House of Lords Journal Volume 13
12 November 1678

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History of Parliament Trust

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 13: 12 November 1678', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 13: 1675-1681 (1767-1830), pp. 350-355. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=11600 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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DIE Martis, 12 die Novembris.

REX.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

His Royal Highness the Duke of Yorke.
Epus. London.
Epus. Durham.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Rochester.
Epus. Ely.
Epus. Bath & Wells.
Epus. Oxon.
Epus. Exon.
Epus. St. David's.
Dux Cumberland.
Ds. Cancellarius.
Ds. Custos Privati Sigilli.
Dux Norff.
Dux Bucks.
Dux Albemarle.
Dux Monmouth.
Marq. Winton.
Marq. Worcester.
Marq. Darchester.
L. Great Chamberlain.
L. Chamberlain.
Comes Kent.
Comes Huntingdon.
Comes Bedford.
Comes Suff.
Comes Salisbury.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Westmerland.
Comes Manchester.
Comes Berks.
Comes Mulgrave.
Comes Rivers.
Comes (fn. *) Peterborough.
Comes Thannet.
Comes Strafford.
Comes Sunderland.
Comes Scarsdale.
Comes St. Alban.
Comes Clarendon.
Comes Essex.
Comes Cardigan.
Comes Bath.
Comes Craven.
Comes Aylesbury.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Guilford.
Comes Feversham.
Vicecomes Halyfax.
Vicecomes Newport.
Ds. Mowbray.
Ds. Awdley.
Ds. Berkeley.
Ds. Ferrers.
Ds. De Grey.
Ds. Stourton.
Ds. Eure.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. North & Grey.
Ds. Hunsdon.
Ds. Tenham.
Ds. Brooke.
Ds. Grey de Wark.
Ds. Lovelace.
Ds. Maynard.
Ds. Howard Esc.
Ds. Byron.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Carington.
Ds. Lucas.
Ds. Gerard Brand.
Ds. Wotton.
Ds. Cornwallis.
Ds. Freschevile.
Ds. Arundell T.
Ds. Butler M. Park.

PRAYERS.

Report concerning the Examination of Bedloe.

The Lord Marquis of Winchester reported, "That the Committee appointed to take Examinations for the Discovery of the Murder of Sir Edmond Bury Godfrey have spent many Days therein; and do present the House Two Examinations of Mr. William Bedloe, and some Examinations of several other Persons."

His Lordship said, "That the Lords Committees did conjure William Bedloe to speak nothing but Truth. And he did, in the Presence of God, as he should answer it at the Day of Judgement, assure all to be true he had deposed.

"The Lords caused him, after he had distinctly read every Sheet, to set his Hand to each Sheet.

"And the Lords are of Opinion, That he hath been very careful and exact in his Testimony, in not accusing any one further than he had perfect Memory of, and of what he knows of his Knowledge, or from the Mouths of others.

"The Lords have many other Examinations concerning the Death of Sir Edmund Godfrey, not yet perfected; and therefore they think fit yet to keep them private; when perfected, will make Report of them to your Lordships.

"This Report only relates to William Bedloe's Testimony, and some others I have taken upon Oath as a Justice of Peace to confirm his Testimony.

"Mr. William Bedloe faith, He hath sent for a Person to Town; who, when he comes, will be able to give an Account of the Truth of several Particulars which he hath sworn to."

Then the Examinations, taken November 8th, 1678, at the Committee of Lords for enquiring into the Murder of Sir Edmund Bury Godfrey, were read, as followeth:

Bedloe's Examination concerning the Murder of Sir Edm. Godfrey.

