House of Lords Journal Volume 36
May 1782 1-3

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History of Parliament Trust

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Year published

1767-1830

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451-468

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 36: May 1782 1-3', Journal of the House of Lords volume 36: 1779-1783 (1767-1830), pp. 451-468. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=116703 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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May 1782 1-3

DIE Mercurii, 1o Maii 1782.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Archiep. Ebor.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Cicestrien.
Epus. Bath. & Wells.
Epus. Asaphen.
Epus. Carliol.
Epus. Petriburg.
Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Wigorn.
Epus. Bangor.
Epus. Cestrien.
Epus. Oxon.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Litch. & Cov.
Epus. Glocestr.
Epus. Bristol.
Dux Cumberland.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Ds. Camden, Præses.
Dux Grafton. C. P. S.
Dux Manchester, Camerarius.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Bolton.
Dux Devonshire.
Dux Queensberry.
Dux Chandos.
March. Lothian.
March. Rockingham.
Comes Derby.
Comes Pembroke & Montgomery.
Comes Suffolk & Berkshire.
Comes Salisbury.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Sandwich.
Comes Essex.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Doncaster.
Comes Berkeley.
Comes Plymouth.
Comes Scarborough.
Comes Coventry.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Cholmondeley.
Comes Cassillis.
Comes Galloway.
Comes Aberdeen.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Kerr.
Comes Effingham.
Comes Brooke & Warwick.
Comes Gower.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Temple.
Comes Harcourt.
Comes Fauconberg.
Comes Northington.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Spencer.
Comes Bathurst.
Comes Hillsborough.
Comes Mansfield.
Viscount Hereford.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Falmouth.
Viscount Leinster.
Viscount Dudley & Ward.
Viscount Maynard.
Viscount Hampden.
Viscount Mount Edgcumbe & Valletort.
Viscount Sackville.
Viscount Keppel.
Ds. Abergavenny.
Ds. Percy.
Ds. De Ferrars.
Ds. Say & Sele.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Craven.
Ds. Osborne.
Ds. Boyle.
Ds. Middleton.
Ds. Romney.
Ds. King.
Ds. Montfort.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Fortescue.
Ds. Ravensworth.
Ds. Ponsonby.
Ds. Vere.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Wycombe.
Ds. Grantham.
Ds. Grosvenor.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Vernon.
Ds. Ducie.
Ds. Digby.
Ds. Hawke.
Ds. Amherst.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Foley.
Ds. Loughborough.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Bagot.
Ds. Southampton.
Ds. Porchester.
Ds. Ashburton.
Ds. Grantley.

PRAYERS.

Wapping Poor, &c. Bill.

The Lord Scarsdale reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the better Relief and Employment of the Poor of the Parish of Saint John of Wapping, in the County of Middlesex; and for providing a proper Workhouse and Burial Ground for the Use of the said Parish; and for opening certain Communications and making certain Streets within the said Parish," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Contracts held by Members of H. C. Lists of, delivered.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Burke from the Treasury attended:"

He was called in, and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to an Order of Monday last,

"A List of all Contracts now held by Members of the House of Commons, which have been made with the Commissioners of the Treasury, with the Dates and Times at which such Contracts will expire."

And then he withdrew.

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk,

Ordered, That the said List do lie on the Table.

The Duke of Richmond laid before the House, pursuant to an Order of Monday last:

"List of all the Contracts now held by any Members of the House of Commons, which have been made with the Board of Ordnance, together with their Dates, and the Times at which such Contracts will expire."

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk,

Ordered, That the said List do lie on the Table.

Foreign Troops Quartering Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for providing Quarters for certain Foreign Troops, lately employed in His Majesty's Service, in the Defence of the Island of Minorca, and expected to arrive soon in this Kingdom, for a limited Time."

Ordered, That the said Bill be read the Third Time To-morrow.

Wrexham Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening and keeping in Repair, the Road from Wrexham, in the County of Denbigh, to Barnhill, in the County of Chester."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

Ld. President.
Ld. Privy Seal.
Ld. Chamberlain.
D. Richmond.
D. Beaufort.
D. Bolton.
D. Devonshire.
D. Queensberry.
D. Chandos.
M. Lothian.
M. Rockingham.
E. Derby.
E. Pembroke & Montgomery.
E. Suffolk & Berkshire.
E. Salisbury.
E. Westmorland.
E. Sandwich.
E. Essex.
E. Carlisle.
E. Doncaster.
E. Berkeley.
E. Plymouth.
E. Scarborough.
E. Coventry.
E. Jersey.
E. Cholmondeley.
E. Cassillis.
E. Galloway.
E. Aberdeen.
E. Rosebery.
E. Ferrers.
E. Tankerville.
E. Kerr.
E. Effingham.
E. Brooke & Warwick.
E. Gower.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. Temple.
E. Harcourt.
E. Fauconberg.
E. Northington.
E. Radnor.
E. Spencer.
E. Bathurst.
E. Hillsborough.
E. Mansfield.
V. Hereford.
V. Townshend.
V. Stormont.
V. Falmouth.
V. Leinster.
V. Dudley & Ward.
V. Maynard.
V. Hampden.
V. Mount Edgcumbe & Valletort.
V. Sackville.
V. Keppel.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Abp. York.
L. Bp. Winchester.
L. Bp. Chichester.
L. Bp. Bath & Wells.
L. Bp. St. Asaph.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Bp. Peterborough.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Worcester.
L. Bp. Bangor.
L. Bp. Chester.
L. Bp. Oxford.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. St. David's.
L. Bp. Litch. & Cov.
L. Bp. Gloucester.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Abergavenny.
L. Percy.
L. De Ferrars.
L. Say & Sele.
L. Teynham.
L. Craven.
L. Osborne.
L. Boyle.
L. Middleton.
L. Romney.
L. King.
L. Montfort.
L. Chedworth.
L. Sandys.
L. Fortescue.
L. Ravensworth.
L. Ponsonby.
L. Vere.
L. Walpole.
L. Wycombe.
L. Grantham.
L. Grosvenor.
L. Scarsdale.
L. Vernon.
L. Ducie.
L. Digby.
L. Hawke.
L. Amherst.
L. Harrowby.
L. Foley.
L. Loughborough.
L. Walsingham.
L. Bagot.
L. Southampton.
L. Porchester.
L. Ashburton.
L. Grantley.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet To-morrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Ireland, Message, &c. delivered.

The Lord Wycombe (by His Majesty's Command) delivered to the House,

"Copy of the Message to the Houses of Lords and Commons in Ireland, from his Grace the Lord Lieutenant, delivered the 16th April 1782."

Also, "Resolution of the House of Lords of Ireland, 17o Aprilis 1782."

And also, "Resolution of the House of Commons of Ireland, Martis 16o Die Aprilis 1782."

And the Titles thereof being read by the Clerk:

Ordered, That the said Message and Resolutions do lie on the Table.

Contractors Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for restraining any Person concerned in any Contract, Commission, or Agreement made for the Public Service, from being elected, or sitting and voting as a Member of the House of Commons;" and for the Lords to be summoned.

The said Bill was accordingly read a Second Time.

Moved, "That the said Bill be committed:"

Which being objected to;

After long Debate,

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow; and that the Lords be summoned.

Wilts Assizes, Persons to attend with Minutes of Causes.

Ordered, That John Foliott Esquire, Clerk of Assize, and Mr. John Clark Associate, do attend this House on Friday next, with the Book containing the Minutes of the Causes tried at the last Summer Assizes for the County of Wilts.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, secundum diem instantis Maii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Jovis, 2o Maii 1782.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Epus. Asaphen.
Epus. Petriburg.
Epus. Eliens.
Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Bristol.
Dux Cumberland.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Dux Chandos, Præses.
Dux Grafton, C. P. S.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Queensberry.
Dux Chandos.
Comes Suffolk & Berkshire.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Essex.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Doncaster.
Comes Plymouth.
Comes Scarborough.
Comes Rochford.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Cholmondeley.
Comes Galloway.
Comes Aberdeen.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Effingham.
Comes Gower.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Egremont.
Comes Temple.
Comes Northington.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Spencer.
Comes Hillsborough.
Viscount Hereford.
Viscount Townshend.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Leinster.
Viscount Hampden.
Viscount Sackville.
Ds. Abergavenny.
Ds. Percy.
Ds. Say & Sele.
Ds. King.
Ds. Montfort.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Fortescue.
Ds. Ravensworth.
Ds. Ponsonby.
Ds. Vere.
Ds. Wycombe.
Ds. Grantham.
Ds. Scarsdale.
Ds. Vernon.
Ds. Digby.
Ds. Hawke.
Ds. Amherst.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds Loughborough.
Ds. Gage.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Bagot.
Ds. Southampton.
Ds. Ashburton.
Ds. Grantley.

PRAYERS.

Honley Enclosure, &c. Bill.

Ordered, That the Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing, enclosing, and improving the several Commons and Waste Grounds within the Manor of Honley, in the Parish of Almondbury, in the County of York; and for abolishing or settling certain other Rights or Claims within the said Manor;" be read the Third Time on Thursday the 9th Day of this Instant May.

Kingston Deverill Enclosure Bill.

Ordered, That the Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing and allotting in Severalty the Open and Common Fields and Downs, Common Meadows, Common Pastures and Commonable Places, within the Parish of Kingston Deverill, in the County of Wilts," be read the Third Time on Thursday the 9th Day of this Instant May.

Cholwich's Bill.

The Lord Scarsdale reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for discharging Part of the Settled Estates of John Burridge Cholwich Esquire, in the County of Devon, from the Uses and Trusts of his Marriage Settlement, and for settling other Estates in the said County in lieu thereof," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to the Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ordered, That the said Bill be engrossed.

Wrexham Road Bill.

The Lord Scarsdale also reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening and keeping in Repair the Road from Wrexham, in the County of Denbigh, to Barnhill, in the County of Chester," was committed: That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Broseley, &c. Small Debts Bill.

The Lord Scarsdale made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the more easy and speedy Recovery of Small Debts within the Parishes of Broseley, Benthall, Madeley, Barrow, Linley, Willey, Little Wenlock and Dawley, and an Extraparochial Place call Posnall, in the County of Salop," was committed.

Ordered, That the said Bill be re-committed to the same Committee; and that they do meet to consider the same To-morrow.

