cure it. These shallops are about 7 or 8 tons and catch generally 300 quintals of fish in a season (which is from April to the latter end of September) of which the fishermen have one third and all things furnished them at the owner's expense, who draws the other two thirds for his outset in catching and his labour in curing the said fish, which is effected by often exposing it to the sun and sorting it for the different markets, each sort being kept in different piles and not weighed off till 20 September and then sold to the ships that come from France with stores and necessaries for carrying on the said fishery, and that at a price appointed by order of the government which is generally about 9s sterling a quintal. This fish is carried to the different parts of France, Spain, Portugal and Italy and there sold at a higher rate than the English fish by reason of the care that is taken in curing it and of the method they have in sorting and sizing it for the proper markets. This is the method of the summer fishery carried on by the inhabitants; now comes on that of the winter fishery. The summer season being over they contract with their men anew and allow them half what fish they catch and they find themselves provisions. The fishery begins about the middle of November and ends the beginning of February in which time they frequently catch 100 quintals a boat, which fish is ready to ship in the spring for France by which means they have the advantage of the English who make no winter fish there. There are at least 80 sail of ships in a year load with fish and trainoil proceeding therefrom of which number there are about 60 sail who come to purchase their load, which may be computed at 2000 quintals of fish one ship with another. The rest of the ships fit out from that part of France called St John de Loe and Bayonne to fish for themselves and proportion their number of men to the quantity the ship will carry, which they compute at 2 men to every 100 quintals of fish. These men have no wages out or home, are allowed by the owners nothing but bread and small beer and one pound of butter a day for ten men, and at their return to France they have two fifths of what fish they have caught amongst the master and crew and the owner of the ship has the remainder. Some of these ships' men fish in shallops but most in schooners from 20 to 40 tons who go to the Isle of Sable bank, Bank Quero, St Peter's Banks, and all the banks on the coast of Nova Scotia and catch their fish there and make good part of them in the English uninhabited ports on that coast. In 1720 the French fishery consisted at most of about 15 or 20 sail of ships, few shallops and no schooners but have gradually increased ever since. Besides these French ships that load for Europe there are yearly above 30 sail of large sloops, schooners and brigs load for the French settlements in the West Indies.
Sorts and sizes of fish for the different ports to which they are carried by the French:
Lisbonsmall white fishCadizlarger(?) fish of all sizes, one with another
MarseillesAlicante
LeghornSeville
Naples
Bordeauxlarge winter fishDunkirklarge black fish
NantesHavre
BayonneSt Malo
Bilbao and all Biscay
French West Indies mostly refuse [MS: refuge] fish.
As to the state of the garrison at Canso, if it can be called so, it is in a most miserable condition, not one gun mounted nor a barrack fit for a soldier to live in. There are now there four companies of 30 men: in my humble opinion, had we a rupture with France, it would not be supportable a week in its present condition. I am informed the French are very well fortified at Cape Breton and have never less than 1000 regular troops in garrison there.
The English fishery at Canso is much decayed in proportion to the improvement and increase of the French fishery within these ten years past, greatly occasioned by their fishery on those banks on our coast which are looked upon as the sole property of the crown of England and its subjects, and even making and curing their fish on the coast of Nova Scotia; which, if they could be prevented from doing, they must entirely give up that valuable branch of trade which employs great numbers of people as appears by the above state of the French fishery. I am also informed that the French have no fishing banks within their limits but such as are subject to inconveniences that would render it impracticable to carry on their fishery with any advantage. The form and situation of the islands of Canso seem calculated by nature for the use of the fishery and nothing else, for which reason a small fortification there for the protection of the fishery would be necessary; and as the barrenness of that soil and that adjacent renders it incapable of any other improvement, I apprehend a settlement made in one of the best ports on the south side of Nova Scotia, where the soil is good and proper for agriculture and as near Canso as such port may be found, would be of great advantage to the fishery. Port La Have and Shettbucter, the former about 40 leagues to the eastward [sic] of Canso, would be the properest place for such a settlement but especially Port La Have, the soil being better, though both fine harbours. In the present situation the French, by their missionaries and the presents the crown makes annually of powder and shot, and triannually a new gun to each Indian fit to bear arms, have so riveted them to their interest that they will not suffer an Englishman to settle or cure fish in any of the ports on the south side [of] Nova Scotia, in all which ports there are a few Indians, one of which has a commission from the governor of Canada or Cape Breton to command a particular district and generally bears the title of captain of the port to which they belong. These are such observations as I have been able to collect in obedience to their lordships' orders. Copy. 6 pp. [CO 217/8, ff 46–51d]
