Aythorpe Roding

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1921

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3-4

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'Aythorpe Roding', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Essex, Volume 2: Central and South West (1921), pp. 3-4. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=122607 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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2. AYTHORPE RODING. (D.b.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)xxxii. S.E. (b)xlii. N.E.).

Aythorpe Roding is a small parish, 5 m. S.W. of Great Dunmow.

Ecclesiastical

a(1). Parish Church of St. Mary stands at the W. end of the parish. The walls are probably of flint-rubble but are entirely covered with cement; the dressings are of clunch; the roofs are tiled, the bell-turret weather-boarded and the spire shingled. The Chancel and Nave were built, probably in succession, in the 13th century. The bell-turret was built probably in the 15th century. The church was restored in the 19th century when the North Vestry and South Porch were added.


The Church, Plan

The Church, Plan

Architectural Description:—The Chancel (31½ ft. by 17½ ft.) has in the E. wall three modern lancet windows. In the N. wall are three 13th-century lancet windows much restored externally. In the S. wall are three similar lancet windows; between the two western windows is a doorway modern externally, but with splays and segmental rear-arch, probably of the 13th-century. There is no chancel-arch.

The Nave (35 ft. by 20½ ft.) has in the N. wall a lancet window similar to those in the N. wall of the chancel but more widely splayed; further W. is the N. doorway, all modern except for the segmental rear-arch. In the S. wall are three lancet windows uniform with that in the N. wall; between the two western is the S. doorway, all modern externally, but with splays and segmental rear-arch of the 13th century. In the W. wall is a lancet window uniform with that in the N. wall.

The Roof of the chancel has 15th-century moulded wall-plates and two plain tie-beams of doubtful date. The roof of the nave has two tiebeams, the eastern rough and the western moulded and of the 15th century. The bell-turret at the W. end of the nave stands on four oak posts of the 15th century supporting tie-beams, that on the W. with old curved braces.

Fittings—Bells: three, said to be all by John Tonne, early 16th-century and inscribed. 1st, "De celis missi nomen habeo Gabrielis"; 2nd, "Virginis atq matri resonet campana Marie"; 3rd, "Hec fratris Simonis Andree nomen habeto." Chair: In chancel—with turned legs and carved back, early 17th-century. Coffin-lid: In nave— near S.E. angle, with raised cross, 13th-century, much worn. Floor-slab: In nave—to William Cowland, 1687. Piscina: In chancel—with chamfered two-centred head and two round drains, 13th-century. Seating: In nave—plain benches, incorporating ends, backs and seats of the 16th or 17th century.

Condition—Fairly good, much restored.

Secular

a(2). Aythorpe Roding Hall, house and moat 150 yards W. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built probably in the 17th century, and inside the building is some original oak panelling and a moulded ceiling-beam.

The Moat lies immediately to the W. of the house.

Condition—Of house, good.

b(3). Friar's Grange, house and moat nearly 1½ m. S.E. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. The form of the house is of the 15th century, but it was altered in the 16th century, and the added wing at the back is of later date. The central block formed the Hall with gabled Kitchen and Solar wings at the E. and W. ends. The central chimney-stack is of the 17th century. Inside the building there is some old panelling and two panelled doors of the 17th century. The roofs of the cross-wings have queen-post trusses.

The Moat is fragmentary.

Condition—Of house, good.

a(4). Highams, house and moat, about 1 m. E.S.E. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built in the 17th century, but has a modern stone porch and other additions at the back. In a summer-house in the garden is some 17th-century panelling with a fluted frieze and also a carved oak overmantel, all removed from the house.

The Moat is fragmentary.

Condition—Of house, good, much altered.

a(5). Collin's Farm, house and moat, 300 yards E. of (4). The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 17th century and the upper storey projects on the E. front. The central chimney-stack is original, and inside the building are original ceiling-beams.

The Moat is fragmentary and had a smaller enclosure at the S.E. angle.

Condition—Of house, good.

Monuments (6–10).

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are tiled or thatched. Some of the buildings have original chimney-stacks, wide fireplaces and exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good, or fairly good, unless noted.

a(6). Yeumans, cottage, about 1¼ m. E. of the church.

a(7). Post office and tenement, formerly Gunner's Farm, about ½ m. E.S.E. of the church.

a(8). Cottage at Roundbush Green, ½ m. S.E. of the church.

Condition—Ruinous.

a(9). Cottage, W. of (8).

a(10). Keeres, house, about 1 m. S.E. of the church. The original central chimney-stack has attached diagonal pilasters.

Baddow, see Little Baddow.



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