Great Bardfield

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1916

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105-113

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'Great Bardfield', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 1: North West (1916), pp. 105-113. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=122436 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


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28. GREAT BARDFIELD. (D.c.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)xv. N.W., (b)xv. S.W., (c)xv. S.E.)

Great Bardfield is a large parish and village about 6 m. N.E. of Great Dunmow. The principal monuments are the Church and the 15th-century buildings in the village.

Ecclesiastical

c (1). Parish Church of St. Mary the Virgin stands S.E. of the village. The walls are of flint rubble with dressings of limestone and clunch; the roofs are covered with tiles and lead. The West Tower was built at the end of the 12th century, and the Chancel is apparently of the same date. Late in the 14th century the chancel-arch was rebuilt, the present Nave, with its clearstorey, was built; the North and South Aisles and a South Porch were also rebuilt or added. The church was restored in the 19th century, and the North Vestry is modern.

The four square-headed windows of the 14th century, in the N. aisle; the late 14th-century arcaded stone screen under the chancel-arch and the 17th-century carved beams in the roof of the chancel are especially interesting.


The Church, Plan

The Church, Plan

Architectural Description—The Chancel (34½ ft. by 16 ft.) has grotesque figures carved on the kneelers of the gable. In the E. wall is a window entirely modern, except the 14th-century internal splays and two-centred rear arch; in the gable is a window of one trefoiled light, much weathered. In the N. wall are two windows; the eastern is modern, except the 14th-century internal splays and segmental-pointed rear arch; the western window is of late 14th-century date, much restored, and of three cinquefoiled lights with tracery under a square head with a four-centred rear arch. In the S. wall are two windows, the eastern is modern, except the internal splays and rear arch, which are of the 14th century; the western window is of the 14th century, much restored, and of three cinquefoiled lights with modern tracery under a two-centred head. Between the windows and set in a large recess, probably modern, is a doorway, now blocked; it is also modern, except some of the jamb-stones, which are of the 14th century. The late 14th-century chancel-arch is combined with part of the stone rood-screen. The arch is two-centred and of three moulded orders with moulded labels which have head-stops; the responds have clustered shafts with moulded capitals and bases. The screen (see Plate p. 106) consists of a wide middle bay and narrower side bays, divided by moulded shafts with moulded bases and moulded and carved capitals; the shafts are carried vertically up to the chancel-arch; the middle bay has an ogee head, cinquefoiled and sub-cusped, with carved spandrels and a moulded and enriched label, which has carved crockets, finials and angel-stops; the head supports an embattled pedestal on which is a modern rood, on each side of it is a small enriched ogee arch, surmounted by a pedestal supporting a modern figure; St. Mary on one side and St. John on the other; the soffit of the chancel-arch in the middle bay is cusped and sub-cusped, the side bays have two-centred heads filled with open leaf tracery.

The Nave (54 ft. by 18 ft.) has late 14th-century N. and S. arcades, each of four bays, of which the westernmost is narrower than the others. The two-centred arches are of three moulded orders with moulded labels, which have stops carved as heads, beasts, or grotesque figures; the columns have each eight attached shafts alternately round and octagonal, with moulded bases and capitals; the responds have attached half-columns. The late 14th-century clearstorey has, on the N. and S. sides, four windows, each of two cinquefoiled lights with tracery under a square head with a moulded label; the rear arches are four-centred; below the internal sills is a moulded string-course, returned along the E. wall to the chancel-arch.

The North Aisle (10 ft. wide) has, in the E. wall a late 14th-century window, partly restored, and of three cinquefoiled lights with tracery under a square head; the moulded labels have grotesque stops. In the N. wall are two windows (see Plate p. 107) similar to that in the E. wall; further W. is a contemporary doorway with jambs and two-centred arch of two moulded orders and a moulded label. In the W. wall is a window of the same date and design as those in the E. and N. walls.

The South Aisle (10 ft. wide) has E. and W. windows, and two windows in the S. wall, all uniform with those in the N. aisle, but entirely modern outside. W. of the windows in the S. wall is the late 14th-century S. doorway, partly restored; the jambs are moulded and the arch is two-centred under a square head with traceried spandrels, each having a blank shield; the moulded label has head-stops.

The West Tower (15 ft. square) is of late 12th-century date, and of two stages with a plain parapet, and an early 18th-century small spire, covered with lead. The two-centred tower-arch is of one square order with chamfered imposts and square responds. The N., S. and W. walls have each a lancet window; that in the W. wall being wider than the other two. The upper stage is divided into two internal storeys; the lower storey has, in the N. and in the S. wall, a lancet window, that in the N. wall is covered by the clock; the upper storey or bell-chamber has two lancet windows in the N. wall and similar windows in the S. and W. walls.

