Chiswick

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1937

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7-10

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'Chiswick', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Middlesex (1937), pp. 7-10. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=121959 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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6 CHISWICK (C.d.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XVI, S.W. (b)XXI, N.W.)

Chiswick is a parish on the N. bank of the Thames immediately W. of the London county-boundary.

Ecclesiastical

b(1) Parish Church of St. Nicholas stands near the river, on the E. side of the parish. The walls of the tower are of rag-stone rubble with dressings of Reigate and other freestone. The West Tower was built by William Bordall, vicar (1416–35). The rest of the church was entirely re-built in 1882.

Architectural Description—The West Tower (11¼ ft. by 12¼ ft.) is of early 15th-century date and of three stages with an embattled parapet. The two-centred tower-arch is of two moulded orders, the outer continuous and the inner resting on attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases. The W. window is modern except for the splays and rear-arch; the W. doorway is entirely modern. The second stage has, in the N., S. and W. walls, a restored window of one pointed light; in the E. wall is a square-headed opening to the nave roof. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a restored window of two tiers of two four-centred lights in a square head.

Fittings—Bells: eight; 3rd to 7th by Knight of Reading, 1656. Brasses and Indents. Brasses: In organ-chamber—on E. wall, (1) to Mary (Litcott), wife of Richard Barker, 1599, inscription only; (2) to Anne, widow of William Barker, [1607] with two lozenges-of-arms. Indents: In churchyard—S.E. of chancel, (1) of rectangular plate, etc.; W. of N. aisle, (2) of Brass (2). Coffin-lid: In churchyard—S. of W. porch, Purbeck marble slab with double hollow-chamfered edge and traces of cross, 13th-century. Door: In second stage of tower—plain with strap-hinges, probably 17th-century. Glass: In S. chapel— in S. window, figures of Christ, St. John and St. James with Gothic canopies, probably 18th-century, said to have come from Cologne. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In organ-chamber—on E. wall, (1) to Ann (Stoughton), wife successively of Richard Maxey and William Barker, 1607, marble tablet with side-pilasters, cornice and lozenge-of-arms; (2) possibly to Thomas Barker, 1630, marble tablet with strapwork frame and two shields-of-arms, covered by organ. In S. chapel—on S. wall, (3) to Sir Thomas Chaloner, 1615, Elizabeth (Fletwood) his first wife, 1603 and Judethe (Blunt) his second wife, 1615, alabaster wall-monument (Plate 50) with kneeling figures of man in armour and wife, armed figures at sides holding back curtains of canopy, with pyramid, and achievement and two shields-of-arms. In nave—on W. wall, (4) to John Becher, 1679, Magdalen his wife, 1680–1, Elizabeth their daughter, wife successively to Mathias Hunter and William Marriott, 1694, also to John Hunter, 1680 and Mathias Hunter, 1685, curved marble tablet with Ionic side-columns and scrolls, pediment, etc. In W. tower—on N. wall, (5) to Richard Taylor, 1698, Ann, his wife 1700 and Richard and Ann children of their eldest son, draped white marble tablet (Plate 17) with cherubs, urn and cartouche-of-arms; (6) to William Bordall, vicar, "founder of the steeple," 1425 (incorrect) alabaster tablet erected 1631 by Francis, Earl of Bedford; on S. wall, (7) to James Howard, nephew of James, Earl of Suffolk, 1669, curved marble tablet with Ionic side-columns, cornice, urn and cartouche-of-arms. In churchyard— S.E. corner, (8) to Thomas Carey, 1694, table-tomb with shield-of-arms. Floor-slabs: In churchyard—E. of chancel, (1) to Thomas Elborow, vicar, 1675, with cartouche-of-arms; (2) to Thomas Hull, 1697, and others later; E. of S. chapel, (3) to Marc Anthony La Bastide, 1704–5. Miscellanea: Loose in W. tower— round bowl. In E. wall of churchyard—stone recording building of former wall by Francis, Earl of Bedford, 1623.

Condition—Good.

Secular

b(2) Chiswick House, 600 yards W.S.W. of the church, was built originally in the 16th century and to this was added the still existing Grosvenor wing on the N.E. c. 1700; the Palladian Villa was added by Lord Burlington in 1730–6, and in 1788 the original house was pulled down and wings added on either side the villa. The Grosvenor wing is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of plastered brick and the roofs are slate-covered. It is shown standing, in much its present form, in Kip's view of 1708. It has a central pedimented feature with two round-headed doorways but the doors and window-frames are modern. The interior has been completely modernised.