Contracts held by Members of H. C. Lists of &c. delivered.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Jackson from the Admiralty Office attended:"

He was called in, and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to an Order of Monday last,

"A List of all Contracts now held by any Members of the House of Commons, which have been made with the Commissioners of the Navy, or any other Person or Persons, for the Public Service, together with the Dates, and the Times at which such Contracts will expire."

Also, "Navy Board's Letter, dated 1st May 1782, relative to Persons concerned in Contracts with them, who maybe Members of the House of Commons, but whose Names do not appear in the Contracts."

And then he withdrew.

And the Titles thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said List and Letter do lie on the Table.

Foreign Troops Quartering Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for providing Quarters for certain Foreign Troops lately employed in His Majesty's Service in the Defence of the Island of Minorca, and expected to arrive soon in this Kingdom, for a limited Time."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill, shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Ships Ransoming Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to prohibit the Ransoming of Ships or Vessels captured from His Majesty's Subjects, and of the Merchandize or Goods on board such Ships or Vessels."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Wapping Poor, &c. Bill.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the better Relief and Employment of the Poor of the Parish of Saint John of Wapping, in the County of Middlesex; and for providing a proper Workhouse and Burial Ground for the Use of the said Parish; and for opening certain Communications, and making certain Streets within the said Parish."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Messages to H. C. that the Lords have agreed to the Three preceding Bills.

And Messages were, severally, sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Leeds and Mr. Pepys:

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bills, without any Amendment.

Newton's Divorce Bill.

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of John Newton Esquire with Catharine Seymour his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H. C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers:

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

Spitalfields, &c. Paving Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for making a Passage for Carriages from Spitalfields to Bishopsgate Street, in the County of Middlesex; and for paving the same; and for appropriating to those Purposes the Money arisen by virtue of an Act passed in the Eighteenth Year of His present Majesty, for applying the Sum of Nine thousand Pounds, to arise out of the Orphans Fund, for making such Passage."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

Ld. President.
Ld. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
D. Beaufort.
D. Queensberry.
D. Chandos.
E. Suffolk & Berkshire.
E. Westmorland.
E. Essex.
E. Carlisle.
E. Doncaster.
E. Plymouth.
E. Scarborough.
E. Rochford.
E. Jersey.
E. Cholmondeley.
E. Galloway.
E. Aberdeen.
E. Rosebery.
E. Ferrers.
E. Tankerville.
E. Effingham.
E. Gower.
E. Fitzwilliam.
E. Egremont.
E. Temple.
E. Northington.
E. Radnor.
E. Spencer.
E. Hillsborough.
V. Hereford.
V. Townshend.
V. Stormont.
V. Leinster.
V. Hampden.
V. Sackville.
L. Bp. St. Asaph.
L. Bp. Peterborough.
L. Bp. Ely.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. St. David's.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Abergavenny.
L. Percy.
L. Say & Sele.
L. King.
L. Montfort.
L. Chedworth.
L. Fortescue.
L. Ravensworth.
L. Ponsonby.
L. Vere.
L. Wycombe.
L. Grantham.
L. Scarsdale.
L. Vernon.
L. Digby.
L. Hawke.
L. Amherst.
L. Harrowby.
L. Loughborough.
L. Gage.
L. Walsingham.
L. Bagot.
L. Southampton.
L. Ashburton.
L. Grantley.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet To-morrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Contractors Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the House to be put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act for restraining any Person, concerned in any Contract, Commission, or Agreement made for the Public Service, from being elected, or sitting and voting as a Member of the House of Commons;" and for the Lords to be summoned.

Ordered, That the said Order be discharged.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill on Monday next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Lords summoned.

Ordered, That all the Lords be summoned to attend the Service of the House To-morrow.

Ashborne, &c. Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by the Lord George Cavendish and others:

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for enlarging the Term and Powers of so much of an Act, made in the Second Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act for repairing and widening the High Road leading from Ashborne, in the County of Derby, to the Town of Leek, in the County of Stafford; and from Ryecroft Gate, upon Rushton Common, to Congleton, in the County of Chester; and also the Road leading from Blyth Marsh, in the County of Stafford, through Cheadle Oakamoor and Blore, to the Turnpike Road from Ashborne to Buxton near Thorp, in the County of Derby," as relates to the District of Road between Ashborne and Congleton; and for repairing the Road from the End of Ashborne Church Yard, to the Top of the Dig Street, in Ashborne aforesaid;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Bill was read the First Time.

Civil List Debt, Message from His Majesty relative to it:

The Lord Wycombe (in the Absence of the Marquis of Rockingham) acquainted the House, "That he had a Message from His Majesty, under His Royal Sign Manual, which His Majesty had commanded to be delivered to their Lordships:"

And the same was read by the Lord Chancellor, and is as follows; (videlicet)

GEORGE R.

His Majesty has found, with Concern, that notwithstanding the Two several Payments of the Civil List Debt, and the subsequent Increase of the Civil List Revenue, a considerable Debt is since incurred. His Majesty therefore desires the Advice and Aid of the House of Lords, as to the Mode of discharging that Debt, and preventing the like in future, without laying any new Burthen on His People, whom it is ever his Wish as much as possible to relieve.

For these Purposes, His Majesty lays before the House the Plan of Reform, which he has judged proper to make in His Establishments, to be perfected by the Wisdom of Parliament, for the Honour of the Crown, and the Public Benefit.

"G. R."

And the same having been again read by the Clerk:

The Lord Wycombe (in the Absence of the Marquis of Rockingham) delivered to the House,

Plan for relieving the Civil List delivered.

"Abstract of a Plan for relieving His Majesty's Civil List from its present Burthens, and for preventing the Increase of its Debt."

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Plan do lie on the Table.

Address on His Majesty's Message.

Ordered, That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, "To return to His Majesty the dutiful Acknowledgments of this House for His most gracious Message, and for the Communication His Majesty has been pleased to make of the Plan of Reform He has executed in his Establishments; and to assure His Majesty, that this House will concur in all Measures which shall appear expedient for effectuating the wise and beneficial Purposes with which His Majesty has had in View in His Plan of Reform for the Honour of His Crown and the Public Benefit; fully trusting, that so bright an Example will be productive of the most salutary Effects by infusing a similar Spirit of Œconomy through every Branch of the Public Expenditure."

Ordered, That the said Address be presented to His Majesty by the Lords with White Staves.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Veneris, tertium diem instantis Maii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

DIE Veneris, 3o Maii 1782.

Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Archiep. Cantuar.
Archiep. Ebor.
Epus. Carliol.
Epus. Petriburg.
Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Meneven.
Epus. Litch. & Cov.
Epus. Bristol.
Dux Cumberland.
Ds. Thurlow, Cancellarius.
Ds. Camden, Præses.
Dux Grafton, C. P. S.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Chandos.
Comes Suffolk & Berkshire.
Comes Salisbury.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Essex.
Comes Scarborough.
Comes Coventry.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Aberdeen.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Kerr.
Comes Effingham.
Comes Bucks.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Egremont.
Comes Temple.
Comes Harcourt.
Comes Fauconberg.
Comes Northington.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Spencer.
Comes Bathurst.
Comes Mansfield.
Viscount Stormont.
Viscount Leinster.
Viscount Mount Edgcumbe & Valletort.
Viscount Sackville.
Ds. Abergavenny.
Ds. Percy.
Ds. De Ferrars.
Ds. Craven.
Ds. King.
Ds. Chedworth.
Ds. Sandys.
Ds. Fortescue.
Ds. Ravensworth.
Ds. Ponsonby.
Ds. Vere.
Ds. Walpole.
Ds. Wycombe.
Ds. Grantham.
Ds. Grosvenor.
Ds. Vernon.
Ds. Digby.
Ds. Amherst.
Ds. Brownlow.
Ds. Harrowby.
Ds. Loughborough.
Ds. Walsingham.
Ds. Bagot.
Ds. Porchester.
Ds. Ashburton.
Ds. Grantley.

PRAYERS.

Bills passed by Commission.

The Lord Chancellor acquainted the House, "That His Majesty had been pleased to issue a Commission to several Lords therein named, for declaring His Royal Assent to several Acts agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament."

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Then Three of the Lords Commissioners, being in their Robes, and seated on a Form placed between the Throne and the Woolsack, the Lord Chancellor in the Middle, with the Lord President on his Right Hand, and the Duke of Richmond on his Left; commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod to signify to the Commons, "The Lords Commissioners desire their immediate Attendance in this House, to hear the Commission read."

Who being come, with their Speaker;

The Lord Chancellor said,

My Lords, and Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

"His Majesty not thinking fit to be personally present here at this Time, has been pleased to cause a Commission to be issued under the Great Seal, and thereby given His Royal Assent to divers Acts, which have been agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament, the Titles whereof are particularly mentioned; and by the said Commission hath commanded Us to declare and notify His Royal Assent to the said several Acts, in the Presence of you the Lords and Commons assembled for that Purpose; which Commission you will now hear read."

Then the said Commission was read by the Clerk, as follows:

GEORGE R.