The South Porch is of early 14th-century date, and has a moulded plinth. The two-centred outer archway is moulded and has a moulded label; the gable over it has a much weathered base of a cross, and carved grotesques on the kneelers. In the E. wall is a window of two trefoiled lights under a two-centred head, and flanking it are two square quatrefoiled openings. In the W. wall is a window similar to that in the E. wall.

The Roof of the chancel has two heavy tiebeams with brackets and wall-posts; both beams are richly carved; the western beam has I.H.S. with cross and crown, repeated within circles, and in one case enriched by a crown of thorns; the brackets have carved grotesque corbels, and those of the western beam are carved with centaurs, the initials E. B., date 1618, and motto, 'Tende Solve,' for Bendlowes. The roof of the nave is of four bays and of the trussed-rafter type, with five moulded tie-beams; the corbels are carved as figures and include the symbols of the evangelists; the wall-plates are moulded; all of late 14th-century date. The lean-to roof of the N. aisle is also of late 14th-century date and has moulded timbers, curved braces to the five trusses, and moulded corbels carved with figures. The roof of the S. aisle is of the same date and detail as that of the N. aisle.

Fittings—Bells: six; 2nd and 6th by Miles Graie, 1602. Brasses—(see Monuments). Chests: In tower—(1) of hutch type, with moulded and panelled front and ends, inlaid and enriched, probably early 17th-century; (2) of hutch type, with moulded and panelled front, early 17th-century. Door: In S. doorway—in two folds, each with a traceried border and three trefoil-headed panels, with a band of tracery at half the height, square lattice frame, late 14th-century, partly restored. Glass: In N. aisle—In tracery of eastern window in N. wall, canopy heads, and figures of St. Lawrence, the Crucifixion, and St. Stephen; in tracery of western window in N. wall, canopy heads, and suns, etc.; in tracery of W. window, three shields of (a) Mortimer, (b) Old France and England quarterly; (c) (a) impaling, (b) the arms of Edmund Mortimer, earl of March and Philippa his wife, daughter of Lionel, duke of Clarence, late 14th-century, slightly restored. Monuments: In chancel—against S. wall, (1) to William Bendlowes, Sergeant-at-Law [1584] and of Eleanor his wife, small altar tomb of Purbeck marble, moulded slab and moulded and panelled base remaining, the rest probably destroyed; on slab, brass figure of woman in close cap, veil and ruff, inscription and two shields of arms; (2) to William Bendlowes, 1584, limestone tablet with small pilasters, panel with brass inscription and two brass shields of arms, traces of colour. Niche: Over outer entrance of S. porch—with moulded jambs and cinquefoiled head, late 14th-century, label modern. Painting: On rood screen—traces of red paint. Piscinæ: In N. aisle—in E. respond of N. arcade, with moulded jambs, cinquefoiled head and panelled spandrels, oak shelf, quatrefoil drain broken away, late 14th-century. In S. aisle—in E. jamb of S.E. window, with two openings, each with cinquefoiled head, quatrefoil drain, late 14th-century. Possibly also in S. wall of chancel, now hidden by plaster. Plate: includes cup with stem of c. 1600, bowl apparently modern. Screen: Under chancel-arch (see architectural description). Miscellanea: In S. aisle—on iron brackets, two funeral helms with vizors, early 17th-century. On piers of arcades— scratched inscriptions, illegible, mediæval. In churchyard—near N. wall of nave, stone coffin with lid.

Condition—Good.

Secular

c (2). Great Bardfield Hall, barn and dovecot, 100 yards S. of the church. The House is of two storeys with attics, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It is now of T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the E. end. The cross-wing was built probably in the first half of the 16th century, and the main block was added or rebuilt early in the 17th-century; on the N. side of the main block are small modern additions. The upper storey projects on the W. half of the S. front. The central chimney-stack is of the 17th century, with a modern top. Inside the building, in the E. wing, the ground floor has chamfered ceiling-beams, with the cross-beams resting on shaped wall-posts. In the upper storey one roof-truss is visible.

The Barn, S. of the house, is of five bays, timberframed and weather-boarded; the roofs are thatched and tiled. It is probably of the 17th century.