"William Bedloe, being sworn in the Lords House, was called in, and examined; faith, on his Oath, That this Examinant, being treated with by Mr. Lee Phaire and Mr. Walsh, who are Two Jesuits, about the Beginning of October last, they offered him a Reward of Four Thousand Pounds, if he would be One of the Four or Six that should kill a Man that was a great Obstacle of their Design. He, this Deponent, promised to be One to do it, upon their giving him Notice. Afterwards (videlicet, the Friday before Sir Edmund Godfrey was missing) Mr. Lee Phaire met him this Deponent, about Four of the Clock, in Grayes Inne Walks, and appointed to meet him again in the same Place about Four of the Clock the next Day to do that Business; that, upon taking the Sacrament to do it, he this Deponent should have the Money paid, to himself or to any Friend he should name. But he this Deponent, not liking the Design, failed of meeting of him. The next Night after, being Sunday, he met Mr. Lee Phaire again, by Accident, in Fleete-Streete, going into Red Lyon-Court, about Five of the Clock. Mr. Lee Phaire then desired him, "not to fail of meeting him the next Night (being Monday), about the same Hour, at The Palsgrave's Head Taverne, that he might employ this Deponent in some other special Business." But this Deponent came (fn. *) rarer than the Time appointed, and so failed to meet him there; but left Word, at the Bar of that Tavern, "that he would meet him at Eight of the Clock, in the Cloister of Somerset House Court;" and accordingly, betwixt Eight and Nine of the Clock, this Deponent came thither, and found Lee Phaire walking there, who said, "He had staid almost an Hour for him." They passed the Time there about Half an Hour; Lee Phaire telling him how much the Church of Rome and the Pope were obliged to him, and what Rewards he should have for his Secrecy and Fidelity to them.

"Afterwards he desired him, this Deponent, to walk into the Midst of the Court, where he the said Lee Phaire might say something to this Deponent, and nobody over-hear it; and there he told this Deponent, "That the Person who he was to kill was killed, and his Body then lay in Somersett House; and that he did believe that the Excuse which this Deponent had made him before, for not coming to the Murdering of him, was real; and that he knew his Fidelity was such, that he should have Half the Reward, if he would help to carry the Body to a Place where they had chose to lay him."

"This Deponent asked to know, First, "Who were to be the Persons that were to go with him?" Lee Phaire told him, "They were himself, Mr. Walsh the Lord Bellasis' Gentleman, Mr. Atkins (Pepis' Clerk), and One that he hath often seen in the Queen's Chapel, and did believe to be One that belonged to the Chapel." Then Lee Phaire brought this Deponent by the Hand, in the Dark, through the Entry, into that Room which he shewed the Duke of Monmouth, and knocked softly with his Finger at the Door; and when it was opened, Lee Phaire led this Deponent into it, which was dark. Lee Phaire then pulled a dark Lanthorn from under his Coat, and shewed a small Light in the Room, where this Deponent saw the Persons he before named; of whom this Deponent knew Lee Phaire, Mr. Walsh, and the other Person he saw often in the Chapel; and the other Two owned themselves, the one to be the Lord Bellasis' Servant, and the other to be Mr. Atkins (Pepis' Clerk).

And this Deponent saith, That they did agree to carry the Body in a Chair to the Corner of Clarendon House, and there to put him in a Coach, to carry him to the Place where he was found. Having concluded this, they agreed to carry him off at Eleven of the Clock the same Night. Then, some of them turning about, they throwed off a Cloak that lay upon him, and shewed this Deponent the Body. This Deponent asked them, "Who it was?" They told him, "It was an old Man, that belonged to a Person of Quality who had taken some Examinations tending to the Discovery of their Design." This Deponent asked them further, "Why it was not more proper to kill the Person of Quality himself?" They answered, "No; for this Man had the Examinations in his own Custody; and that their Design of getting him thither was, to get him to send for them by fair Means or foul; and then they did not question but the next Examination would be so contrary to that, that it should appear upon their Trials Two several Stories; and when they should be brought to Trial upon the latter Examination, they would produce the former, to contradict it, that it might seem Partiality to the World." Upon which Reasons, this Deponent seemed satisfied, and asked them, "Where they killed him?" They told him, "At Somersett House."