"George the Third, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth: To Our Right Trusty and Right Well-beloved the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and to Our Trudy and Well-beloved the Knights, Citizens and Burgesses, and the Commissioners for Shires and Burghs of the House of Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, Greeting; Whereas We have seen and perfectly understood divers and sundry Acts agreed and accorded on by you Our loving Subjects, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and the Commons, in this Our present Parliaament assembled, and endorsed by you as hath been accustomed, the Titles and Names of which Acts hereafter do particularly ensue; (that is to say) "An Act for defraying the Charge of the Pay and Cloathing of the Militia in that Part of Great Britain called England, for One Year, beginning the Twenty-fifth Day of March One thousand seven hundred and eighty-two." An Act for granting an additional Bounty on Ships employed in the Greenland and Whale Fishery for a limited Time." "An Act to revive and further continue an Act made in the Seventh Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act to discontinue for a limited Time the Duties payable upon the Importation of Tallow, Hogs Lard and Grease." "An Act for allowing further Time for Enrollment of Deeds and Wills made by Papists, and for Relief of Protestant Purchasers." "An Act for providing Quarters for certain Foreign Troops lately employed in His Majesty's Service, in the Defence of the Island of Minorca, and expected to arrive soon in this Kingdom, for a limited Time." "An Act to, extend so much of Two Acts of the Twentieth and Twenty first Years of His present Majesty's Reign as relate to the Sale of and ascertaining the Duties upon East India Goods, to Tea and all other Goods of the Growth, Product or Manufacture of China, or any Country within the Limits of the East India Company's Charter, which have been or shall during the present Hostilities be brought into this Kingdom and condemned as Prize; for equalizing the Duties upon and regulating the Importation of Foreign Snuff into this Kingdom; and for preventing the Importation and Running of Foreign Spirituous Liquors, Tea and other prohibited Goods into this Kingdom, in Vessels fitted out and armed as Privateers." "An Act to prohibit the ransoming of Ships or Vessels captured from His Majesty's Subjects, and of the Merchandize or Goods on board such Ships or Vessels." "An Act for better securing the Duties payable by virtue of an Act of the Fifth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne on the Importation of Coals, Culm and Cinders into the Port of Great Yarmouth, in the County of Norfolk." "An Act for the more easy and speedy Recovery of Small Debts within the City of Rochester, and the Parishes of Strood, Frindsbury, Cobham, Shorne, Higham, Cliffe, Cooling, High Halstow, Chalk, Hoo, Burham, Wouldham, Halling, Cuxstone, Chatham and Gillingham, and the Ville of Sheerness, in the County of Kent." "An Act for the better Relief and Employment of the Poor of the Parish of Saint John of Wapping, in the County of Middlesex; and for providing a proper Workhouse and Burial Ground for the Use of the said Parish; and for opening certain Communications and making certain Streets within the said Parish." "An Act for continuing the Term of an Act made in the Second Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for amending and widening the Road leading from the High Post Road, near the Town of Faversham, by Bacon's Water, through Ashford, to the Town and Port of Hythe, in the County of Kent; and from Bacon's Water to a certain Lane called Holy Lane, in Wincheap, near the City of Canterbury." "An Act for reviving and continuing the Term and enlarging the Powers of an Act of the Thirtieth Year of His late Majesty, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening and keeping in Repair several Roads in and near to the Town of Tenbury, in the Counties of Salop, Worcester and Hereford; and for amending and keeping in Repair the Roads leading from the Knowle Gate to the Turnpike Road on the Clee Hill, leading from Ludlow to Cleobury Mortimer; and from Kyre Mill to the Turnpike Road leading from Bromyard to Tenbury, in the said Counties." "An Act to continue and enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act made in the Thirty-third Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Second, for repairing and widening the Roads from Haleworthy, in the Parish of Davidstow, in the County of Cornwall, to the East End of Wadebridge, in the said County; and from the West End of Wadebridge aforesaid, into and through the Borough of Mitchell, in the said County." "An Act for amending and keeping in Repair the Roads leading from the Willersley Turnpike Road near Parton, to Monkland Mill; and from the Turnpike Road on Fair Mile Field, to the Turnpike Road at Broad Heath; and from the Turnpike Road at or near the Ford's Bridge, to the Turnpike Road near Stockton; and from Kyre Common, to the Turnpike Road at Grendon Green, in the Counties of Hereford and Worcester." "An Act to enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act made in the First Year of the Reign of His present Majesty for repairing and widening several Roads leading to and through the Towns of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, and Dorchester, in the County of Dorset; and for repairing the Road leading from the Parish of Warmwell, through the Parishes of Poxwell and Osmington, to the Church in the said Parish of Osmington, in the said County of Dorset." An Act for dividing and enclosing a certain Part of the Forest of Mendip, and a Piece of Waste Land called Windsor's Hill, situate within the Parish of Shepton Mallet, in the County of Somerset." And albeit the said Acts by you Our said Subjects, the Lords and Commons in this Our present Parliament assembled, are fully agreed and consented unto; yet nevertheless the same are not of Force and Effect in Law without Our Royal Assent given and put to the said Acts: And forasmuch as for divers Causes and Considerations, We cannot conveniently at this Time be present in Our Royal Person in the Higher House of Our said Parliament, being the Place accustomed to give Our Royal Assent to such Acts as have been agreed upon by you Our said Subjects the Lords and Commons, We have therefore caused these Our Letters Patent to be made, and have signed the same, and by the same do give and put Our Royal Assent to the said Acts, and to all Articles, Clauses, and Provisions therein contained, and have fully agreed and assented to the said Acts; Willing that the said Acts, and every Article, Clause, Sentence and Provision therein contained, from henceforth shall be of the same Strength, Force, and Effect, as if We had been personally present in the said Higher House, and had openly and publickly in the Presence of you all assented to the same: And We do by these Presents declare and notify the same Our Royal Assent, as well to you the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons aforesaid, as to all others whom it may concern: Commanding also, by these Presents, Our right trusty and Well-beloved Counsellor Edward Lord Thurlow, Our Chancellor of Great Britain, to seal these Our Letters Patent with Our Great Seal of Great Britain; and also, commanding Our said Chancellor of Great Britain; Our right trusty and Well-beloved Counsellor Charles Lord Camden, President of Our Council; Our Right trusty and right entirely beloved Cousins and Counsellors Augustus Henry Duke of Grafton, Keeper of Our Privy Seal; Charles Duke of Richmond; Our right trusty and entirely beloved Cousin and Counsellor Charles Marquis of Rockingham, First Commissioner of Our Treasury; Our right trusty and well-beloved Cousin and Counsellor Augustus Viscount Keppel, First Commissioner of Our Admiralty; Our right trusty and well-beloved Counsellors William Lord Wycombe, One of Our Principal Secretaries of State; and John Lord Ashburton, or any Three or more of them, to declare and notify this Our Royal Assent, in Our Absence in the said Higher House, in the Presence of you the said Lords and the Commons of Our Parliament, there to be assembled for that Purpose; and the Clerk of Our Parliaments to endorse the said Acts with such Terms and Words, in Our Name, as is requisite, and hath been accustomed for the same, and also, to enroll these Our Letters Patent and the said Acts, in the Parliament Roll; and these Our Letters Patent shall be to every of them a sufficient Warrant in that Behalf: And finally, We do declare and will, that after this Our Royal Assent given and passed by these Presents, and declared and notified as is aforesaid, then and immediately the said Acts shall be taken, accepted, and admitted good, sufficient, and perfect Acts of Parliament, and Laws, to all Intents, Constructions and Purposes, and to be put in due Execution accordingly; the Continuance or Dissolution of this Our Parliament, or any other Use, Custom, Thing or Things, to the contrary thereof notwithstanding. In Witness whereof, We have caused these Our Letters to be made Patent.

Witness Ourself, at Westminster, the Third Day of May, in the Twenty-second Year of Our Reign.

By the King Himself, signed with His own Hand.

"Yorke."

Then the Lord Chancellor said,

"In Obedience to His Majesty's Commands, and by virtue of the Commission which has been now read, We do declare and notify to you the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in Parliament assembled, That His Majesty hath given his Royal Assent to the several Acts in the Commission mentioned; and the Clerks are required to pass the same, in the usual Form and Words."

1. "An Act for defraying the Charge of the Pay and Cloathing of the Militia in that Part of Great Britain called England, for One Year, beginning the Twenty-fifth Day of March One thousand seven hundred and eighty-two."

2. "An Act for granting an additional Bounty on Ships employed in the Greenland and Whale Fishery, for a limited Time."

3. "An Act to revive and further continue an Act made in the Seventh Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, "An Act to discontinue for a limited Time the Duties payable upon the Importation of Tallow, Hog's Lard and Grease."

4. "An Act for allowing further Time for Enrollment of Deeds and Wills made by Papists, and for Relief of Protestant Purchasers."

5. "An Act for providing Quarters for certain Foreign Troops lately employed in His Majesty's Service in the Defence of the Island of Minorca, and expected to arrive soon in this Kingdom, for a limited Time."

6. "An Act to extend so much of Two Acts of the Twentieth and Twenty-first Years of His present Majesty's Reign, as relate to the Sale of, and ascertaining the Duties upon East India Goods, to Tea and all other Goods of the Growth, Product or Manufacture of China, or any Country within the Limits of the East India Company's Charter, which have been or shall during the present Hostilities be brought into this Kingdom, and condemned as Prize; for equalizing the Duties upon and regulating the Importation of Foreign Snuff into this Kingdom; and for preventing the Importation and Running of Foreign Spirituous Liquors, Tea and other prohibited Goods into this Kingdom in Vessels fitted out and armed as Privateers."

7. "An Act to prohibit the ransoming of Ships or Vessels captured from His Majesty's Subjects, and of the Merchandize or Goods on board such Ships or Vessels."

8. "An Act for the better securing the Duties payable by virtue of an Act of the Fifth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne, on the Importation of Coals, Culm and Cinders into the Port of Great Yarmouth, in the County of Norfolk."

9. "An Act for the more easy and speedy Recovery of Small Debts within the City of Rochester, and the Parishes of Strood, Higham, Frindsbury, Cobham, Shorne, Cliffe, Cooling, High Halstow, Chalk, Hoo, Burham, Wouldham, Halling, Cuxstone, Chatham and Gillingham, and the Ville of Sheerness, in the County of Kent."

10. "An Act for the better Relief and Employment of the Poor of the Parish of Saint John of Wapping, in the County of Middlesex, and for providing a proper Workhouse and Burial Ground for the Use of the said Parish, and for opening certain Communications, and making certain Streets within the said Parish."

11. "An Act for continuing the Term of an Act made in the Second Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for amending and widening the Road leading from the High Post Road near the Town of Faversham, by Bacon's Water, through Ashford, to the Town and Port of Hythe, in the County of Kent, and from Bacon's Water to a certain Lane called Holy Lane, in Wincheap, near the City of Canterbury."

12. "An Act for reviving and continuing the Term, and enlarging the Powers of an Act of the Thirtieth Year of His late Majesty, intituled, "An Act for amending, widening, and keeping in Repair several Roads in and near to the Town of Tenbury, in the Counties of Salop, Worcester, and Hereford; and for amending and keeping in Repair the Roads leading from the Knowle Gate to the Turnpike Road on the Clee Hill, leading from Ludlow to Cleobury Mortimer, and from Kyre Mill to the Turnpike Road leading from Bromyard to Tenbury, in the said Counties."