The Dovecot, S.W. of the house, is square, timberframed and plastered, and has a tiled pyramidal roof with a lantern. It is probably of the 17th century. Inside the building is a pole which carries a revolving frame and vertical ladder to give access to the nests.

Condition—Of house, barn and dovecot, good.

c (3). Great Lodge (see Plate, p. xxiv.) 1½ m. S.E. of the church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of brick and the roof is tiled. The existing structure consists of the stables, the Armoury (?) and barns belonging to a large building which formerly stood on an adjacent site. The present house was built early in the 17th century on a large half-H-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N.; the E. wing and the middle part of the main block form barns. On the W. side of the W. wing, and on the E. side of the E. wing are small modern additions. Between the two storeys a moulded string-course of brick, with some remains of strap-work pattern in plaster, is carried round the whole building except the E. wing. On the S. elevation (about 225 ft. long) in the eastern part of the wall, is some original diaper work in black headers; several of the windows retain their original brick mullions; one window has an oak frame, probably of late 17th-century date, and another, now blocked, has a moulded and plastered brick cornice and pediment with dentil ornament and a pattern in plaster on the tympanum; at the W. end of the elevation is an original chimney-stack which retains the moulded bases of four octagonal shafts. The barns are lighted by narrow loops. On the N. front, in the middle of the main block, is a small staircase-wing; E. of the wing is a timber projection with large doors forming the entrance to the westernmost barn, and W. of the wing a crane-house projects from the roof; both these projections are of later date than the original walls. In the N. end of the N. wing is an archway, now blocked, with a semi-circular head.

Interior—The W. wing, now the residential part of the building, has one wide open fireplace and several doors with 16th-century cock's-head hinges. In the hall is some late 16th or early 17th-century oak panelling, re-set. In the main block N. of the W. wing, the coach-house has heavy stop-chamfered ceiling-beams, and there are similar beams in the stable further N.; the roof of this part of the building is of plain collar-beam construction, probably of late 17th-century date. The roof of the barn in the main block is original and has trusses with collar-beams and braced tie-beams carrying two nearly vertical struts; the roof of the barn in the E. wing is also original and has trusses with braced tie-beams, two struts and a king-post with two-way struts.

Condition—Good.

Homestead Moats.

c (4). At Parkgate, about ½ m. S.S.E. of the church.

b (5). At Fann's Farm, about 1¼ m. S.W. of the church.

Monuments (6–49).

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century, and of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled or thatched, and some of the buildings have exposed ceiling-beams, wide fireplaces and original chimney-stacks.

Condition—Good, or fairly good, without exception.

c (6). Lower Hall, cottage, 60 yards E. of the church, on the E. side of the Great Saling Road, is probably part of a house built late in the 16th century, and has a modern N.E. wing.

c (7). Cottage, now two tenements, 30 yards N. of (6), on the E. side of the road. The central chimney-stack is original and retains the stumps of two octagonal shafts now covered with cement.

Brook Street, S. side

c (8). The White Hart Inn, 220 yards N.W. of the church, was built in the 15th century, with a central Hall and cross-wings at the E. and W. ends, containing the Solar and Buttery; at some later date the roof of the Hall was heightened and an upper floor inserted; at the back are 18th-century and modern additions. On the N. front the upper storey projects at the end of each wing, but in the W. wing it has been under-built. The roof of the W. wing is of two bays, and has a king-post truss.

c (9). House, now three tenements, 50 yards W. of (8), was built in the 15th century with a central Hall and cross-wings at the E. and W. ends, containing Solar and Buttery. Probably late in the 16th century an upper floor and a chimney-stack were inserted in the Hall; the roof of the Hall has been heightened and modern additions have been built at the back and W. end. On the N. front the upper storey projects at the end of each wing, but in the W. wing it has been under-built. The N. gable of the E. wing has original foliated barge-boards. The 16th-century central chimney-stack has four grouped diagonal shafts. The roof of the E. wing is of two bays, divided by a king-post truss.

N. side

c (10). House, now two tenements and shop, 25 yards N.W. of (8), was built on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the E. and N., and has a modern addition at the end of the E. wing. There is a gable at the W. end of the S. front. The upper storey apparently projected at the original end of the E. wing. The central chimney-stack is original and has two attached diagonal shafts.

c (11). House, now two tenements, E. of (10). It has a modern N.W. wing, built of old material. The original central chimney-stack has grouped diagonal shafts.