"Then this Deponent begged their Pardon for Half an Hour, and he would wait upon them again. But this Deponent went away, and came no more. But the next Day, about Eleven of the Clock, this Deponent met Lee Phaire, by Accident, crossing Lincolns Inne Feilds; and then they went together unto The Greyhound Taverne in Fleete Streete. Lee Phaire (putting his Cane up to his Nose) said, "He had something to say to him." Lee Phaire there charged this Deponent, for not coming the last Night according to his Promise. This Deponent told him, "He was unwilling to come, because he knew the Person." Lee Phaire asked him then, "Who it was?" This Deponent told him, "It was Justice Godfrey." Lee Phaire then acknowledged it was so; and he was willing to dispense with this Deponent's not coming, if he would assure him of his Fidelity.

"This Deponent then asked Lee Phaire, "How they got him thither, and where they found him?" Lee Phaire told him, "That himself, Walsh, and the Lord Bellasis' Gentleman, met him by The King's Head Inne in The Strand, crossing the Street, in the Evening, before Five of the Clock; and told him, "That if he would please to go with them so far as Strand Bridge, they would bring him to a Place near St. Clement's Church, where there were a Company met, principal Plotters of that Design against the King; and there (if he would go presently) he might take them and the principal of their Papers." He answered, "That he thought it not convenient to go himself; but he would send his Warrant, and the Constable." They told him, "If he did make so much Delay, they might be gone; and that, if he would walk up so far as Strand Bridge, One of them would go and call a Constable to him there; and he might give his Order presently." Whereupon he walked with them so far as Somersett House; and there they made a Halt. They told him, "It would be less observed, if he walked in Somerset House, than to stand in the Street." And thereupon Two of them walked in with him, and the other pretended to go call a Constable; and when they had walked a Turn or Two in the Court, Two more Persons came forth, and shoved him into a Room; and when they had him secure there, they held a Pistol to him, threatening, "if he made a Noise, they would shoot him; but, if he would answer their Expectations, they would do him no Harm." Then they asked him, "To send for those Examinations he had taken, about those that were committed." He answered, "They were not in his Power; for he had sent them to Whitehall." Upon that, and his refusing to answer other Questions, they seized him, and stifled him with a Pillow; and so they thought he had been dead: But, coming into the Room some Time after, they found him struggling, and then they strangled him with a long Cravat" (which Cravat this Deponent saw the Monday at Night about his Neck). Then this Deponent asked Lee Phaire, "Why they carried him into the Fields, or what they designed by it?" He answered, "That they had made a Wound in his Body, and laid his Sword by him, that it should seem he had killed himself; and that they did not question that the Discovery of killing him would ever have been made; neither did they doubt but that their Design would have its Effect." Then Lee Phaire told this Deponent, "That, as he would be answerable to Christ Jesus at the last Day, he should be faithful to the Cause:" And so they parted."

"The same Time Mr. Atkins being called in before Mr. Bedloe, Mr. Bedloe saith, "That he is in all Things very like the Person he saw in the Room with Sir Edmond Bury Godfrey's dead Body; and he doth verily believe it was him that owned himself to be Pepis' Clerk: But, because he never saw him before that Time, he cannot positively swear it; but he doth verily believe him to be that Man."

"The further Examination of William Bedloe, being sworn at the Lords Bar.

Bedlce's further Examination, concerning the Plot.