375
September 7
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to Governor Jonathan Belcher acknowledging letters of 29 August, 20 and 21 December 1738 and 23 January 1739. We have perused all those from you back to 28 December 1736, great part of which consists of reasoning against reports by this board to HM. Your answer of 11 May 1737 will lie by for your justification. One copy of the King's orders for running the boundaries between Massachusetts and New Hampshire was sent sealed to the governor of Massachusetts, another copy open to the commanderin-chief then residing in New Hampshire. Proceedings on this commission are now before HM. We have reported to HM on the paper currency. Your agent Mr Partridge is to have copies of all complaints and papers against you arising from the petition of John North and others resident in the eastern parts of Massachusetts. Letters to you will be delivered to your agent as desired. PS. Lieut-Governor Clarke reports that several of your colony have gone within sixteen miles of Hudson River with a surveyor to lay out lands without waiting for meeting of commission to determine boundary between New York and Massachusetts. We think this too hasty; take all possible care to prevent disputes. Entry. Signatories, M Bladen, J Brudenell, R Plumer. 5¼ pp. [CO 5/917, pp 284–289]
376
September 7
Whitehall
Same to Lieut-Governor George Clarke acknowledging letters of 18 and 24 April, 24 May and 15 June 1739. We doubt not but you will by your prudent conduct preserve the peace and tranquillity of the province, notwithstanding the printed libel which you sent us or any other writing of that kind which the discontented may publish in order to inflame the people; and we hope you will at your next meeting with the Assembly find them in such a temper as to be able to obtain from them a settled revenue, so absolutely necessary for the support of your government, taking particular care to get it done in such a manner as not to admit of any the least encroachment upon the prerogative of the Crown. We hope you have written to the commissioners for Indian affairs about the murders committed in Virginia and that you will bring the Six Indian Nations to settle a lasting peace with that colony and with all the Indians under the protection of HM and in friendship with his people. We have had under our consideration what you mention in your last of 24 May 1739 concerning the boundaries of your province; and as it is our opinion that the people of Massachusetts have been too hasty in this affair we have written to the governor to have it adjusted in an amicable way by commissioners, agreeable to his own proposals, and in the meantime to take care to prevent any inconveniences that might arise to either of the colonies by any disputes about it. We have laid your letter of 15 June before the Duke of Newcastle with the papers transmitted with it and hope you will soon have directions from him how to act upon that occasion. Entry. Signatories, M Bladen, James Brudenell, R Plumer. 2 pp. [CO 5/1126, pp 88–89]
377
September 7
Chelsea
Rev James Woodside to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Age and infirmity do not permit my waiting on you. I have sent you a letter of attorney signed by 207, some of whom I well know, having exercised my pastoral office among them for some time. My son, who was sent over express by the people with a long memorial, can and will give as much light in it as I possibly can, having been an eye-witness to Governor Belcher's demolition of Fort Mary, dismantling Fort Frederick and reduction of Fort George after I had most earnestly and previously dissuaded him, the said Belcher, in a letter to him to beware of demolishing, etc any of HM's forts at such a critical juncture. Your speedy determination of that affair will be acceptable service to God, may save lives of many, and engage the prayers of, Signed, James Woodside. 1 small p. Annotated, Should be September 6th. Endorsed, Recd., Read 6 September 1739. [CO 5/881, ff 145, 145d, 151, 151d]
378
September 10
Boston
Account of bills of Massachusetts issued and discharged from 1703 to 1739, received by the Treasurer of Massachusetts at several times of the committee appointed by the General Court. Sums issued, stated annually: 1703–1714, 194950l 13s; 1715–1729, 432055l 8s; 1738–1739, 191909l. Sums discharged and burnt, stated annually: 1707–1714, 68968l 2s 4d; 1715–1733, 224501l 14s 5d; 1738–1739, 127510l 9s 8d. With accounts of bills outstanding and remaining in the Treasurer's hands. Signed, John Wheelwright. 3 pp. Endorsed, Received from Mr Kilby. Recd., Read 18 March 1740. [CO 5/881, ff 243–244d]
379
September 10
Savannah