13. "An Act to continue and enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act made in the Thirty-third Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Second, for repairing and widening the Roads from Haleworthy, in the Parish of Davidstow, in the County of Cornwall, to the East End of Wadebridge, in the said County; and from the West End of Wadebridge aforesaid, into and through the Borough of Mitchell, in the said County."

14. "An Act for amending and keeping in Repair the Road leading from the Willersley Turnpike Road near Parton to Monkland Mill, and from the Turnpike Road on Fair Mile Field, to the Turnpike Road at Broad Heath, and from the Turnpike Road at or near the Ford's Bridge to the Turnpike Road near Stockton, and from Kyre Common to the Turnpike Road at Grendon Green, in the Counties of Hereford and Worcester."

15. "An Act to enlarge the Term and Powers of an Act made in the First Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, for repairing and widening several Roads leading to and through the Towns of Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, and Dorchester, in the County of Dorset; and for repairing the Road leading from the Parish of Warmwell, through the Parishes of Poxwell and Osmington to the Church in the said Parish of Osmington, in the said County of Dorset."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant in these Words; (videlicet)

"Le Roy le veult."

16. "An Act for dividing and enclosing a certain Part of the Forest of Mendip, and a Piece of Waste Land called Windsor's Hill, situate within the Parish of Shepton Mallet, in the County of Somerset."

To this Bill the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant, in these Words; (videlicet)

"Soit fait comme il est desiré."

Then the Commons withdrew.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Cholwich's Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for discharging Part of the Settled Estates of John Burridge Cholwich Esquire, in the County of Devon, from the Uses and Trusts of his Marriage Settlement; and for settling other Estates in the said County in lieu thereof."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmatve.

Message to H. C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Holford and Mr. Hett:

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

The King's Answer to Address.

The Earl of Effingham reported, "That the Lords with White Staves had (according to order) waited on His Majesty with their Lordships Address of Yesterday; and that His Majesty was pleased to receive the same very graciously."

Broseley, &c. Small Debts Bill.

The Lord Bishop of Rochester reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the more easy and speedy Recovery of Small Debts within the Parishes of Broseley, Benthall, Madeley, Barrow, Linley, Willey, Little Wenlock and Dawley, and an Extraparochial Place called Posnall, in the County of Salop," was committed: "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and made several Amendments thereto."

Which Amendments were read by the Clerk as follows; (videlicet)

Pr. 7. L. 25. After ("Shillings") insert ("and exceeding Two Shillings")

Pr. 8. L. 31 and 32. After ("equitable") insert Clause (A)."

("Provided nevertheless, and be it enacted, That in case such Debtor or Debtors on being served with such Summons, shall forthwith pay or cause to be paid into the Hands of the Serjeant or the Creditor, or to his or her Agent, the whole of the Debt due and owing, together with the Fee payable to the Clerk for issuing such Summons and the Serjeant for serving the same, the Receipt of such Serjeant, Creditor, or Agent for such Debt, shall stop all further Proceedings of the said Court against such Debtor or Debtors.")

"Pr. 9. L. 25. After ("Shillings") insert ("and exceeding Two Shillings")

"Pr. 12. L. 11. Leave out ("Calendar Months") and insert ("Weeks")

"Pr. 22. L. 25. After the Second ("the") insert ("Clerk and")

"Pr. 29. L. 16. After ("applied") insert (Clause B.)

("And be it further enacted, That whenever any Person shall be committed to Prison by virtue of any Execution or Process issued in pursuance of this Act, for the Recovery of any Debt or Costs, the Person or Persons at whose Suit such Execution or Process shall issue, shall pay and allow to the Person committed, the Sum of Two-pence a Day, for every Day he or she shall continue in Prison upon the same Execution or Process, towards his or her Subsistence, the same to be paid to the Keeper of the said Prison, or left at his House for the Use of the Person so committed; and in case any Default shall be made in the Payment of the said Sum of Two-pence a Day, for any One or more Day or Days, and due Proof on Oath of such Default shall be made to the Satisfaction of any Justice of the Peace residing and acting within the Limits of this Act (who is hereby authorized and empowered to administer such Oath) that then it shall be lawful for the said Justice to order and direct such Prisoner to be forthwith set at Liberty; and such Person shall thereupon be discharged from the Payment of the Money for which he or she shall have been so committed.")

Pr. 29. L. 19. After ("Shillings") insert ("and exceeding Two Shillings")

Pr. 30. L. 2. After ("Shillings") insert ("and doth exceed Two Shillings")

And the said Amendments, being read a Second Time, were agreed to by the House.

Revenue Officers voting Bill.

Ordered, That the Bill, intituled, "An Act for better securing the Freedom of Election of Members to serve in Parliament, by disabling certain Officers employed in the Collection or Management of His Majesty's Revenues, from giving their Votes at such Elections," be read a Second Time on Tuesday next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Cricklade Election Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for the preventing of Bribery and Corruption in the Election of Members to serve in Parliament for the Borough of Cricklade, in the County of Wilts;" and for the Lords to be summoned; and for hearing Counsel against the same, as also in Behalf of the Bill; and for the Attendance of several Witnesses:

Counsel were called in.

Then William Saunders was called in, and being sworn, was examined as follows:

Q. "What are you by Trade?"

A. "A Boatman now."

Q. "Where do you live?"

A. "At Cricklade St. (fn. 1) in the County of Wilts."

Q. "How long have you lived there?"

A. "Thirty Years and upwards."

Q. "Did you know it at the last General Election?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you hear of any Bribery at the last General Election?"

A. "I heard talk of Money being given or lent."

Q. "Whether there is not a general Reputation that there was Bribery at the last Election?"

He was directed to withdraw.

Then the said Witness was again called in.

Q. "I ask the Witness whether he believes there was any Bribery practised at the last Election at Cricklade?"

He was again directed to withdraw.

Then the Witness was again called in.

Q. "Do you know of any Bribery that was practised at the last Election at Cricklade?"

A. "No, not with my own Knowledge."

Q. "Do you know Mr. Bristow?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Had you any Transactions with Mr. Bristow?"

A. "No; you don't mean any Thing I suppose that tends to myself upon my former Examination before the House of Commons, which I am ready to relate again if I am required."

Q. "What you do know, you will tell?"

A. "I was distressed for Money, and I borrowed £.10 of Henry Herbert Esquire, then, now Lord Porchester, of Mr. Bristow; but that was before any Thing of this Concern that is before this Honourable House now, for which my Brother and me gave a joint Note of Hand for the Money."

Q. "Are you a Voter for Cricklade?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Was you then?"

A. "Yes."

He was directed to withdraw.

Moved, "That the Lord on the Woolsack do apprize the Witness, that he is not obliged to answer any Questions that may accuse himself."

The same was agreed to; and the Witness was again called in, and acquainted by the Lord Chancellor, "That the House will not require an Answer to any Question which tends to accuse himself of the Crime of Bribery."

Q. "Whether you recollect the Evidence you gave before the House of Commons?"

A. "I believe I do, Part of it."

Q. "Have you any Objection to give the same Evidence here?"

A. "No, not at all."

Q. "When you have said, that you are willing to give the same Evidence that you gave in the House of Commons, it is not meant that whenever any Question is made to you that involves you in any Bribery, that you should not stop and say, I won't answer that Question now, though you did answer it then— Do you know Lord Porchester?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Are you a Boatman?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Was you a Freeholder when you knew Mr. Herbert?"

A. "I had a Freehold Estate at that Time, but not in the County of Wilts, nor at Cricklade; it was in the County of Warwick?"

Q. "Do you know Mr. Bristow?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Do you know Mr. Burt?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Was you at any Time distressed for Money in Business?"

A. "Yes, I was."

Q. "Did you ask Lord Porchester to assist you?"

A. "Yes, I remember I did; but I should object to that Question."

Q. "At what Time was it that you asked Lord Porchester to assist you?"

A. "Is that Question fair?"

Q. "Then you give no Answer to it; what did Lord Porchester tell you?"

A. "I object to that."

Q. "I do not mean to ask you what Answer you gave Lord Porchester; I only mean to ask you, what Answer Lord Porchester gave to you, which does not affect you. What did Lord Porchester say to you?"

A. "Lord Porchester said, if I would apply to Mr. Burt or Mr. Bristow first, he said he would do any Thing that lay in his Power for me; and that if I would apply to Mr. Burt or Mr. Bristow, he would do whatsoever they thought was right for me, or Words to that Effect."

Q. "Did you tell Mr. Burt what Lord Porchester said to you?"

A. "I did."

Q. "What did Mr. Burt say to you?"

A. "He referred me to Mr. Bristow."

Q. "What did Bristow say to you?"

A. "I am not clear; but I believe he said he had nothing to do with it, or to that Purport; and he referred me to Mr. Bristow."

Q. "Did you see Mr. Bristow?"

A. "I did."

Q. "What did he say to you?"

A. "I must object to that Question I believe."

Q. "I do not ask you what you said to Bristow, but what Bristow said to you?"

A. "When I made Application, he did not choose to go so far as I wanted, not in the Sum; he said he would venture at Ten."

Q. "Ten what?"

A. "Ten Pounds; I gave my Note, which I have already mentioned."

Q. "When he gave you Ten Pounds, did he give it you in a Note?"

A. "He gave me a Draught on Henry Herbert Esquire for Ten Pounds."

Q. "Do you know Mr. Bedwell?"

A. "Yes, I do."

Q. "Had you any Transactions with him?"

A. "Yes, he gave me Cash for that Draft."

Q. "Did any Body tell you, you was to go to him that he would give you Cash for that?"

A. "No; I was very well acquainted with him; he does a good deal in that Way; and he often changes Notes and Draughts for they he is acquainted with."

Q. "Have you heard any Voters say, "that they have received Money?"

He was directed to withdraw.

Mr. Grant.—"The Allegation in this Bill is, that there was Bribery and Corruption at the last Election at Cricklade; the Fact to be proved is, there was such Bribery; in order to prove that Fact, I understand this Evidence is to be given; that the Witness has heard a Person say, that he was guilty of Bribery, he does not himself prove the Fact that any Person was guilty of Bribery, but he has heard some Body say he was guilty of Bribery; that is therefore hearsay Evidence, as far as it affects us; as far as it affects third Parties against the Man himself who made the Consession, this would be good Evidence; and if your Lordships were trying only the Man who made that Confession, that would be good and conclusive Evidence against him; but there are a great many other Parties who are affected by this Bill, besides the Individual who made that Confession; the whole Borough of Cricklade is to be affected by this Bill; every Voter of the Borough is to be affected by this Bill; and we are to be affected; why? because another Man has accused himself of a Crime; we should have an Opportunity of examining that other Man; he may tie himself down by his own Consession; he may afford Evidence against himself that will convict him of Bribery; but that is not to be received as conclusive Evidence against us; I object to that as being hearsay Evidence."