"The Lady Abbess of the English Nuns in Dunkirke sent me to St. Omers, with a Letter to Sir John Warner and the other Jesuits; which Letter I opened, and found in it I was recommended (a Man wholly fit to be employed in the Design). Then those Jesuits sent me to Antwerpe, to Father Worsley, to be informed by Degrees of the Part I was to have in it. When he had, as he thought, confirmed me to Secrecy, he sent me to Doway, with a Letter in a Language I did not know, where the Monks, after several Ways sifting me, declared to me, "That now was a Design in Hand, to make England happy, both to Body and Soul; and that, being just to the Cause, I should not only enjoy infallibly Heaven, but raise myself and my Family to a Fortune equal to what I should expect, if I continued faithful to the End." "Then they sent me to England, to Father Harcoate a Jesuit, lodging in Duke-Streete, with a Letter in Latin, after they had given me the Sacrament Four Times upon the Charge of Secrecy. When I came to London, I was provided for by Mr. Harcoate. What he employed me in was, to fetch and bring Post Letters; which I did in Abundance, for Four Months Time. Then he sent me to Paris, I being sent for by the Monks there; who immediately sent me again for England, with a very great Packet of Letters and directed to Mr. Vaughan of Courtfeild in Monmouthshire; the rest that were enclosed were to Mr. Vaughan of Uper Rose, to Mr. Milborne of Monmouth, to Mr. James near Monmouth, to Mr. Charles Winter, and to Mr. Charles Price who is Steward to my Lord Marquis of Worcester. Their Order was, as Mr. Vaughan told me, "To confer with some others, and to send their Result over by Mr. Pritchard; that at Rome, and all Places beyond the Seas, the Business went on very well, as they did not question but that it did as well in England and Ireland." After Mr. Vaughan had told me this, I came for London, where I staid conversing with Mr. Harcoate, Mr. Le Faire, and other Jesuits, till Winter was over. Then they sent me to St. Omers, from thence to Doway, where Mr. Gege the Rector of the English College there told me, after he had confirmed what great Rewards were designed for me, and how much I had merited from Christ and the Blessed Virgin, "That, in a Year or something more, they did not at all question but to be established in Christ Church Colledge in Oxford, and to see England flourish in the true Religion of Rome." Then I demanded, "What they would do with the King?" He answered, "They would keep Him well in a Convent." But then I demanded, "Who should govern in Chief?" Then he told me, "There should be a Tender made to One of the Crown, if he would acknowledge it from the Church; but they did believe he would not accept it; and then the Government should be left to some Lords that the Pope would appoint; which Lords Names he would not tell me; but said, "I should know it from the Monks at Paris." When I came there, they sent me to Spaine, with Letters to the Rector of the College of Irish Jesuits at St. Jagoe; and they sent me with a Letter to be given to Mr. Harcoate in Characters; since which Time I have been in England; and, from Lee Faire and Welsh, Pritchard and Lewis, I have understood that the Lords who were to govern were, my Lord Arundell of Wardour as Chief; my Lord Bellasis, as General, with Mr. Thimblcby of Ernham, with several others, whereof Sir Radcliffe was One, was to command in the North, and to receive from Flaunders Ten Thousand Men, to be landed at Bridlington Bay; and the First Thing they designed was, by a Correspondency that my Lord Bellasis had in Hull, to surprize that Garrison; and that my Lord Powis, joined with my Lord Petre, Mr. Vaughan of Uper Rose, Mr. Charles Winter, Mr. Charles Milbourne of Monmouth, and Counsellor James near Monmouth, were to meet, at a certain Place in Radnorshire in South Wales, with another Army, and to march to Pembrookeshire, to meet with Twenty or Thirty Thousand Men, who were to land at Milford Haven, from The Groyne in Spaine; which Army was to be Religious Men and Pilgrims from St. Jagoe in Spaine. Upon this Design being just ready to be put in Execution, the Design against the King's Person was discovered; when immediately comes Mr. Lee Faire to me, and made me take the Sacrament, with a great Benediction, to continue secret to the Cause. Then I demanded, of him and Mr. Lewis another Jesuit, "Why they did conceal the Design against the King from me?" And they both answered me, "It was my Lord Bellasis' Order, that none should know it but those that were to be the Actors in it." Then I asked of them, "How and where it was to be done?" They said, "It was designed several Ways, and at several Times; but the certain Way they pitched upon was, in His Morning Walks at New Market; and that Mr. Conyers had taken it upon him to do it, and Mr. Kaines to kill the Duke of Monmouth, Mr. Pritchard the Duke of Buckingham, Mr. Knight my Lord Shaftsbury, Mr. Oneale my Lord of Ossery, and One whose Name I have forgotten the Duke of Ormond; and when those Persons were killed, they did not question the Power of the rest, or their Counsels, but that they should outdo them; for they would give such great Pay, that all Sorts of Malecontents and People that depended on their Fortune would be ready to serve them: But, whatever should happen, their Power, as they had laid it, would be sufficient; for they had Forty Thousand Men ready in London, besides those that would on the Alarum be posted at every Ale-house Door, to have killed the Soldiers as they came out of their Quarters." Then I asked them, "Where they were provided with Money to answer all this?" They said, "That my Lord Stafford and Mr. Coleman and Ireland had Money enough to go through all this; and that several Gentlemen in England had great Sums to contribute to it." Then I asked them, "What Place they would secure in the West?" They told me, "That the Castle at Chepstow was to be delivered up to Mr. Charles Winter, by the Governor Captain Spalding and my Lord of Worcester's Steward Mr. Charles Price." Then I told them, "I did believe that my Lord of Worcester and the Earl of Shrewsberry and the Duke of Norffolke had a great Part in this Design." They told me, "No; for they durst never attempt to discover it to either of them, and to many more they could with to favour them; and that Mr. Charles Price had told them, They should never attempt my Lord of Worcester, for he knew it would be impossible to bring him to it; but that they would be discovered, if he knew it." Then I asked him, "Why they gave such great Credit to Mr. Price?" They said, "Because he had been One of the principal Persons in contriving the Design, and One whose wise Counsels was the most observed in England." I answered, "I thought him a Man sitter indeed for a Counsellor than a Soldier." They said, "It would not appear so, if I knew what good and ingenious Arms he had presented all the Lords concerned with; but that his own Counsel was what they had builded much upon, and they thought him One of the wisesh Men in Orders in the World." After this Discourse, we parted; and about Two Days after, I met Mr. Lee Faire, who told me, "I should receive the Reward of Four Thousand Pounds, being One as would murder a Man; and that it was my Lord Bellasis' Order, for whatever they had employed me in, as well in all other Matters as in this." And more, they have always told me, "That, when their Design was to be begun, we should all receive our Commissions from my Lord Bellasis, with a Benediction from the Pope annexed to it." And when I have often demanded of them, "How they would establish the Government?" They always answered, "Securely enough; for they did intend utterly to extinguish all Sorts of People that would not really be converted to the Church of Rome, and, to prove it, persecute their nearest Relations that were obstinate."