William Stephens to Harman Verelst. In my last of 26 July I acknowledged the receipt of yours of 27 April and 10 May with sundry other letters and papers as therein mentioned, which I sent by my son together with one to the Trustees and copy of my journal, etc as usual; and from the distance of time I might hope he is near the end of his voyage now unless he should be fallen into the Spaniard's hands and intercepted in his way, against whom when we least expected it we are newly informed open war is declared, which information is brought us by a sloop arrived here from Rhode Island 8th instant with some provisions for sale if we can find money to purchase them. The master of the sloop reported, and made affidavit to the truth of it, that the Tartar pink was sent express from the government to acquaint the northern provinces with it; that upon her arrival at Boston a messenger was sent overland to Connecticut, Rhode Island and New York with packets for the several governors of those places advising them thereof; that upon the governor of Rhode Island's opening his packet he went together with his Council into the balcony of a public house from whence his secretary read the contents to the people who were assembled by beat of drum, signifying that he was empowered to grant commissions to all people fitly qualified to set out privateers and to take, burn or destroy all the Spanish ships they could; that thereupon, within the few days he stayed, there were three sloops equipped and ready to sail as privateers with 80 good men on board and three or four more would soon be ready to follow; that the Tartar pink (he understood) was to sail immediately from Boston with the like intelligence from government to these provinces of Carolina and Georgia and he expected to have found her here. These matters [being] of such importance we dispatched immediately several expresses off to the general if he might be found, to the major at present commanding officer in the south, to the commander of the company at Port Royal, and to the lieut-governor of Carolina (doubting whether or not he might yet have had advice of it), to whom I severally wrote and enclosed copies of the foresaid affidavit. To which time my enclosed journal is carried on containing various matters of a different nature and was extended to a little longer time than usual in expectation of Capt Thomson's arrival here whom we looked for from what you wrote me in your last of 10 May, but these advices now informing us that the war broke out soon after we imagine to be the cause of his not putting to sea so soon. After what manner our correspondence hereafter must be carried on, we are to learn, a new scene commencing (as I reckon) from the close of my present journal. And as this province is now in an especial manner become a frontier against the enemy (for which our neighbours of Carolina ought to show a kinder regard to us) I doubt not but the Trustees will have that interest with the government as to secure the preservation of this colony, which I dare affirm from what I can observe the present inhabitants will do all that is in their power to contribute to. Could it have been foreseen what a sudden change has happened in regard to peace or war I am confident my son would not have turned his back and left us at such a juncture; and if I know him right I believe it will be far from being a cause of his not returning the sooner. He will now have the satisfaction to be informed by you in what manner his future subsistence is so kindly taken care of by the Trust, which you gave me the pleasure of writing me was intended and I am perfectly easy about, though by reason of no letters coming since I could not attain to the knowledge of it yet.
One thing I must observe with pleasure: that this examination has produced (I hope) a better understanding betwixt Mr Jones and me than at one time past I could promise myself, from whence generally has followed an unity in opinion, always to be wished for and at this juncture more especially, so necessary that I should stand self-condemned in suffering any private pique or resentment of mine to interfere in our carrying on the work required, neither will I doubt but his thoughts are the same; and allowing a little complacency to take place sometimes of the reverse, such a coincidence must ensue as will bring to effect what a dissension commonly forbids. It would be great vanity in me to affirm an equal knowledge with Mr Jones in these matters of accounts, which by long practice doubtless he is perfect in and very dexterous in tracing such dark affairs from their first source. What little help I can give is not nor shall be wanting. I cannot yet free my thoughts of some doubts whether or not we have done right in not strictly observing those orders Mr Parker and I received touching the receipts and issues of stores which I presumed to offer some reasons for our not intermeddling with in my former and which proceeded from no unwillingness but purely from a fear that it might produce some ill effects and be displeasing where I would by no means give offence, Mr Jones's present situation not seeming easily to admit of any control from us. I shall wait, therefore, in hopes of a safe guidance through these straits for I must wish always to be right.
I flattered myself that by this time I should have perfected divers lists I am preparing which may show the present state of the colony, but indeed my hands have been so full of late and now we are so daily exercised in despatches of another sort upon this alarm of war that I hope I shall be forgiven for delaying it till I get a few days more leisure. In the meanwhile I cannot be easy in deferring any longer to send what I do to my correspondent at Charleston where it must take its chance how long it will lay before a safe opportunity offers of proceeding for England. Signed.