The Witness was again called in;

And the Lord Chancellor acquainted him, "The House was of Opinion, That what he had heard other Voters of Cricklade say concerning their having been guilty of Bribery, is not a Question that affects himself with Guilt, and that therefore he is bound to answer it."

Q. "Have you heard any Voters say that they had received any Money?"

A. "I heard John Smith, that used to keep the White Hart, say he received Five Guiueas."

Q. "For what?"

A. "He did not know for what."

Q. "From whom?"

A. "Nor he did not say from whom; as he kept a Public House, it was in public Conversation; and he did not say for what nor from whom."

Q. "What was the Conversation that led to this?"

A. "I cannot be particular; it was a general Talk in the Place about Money being lent and given; when People get into a Public House they talk of one Thing and another; and one may not observe every Thing that passes in Company."

Q. "For what Purpose was it said that the Money was borrowed or given?"

A. "I imagine it must be something about Money lent or given."

Q. "But what was the Conversation you heard?"

A. "I did not pay any great Attention to it, more than I heard him say he received Five Guineas."

Q. "Was or was not the Conversation you are now alluding to, in which Smith said he had received the Five Guineas, a Conversation concerning the Money that was given for voting at Cricklade?"

A. "I believe it was."

Q. "What did you hear Benjamin Enock say?"

A. "That he received Five Guineas."

Q. "And what was the Conversation that led to that?"

A. "I believe it was much the same Conversation; it was not at the same Time; it was at a different Time."

Q. "Was John Smith at the White Hart a Voter at Cricklade at that Time?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did he vote at that Election?"

A. "He did, and I believe the former."

Q. "What did Benjamin Enock say he received the Five Guineas for?"

A. "I did not hear him say."

Q. "What was the Conversation that led to his saying that?"

A. "There was no Conversation I recollect in particular; that was at a Public House, the Sign of the Crown, I heard him mention that."

Q. "What were you talking about?"

A. "I cannot tell; it was as publicly talked of in the Public Kitchens at Cricklade as any Business is or Trade in the Land."

Q. "What was publicly talked of?"

A. "The Five Guineas they received?"

Q. "They received for what?"

A. "They did not express for what."

Q. "What was generally understood when there was so much talk about receiving Five Guineas?"

Mr. Grant.—"I submit to your Lordships, the general Understanding of the Witness is not Evidence."

Q. "You talk of a general Discourse in the Town about that Time, of giving and receiving Money, as much as about any other Business or Trade whatsoever; now what was the Meaning and Intention of that Talk about Money?"

A. "I believe it was generally understood upon Election Account."

Q. "Was there any Conversation of this Sort at that Time that you heard Enock say, that he received the Five Guineas, or was it only general Conversation at other Times?"

A. "It was in a Public Kitchen; one was talking of one Thing, one of another; I did not pay any particular Attention; I sat pretty close to him, and I heard him say, "he received Five Guineas."

Q. "Was that the Conversation in the Kitchen at that Time?"

A. "It was."

Q. "Did they say they had given Notes payable to Mr. Herbert?"

A. "I do not recollect that either Smith or him said any Thing about the Notes to me, or to any other Person, while I was in Company."

Q. "I wish you to recollect yourself only to be sure of the Fact, it is a great Distance of Time; did you hear them or not say they gave Notes payable to Mr. Herbert for this Money?"

A. "To the best of my Recollection I do not know that I heard them say any Thing about the Notes, not either of them; if I had thought of being asked these Questions I would have been more particular."

Q. "Do you recollect having heard any other Persons besides John Smith and Benjamin Enock say so?"

A. "No, I don't."

Q. "Did Lord Porchester go about the Town and canvas any Body for their Votes?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you see him?"

A. "He asked me to vote for his Friend Mr. Macpherson, but in a very odd Manner."

Q. "What was the Manner?"

A. "He said, when he came and asked me, how do you do? He said, Your Vote, I believe, you have none; I only ask you for your Interest; and I think that was an odd Manner of canvassing."

Q. "Was there any Thing about a Gridiron that used to be chalked up at the Doors?"

A. Yes, there was.

Q. "What was the Meaning of that?"

A. "It was generally understood that where the Gridiron were at People's Doors, that they were left out, and had not received any of the Money that you are talking of."

Mr. Anstruther.—"It strikes me that this Question goes exactly upon the Footing of the Question your Lordships rejected; it is a Question that goes again to general Understanding."

Q. "Did you see any Gridirons chalked up upon any People's Doors?"

A. "Yes, there was one at the Door where I live; I think it remains there to this very Time, for I have never rubbed it out."

Q. "What did you hear any Person say was the Reason of these Gridirons being chalked up?"

A. "I heard them say such a one and such a one have a Gridiron at their Door; and it was generally understood that those People had not received the Five Guineas."

Q. "How many Gridirons might there have been in the whole Town?"

A. "I cannot tell the Number; a good many."

Q. "At last how many were there?"

A. "There might be Four Score for what I know or more."

Q. "Some were rubbed out, were they not?"

A. "Yes, I believe some were rubbed out, but a great many remain to this Day unrubbed out; if they were rubbed out one Day they were put on again the next Evening."

Q. "What were they put on for the next Day?"

A. "I have already mentioned what was the general Opinion of the People; they that were or dironed, as they called it, were them that had not received the Five Guineas as they talked of."

Q. "But suppose they had received the Five Guineas, and the Gridiron was rubbed out, what was it put on for again?"

A. "The People of the House would rub it out sometimes, because they would not be laughed at by their Neighbours, and then in the Evening it was put on again."

Q. "How many Voters are there at Cricklade?"

A. "Upwards of Two hundred, I believe."

Q. "How many Gridirons remained at last?"

A. "I cannot tell, I imagine there may be a good many now; I cannot recollect how many."

Q. "You never counted them?"

A. "No."

Q. "Do you know any Instance of any Money being paid to any one Person whose Gridiron was rubbed out?"

A. "No, I do not."

Q. "Do you know Mr. Bristow?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did he act as Lord Porchester's Agent?"

A. "Yes, I always looked upon it that he did."

Q. "Did Mr. Burt act as Lord Porchester's Agent too?"

A. "He canvassed with him I believe."

Q. "Did you see him?"

A. "I do not recollect that I did see him, but I believe he did."

Mr. Anstruther.—"With Submission to your Lordships, I would beg leave to state, that asking a Man whether such a Person was his Agent, is asking a Person to draw a Conclusion from certain Facts; Agency is to be discovered from a Variety of Facts, from which Facts your Lordships will draw the Conclusion whether such a Person is or is not an Agent; with Submission to the House, perhaps it would be more regular to put the Question, What did Bristow do? and then your Lordships would be enabled to judge whether he so doing came under that Character described to be an Agent; Agent is a Character in Law."

Q. "What is your Reason for thinking Bristow an Agent of Lord Porchester?"

A. "He canvassed with him."

Q. "Was there any other Thing he did, that made you take him to be an Agent besides that?"

A. "Nothing but what I have already related."

Q. "Did not Lord Porchester send you to Mr. Bristow to receive some Money?"

A. "He referred me to him."

Q. "And did not he refer you to him or Mr. Burt?"

A. "Yes, to both of them."

Q. "Who gave you the £.10 Draught?"

A. "Mr. Bristow."

Q. "As who, as the Agent for Lord Porchester?"

A. "He drew the Draught in his own Name."

Q. "Did not he give you that Draught upon the Account of Lord Porchester?"

A. "He gave it me when I gave him that joint Note of Hand."

Cross-examined by Mr. Grant.

Q. "At what Time was this first Conversation you have mentioned with Mr. Herbert?"

A. "Soon after Mr. Macpherson's first Election."

Q. "What Time was that?"

A. "I cannot recollect."

Q. "What Year was it?"

A. "I am not certain."

Q. "Was it in 1779?"

A. "I cannot tell; it might be."

Q. "Was you a Voter at that Time?"

A. "I was not resident in the Borough at that Time, though I lived in the Parish."

Q. (From the House.)—"But you had a Vote?"

A. "If there had been a contested Election, I should have claimed a Vote, whether it might have been rejected I do not know."

Q. (From the House)—"You thought you was a Voter?"

A. "I had a House in a Place, the same I live in now."

Mr. Grant—"At this first Conversation with Lord Porchester did any Thing pass about the Election?"

A. "Not a Word."

Q. "Why did Lord Porchester make this Offer to you?"

A. "When Mr. Duer deserted his Petition which came before the House of Commons Seven Years ago, Lord Porchester took up the Matter for the Voters, there was a Petition signed by Six Voters; Lord Porchester was the Friend to the Voters to establish their Rights and Privileges upon the Return that was made illegally, and that was the Means that I became acquainted with Lord Porchester; I was principally concerned for Mr. Duer at that Time to have the whole Management of his Business when Mr. Duer gave up the Petition; Lord Porchester took up the Petition of the Voters, and applied to me as being Agent for Mr. Duer to give him the best Assistance I could, through the Line of Evidence to carry the Cause on."

Q. "Then you was connected with Lord Porchester before this Election?"

A. "Yes, Seven Years ago it is about now, I believe."

Q. "You never saw any Money given?"

A. "No."

Q. "At the Time of this Conversation with Mr. Smith and Mr. Enock, was there any Thing said about the Account on which they received it?"

A. "No, they did not say any Thing more than I have already related."

Q. "Merely that they had received Five Guineas, but did not say from whom?"

A. "No."

Q. "Do you mean the Conversation which you said was common in Cricklade, that it was common in Cricklade at all Times, or only at the particular Times when these Men said they had received the Five Guineas?"

A. "It was the general Conversation in both Town and Country."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Townsend Junior was called in, and being sworn, was examined as follows:

Q. "Are you a Voter at Cricklade?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Was you a Voter at the last General Election?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "The House will not require you to answer any Questions that shall affect you of Bribery yourself, therefore if any Question is put to you that you think will convict yourself of Bribery, and you do not choose to answer that Question, you are at Liberty not to answer it.—Do you know of any Bribery having been committed at Cricklade?"