"I have no more to say to what I can now remember; but then was I solicited to Murder; which Account I have given in to the Committee of Lords: And further, That I have been assured by Mr. La Faire, "That Mr. Conyers, who had undertaken to kill the King, is the Lord Bellasis' Confessor;" and that Mr. La Faire has often told me, "That Mr. Conyers is just now come from my Lord Bellasis, with such and such Orders;" and also Mr. La Faire hath often told me, "That when any Person that was concerned in the Plot was imprisoned, that by one Means or other they would kill them before they should come to their Trials, though they burned the Prisons where they were in Custody; and that Guarnsey and Jersey were to be surprized, by a Power from Brest and other Places of France; and that several French Ships have lain in and about the Channel all this Summer upon the same Occasion." And further, Mr. Le Faire, Mr. Pritchard, Mr. Lewis, Mr. Caines, and Mr. Welsh, in England, and Mr. Letham, Mr. Stapleton, Mr. Sheldon, and Dr. Gege Rector of the English College in Doway, and others, have often told me, "That there was not a Roman Catholic in England, of any Quality or Credit, but was acquainted with this Design of the Papists, and had received the Sacrament from their Father Confessors, to be secret and assistant in the carrying of it on."

Hawley's Examination;

"November, 9th, 1678; Captain Hawley, Ensign of the King's Regiment of Foot Guards, being called in to the same Committee of Lords, and sworn by the Lord Marquis of Winchester, as a Justice of the Peace, in the Presence of the said Committee, informed their Lordships, That he was upon the Guard at Somerset House that Saturday Sir Ed. Godfrey was missing; and, as he was walking with Mr. Francis Russell in some Room wherein the State stands within the Guard Chamber, Two Elderly Men came to one Dukes, who was also in that Room: And immediately after, Mr. Dukes came to this Deponent and Mr. Russell, and told them, "That they must withdraw; for that the Queen desired to be private." And saith, That this was about Five of the Clock.