Adjoining the N. wing is a gateway (Plate 46) ascribed to Inigo Jones and formerly at Beaufort House, Chelsea. It is a building of brick, partly cement rendered and with stone dressings. The round-headed central archway is rusticated and is flanked by Doric columns supporting an entablature and pediment; at the sides are 18th-century walls forming a screen and having tablets inscribed (a) "Given by Sir Hans Sloane Baronet to the E. of Burlington 1738" and (b) "Builded by Inigo Jones at Chelsea 1621." About 150 yards N. of the house is a rectangular garden with walls of c. 1700. In the S.E. side is a wide gateway with piers of rubbed brick, finished with stone cappings and ball-terminals; the gates are of wrought iron with scrolled panels, overthrow and cresting.

Condition—Good.

b(3) Church Hall, on the S.E. side of the churchyard, is of two storeys; the walls are of plastered brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built as a school in 1707 but has been much altered.

Condition—Good.

Chiswick Mall

b(4) Woodroffe House, 50 yards N.E. of the church, is of three storeys; the walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century and has dressings of rubbed brick. The upper part of the staircase is original and has twisted balusters, close strings and square newels.

Condition—Good.

b(5) Bedford House and Eynham House, N.E. of (4) were originally one building. It is of two storeys with cellars and attics, the walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 18th century and was extended to the S.W. in 1749; there are modern additions on the N.W. and a modern bay on the S.E. The front has a central feature with a plain pediment and the windows have rubbed brick dressings; the side bay on the N.E. has an original eaves-cornice. Inside the building some of the rooms have original panelling. In the garden are two lead cisterns one with the initials and date T. and G.P. 1678 and the other with the initials and date E.L. (for Edward Litton) 1622, and a shield-of-arms.

Condition—Good.

b(6) House, two tenements, called Thames View and Lingard House, 30 yards N.E. of (5), is of three storeys with cellars; the walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 18th century, but has been much altered.

Condition—Good.

b(7) Red Lion House, 40 yards N.E. of (6), is of two storeys with cellars and attics; the walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built c. 1700 but the attic-storey is modern and the S.E. front has been refaced. Inside the building is an original fireplace with a bolection-moulded surround; the staircase (Plate 38) is also original and has twisted balusters close strings and square newels with pendants.

Condition—Good.

b(8) Walpole House, 420 yards N.E. of the church, is of three storeys with cellars and attics; the walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled. The main block of the house dates probably from late in the 16th century, but little is left of this date except the main chimney-stack. The S.E. front was built c. 1730 and about the same time a large addition was made on the N.W. side; there are other later additions. The original chimney-stack has four octagonal shafts with moulded bases. Inside the building are some 17th and early 18th-century panelling, an early 18th-century fireplace with a moulded surround and a late 17th-century staircase with turned balusters and close strings.

Condition—Good.

b(9) Strawberry House, immediately N.E. of (8), is of three storeys; the walls are of brick and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built c. 1700 but was refronted c. 1730.

Condition—Good.

b(10) Morton House, immediately N.E. of (9), is of the same type and period; it also was refronted c. 1730. The back has an original eaves-cornice. Inside the building is a considerable amount of original panelling and the staircase has turned balusters and close strings. In the top storey is a re-set 17th-century window.

Condition—Good.

b(11) House, now Swan House and Cedar House, 80 yards N.E. of (10), is of three storeys with cellars and attics. The walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled. It was built probably late in the 17th century but was largely refaced in the 18th century. Inside the building both tenements have original staircases with turned balusters and close strings.

Condition—Good.

b(12) Boston House, on the S.E. side of Chiswick Square and 100 yards W. of the church, is of three storeys with attics; the walls are of brick and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built on a half H-shaped plan late in the 17th century and has a large early 18th-century addition on the S.W. There are modern additions at this and the N.E. end. The windows have rubbed brick dressings. The front has a later cornice and parapet but one of the wings at the back retains its original eaves-cornice. Inside the original block most of the rooms are panelled; the early 18th-century staircase, above the first floor, has a cut string and twisted balusters to the first flight, close string and similar balusters to the second flight (Plate 38) and turned balusters above.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (13–41)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of late 17th or early 18th-century date and of two storeys; the walls are of brick and the roofs are tile or slate-covered.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

b(13) House, Nos. 5 and 6 on the S.W. side of Chiswick Square, has an added early 18th-century wing at the back. The first-floor windows at the back have wooden frames of pseudo-Gothic character. Inside the building are some original panelling and a staircase (Plate 39) with heavy turned balusters and close strings.