Great Bardfield, Plan Shewing Position of Monuments Described

Great Bardfield, Plan Shewing Position of Monuments Described

c (12). House, now two tenements, E. of (11), was built in the 15th century on a half-H-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S.; probably late in the 16th century a chimney-stack and an upper floor were inserted in the central block or Hall; the house has been recently refronted, and the upper storey which projected at the end of each wing was under-built. Inside the building, in the N. wall, is a doorway, now blocked, with a segmental-headed lintel; its low position indicates that the ground floor has been raised. The upper storey of the main block is divided into two bays by the remains of an original king-post truss with a moulded tie-beam, of which part has been cut away, and re-used for the posts and lintel of a doorway in a partition filling in the former truss. The upper storey of the E. wing is also divided into two bays by an original king-post truss.

c (13). House, 20 yards E. of (12), is of two storeys with attics, and has a modern N.W. wing.

High Street, S.E. side

c (14). House, now shop, but said to have been a Friends' Meeting House, about 300 yards N.W. of the church, was built late in the 16th century, and extended at the N.E. end early in the 17th century; at some later period an upper floor was inserted in the 16th-century block, which was originally of one storey. Inside the building, the upper storey of the original block is divided into two bays by a cambered tie-beam with curved braces.

c (15). House, now shop, W. of (14), was built probably in the 16th century, but the upper storey and roof have been altered.

c (16). House, W. of (15), is of two storeys with attics; it was built apparently on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N. and E., but has been much altered, and has modern additions on the E. side. The W. and S. elevations have been re-fronted with brick. There is a gable at the S. end of the W. front. Inside the building, on the first floor, are two 17th-century moulded oak battened doors, and the stairs from the first floor to the attics have an old central octagonal newel and oak winders.

c (17). House, now three tenements, 50 yards S.W. of (16), is of two storeys with attics; it was built in the 15th century with a central Hall and cross-wings at the N.E. and S.W. ends; probably in the 17th century two upper floors were inserted in the Hall, and the roof was raised; the S. wing is modern, and the whole structure has been much altered. On the N.W. elevation the upper storey projects at the end of the N.E. wing, and formerly projected at the end of the S.W. wing, but has been under-built. In the S.W. elevation is a window of two lights with diamond quarry glazing. Inside the building, the roof of the N.E. wing is of two bays divided by a king-post truss with four-way curved struts.

c (18) House, 20 yards S.W. of (17), was built late in the 16th century on a rectangular plan, and has a S.W. wing of late 17th-century date. On the N.E. front the upper storey formerly projected, but has been under-built. Inside the building, in the upper storey, a cambered tie-beam is visible.

a (19). House, S.W. of (18).

a (20). House, now two tenements, about 150 yards S.W. of (19), was built in the 15th century, and probably then extended further towards the S.W.; there are modern additions on the N.E. and S.E. sides. At the N.E. end of the N.W. front the upper storey projects and is gabled. Inside the building is an original king-post truss in the roof.

c (21). Place House, and outbuilding, S.W. of (20). The House was built in the middle of the 16th century, but of the original structure only an L-shaped fragment remains, with the wings extending towards the N.W. and S.W.; later in the 16th century a wing was added at the N.E. end of the S.E. side, and the S.W. wing was altered and perhaps reduced in size. In the angle between the late 16th-century wing and the main block a small wing was built, probably in the 17th century; at the S.E. end is a modern addition. At the S.W. end of the N.W. front is a gable, and the S.W. return wall of the original N.W. wing is of original brick; in the upper storey is a window of three lights with three-centred heads; the jambs and mullions are of brick covered with cement; some of the glass is old. On the N.E. elevation the original block has two gables, and a late 16th-century chimney-stack; the upper storey projects and has an original moulded bressumer; at the N. angle is a post with a moulded capital and a curved bracket carved with foliage, the initials W.B., and the date "Mense Aprilis 1564 (?). The central chimney-stack is of late 16th-century date.

Interior—In the S.E. wing is a staircase with solid oak steps. In the upper storey two rooms of the original block have oak panelling of late 16th and early 17th-century date, re-set. In a window at the N. end of the N.E. elevation are fragments of mid 16th-century glass, re-set, showing a shield of arms, Bendlowes impaling Palmer, a queen's head in a garter, strapwork, grotesque head, fruit ornament, etc. In another window is a fragment of mid 16th-century glass, re-set, bearing the following inscription in black-letter: '[Will]ms Bendlowes solus serviens ad legem in Anglia per quoddam tempus 1558 et temporis Regni Philippi Regis et Maria Regina et Elizabetha Regina fuit.'