Berry's,

"The Information of Henry Berry, Porter of the Gate at Somersett House, taken by the Right Honourable the Marquis of Winchester, this 11th Day of November, 1678, as followeth; videlicet,

"That, about the 12th, 13th, or 14th of October last, this Deponent had Orders to tell all Persons of Quality, that came to the Gate, "That the Queen desired to be private." And that the Prince came to the Gate, but could not be admitted. And this Deponent saith, That the Queen continued so private for Two Days.

Salvins,

"The Informations of Mrs. Diana Salvin and her Sister Mrs. Elizabeth Salvin, taken as abovesaid; who, being sworn, say, That they do both know Mr. Lee Phaire and Mr. Walsh; and have seen them, with Mr. Bedloe, at their House; and that Mr. Walsh hath Twice said Mass at their House, when Mr. Bedloe hath been present; and that Mr. Bedloe did acquaint them of Ten Pounds which Mr. Lee Phaire lent unto Mrs. Herne of Essex Streete."

Saunders',

"John Saunders, being sworn, and examined by the Right Honourable the Lord Marquis of Winchester, One of the Justices of the Peace for the County of Midlesex, saith, That this Deponent hath seen Mr. Lee Faire, in Company with Mr. Bedloe; and that he was bound, with Mrs. Herne, unto a Shoemaker, for Ten Pounds; which Money Mr. Lee Faire brought, and took the Bond in the Shoemaker's Name. And Mr. Lee Phaire was a Witness unto the same Bond, together with Mr. Bedloe."

Oldis',

"The Information of Alexander Oldis, taken the 12th of November, 1678, before the Right Honourable the Marquis of Winchester, One of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the County of Midd's:

"He faith, That he, in the Company of William Bedloe, about Six Weeks since, did hear Mass said in the House of Mrs. Salvin, in Essex Buildings, by a middle-sized Man, with Pock-holes in his Face; he wears a Periwig, which he put off when he put on his Vestments to say Mass. He knoweth not his Name."

Atkins'

"The Examination of Charles Atkins Esquire, taken upon Oath before me, One of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the County of Midd's and Liberty of Westm. the First Day of November, 1678:

"Saith, That, in Darby House, being in Discourse with Samuell Atkins (Clerk to Mr. Pepis Secretary of the Admiralty), the said Samuell did say, "That Sir Edmund Bury Godfrey had very much vilified his Master; and that, if he lived long, would be the Ruin of him." Upon which, the said Samuell did ask this Examinant, "Whether he did think Childe to be a Man of Courage and Secrecy?" To which this Examinant did reply, "That the said Childe had been at Sea, and had behaved himself very well, as he had been informed." Upon which, the said Samuwell did bid this Examinant "send the said Childe to his Master Mr. Pepis, but not to him the said Samuell, for that he would not be seen to know any Thing of it." This Examinant did endeavour to find out the said Childe; but did not meet with him till the Day after (this Discourse had happened betwixt him and Samuell Atkins), at The Three Tobacco Pipes in Holbourne; where this Examinant did tell Childe, "that Secretary Pepis would speak with him." And the next Time that this Examinant did see the said Childe (after that he had given him that Direction), he the said Childe did endeavour to engage the said Examinant to join with him in the Murder of a Man; the Particulars of which this Examinant hath declared, before the King and Council, Wednesday last past.

"Taken before me, One of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the County and Liberty abovementioned.

"P. Howard."

King to be moved, for Pardons for Bedloe and Salvins.

ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Lords with the White Staves do wait on His Majesty, humbly to desire Him, from this House, "That His Majesty will be graciously pleased to grant His general Pardon to William Bedloe."

ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Lords with the White Staves do attend His Majesty, humbly to desire Him, from this House, "That His Majesty will be graciously pleased to grant His Royal Pardon to Diana and Elizabeth Salvin; who, upon their Examinations, have confessed (among other Things) that they have been at Mass; and that they, the said Diana and Elizabeth Salvin, being to be further examined as Witnesses, may be licensed to stay in Town, they having behaved themselves very well before the Lords Committees who examined them."