PS. A trading boat from New Windsor bound for Charleston is arrived here and reports that the general in his travels, finding himself not well, was returning this way being come within forty miles of Augusta where it might be expected he would be soon; but how far the patroon of this boat may be credited I cannot say. Surely every good man wishes to see him well here and most people think this report is without sufficient grounds. You may possibly remember that when I left England there was one Wolly, a young man whose friends you knew, came a passenger with me as far as Charleston where (I wrote) he was soon seduced and would proceed no farther this way. It seems some friends of his sent a small cask after him, directed hither where it has lain in the stores I know not how long, no person inquiring after it: wherefore it was thought proper to open it lately when Messrs Parker, Jones and I were together, and the enclosed paper shows the contents. If you will give yourself the trouble to let his friends know what we found it will be delivered to your order. Bad paper and a heavy hand seldom do well together; the stationer certainly cannot call it good as I acquainted you more than a year since. It is now near an end and we know not how to come at any good unless you will furnish the Trust's secretary with a ream of good foolscap in folio and ditto of post in ditto. 2 pp. Addressed. Endorsed, Recd. 30 November 1739. [CO 5/640, ff 373–374d]
380
September 11
Charleston
Fragment of letter without signature or addressee. We have just now received advice that Gen Oglethorpe arrived at Fort Augusta in Georgia on 5th inst on his return from the Cowetas which is the chief town of the Creek Indians about 400 miles within land from this place. At the Cowetas on 11 August 1739 was held a general meeting of the estates of the Creek nation and the micos or kings, chief men, and deputies from all the towns of that nation were assembled there. This meeting of the Creek Indians continued till 21 August 1739 and gave strong assurances of fidelity to HM and proposed several regulations for maintaining the peace of the country to which the general agreed. He and the gentlemen that accompanied him endured much hardship in their march, being obliged to pass through great woods where for 240 miles there was neither house nor inhabitants of any kind and were forced to swim their horses over several large rivers. The Indians received his excellency with the greatest respect and friendship and entertained him and his men with plenty of fowl, beef, pork, venison, melons and other fruit. The general was ill with a burning fever in the Indian town but is perfectly recovered. 1¼ small pp. [CO 5/640, ff 376–377d]
381
September 12
Whitehall
Commissioners for Trade and Plantations to Governor Gabriel Johnston acknowledging letters of 15 January and 13 June 1738 and 10 April 1739. HM has approved of recommendation of Mr Murray to be Councillor. As to the dispute you mention relating to boundary with South Carolina we have only to answer that as yet no application has been made to us from South Carolina but whenever there should be we shall take the same under our consideration and you shall be acquainted with what is done in it. We are glad to hear the Assembly have passed so many good laws and so soon as we shall receive them we shall take them into consideration. In the meantime we congratulate you upon the good harmony that is at length established betwixt you and the people under your government and hope for the continuance of it to your mutual satifaction. We enclose to you the opinion of the Attorney-and Solicitor-General relating to staple commodities rated and we hope the affair of the blank patents will soon be put into such a method as to make all parties easy. Entry. Signatories, M Bladen, J Brudenell, R Plumer. 2 pp. [CO 5/323, pp 266–267]
382
September 12
Whitehall
Same to President William Bull acknowledging letters of 20 April and 20 July 1738 as likewise representation [of 25 May 1738] setting forth HM's right to Carolina with depositions and other papers in support thereof. Copy of letter of 20 April was sent to Duke of Newcastle in order that proper measures might be taken for the defence and security of that part of HM's dominions. We reported on 25 July 1738 to the Committee of Council that the importance of the province and the posture of affairs in America are such that, though we were not capable of determining what quantities and species of stores were requisite for that service, we were however of opinion that HM might grant such supplies as he should think convenient. We likewise on 27th of same month recommended your representation abovementioned with the other papers on the same subject to Duke of Newcastle as matters of great moment to HM's service as we have also done with respect to what you wrote to us in yours of 20 July 1738 concerning the Choctaw Indians, which is all we have to say at present on those subjects. Entry. Signatories, M Bladen, J Brudenell, R Plumer. 1½ pp. [CO 5/402, pp 13–14]
383
September 14
Georgia Office
Harman Verelst to James Oglethorpe, by King George, Capt Jacob Ayres consigned to William Hopton in Charleston. Your letter of 15 June last to the Trustees' accountant containing a matter of great importance to the public, the Trustees ordered a copy of part thereof (as far as your mentioning your being obliged to buy horses and presents to carry up to the meeting of the Indian nations) to be sent to the Duke of Newcastle with a memorial from the Trustees on your behalf concerning the expenses which may attend that service on this extraordinary occasion for the security of the colony, which is no way provided for by any money granted for the Trust. Copy herewith sent. By which memorial the Trustees hope you will have a proper claim laid to entitle you to apply to the administration for the payment of these expenses or any other you may have defrayed or should have occasion to defray for the security and defence of the colony as necessary services incurred and not provided for by Parliament. And the accounts thereof, when sent over by you, will enable such person as you shall appoint to apply for the reimbursing you such expense as abovementioned since the Trustees have it not in their power to do so with any money they are accountable to the public for.