The Outbuilding, S.W. of the house, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of plastered brick, except the S.W. end which is timber framed and weather-boarded. It was built in the 16th century and has in the front wall an original window of plastered brick and of three lights with four-centred heads. In the back wall is an original door-frame of oak, with a four-centred head. Inside the building, both floors have moulded ceiling-beams, and on the ground floor is a recess with a four-centred head.

W. side

c (22). Cottage, two tenements, 80 yards N.N.E. of (21), has been re-faced with modern brick. In the S.E. front is the upper half of an oak door-frame, with a four-centred and hollow-chamfered head; it is probably of the 15th century, re-set. At the S.W. end the timber-framing is exposed.

c (23). House, 80 yards N.E. of (22), at the junction of the Saffron Walden Road, was built early in the 15th century, possibly on a half-Hshaped plan, of which an L-shaped fragment remains, with the wings extending towards the S.W. and N.W. Modern additions make the present plan quadrangular. The S.W. wing formerly consisted of a Hall open to the roof, but an upper floor and a chimney-stack were inserted, probably late in the 16th century. The 16th-century central chimney-stack has four grouped diagonal shafts. Inside the building, on the ground floor, a room in the original S.W. wing has a moulded ceiling-beam of c. 1500, re-set, and carved with a twisted leaf design. In the roof of the same wing are two original trusses with chamfered tie-beams and king-posts with moulded capitals and bases and four-way struts. All the original roof timbers are smoke-blackened.

c (24). Town House, N.E. of (23). The plan is L-shaped with the wings extending towards the S.W. and N.W.; the N.W. wing is probably of early 17th-century date, and the S.W. wing of later date in the same century; there is a modern addition at the end of the N.W. wing. Inside the building, in the N.W. wing is an original battened door of oak.

c (25). Cottage, N.E. of (24). The large central chimney-stack is probably of late 16th-century date, and has four detached octagonal shafts, moulded at the top, on a square base with a moulded capping.

c (26). House and shop, now the Post Office, 40 yards N.E. of (25), was built probably late in the 16th century, but has been almost entirely altered. Inside the building, in the upper storey, is a braced tie-beam incorporated in a partition wall. Much of the original roof remains.

c (27). House, 15 yards N.E. of (26), is of two storeys with attics; the walls are of red and black brick. It is of early 18th-century date, but has a modern addition at the back. The principal doorway has a moulded wood architrave with panelled pilasters, and a projecting entablature and pediment, supported by shaped consoles; over the doorway is a fanlight of half-wheel shape with heavy spokes. Inside the building is a staircase, apparently original, with light turned balusters and a moulded handrail.

c (28). House and shop, N.E. of (27), is of two storeys with attics.

c (29). House, now workshop, in a yard, 40 yards N. of (28), was built in the 15th century and appears to have been used always as an outbuilding. The walls are weather-boarded, except the N.E. gable, which has exposed timber-framing with 17th-century brick filling. Inside the building, the lower storey is divided into four bays by heavy chamfered beams on shaped posts with curved braces; in the upper storey are remains of king-post trusses.

c (30). House, now workshop, attached to a dwelling-house, in a yard, 10 yards S.E. of (29), was originally part of a larger house; the S. half was built probably in the first half of the 15th century, and the N. half was added later in the 15th century. On the S.W. elevation the upper storey projects, but has been partly under-built, and refaced in brick; it is supported by a curved bracket springing from a shaft with a moulded capital, much weathered. Inside the building, the ground floor of the S. half has moulded ceiling-beams; at the N. end is a narrow passage, possibly representing the Screens. In the S. corner are two 15th-century doorways, now blocked; one of them has a hollow-chamfered four-centred head. In the roof of the N. half of the building are two original king-post trusses.

c (31). The Vine Hotel, N.E. of (30), is of two storeys with attics; it was built late in the 16th century on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S.W. and N.W. The S.E. front has three gables; the N.E. gable has old brackets, and the middle gable projects and has a moulded bressumer with two shaped and carved brackets. The central chimney-stack is original and has four octagonal brick shafts, apparently rebuilt, on a square base with a moulded capping. Inside the building, in the upper storey of the N.W. wing, is a stop-chamfered the-beam, probably part of a king-post truss.

c (32). House, 30 yards N.E. of (31), was built on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N.E. and N.W., but has a modern addition on the N.W. side of the N.E. wing. There is a gable at the S.W. end of the S.E. front.