Price, Vaughan, & al, to be attached in Monmouthshire.

ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Serjeant at Arms attending this House, his Deputy or Deputies, shall forthwith attach the Bodies of Mr. Charles Price, Mr. Vaughan of Upper Rose, Mr. Vaughan of Courtfeild, Mr. Thimbleby of Ernham, Captain Spalding Deputy Governor of Chepstow, Mr. Charles Millburne of Monmouth, Counsellor James near Monmouth, and Mr. Charles Winter, and bring them in safe Custody to the Bar of this House, to answer such Matters as shall there be objected against them on His Majesty's Behalf: And this shall be a sufficient Warrant on that Behalf.

To Sir George Charnock Knight, Serjeant at Arms attending this House, his Deputy and Deputies, and to all His Majesty's Officers Civil and Military to be aiding and assisting in the Execution hereof.

Address for the Trial of Coleman, Atkins, & al.

ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Lords with White Staves do wait on His Majesty, humbly to desire Him, from this House, "That His Majesty will be pleased to direct, that the Trials of Samuell Atkins, Mr. Childe, and Edward Coleman, may be expedited."

Coleman's and Le Chese's Letters to be delivered to Attorney General.

ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That Mr. Coleman's Letters, and Mr. Le Chees' Letters, communicated to this House by His Majesty, may be delivered to His Majesty's Attorney General, in order to the framing his Process, and preparing his Evidence against the Prisoners to be tried for Treason.

Biston, Ly. Bellasis's Servant to he summoned.

ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Lords with White Staves do attend His Majesty, humbly to desire Him, from this House, "That Mr. Biston, late Servant to the Lady Bellasise, described to wear a Black Periwig and Back Whiskers, round-faced, pretty plump in Body, of a middle Stature, may be added to the Persons to be summoned by His Majesty's Royal Proclamation, for which both Houses presented their humble Address to His Majesty."

Sir George Wakeman's Stables to be searched.

Upon Information given to this House, "That there hath been an Attempt made by some Persons to blow up or burn Sir George Wakeman's Stables:"

It is ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Hay and other Materials in the said Stables and Hay-losts belonging to them be forthwith removed, and a diligent Search made for what may be found there: And it is further ORDERED, That the Two next Justices of the Peace to the Place be, and are hereby, required to see this Order executed, and give a speedy Account thereof to this House.

A Pavement in Coleman's House to be taken up.

ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That Mr. William Snow and Mr. James Noble go, with all convenient Speed, and cause a Brick or Stone Pavement lately laid in some Part of Mr. Edward Coleman's House to be taken up, and Search made what they can find there; and if there be any Papers or Writings, that they seal them up, and bring them away with them, to be brought before this House: And that they require the Assistance of His Majesty's Workmen, Masons or Bricklayers, to assist them in this Service; and One of the Clerks attending on this House is to be present with them: And this shall be a sufficient Warrant on that Behalf.

To all His Majesty's Officers, Civil and Military, to be aiding and assisting in the Execution hereof.

Scotch Regiment to be removed farther from London.

ORDERED, That the Lords with White Staves do wait on His Majesty, humbly to desire Him, from this House, "That His Majesty will be pleased to give Order for the Removal of the Scottish Regiment, now quartered in and near Hertfordshire, to the Distance of Forty Miles from London."

Report of King's Answer to the Address for a Proclamation.

The Lord Chancellor acquainted the House, "The Address of both Houses for issuing out a Proclamation for summoning Conyers and others to render themselves, was Yesterday presented to His Majesty; who received the same very graciously, and said, He would take it into His speedy Care."

Sorocold's Complaint of the L. Mayor's Refusal to grant a Warrant for apprehending a Priest.

Upon Information of William Sorocold, "That he having found a Priest and other Papists in the same House in the City of London; and that he went to a Justice of the Peace for a Warrant, and he ordered him to go to my Lord Mayor; which he accordingly did: But his Lordship told him, he would grant no such Warrant till he had summoned the Parties before him."