The Trustees having at their last general meeting resolved to extend their grants to their present tenants in tail male, the Common Council have with great deliberation and in consequence of many full meetings at last resolved to preserve their tenures in tail male but to extend their grants under the same rents, reservations, provisos and conditions as in their original grants are contained, save and except so much thereof as is now allowed in case of failure of issue male, which resolutions were agreed to on 28th of last month and also a deed poll relating to forfeited lots. Copies herewith sent; and these resolutions will be printed for the use of the inhabitants in Georgia. The Trustees having been informed that Caleb Davis had an order from the governor of St Augustine for 400 arms and for ammunition and that he had promised to supply the Spaniards with them, you are hereby acquainted thereof that the same may be inquired into and guarded against and more especially in the present situation of affairs. The Trustees have herewith sent you a book containing a compendious account of silkworms and have sent five more of them to Mr Stephens for the use of such persons in both parts of the province who are most desirous to promote that so much wanted and beneficial produce. Your letter of 28 May last was received 10th inst and read 12th but the particular accounts you mention to be sent by way of Carolina are not yet received although your letter of 15 June beforementioned was received 20th of last month; and the Trustees are sorry for your rheumatic pain occasioned by your fatigues but hope it is gone off again. Entry. 1½ pp. [CO 5/667, pp 280–281]
384
September 14
Georgia Office
Harman Verelst to William Stephens. The Trustees since their letter to you dated 10th of last month have received your letters dated 19 May and 22 June with your journals from April before. They are concerned to find Mr Jones's behaviour so dissatisfying to the people and therefore so ungrateful to you, and that your son has had the least reason of uneasiness which the Trustees apprehend him in no manner deserving of. They have wrote to Mr Jones of what is expected of him and have herewith sent you a copy of that letter; and Mr Hawkins being to correspond with you from the southern part of the province they have wrote to him also and sent you a copy thereof: the occasion of which letters is that it may be known what great dependence the Trustees have on you and how much they regard you. When your son arrives the Trustees hope his health will soon be re-established and that he will hasten his return to you to be assistant to and entrusted in their service by you, whose example they would have him imitate. The resolution of the Common Council relating to the grants and tenure of lands in Georgia passed the seal 28th of last month and are now printing for the use of the inhabitants, and the original and printed copies thereof will be sent you together by the America, Capt Gerald; as also a proper notice to be given in America by affixing one in each respective town-court in Georgia and publishing it in the South Carolina Gazette, which the Trustees will employ William Hopton at Charleston to do, to whose care on your character of him in your journal the Trustees' letters and parcels for the future will be consigned. The Trustees have herewith sent you a book containing a compendious account of silkworms and have sent another to Gen Oglethorpe, as also four more of them to you for the use of such persons in both parts of the province who are most desirous to promote that so much wanted and beneficial produce, to be lent them for making a good use thereof. And the Trustees desire to know how Abraham de Lyon goes on with his vineyards.