c (33). House, now three tenements, N.E. of (32), was built in the 15th century, probably on a half-H-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S.E., but the main block or Hall was altered in the 17th century, and has been extended in front so that it now aligns with the ends of the wings. The upper storey probably projected at the ends of the wings, but it has been under-built. Inside the building, on the ground floor of the S.W. wing, is an original moulded ceiling-beam, and in the upper storey is a king-post truss. In the upper storey of the N.E. wing is another king-post truss with shaped wall-posts.

c (34). House, now three tenements, on the W. side of the Finchingfield Road, 50 yards N. of (33), was built on a T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the S. end, but has a modern addition at the back. The upper storey formerly projected at the E. end of the cross-wing, but has been under-built. The central chimney-stack is original and has grouped diagonal shafts on a rectangular base with broached angles.

c (35). House, now three tenements, N. of (34), has a small wing, probably original, on the W. side, and modern additions on the same side and at the N. end. The timber-framing is exposed in the gable at the N. end. The central chimney stack is original and has grouped diagonal shafts.

c (36). House, 170 yards N. of (35), was built on a T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the S. end.

a (37). House, now two tenements, 150 yards N. of (36), was built in the 15th century, and probably consisted of a Hall with a cross-wing at each end. The S. wing has been removed, and on the N. side of the N. wing is an extension, of which the lower storey is of the 16th or 17th century, and the upper storey is modern; an upper floor has been inserted in the Hall. At the E. end of the original N. wing the upper storey projects. Inside the building, on the ground floor of the main block, is a curved timber, possibly a brace of a former roof-truss of the Hall. In the upper storey of the N. wing, is a king-post truss.

a (38). House, now three tenements, 40 yards N. of (37).

c (39). The Crown Inn, on the E. side of the Finchingfield Road, 300 yards N.N.E. of the church, was built early in the 17th century on an L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N. and E.; the E. wing was extended, probably late in the 17th century, and has also a modern extension. In the E. wall of the N. wing is an original window, now blocked, with mortises for diamond-shaped mullions.

a (40). Cottage, now three tenements, 530 yards N. of (39), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century.

a (41). Cottage, now two tenements, at Hawkspur Green, 1½ m. N.W. of the church, is of T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the W. end; all the building, except the original cross-wing, is of the 18th century. The roof of the cross-wing is covered with slate.

a (42). Pitley Farm, house, 1¾ m. N.N.W. of the church, was built, probably late in the 16th century, on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N.E. and N.W.; more recent additions make the plan quadrangular, and there is a modern porch on the S.E. front. The N.E. and S.W. elevations have each two gables. Inside the building, the room on the ground floor of the original N.W. wing has a moulded ceiling-beam and 16th-century oak panelling, probably re-set, with a carved and fluted frieze. In the partition walls of the upper storey are cambered tie-beams with curved braces.

c (43). Cottage, now two tenements, 400 yards N.E. of the church. In the ground storey of the S. tenement is a moulded ceiling-beam.

c (44). Orger's Farm, house, nearly 1 m. E.S.E. of the church. On the N. and E. sides are modern additions. Some of the window frames are old. The central chimney-stack is original and has two attached diagonal shafts.

c (45). Bluegate Hall, probably originally one of the lodges of the former Great House, ¾ m. S.E. of the church, is of two storeys with attics. It was built on a T-shaped plan with a cross-wing at the S.W. end, and modern additions on the N.E. side, and at the end of the N.E. wing.

c (46). Little Lodge, ¾ m. S. of Great Lodge, is of two storeys with attics; the roof is covered with tiles and slate. It was built early in the 17th century, but the attics and roof are probably of early 18th-century date. There is a modern addition on the W. side. The S. chimney-stack is original and has three grouped diagonal shafts. Inside the building, the ground floor has an original moulded ceiling-beam.

c (47). Pond Farm, house, 1½ m. S. of the church, with a modern addition on the W. side.

c (48). Bushett Farm, house, about 1¾ m. S. of the church, was built late in the 15th century on an L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the N.W. and S.W. In the middle of the N.W. wing was the Hall, in which an upper floor and a chimney-stack were inserted in the 16th century. Late in the 17th century a wing was added at the N.W. end of the S.W. side. At each end of the N.E. front is a projecting gable, supported by two shaped brackets. In the 17th-century wing is an old moulded window-frame. Inside the building, on the ground floor in the E. room, is a moulded ceiling-beam supported on chamfered wall-posts. In the roof of the original Hall is a king-post truss.

b (49). Charity Farm, house, about 1 m. W.S.W. of the church, was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century, and has a modern wing on the N.W. side.



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