A. "No, not for the last Election."

Q. "Do you know of any Bribery having been committed there at any Election?"

Mr. Grant.—"The Allegation of the Bill is Bribery committed at the last Election; I apprehend the Question should be confined to the last Election, it does not go to the Allegation of the Bill; he is called here to support the Allegation of that Bill, but the Proof of of the Allegation of that Bill is, that there was Bribery at the last Election at Cricklade."

Q. "There is an Allegation that there is Reason to suppose it may be so in future, and that may be inferred from the Conduct at former Elections.—Do you know of any Bribery having been committed there at any Election?"

A. "I do not know how to answer."

Q. "Do you know of any Person that at any Time being a Voter at Cricklade has received Money?"

A. "I cannot pretend to say of any Body receiving Money."

Q. "Is your Father a Voter at Cricklade?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Was he so at the last Election?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you see him receive any Money?"

A. "No, I cannot say that I did."

Q. "Did you see him sign a Note?"

A. "I saw him sign a Note."

Q. "What was it for?"

A. "I believe it was for receiving the Money."

Q. "When did you see him sign that Note?"

A. "Before this last Election."

Q. "How long before that?"

A. "I cannot pretend to say how long before."

Q. "How long might it be before?"

A. "I cannot make any Remembrance how long it was, it might be Half a Year."

Q. "Was it after the Canvass, or while People were canvassing about?"

A. "There was no great Canvass at the last Election."

Q. "Who was that Note made payable to, you saw him sign?"

A. "I cannot say, I am no Scholar."

Q. "Did your Father never tell you what that Note was?"

A. "I do not know that he could read it."

Q. "Whose House was it at?"

A. "Mr. Gun's."

Q. "Were there more Notes in the Room at the Time?"

A. "Yes, I believe there was."

Q. "Was Mr. Bristow there?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "What passed at the Time, tell your own Story of what happened?"

A. "Very little passed, nothing at all in particular passed that I remember; there was nothing at all mentioned about Election Affairs."

Q. "What was the subject of Conversation at the Time in the Room?"

A. "My Father was in the Room before me, he was coming out as I went in, I do not remember any Thing that I heard pass while I was there."

Q. "You say you saw him sign a Note, then if you met him coming out of the House, he must have gone in again to sign it, how did that happen?"

A. "No, I did not meet him a coming out, he signed a Note just as I went in, and came out immediately."

Q. "Was there any Conversation that led to it?"

A. "None at all that I remember."

Q. "What was the Conversation in the Room at the Time?"

A. "I did not hear no Words at all mentioned."

Q. "Did you stay in the Room after he came out?"

A. "I was in a Minute or Two I believe."

Q. "What was the Conversation at that Time?"

A. "Nothing at all that I remember that passed."

Q. "What were those other Notes you saw there?"

A. "I cannot say what they were."

Q. "What became of that Note your Father signed?"

A. "I do not know."

Q. "Did you never hear him say?"

A. "No."

Q. "Do you know whether he gave it any Body or not when he signed it?"

A. "He left it upon the Table."

Q. "Who took it up?"

A. "I believe Mr. Bristow took it up."

Q. "Did you see him take it up?"

A. "I cannot say I did, but I believe he did."

Q. "What makes you believe he took it up, unless you saw him take it up?"

A. "Not that in particular, there were more Notes upon the Table, that he had in his Hand."

Q. "Did you ever say to any Body that you had seen your Father receive the Money?"

A. "I do not remember that I ever did."

Q. "You were examined before a Committee of the House of Commons, were not you?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you say there you saw your Father receive Five Guineas?"

A. "I was never asked the Question."

Q. "You may have said such a Thing without being asked the Question; did you ever say so?"

A. "No."

Q. "You swear that?"

A. "I do not remember that ever I did."

Cross examined by Mr. Anstruther.

Q. "I wish you would fix about what Time you saw your Father sign this Note; was it six Months before the Election?"

A. "I cannot pretend to say; it was a great while before the Election; it might be Half a Year."

Q. "Had there been any canvassing before that Time?"

A. "No, not by Nobody."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Nevil Symonds was called in, and being sworn, was examined as follows:

Q. "Are you a Voter at Cricklade?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Was you so at the Time of the last General Election?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you vote at the last General Election?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "You need not answer any Questions that you may think will prove yourself guilty of Bribery—Do you know Thomas Davis?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Do you know one Hobgood?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you ever see or know of their doing any Thing tending to Bribery?"

A. "Wrote down upon the Table."

Q. "What did they write down upon the Table?"

A. "Twenty and Ten."

Q. "Which of the Two?"

A. "Davis wrote Twenty and Ten."

Q. "Is Davis a Voter?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Is Hobgood a Voter?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "What did they say when they wrote that Twenty and Ten?"

A. "Somebody there did not understand, so John Hobgood stood up and wrote, in, under the Twenty, and out, under the Ten."

Q. "And what did you understand that in, and that out, to mean?"

A. "I understood what Mr. Petrie designed to give, I thought it was."

Mr. Anstruther, "Surely his Understanding cannot be Evidence against us, unless he has some Facts upon which he can ground that Opinion."

Q. "Were Davis and Hobgood in Mr. Petrie's Interest?"

A. "Davis was."

Q. "What was Hobgood?"

A. "A Baker."

Q. "In whose Interest was he?"

A. "Mr. Macpherson's and Mr. Benfield's; Mr. Benfield's however."

Q. "Who was present in the Room at the Time this passed?"

A. "James Akerman."

Q. "Who was James Akerman?"

A. "A Dairy Man of Cricklade?"

Q. "Is he a Voter?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "At what Place did this pass?"

A. "At William Symmons's, the New Inn."

Q. "How long was it before the Election?"

A. "The Night before."

Q. "Was there any Body else present besides Akerman?"

A. "Yes, Price."

Q. "And who else?"

A. "Christopher Saunders."

Q. "Were they all Voters?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did Davis ask you to vote for any Body?"

A. "He asked me to vote for Mr. Petrie."

Q. "Did you promise him?"

A. "No."

Q. "What did you say?"

A. "That I had not promised nobody, nor should not promise nobody."

Q. "Was it upon that Occasion that he wrote the Chalk upon the Table?"

A. "Yes, I thought so."

Q. "Directly after you said you would not promise?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Am I to understand, that he did then directly write Ten, and Twenty, upon the Table?"

A. "Yes, after he asked me whether I would promise my Vote."

Q. "What did Davis say when he saw Hobgood write that Twenty in, and Ten out?"

A. "He looked at it and said, "that I will stand to."

Q. "Was Davis an Agent for any Body?"

A. "I took him to be an Agent for Mr. Petrie."

Q. "What Reason had you for thinking so?"

A. "He sent for me to canvass me I imagine."

Q. "Did he ask you for your Vote?"

A. "Yes, at that Time, not at no other."

Q. "How long did you stay in the Room?"

A. "An Hour or Two."

Q. "And what was the general Conversation there?"

A. "No more passed then, what did after that I cannot tell."

Q. "When you went out, did any Thing pass at the Door?"

A. "He asked me to go up to Mr. Petrie."

Q. "Did Davis say any Thing particularly to you as you went out of the Door?"

A. "He said, "Nevil, that shall not serve your Turn."

Q. "What did you understand by that?"

A. "I could not understand what to make of it."

Q. "Did you sup with Mr. Petrie?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "What did he say to you?"

A. "He asked me, "Whether I had promised my Vote?" I said, "No."

Q. "Did he tell you, you might apply to any Body?"

A. "No, he asked me, "Whether I would give him my Vote," I said, "I have not promised Nobody, nor I do not choose to do it."

Q. "What did he say then?"

A. "I cannot recollect."

Q. "Did he tell you that you might apply to any Body?"

A. "Yes, he said, "apply to my Friend Davis," and then he departed the Room."

Q. "Did he say that he would agree to any Thing, or stand by any Thing that Davis had said?"

A. "Apply to my Friend Davis, and what he does I will stand to," or something in that Manner."

Q. "Who were in the Room at that Time?"

A. "Mr. Akerman, Mr. Hobgood, Thomas Price, and some more."

Q. "Did he say the same Thing to any others?"

A. "No, not as I heard of, he said it in the Room amongst us all."

Q. "Did Mr. Petrie say any Thing, that he could go no further, or any Thing of that Sort?"

A. "No."

Q. "Did Gun say any Thing to you the next Morning?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "What did he say?"

A. "He came down to the White Hart, and said to me, "Nevil, do not be afraid, it is lodged in the Bank, and Nobody can draw it but we."

Q. "What was he speaking of at that Time?"

A. "Those were all the Words he said to me."

Q. "What did he refer to, that was in the Bank?"

A. "He never told me what was in the Bank."

Cross examined by Mr. Grant.

Q. "Who did you vote for?"

A. "Mr. Benfield."

Q. "Who did Hobgood vote for?"

A. "Mr. Benfield."

Q. "You did not vote for Mr. Petrie?"

A. "No."

Q. "Davis you say was connected with Mr. Petrie?"

A. "I take it so."

Q. "And Hobgood was against Mr. Petrie?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "And they both chalked upon the Table?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "You say James Akerman was present?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Who did he vote for?"

A. "I believe for Mr. Benfield."

He was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Man Gun was called in, and being sworn, was examined as follows:

Q. "The House will not require you to answer any Questions that affect yourself, unless you shall choose it—Do you know George Williams?"

A. "Very well."

Q. "Where do you live?"

A. "At Cricklade."

Q. "Are you a Voter there?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Were you a Voter at the last Election?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Do you know any Thing of George Williams being bribed?"

A. "I heard him say "he had the Money."

Q. "What Money?"

A. "I heard him say "he received Five Guineas?"

Q. "For what?"

A. "Upon a Note of Hand of Mr. Bristow upon Lord Porchester's Account."

Q. "Where did he say this?"

A. "I heard him say it in my House."

Q. "Was it relative to the Election?"

A. "It was in January, and the Election came on in September."

Q. "But what Reason have you for thinking it was for his Vote that he received that Money?"

A. "He and a great many People made Objections to signing these Notes when they were offered them, but Mr. Bristow said, "they never would be called upon for the Money."

