Sheriffs' Court Roll, 1320
Membrane 24 (transcript pp.90-91)

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'Sheriffs' Court Roll, 1320: Membrane 24 (transcript pp.90-91)', London Sheriffs Court Roll 1320. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=119342 Date accessed: 26 October 2014.


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Membrane 24

[m. 24]
in respectu





misericordia
Richard of Rothynge, carpenter, and Isabella his wife were attached to answer Ralph of Oxford, 'portour', in a plea of trespass. The pl. complains that on Monday after the feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin, 14 Edward II [18th August, 1320], in the par. of St. Botulph without Aldersgate, the defs., with their son Thomas, assaulted them with force and arms, to his damage £20.0.0. The defs. deny the charge and put themselves upon their country. Afterwards the jury comes and returns a verdict of not guilty. Pl. in mercy. Defs. sine die.
Isabella of Seint Cler was attached to answer Alexander of Lincoln - essoin -, clerk, in a plea of trespass. The pl. complains that on Monday after the feast of the Decollation of St. John the Baptist, 14 Edward II [1st September, 1320], in the par. of St. George, the def. assaulted him with force and arms, wounding him in the left eye with a stick. The def. denies the trespass and puts herself upon her country. A jury of the venue is summoned, and Isabella is mainprised by Nicholas of Bentele, Thomas of Saint Cler, and William of Tanrugge.
patria










misericordia
William of Staunford, chaplain and John Sauvage were attached to answer Andrew Gubbe, servant ['valletus'] of Richard Gubbe, in a plea of trespass. The pl. complains that while he had charge of the house and goods of the said Richard at Eldefisshestrete, during his absence at the fair of St. Botulph, the defs., on Thursday after the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula, 14 Ed II [7th August, 1320], entered the said house with force and arms, broke open a chest and carried off £6.0.0 in money, to his damage £20.0.0. The defs. come and deny the charge, and put themselves upon their country. A jury of the venue of Eldefishestrete is summoned, and the defs., who can find no security to appear, are committed to prison. Afterwards the jury comes and finds for the pl., assessing the damages at £12.0.0, the defs to go to prison until they shall have paid the said damages, and made satisfaction to the king.
[m 24 d.]
patria
Edith of Lodelawe was attached to answer Robert of Lodelawe, goldsmith, in a plea of trespass. The pl. complains that the said Edith, with one Richard of Aumesburi, goldsmith, came to his house in the par. of St Alban's, Wodestrete, on the vigil of the feast of St. James the Apostle, 14 Edward II [24th July, 1320], and carried off a gilt cup worth £40.0.0, and £25.0.0 in money, to his damage £100.0.0. The def. denies the charge and puts herself upon her country. Afterwards the jury comes-
[p. 91] -and returns a verdict of guilty. The damages are assessed at £36.0.0. The def. is committed to prison until etc.
fe cit legem




lex ad quindenam
John Godefray, carpenter, waged his law v. Elen, relict of William le Shereman, concerning the charge that on Friday the feast of the Assumption of the B. V. M, 14 Edward II [15th August, 1320], he went to the pls. house in the par. of St. Andrew of Holebourne, and carried off a copper pot worth 5s. and a pitcher worth 12d., with other goods. Afterwards he came and made his law. Therefore he is quit, and the pl. is in mercy for a false plaint.
lex ad quindenam Benet Newman was attached to answer Henry le Callere in a plea of trespass. The pl. complains that whereas the def. lived in his house outside Bisshopesgate and served him well and faithfully in his craft of burser from Easter, 13 Edward II to the Easter following [1320-1321], during the past half-year he carried off at divers times leather, breech-girdles and other goods worth 60s., to his damage, 5m. Benet comes and denies the charge, and, as a freeman of the city, wages his law. A day is appointed etc.
patria A jury of the venue of Douuegate is summoned to recognize whether Alice, wife of Andrew of Tyndale, on Wednesday before Ascension Day, 10 Edward II [11th May, 1317], at Douuegate received from Richard of Lincoln a striped tunic worth 4s. in pledge for the payment of 6d. due to the said Alice and Andrew, who, when the pl. proffered the said sixpence refused to return the tunic aforesaid, to his damage 10s. Afterwards the jury came and returned that the said Alice received from the pl. a tunic worth 3d. which she was prepared to return if the pl. were willing to pay the 6d. in question.
lex ad quindenam William of Hakeneye waged his law v. John Stedeman concerning the charge that John did not pay him 9s. of a debt of 18s. due for tanned leather sold to him at divers times in Chepe and outside Newgate, between Christmas, 13 Edward II [1320], and the feast of the Purification next following.
cognitio John Stedeman recognises his obligation to pay William of Hakeneye 9s. at the quindene.