The Trustees have wrote to Mr Jones about Mr Causton's and Mr Bradley's accounts and they desire that Mr Bradley should be called upon to give security for his remaining in Georgia until his accounts are made up, for which purpose Mr Christie has been wrote to. And the Trustees desire a return to their commission for examining and stating the public debts particularly mentioned therein, that they may know the true amount of the said debts and thereby be enabled to deliver their account to Parliament, which commission if not fully executed must be perfected with all possible expedition, the Parliament being expected to meet before Christmas. The Trustees desire you will let them know the present state of the province with respect to its inhabitants and defence, and also desire to have a report concerning the land of the several lots set out at Highgate which you and Mr Henry Parker were directed to view by the Trustees' letter of 12 June 1738. And as Mr Hugh Anderson has wrote very largely to the Earl of Egmont, which has been communicated to the Trustees, they have herewith sent you a copy thereof and desire you will make your observations on those parts which relate to the lands with regard to their different soils and communicate the same to the Trustees, together with your informing them if from observation any person's lot already set out does not contain sufficient good land to maintain with industry their family and livestock. They also desire to know of what nature the 300 acres of land is which is set out for the religious uses of the colony in the northern and southern parts thereof, and what progress has been made in the cultivation of those 300-acre lots, and also if any and what progress has been made towards building a church and to have a model or description of such intended building. The Trustees desire you will inform yourself and let them know whether any and what money has been received, and by whom, for the granting of licences to traders with the Indians and in what manner the same has been accounted for. Entry. NB. Capt Gerald has sold his ship to the government for a fireship and Capt Summerset will be the next that sails. 2 pp. [CO 5/667, pp 282–283]
385
September 14
Georgia Office
Harman Verelst to Thomas Jones. The Trustees have reconsidered their orders in letters of 3 March and 14 July concerning issue of sola bills and accounting for the produce of the beer sent to Georgia. They now require that those services should be performed by William Stephens, Thomas Christie and yourself, by all three when possible, if not by any two. No one of the three alone has any power, without the concurrence of one other, to apply the produce of the beer or issue the sola bills; accounts received or bills issued by one only will not be accepted. The Trustees, having appointed you third bailiff of Savannah, hope that you will carefully execute that office and as much as in you lies encourage the other magistrates to act in conjunction with you by an affable and courteous behaviour, which is the most proper endearment for producing the respect due to such office. The Trustees also further recommend to your conduct that on all occasions you apply to and consult with William Stephens, the nature of whose employment is of that great trust and general extent that it requires that every magistrate and other officer in every part of the province should without reserve acquaint him with and consult him in all matters of importance, that he may be enabled to give the Trustees such a minute account from time to time of the state of the province which they expect from him. The Trustees desire you will hasten the finishing the accounts of Thomas Causton and William Bradley with the Trust in case they are not already done, and they have wrote to Mr Christie to call upon Bradley to give security not to depart the province of Georgia until his accounts are made up. They have also wrote to Mr Stephens to hasten the finishing their commission for examining and stating the public debts in Georgia to enable the Trustees to exhibit their account to Parliament, and you being in the commission the Trustees require your assistance therein if not already perfected. Entry. 1½pp. [CO 5/667, pp 284–285]
386
September 14
Georgia Office
Same to Thomas Hawkins. The Trustees have allowed you 10l a year for corresponding with William Stephens concerning occurrences in the southern part of the province. Every magistrate and officer is required to acquaint him of and consult in matters of importance so that he may inform the Trustees. Entry. ½p [CO 5/667, p 285]
387
September 14
Georgia Office
Same to William Hopton. The Trustees have consigned to you a packet and box to be forwarded to Gen Oglethorpe in Georgia and intend to do the same in future. Mr Stephens will defray expenses. PS. Please deliver letters for Charleston. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 286]
388
September 14
Georgia Office
Same to Thomas Christie directing that the best possible security be given by William Bradley not to depart Georgia until his account be made up. The Trustees require your assistance in completing the commission for examining and stating the public debts in Georgia. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 286]
389
September 18
[Charleston]