Q. "Is that what Williams told you?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you hear Bristow say that?"

A. "I have heard Bristow say, "that they would never be called upon for the Money."

Q. "Was Bristow at that Time canvassing the Town."

A. "No, not till afterwards; he did not canvass the Town till I believe July or August; there was a Talk of the Parliament being dissolved at that Time, but it was not certain; Lord Porchester came down himself."

Q. "Did you hear Williams say, "he had received one of these Notes?"

A. "I heard him say, "he received the Money, and gave a Note of Hand for it, payable to Colonel Herbert, now Lord Porchester."

Q. "Do you know John Rogers?"

A. "Very well."

Q. "Do you know any Thing of his having been bribed?"

A. "I heard him say "he received Five Guineas, and gave a Note payable to Lord Porchester."

Q. "Do you know Samuel Broad?"

A. "I heard him say "he received Five Guineas, and gave a Note to Lord Porchester for it."

Q. "Did those Persons you have named vote?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Do you know John Haynes Senior?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say, "he received the Money."

Q. "Do you know John Haynes Junior?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say, "he had received the Five Guineas, and gave a Note for it."

Q. "Do you know John Arden?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Is he a Voter?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Was he so then?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Do you know any Thing of his having been bribed?"

A. "I heard him say, "he received Five Guineas, and gave a Note for it."

Q. "Do you know Richard Pater?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Do you know any Thing of his having been bribed?"

A. "Yes; I saw him receive it from Bristow; he gave a Note."

Q. "Do you know Thomas Barrett?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Is he a Voter?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Do you know William Barrett?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Is he a Voter?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Do you know Samuel Canter?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say "he received the Money the same as the rest had."

Q. "Do you know Robert Carter?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Do you know Adam Clarke?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say, "he had the Money upon the Note."

Q. "Do you know Robert Clarke?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say, "he had the Money upon the Note."

Q. "Do you know Benjamin Stratford?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say, "he had the Money?"

Q. "Do you know John Symonds?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say, "he had the Money."

Q. "Do you know Benjamin Enock?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say, "he had the Money upon the Note."

Q. "Do you know Nevil Symonds?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say, "he had the Money upon the Note, and he wanted to change it."

Q. "Do know Richard Dibbins?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say he had it."

Q. "Do you know William Ellis?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say he had it."

Q. "Do you know Thomas Faulkes?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say he had it."

Q. "Do you know James Jackson?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say he had it."

Q. "Do you know Zachariah Price?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say, "he discounted it with Mr. Bristow, and he gave his Note the same as the rest."

Q. "Do you know Thomas Skilling?"

A. "I heard him say he had it."

Q. "Thomas Peer?"

A. "I heard him say he had it."

Q. "Edward Taylor?"

A. "I heard him say he had it."

Q. "Richard Gardner?"

A. "I heard him say he had it."

Q. "Thomas Poulton Senior?"

A. "I heard him say he had it."

Q. "John Poulton?"

A. "I heard him say he had it."

Q. "William Millard?"

A. "I heard him say he had it."

Q. "Thomas Pyke?"

A. "I heard him say "he received Three Men's Money at once; his own, his Father's, and his Son's;" his Father's Name is Mark Pyke, his Son's Name is John Pyke; I heard Mark Pyke say, "his Son gave it him; and I heard Thomas Pyke's Son, John Pyke, say, he had received the Money."

Q. "William Smith?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had the Money."

Q. "Wilkins Ellis?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had received the Money."

Q. "John Hunter?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had received the Money."

Q. "John Truman?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had the Money."

Q. "William Packer?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had the Money."

Q. "John Slatter?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had the Money."

Q. "Thomas Hinton?"

A. "I know nothing of him."

Q. "William Hobbs?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had received the Money."

Q. "Edward Barns?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had received the Money."

Q. "Joseph Dibbins?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had received the Money."

Q. "John Cuss?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had received the Money."

Q. "Thomas Hayward?"

A. "He did not receive the Money; he is a Man a little out of his Mind; and Mr. Bristow bought Clothes for him with the Money; I heard Mr. Bristow say so himself."

Q. "Thomas Hall?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Hobgood?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Smith?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Hill?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Charles Smith?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Are all these Voters?"

A. "Yes, all Voters."

Q. "Joseph Enock?"

A. "I heard him say, "he received the Money."

Q. "Henry Garlick?"

A. "I heard him say, "he received the Money."

Q. "Thomas Jackson?"

A. "I saw him receive it."

Q. "Thomas Cuss Senior?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Nevil Cuss Junior?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Cove?"

A. "I heard him say he had received it."

Q. "Nevil Cuss Senior?"

A. "I heard him say he had received it."

Q. "William Cuss?"

A. "I heard him say he had received it."

Q. "Harry Birchall?"

A. "I heard him say he had received it."

Q. "Thomas Tombs?"

A. "I heard him say he had received it."

Q. "Walter Carter?"

A. "I know nothing of him; there is two Wat. Carters voted; I know of one that he received Two Guineas; and they said they thought "he was not a Parishioner, or else they would have given him more."

Q. "Was he a Voter?"

A. "He did vote."

Q. "How came he not to have as much as the others?"

A. "They thought he was not a Parishioner at the Time?"

Q. "But he did vote?"

A. "Yes; I heard him say, "he received Two Guineas in Part."

Q. "George Symonds Senior?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "James Nippers?"

A. "I saw him receive it."

Q. "Thomas Scull?"

A. "I saw him receive it."

Q. "Thomas Horne?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Carpenter?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Hollister Forrester?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Lucas?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "George Powell?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Jacobs?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Foukes?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Carter?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Kennewell?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Philip Johnson?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Richard Lucas?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "James Lucas?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Townsend Junior?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Daws?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Fitcher?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Henry Haywood?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "George Pyke?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Godwin?"

A. "I saw him receive it."

Q. "William Dainton?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Somerset Ritchins?"

A. "I heard him say "he received but Two Guineas and a Half."

Q. "How came he not to receive more?"

A. "I cannot tell the Reason."

Q. "John Standly?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Richard Taylor?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Strange?"

A. "I have heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Standly?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Rudler?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Robert Eyles?"

A. "I saw him receive it."

Q. "William Dash?"

A. "I saw him receive it."

Q. "William Saunders?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Tinsey?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Fry?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Strange?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Strange?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Pound?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Boun?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Richard Liddell?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Jonathan Telling?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Kilminster Senior?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Kilminster Junior?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Are they all Voters?"

A. "All Voters."

Q. "Robert Hopkins?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Clifford?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Henry Haywood Junior?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Arden?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Cuss?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Hinton?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Henry Spaish?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Johnsons?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Godwin?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Stratford?"

A. "There is one Thomas Stratford, I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Batt?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Zachary Giles?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Driver?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Herring?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Robert Hindon?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Olive Mills?"

A. "I saw him receive Five Guineas."

Q. "John Chesham?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Isaac Lawrence?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Peer?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Clarke Senior?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Pinnock?"

A. "I heard him say "he received but Two Guineas and a Half."

Q. "William Bucker?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Christopher Kemble?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Christopher King Senior?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Thomas Harman?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Dowsell?"

A. "I heard him say, "he had a fat Pig for his Money."

Q. "John Mabson?"

A. "I heard him say he had received it."

Q. "Charles Stratford?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "John Kemble?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Little?"

A. "I heard him say he received it, and he bought a Watch with his Money."

Q. "Thomas Herring?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Charles Mathyson?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "William Cuss?"

A. "I heard him say "he received Two Guineas and a Half."

Q. "John Dun?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Samuel Archer?"

A. "I heard him say he received it."

Q. "Did you see my Lord Porchester at Cricklade?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you see him canvass?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you hear him ask any Body for their Votes?"

A. "A great many."

Q. "Did you know Mr. Bristow?"

A. "Very well."

Q. "Did he canvass?"

A. "Yes, for Mr. Macpherson with my Lord Porchester."

Q. "Who did Lord Porchester ask Votes for?"

A. "Mr. Macpherson."

Q. "Do you keep a Public House at Cricklade?"

A. "Yes, I do."

Q. "What is it?"

A. "The Sign of The Swan."

Q. "Was that House opened for any Body?"

A. "Yes, for Mr. Petrie; at former Elections it had been opened for Lord Porchester's Friends."

Q. "Did Mr. Petrie canvass?"

A. "Ye."

Q. "Did Colonel Herbert buy any Houses at Cricklade?"

A. "Yes, a good many, as I was told; there is a good many Houses there that he calls his own now."

Q. "Was Bristow a Manager for him?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "In what Manner did he appear to be a Manager."

A. "All the Repairs that were wanted doing they applied to him."

Q. "Did you hear Lord Porchester send any Person to Mr. Bristow?"

A. "If the Houses were to be let, I have heard Lord Porchester say, "Bristow had the Management of them to let them, he was to take Care that the Houses were filled."

Q. "Do you know Captain Morgan Burt?"

A. "Very well."

Q. "Did he appear as any Body's Agent?"

A. "He went about with Lord Porchester and canvassed; he was agent for Lord Porchester, only being in the Militia he could not attend; then it was turned over to Mr. Bristow and Mr. Adams."

Q. "Did Mr. Bristow go with a Mr. Adams into any Room in your House?"

A. "Yes, he came and asked for a Fire to be lighted in the Bar Room in my House, which was several Nights running."

Q. "What passed in that Room?"

A. "A great many People went into the Room to receive Money of him."

Q. "Did you see him pay Money to any Body?"

A. "Yes, and a great many People came out and said they had got the Money."

Q. "Were they Voters?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "When was this?"

A. "In January and February 1780."

Q. "Was this for several Nights?"

A. "Yes, for several Nights running."

Q. "Who called them in?"

A. "Mr. Bristow would come out and call them in."

Q. "What was the Sum?"

A. "Five Guineas in general."

Q. "Did he give it them or let them have it upon their Notes?"

A. "Upon their Notes generally; I heard several of the People say they had got the Five Guineas and now they could afford to treat."

Q. "Did you ever hear whether those Notes were to be called for?"

A. "No."

Q. "Did you ever hear that they were not to be called for?"

A. "No."

Q. "Did you never hear Mr. Bristow say they would not be called for?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "In whose Presence did he say that?"

A. "He said it to me."

Q. "To any Body else?"

A. "I don't know that there was any Body else but he and I when he had said it; he has said it in the public Kitchen to me."