Mathews' Information concerning a Priest.

Then Sibill Mathewes, upon Oath made at the Bar, said, "That she, living with Mr. Vanderbeck, lay One Night at Mr. Cloud's in Broad-street, where there was a Priest; and she, carrying a Note to Mr. Cloude, the Priest, being in the House, was desired to read it. And she serupled at his Reading of it. Mr. Cloud told her, "She need not fear, for he would do righteous Things; for he was a Priest, and that he lodged up Two Pair of Stairs forwards; and he lay there a great while:" And the Maid shewed her the Room; and she saw his Cross and Pictures, which, the Maid told her, he bowed to."

Lord Mayor to give the House an Account of it.

Whereupon the House made this Order following:

"Upon Information given to this House, by William Sorocold, That, applying himself to the Lord Mayor of London, for a Warrant for the apprehending of a Popish Priest, and that the Lord Mayor refused to grant out his Warrant for that Purpose: It is thereupon ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the Lord Mayor of London shall have a Copy of the said Information, of which he is required to send this House an Account in Writing on Thursday next, at Ten of the Clock in the Forenoon."

The Question being put, "Whether this House shall be adjourned till Three of the Clock this Afternoon?"

It was Resolved in the Affirmative.

Disabling Papists from sitting in Parliament, &c. Bill.

ORDERED, That the Bill for the more effectual preserving of the King's Person shall be taken into Consideration this Afternoon, in a Committee of the whole House.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque in post meridiem hujus instantis diei, hora tertia, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Post meridiem.

REX.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

His Royal Highness the Duke of Yorke.
Epus. London.
Epus. Durham.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Rochester.
Epus. Ely.
Epus. Bath & Wells.
Epus. Lyncolne.
Epus. Oxon.
Epus. Exon.
Dux Cumberland.
Ds. Cancellarius.
Ds. Custos Privati Sigilli.
Dux Bucks.
Dux Albemarle.
Dux Monmouth.
Marq. Winton.
Marq. Worcester.
Marq. Dorchester.
L. Great Chamberlain.
L. Chamberlain.
Comes Oxon.
Comes Kent.
Comes Huntingdon.
Comes Bedford.
Comes Suff.
Comes Salisbury.
Comes Bridgwater.
Comes North'ton.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Westmerland.
Comes Manchester.
Comes Berks.
Comes Mulgrave.
Comes Rivers.
Comes Peterborough.
Comes Thannet
Comes Strafford.
Comes Sunderland.
Comes Scarsdale.
Comes St. Albans.
Comes Cardigan.
Comes Essex.
Comes Clarendon.
Comes Bath.
Comes Craven.
Comes Aylesbury.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Guilford.
Comes Feversham.
Vicecomes Halyfax.
Vicecomes Newport.
Ds. Awdley.
Ds. Berkeley.
Ds. Ferrers.
Ds. De Grey.
Ds. Stourton.
Ds. Eure.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. North.
Ds. Hunsdon.
Ds. (fn. *) Brooke.
Ds. Grey de Wark.
Ds. Maynard.
Ds. Howard Esc.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Carington.
Ds. Gerard B.
Ds. Wotton.
Ds. Cornwallis.
Ds. Freschevile.
Ds. Arundell T.
Ds. Butler M. Park.

PRAYERS.

Disabling Papists from sitting in Parliament, &c. Bill.

The House was adjourned into a Committee, to proceed in the Consideration of the Bill for the more effectual Preservation of the King's Person and Government.

The House was resumed.

And the Earl of Bridgwater reported, "That the Committee have made a further Progress in this Bill; and desires the House may be put into a Committee again on Thursday Morning next, to proceed therein; and to be the First Business, and nothing to intervene."

Which is ordered accordingly.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque in diem Mercurii, 13um diem instantis Novembris, hora nona Aurora, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Footnotes

* Bis in Originali.
* Sic.
* Bis in Originali.