[James Abercromby] to Harman Verelst. The packets which Capt Townsend brought I received the 15th at night and next morning sent them by a safe hand to Mr Stephens as directed. The general was then at Augusta about 100 miles from Savannah waiting some headmen of the Cherokees to have a talk with, as by his letter to Col Bull he informs him, as also that he had been ill of a fever amongst the Creeks but then recovered. As Col Bull was then sending an express to the general to make known HM's commands to him I begged him to let the general know that Col Stephens had received a packet directed for him, that he might lose no time in getting it. Unsigned. 1 small p. [CO 5/640, ff 378–379d]
390
September 20
Jamaica
Governor Edward Trelawny to Duke of Newcastle. Capt Stapylton in HMS Sheerness having appeared off Cartagena with French colours to take a view of the Spanish ships there, Don Blas de Lezo sent his officer de ordines to go on board the Sheerness, taking her to have been dispatched by the Consulado with packets on the King of Spain's service. The officer accordingly went on board and Capt Stapylton has brought him with the boat and nineteen men to this island. Herewith I send another copy of the list of Spanish ships of war in the West Indies, which with the advice from Havana of 22 June I believe still holds pretty exact. As St Jago de la Vega, the capital town of this island where all the records are kept, stands very much exposed in an open savannah, and as the pieces of ordnance that were granted long since for its defence are now altogether unserviceable, I must beg that you will be pleased to represent to HM the great want we are in of six field-pieces for the defence of the town in time of war, it being not above three hours march from several places an enemy may easily land at. Signed. PS. Herewith I send you a letter from Commodore Brown. 2 pp. Endorsed, R, 26 November. Enclosed:
390 i List of Spanish ships of war in West Indies, April 1739. Copy of no 141i. PS. By advice from Havana, dated 22 June, Admiral Pisarro sailed that day for Cadiz. 1½ pp. [CO 137/56, ff 247–250d]
391
September 20
Jamaica
Same to same. I having summoned a council of war the 5th of this month to consider what steps were the most proper to be taken to put this island in a posture of defence, the following resolution was taken. 'Resolved, that it is the opinion of the council of war that martial law commence and be established on 29 September and not sooner, to the intent the quarter-taxes which will become due on the 28th may be collected and the business of the grand court not impeded, unless HE shall find an apparent necessity for establishing it before that day. And it is also the opinion of the council that martial law shall not continue and be in force longer than for three months unless HE shall judge it necessary from the circumstances of the public affairs to continue it longer than three months as aforesaid.' It shall be my particular care not to harass the people of the island during martial law or to let it last longer than the utmost necessity requires. I hope six weeks or a month will be sufficient. Signed. 1½ pp. Endorsed, R, 26 November. [CO 137/56, ff 251–252d]
392
September 22
Jamaica
Same to same. There being several Spaniards already taken by the men-of-war, who not being able to keep them on board send them ashore, whereupon I am forced to order them into jails to be subsisted at the country expense. The people here are very uneasy at it; and by what I can judge of their temper the Assembly will not make any provision for the subsistence of prisoners taken by the men-of-war. I desire you will let me know what shall be done with the prisoners of war and whether they should not be subsisted out of the value of the prizes till HM's pleasure be known in relation to them. Signed. 1 p. Endorsed, R, 26 November. [CO 137/56, ff 253–254d]
393
September 22
Jamaica
Same to Andrew Stone. Pleased am I indeed with the Duke of Newcastle's private letter and have returned my thanks for it in the enclosed [above, no 314] which as it contains nothing but my thanks I thought better to put under your cover than to mix it with the letters of business. I sent Mr Manning Mr Delafaye's letter. I have been so taken up since the arrival of the Shoreham man-of-war that I have not talked with Mr Manning about that affair but I wrote to him today to know how the case stands between Mr Delafaye and him and hope to send an answer by Capt Herman who sails three days after the fleet which sails tomorrow. By Capt Herman I shall send duplicates of the letters I now send to the Duke. The council of war has advised me to proclaim martial law. I took care not to recommend it because I know what clamours the lawyers make, who are the only people really hurt by it, and the handle some factors here make of it not to send remittances home occasions the merchants at home to grumble at it. But there was absolutely a necessity for it in order to raise little batteries on the seacoast and to place guards there which by law cannot be done. It is plain that the Spaniards at Cartagena and on the coast did not know of the rupture about a fortnight ago when Capt Stapylton who went to look into the condition of the port took Don Blas de Leso's officer de ordines (he calls himself major-general of the galleons) who came in his boat about five leagues off for the Admiral's letters, so that the commodore has had a fine time to act in by the early advice our ministry has taken care to give. Signed. PS. The treasure from Peru arrived at Panama 31 July (NS). 2¼ pp. Endorsed, Duplicate. [CO 137/56, ff 255–256d]
394
September 28
Kensington