Q. "Were there any other People present?"

A. "I don't know who might be there; I did not remark that in particular; but he had said it to other People as well as to me, because I have heard People say so."

Q. "Did any Body object to sign the Notes till Lord Porchester came to them?"

A. "I heard several object to sign the Notes at first setting off, only Mr. Bristow made that Declaration to them, as they told me, that they should never be called upon."

Q. "Did Lord Porchester call any Meeting and mention any Thing about Two Friends?"

A. "Yes, he sent a Man round the Town and drawed out a List to invite; he sent a Man to invite some particular Friends which were to meet at my House in the Evening, and spend the Evening with them: When they came, John Skilling, who invited them, proposed Two Friends (he was the Clerk of the Parish), he proposed Two Friends of Lord Porchester to stand for the Borough."

Q. "Did he name them?"

A. "No, he did not name none. He said, what was the Reason he could not bring in Two Friends as well as One? The Voters said, they would give him one, but would not give him both; they would not tie their Hands behind them."

Q. "Was Lord Porchester displeased at this?"

A. "Very much."

Q. "What did he say?"

A. "He wanted to know the Reason why he could not bring in Two Friends as well as One; he would not thank them for One.—Two or Three of the Company asked why Mr. Macpherson did not come; he said, I always understood you did not love the Name of Mac; that was the Answer I heard."

Q. "Did Mr. Bristow give any Reason why the Notes were given for the Money?"

A. "The Reason he said was, he should not like to have it said of him as of other Interest Makers, that he had pocketed the Money, as they had said of others; he was willing to shew his Lordship he had pocketed none."

Q. "Did Colonel Herbert say any Thing about a Dissolution of Parliament?"

A. "Yes, he said, he expected the Parliament would be dissolved very soon; at the Time he made the Proposal for his Two Friends."

Q. "Who paid your Bill?"

A. "Mr. Bristow."

Q. "Did any Body order him to pay it you?"

A. "I can't say who ordered him."

Q. "Do you know?"

A. "No, I drawed my Bill upon Colonel Herbert as he was then, and Mr. Bristow paid me; I have not got a Copy of the Bill, I have it at home."

Q. "Do you know any Thing about a Gridiron being chalked up upon Houses?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "What was done about that?"

A. "There were Gridirons put upon the Doors of them as I have heard say that did not receive the Money."

Q. "Do you know of any Body at whose Door a Gridiron was put up?"

A. "There was one put up upon mine, and a great many more Doors."

Q. "Do you know who put them up?"

A. "No, I don't know who put them."

Q. "Do you know of any Gridiron having been put up at Hollister Forrester's?"

A. "I saw a Gridiron hang up at the Sign Post."

Q. "Did Mr. Bristow ask him any Question about it?"

A. "I heard Hollister Forrester say Mr. Bristow came and asked him, whether it was not possible to have that Gridiron taken down; he said, No, it was a comical Lock, it was not every Key that would unlock it; it must be a Key with Five golden Wards that would unlock it."

Q. "Do you know how many Voters there are in all at Cricklade?"

A. "I cannot say."

Q. "How many voted at the last Election?"

A. "Two hundred and four, or five, or six, or thereabouts, I believe; I don't know justly; there have been Three hundred Voters there I know."

Q. "There were several Voters you say you saw receive the Money?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Where did they receive it?"

A. "In this Bar Room, that Mr. Bristow ordered me to light a Fire in."

Q. "All at the same Time?"

A. "At different Times."

Q. "Do you know Richard Taylor?"

A. "Very well."

Q. "Do you know any Thing about his having been bribed?"

A. "I did not see him receive any; I heard him say he received Five Guineas, and I heard him ask Mr. Bristow for it."

Q. "What was it for?"

A. "He gave a Note for it, as he told me himself, the same as the rest did; he asked Mr. Bristow for it in my House before me. Mr. Taylor said, "I will vote for your Friend if you will give me the Money." Mr. Bristow said, "No, you are joking me," or Words to that Effect. He said, "he would be determined to know whether he was off or on." Mr. Bristow said, If you will mow for me you shall have it;" and afterwards he told me "he went a mowing for him and had it."

Q. "Did you ever hear Mr. Bristow say he thought Lord Porchester would carry his Election?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you ever hear him say that Money would carry his Election, or any Thing of that Sort?"

A. "I cannot say I have."

Q. "Did you ever hear him say he thought Lord Porchester would carry the Election?"

A. "I have heard him say he thought Lord Porchester's Friend would carry the Election."

Q. "Did you ever hear him give any Reason why he thought he would carry it?"

A. "No, I never heard him say any otherwise."

Q. "Did you ever hear him say, he did not think any Body would oppose Lord Porchester?"

A. "No, I never heard him say that; they expected they would be opposed; that was what they left my House upon, because another Gentleman came to my House; they set up another House against me."

Q. "Did Mr. Bristow refuse Money to any of the Voters?"

A. "Yes, some of them."

Q. "Why?"

A. "I can't tell what was the Reason of it, not for certain."

Q. "Did you never hear him give any Reason why he refused Money to any of the Voters?"

A. "Not no particular Reason, I can't recollect."

Q. "Any general Reason?"

A. "Not to say as one should not have it no more than another; but I have known several that had not it."

Q. "Did you ever hear him say, "they were afraid they should be sued for any Money?"

A. "No, I can't say I did."

Q. "At the Time when Mr. Bristow refused Money to the Voters, did he give for his Reason, "that they would not vote for Colonel Herbert's Friend?" You say Bristow refused Money to some of the Voters?"

A. "There were several did not have the Money."

Q. "At the Time he refused it, what did he say to them?"

A. "I know they had not the Money; I was not by, and did not know what Mr. Bristow said."

Q. "Did the Voters give any Reason for refusing to sign these Notes?"

A. "I can't say that I did hear any particular Reason."

Cross-examined by Mr. Grant.

Q. "So they set up another House against you?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "That you did not like?"

A. "I did not dislike it."

Q. "Did not you lose by it?"

A. "I do not know that I did."

Q. "Were they not good Customers to you before?"

A. "They paid for what they had."

Q. "And brought a good deal of Company?"

A. "I do not know that they brought any more Company than others."

Q. "Where did all this Conversation pass?"

A. "A great many in my House, some as we came upon the Road from Market and Fairs, and one Place and another."

Q. "So every Man made a Point of telling you what they received?"

A. "It was general Conversation."

Q. "And some particular Conversation led to that I suppose?"

A. "Not at all; only they said, "they had got the Money;" we could tell who had got it, and who had not."

Q. "Can you tell how many received the Money?"

A. "No."

Q. "Can you tell who were present at the Conversation besides the Voters and you?"

A. "I cannot say; George Townsend I remember was present when Richard Taylor said so."

Q. "Are there any other Instances?"

A. "I do not know that there is any particular Instances that I can recollect."

Q. "Did you ever attend at the Assizes?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Did you give the same Evidence there always that you have done here?"

A. "I believe I did to the best of my Knowledge."

Q. "Was you ever a Witness in any Cause that was tried before Mr. Baron Perryn at Salisbury?"

A. "Yes, I was."

Q. "In how many?"

A. "I was a Witness before Mr. Baron Perryn at the first Assizes against Mr. Bristow."

Q. "How many Causes did you give Evidence in before Mr. Baron Perryn?"

A. "I cannot pretend to say."

Q. "Were there a Dozen or Twenty?"

A. "I cannot pretend to say."

Q. "Were there Six?"

A. "Yes, because they tried them Six at a Time."

Q. "Was you called upon more than once?"

A. "Yes, I was."

Q. "Then there must have been Twelve?"

A. "But I cannot pretend to say how many there were; they let me out and called me in again upon the same very often."

Q. "What was the Consequence of those Trials before Mr. Baron Perryn; was there a Verdict for the Plaintiff or Defendant?"

A. "I cannot say, I was not there when the Verdicts were given."

Q. "Were they acquitted or found guilty of Bribery?"

A. "I did not ask any Questions about it."

Q. "And you say upon your Oath you do not know?"

A. "Not for a Certainty."

Q. "Did you ever hear they were acquitted?"

A. "No, I cannot say, they do not know themselves whether they be acquitted or not acquitted, how should they say to me?"

Q. "But you are sure upon those Occasions you gave the same Evidence you did here?"

A. "Yes, to the best of my Knowledge."

Q. "Was you a Witness in the Case of Thomas Boun?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Do you recollect whether he was acquitted or not?"

A. "I cannot say."

Examined by the House.

Q. "Do you or not remember the Names of the Causes in which you was a Witness at Salisbury?"

A. "I cannot recollect."

Q. "That there was an Action against Mr. Bristow, you know that?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "You was examined there?"

A. "Yes, to one Count."

Q. "Did you, at that Time, give an Account of all the Names you have just now mentioned to the House?"

A. "No, not at Mr. Bristow's, I was not asked the Questions."

Q. "Was there any Trial upon which you gave an Account of all those Names?"

A. "I was asked upon Robert Eyles's Trial."

Q. "And when you was asked the Question about Eyles receiving it, you was not asked about all the others?"

A. "No."

Q. "You swear you saw Robert Eyles receive it?"

A. "Yes."

Q. "Do you know whether Robert Eyles was acquitted or not?"

A. "I cannot say whether he was or was not; he was not tried then; there was no Action but what was against Mr. Bristow then."

Q. "Was you examined in the Action against Eyles?"

A. "I believe I was; that was last Summer Assizes."

Q. "Was he acquitted?"

A. "I cannot pretend to say, I do not know who was acquitted and who was not."

Q. "I think you say you heard Mr. Bristow refuse the Bribe to some Voters; in what Manner was the Bribe proposed by them?"

A. "I heard him refuse letting them have Money."

Q. "You don't know exactly the Proposal that was given in to Bristow?"

A. "No, his Excuse often was, he had not got Money, he must write to Colonel Herbert?"

Q. "You do not know what the Proposal was from them to Mr. Bristow, for what he should give them Money?"

A. "No, I did not hear him say."

He was directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further hearing of Witnesses, and also the hearing of Counsel against the Bill, and the Second Reading of the said Bill be put off to Wednesday next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Lunæ, sextum diem instantis Maii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Footnotes

1 Sic. in Orig. Evidence.