b(14) House (Plate 34), No. 4, on the N.E. side of Chiswick Square, is of three storeys with an original moulded eaves-cornice. Inside the building is an original staircase with turned balusters and close strings and a room on the second floor has a panelled overmantel.

b(15) House, now Latimer House and Holly House, 20 yards N.W. of the church, is of three storeys. It was refronted and heightened early in the 18th century. Inside the building the staircase (Plate 39) in Latimer House has moulded balusters and close strings. One room in Holly House is lined with mahogany panelling and a room on the first floor has a fireplace with a moulded surround and panelled overmantel. Adjoining the house on the N. is an original stable-building, now used as a studio.

b(16) House (Plate 27), now three tenements, on the E. side of Church Street, opposite (15), is of plastered timber-framing. It was built probably in the first half of the 16th century but has been much altered and added to. The upper storey projects on the W. front and a part of it has exposed close-set timber-framing; the S. part of the front has some 17th-century plasterwork with rusticated quoins. Inside the building, the N.W. room has a 17th-century plaster frieze with small arches and other enrichments. The roof appears to be partly original.

b(17) Burlington Corner, house 15 yards N. of (16), is of weather-boarded timber-framing. It has modern additions at both front and back. Inside the building is some re-set early 16th-century linen-fold panelling and also some mid 17th-century panelling.

b(18) House, 35 yards N.W. of (17), has an original moulded eaves-cornice. The staircase has turned balusters and close strings.

b(19) Range of tenements Nos. 1–6 on the S.E. side of Lamb Yard and 50 yards N. of the church.

b(20) House, on the S. side of Hogarth Lane 170 yards N.W. of the church, has some exposed ceiling-beams and some panelling of moulded vertical boarding.

b(21) Hogarth House, 170 yards W. of (20), is of three storeys with attics and has a low early 18th-century addition on the S. One window on the N. front retains its original solid frame with mullion and transom. Inside the building are some plain panelling and dados; the staircase has turned balusters and square newels.

b(22) Mawson Row, range of tenements on the W. side of Chiswick Lane, 240 yards N.N.E. of the church, is of three storeys. It has been much altered but retains its original staircases with twisted balusters and close strings.

a(23) House, No. 12 Jessop's Road, ¾ m. N.W. of the church, has exposed ceiling beams and joists.

b(24) Little Sutton Cottage on the S. side of Sutton Lane 1,550 yards W. of the church, retains an original three-light window and has exposed ceiling-beams.

b(25) Duke of Devonshire's Almshouses, six tenements adjoining (24) on the W. They are of one storey with attics and were built c. 1700. The ceiling-beams are exposed.

b(26) House, 50 yards W. of (24).

Condition—Poor.

Strand on the Green

b(27) House, No. 3, nearly 1¼ m. W. of the church, has been refronted and much altered. The original staircase has turned balusters and close strings.

b(28) Range of tenements Nos. 10–14, 40 yards N.W. of (27), has an original eaves-cornice on the front.

b(29) Range of tenements in Grove Row, immediately N.E. of (28).

Condition—Poor.

b(30) Bull's Head Inn, immediately N.W. of (28), has been much altered.

b(31) House, No. 23, 70 yards N.W. of (30), has an 18th-century mansard roof.

b(32) House, Nos. 25, and 26, 5 yards N.W. of (31), has been much altered and refronted.

b(33) City Barge Inn, immediately N.W. of (32), has been extensively altered and the front is modern.

b(34) House, No. 30, 20 yards N.W. of (33), has been much altered and added to and the roof is of 18th-century mansard form.

b(35) House, three tenements Nos. 31–33, immediately N.W. of (34). The N.W. tenement has been heightened but the others retain their eaves-cornice.

b(36) Ship House, 460 yards E.S.E. of Kew Bridge, is modern except for a cottage with a large chimney-stack adjoining the N.E. wing.

Condition—Poor.

b(37) Zoffany House, 75 yards N.W. of (36), is of three storeys and has two small projecting wings at the back, with a modern addition between them. Inside the building is some original moulded panelling and the staircase retains its original close strings.

b(38) House, No. 66, immediately N.W. of (37) is of similar date and character. It contains a considerable amount of plain panelling and the staircase has turned balusters and close strings.

b(39) Springfield House, immediately N.W. of (38) is again of similar date and character but the front has been cement-rendered. It also contains plain panelling and a staircase similar to that in (38).

b(40) House, two tenements, No. 75, 65 yards N.W. of (39), has a rather later wing on the N. and has been much modernised.

b(41) House, No. 100, 270 yards N.N.W. of (40), has been extensively altered.

Condition—Poor.



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