Warrant to Duke of Argyll, Master General of Ordnance, for delivery to James Oglethorpe of the following for the defence of South Carolina and Georgia: howitzers or 8" mortars, 2; fixed shells for same, 400; spare fuzes for same, 100; spades, 1000; shovels, 1000; pickaxes, 100; hand-hatchets, 500; hand bills, 500; felling axes, 20; muskets with bayonets and cartouche boxes, 1000; musket shot, 30 cwt; match, 10 cwt; sandbags, 10000; fixed coehorn shells, 2000; gunpowder, 600 barrels. Signed, George R. Countersigned, Holles Newcastle. 1½ pp. [CO 5/384, ff 59–60d]
395
September 28
Whitehall
Duke of Newcastle to Governor Edward Trelawny acknowledging letter of 30 June. HM was extremely pleased to see the good success of your endeavours for the reduction of the rebellious Negroes. HM has under consideration what you mention with regard to the number of the forces now at Jamaica, and you may be assured that all possible care will be taken for the safety and defence of the island. You will have received long before this time HM's orders authorizing you to grant letters of marque and reprisal against the ships and effects of the Spanish subjects, and I doubt not but you will have encouraged the people under your government to take out letters of marque and reprisal and to make use of this opportunity to revenge the insults which HM's subjects in America have received from the Spaniards. And as it has been represented as a very particular thing to make descents upon some of the Spanish settlements in America, and as the persons to whom letters of marque and reprisal are granted are (it is presumed) by virtue of them authorized to make such descents as well as to take any Spanish vessels at sea, you will I am persuaded do all in your power to encourage the inhabitants of Jamaica to undertake such enterprises which cannot fail greatly to annoy the Spaniards and will probably be attended with great benefit to the adventurers. Draft. 2 pp. [CO 137/56, ff 238–239d]
396
September 28
London
John Thomlinson to Commissioners for Trade and Plantations. Enclosed papers arrived today. Signed. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd. 1 October, Read 16 October 1739. Enclosed:
396 i Stratham, New Hampshire, 18 July 1739. Address of inhabitants to selectmen of Stratham, requesting town-meeting to consider a petition for annexation of New Hampshire to Massachusetts. Copy, certified by David Robinson, townclerk. Signatories, Nathan Taylor and 67 others. 1 p.
396 ii Stratham, 21 July 1739. Summons by selectmen to town-meeting on Tuesday next. Copy, certified as no 396i. Signatories, Andrew Wiggin and three others. ½ p.
396 iii Stratham, 24 July 1739. Proceedings of town-meeting, Capt William Moore moderator. Resolution passed by a great majority protesting at every clause in a petition lately handed about. Copy, certified as no 396i. ¾ p.
396 iv Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 23 July 1739. Proceedings of townmeeting. Resolution protesting at a petition for New Hampshire to be annexed to Massachusetts, which has been privately handed about. Copy, certified by Joshua Peirce, town-clerk, 1 p. [CO 5/881, ff 146–150d]
397
September 28
Georgia Office
Harman Verelst to James Oglethorpe by St George, Capt Wright, sending copy of letter of 14th inst. The Trustees by accident hearing of Mr Revell's ship bound for Georgia with provisions for your regiment embraced that opportunity of sending by land to Portsmouth the presents they estimated for the Indians to be distributed the ensuing year, there being no likelihood in the present posture of affairs of another ship to send them by. Invoice sent herewith. Besides these presents, there are two casks of shoes sent as a remittance for part of the estimated expenses of the colony from Michaelmas next which William Stephens, Thomas Christie and Thomas Jones, or any two of them, are to defray and to send their accounts thereof to the Trustees; and in boxes to Mr Hawkins and Mr Stephens the original and printed copies of the resolutions relating to the grants and tenure of lands in Georgia are sent, the printed copies being 200 in each box, for the use of the inhabitants, and notices are to be affixed in each town-court for persons to claim the benefit intended them which Mr Stephens and Mr Hawkins are wrote to about. Entry. ¾ p. [CO 5/667, p 287]
398
September 28
Georgia Office
Same to William Stephens sending copy of letter of 14th inst. Copies of resolutions concerning grants and tenure of lands in Georgia sent for use of inhabitants of northern part. Invoice enclosed, also deed poll relating to forfeited lands and notice to be fixed in town-court, with copy for South Carolina Gazette to be sent to Mr Hopton at Charleston. PS. Richard Lobb has entered his claim at the Trustees' office to his lot at Savannah and the Trustees desire to know if he has performed the conditions of his first grant, and if not wherein he has been deficient. Entry. ¾ p. Enclosed:
398 i Invoice of Indian presents and shoes consigned for Georgia on St George, Capt Joseph Wright. 1¾ pp. [CO 5/667, pp 288–290]
399
September 28
Georgia Office
Same to Thomas Hawkins sending letter and box to be forwarded to William Stephens, copies of resolutions concerning grants and tenure of lands, notice of same for town-court of Frederica, and the daily advertisements from 16 July to 28 September 1739 for the use of Gen Oglethorpe and proper persons in the province. Entry. ½ p. [CO 5/667, p 290]
400
[September 28]
Account of stores sent to Bermuda by the Ordnance in 1689, 1692, 1701 and 1738. ½ p. Endorsed, Recd. 28 September, Read 15 November 1739. [CO 37/13, ff 125, 125d, 132, 132d]