Addenda

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English Heritage

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Author

Walter C. Pepys and Ernest Godman

Year published

1905

Page

57

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'Addenda', Survey of London Monograph 6: St Dunstan's Church, Stepney (1905), pp. 57. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=117411 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES.

The following notes, in correction or amplification of the text, have been inserted in order to make the information there given more complete:—

p. 7. The Chapel on Stepney Marsh, or Isle of Dogs. For further information concerning this, see article on "Pontefract-on-Thames," by Colonel Prideaux, in Notes and Queries, 9th S. ix. 121.

p. 9. 3rd line from top, for present read eighteenth century.

p. 23. Shield on Lady Dethick's monument. The arms blazoned are of Alex. Nevill, impaling those of his wife.

p. 26. Inscription on Gibson monument. The dates given in Strype's Stow are evidently misprints. N. G. died in 1540 (see Weever's insc. p. 27), and his wife in 1554.

p. 48. Vestry Minutes. Some of the volumes of daybooks of burials, baptisms, fees, &c., were seriously damaged by the 1901 fire, as they were only kept in a wooden box.

p. 52. The Font. Old illustrations show the font to have been of a quite different shape to that at present in the church, & state that it was removed in 1806. The pillars of the present font are said to be old.

p. 54. Beadle's staves. According to the Rector, there are at present only two of these in the possession of Stepney the 1718/9 being the M.E.O.T., and the plated one, dated 1784.

p. 55. The surname of Richard de Dokeseye, who is a party to a fine of 1365, probably expresses an ancient form of the place-name which is now represented by the Isle of Dogs.

plate 3. The large slab in the nave floor, eastward of the font, should be specially noted. It is generally regarded as a part of the monument to "Henry Steward, lord Darnley," d. 1545. The inscription, which has now disappeared, is given by Weever (Fun. Mon., p. 307, ed. 1767). This slab contains the matrices of numerous small shields forming a border.

Bibliography. It is not necessary, as heretofore, to give an extended list of books, &c. referred to, as full references to them will be found throughout the Monograph.