Abbots Ripton

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1926

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'Abbots Ripton', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Huntingdonshire (1926), pp. 1-4. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=123740 Date accessed: 17 September 2014.


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AN INVENTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL MONUMENTS IN HUNTINGDONSHIRE.

ACCREDITED TO A DATE ANTERIOR TO 1714, Arranged by Parishes.

(Unless otherwise stated, the dimensions given in the Inventory are internal. Monuments with titles printed in italics are covered by an introductory sentence to which reference should be made. The key-plans of those churches which are not illustrated by historically hatched plans are drawn to a uniform scale of 48 ft. to the inch, with the monumental portions shown in solid black.)

1. ABBOTS RIPTON (C.d.).

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XIII S.E., (b)XIV S.W., (c)XVIII N.W.)

Abbots Ripton is a parish and village 4 m. N. of Huntingdon. The church is the principal monument.

Ecclesiastical

b (1). Parish Church of St. Andrew stands on the W. side of the village. The walls generally are of stone and pebble-rubble with some freestone; the dressings are of Barnack stone; the roofs are covered with lead and tiles. The Nave was built in the 13th century and probably about the middle of the same century the South Aisle was added and the South Porch built. The narrow width and thick outer wall of the North Aisle may indicate that it is of earlier date than the details, which are all of the 15th century. Late in the 15th or early in the 16th century, the Chancel was re-built, the chancel-arch widened, the North Chapel added and the N. arcade of the nave re-built; it was probably intended to rebuild also the S. arcade, but only the W. respond was actually reconstructed. The clearstorey of the nave is of the same period. The West Tower was added or re-built rather later in the 16th century. The church was restored in 1858 and 1868.


The Church, Plan

The Church, Plan

Architectural Description—The Chancel (31 ft. by 16 ft.) has a modern E. window. In the N. wall is an early 16th-century arch, four-centred and of two moulded orders, the outer continous and the inner resting on attached shafts with moulded capitals and bases; the W. base and part of the shaft have been cut away; there is a moulded label on each face of the arch springing from attached shafts; further E. is an early 16th-century window of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a four-centred head with a moulded label; the external reveals are casementmoulded. In the S. wall are two similar windows. The chancel-arch is two-centred and of two moulded orders dying on to plain splayed responds; some voussoirs of the arch are probably of the 13th century; the arch as a whole was probably re-built in the 15th or early in the 16th century; flanking the chancel-arch are two squints, that on the N. with a four-centred head on the W. and a two-centred head on the E. face; the southern squint has a four-centred head, on the E. face, and is now blocked. In the E. face of the gable above the chancel-arch is an arched recess perhaps for a sanctus-bell.

The North Chapel (15 ft. by 8½ ft.) has an early 16th-century E. window of three cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a four-centred head with a moulded label and casement-moulded external reveals. In the N. wall is a window similar to that in the N. wall of the chancel; further E. is a doorway of similar date and with splayed jambs and four-centred arch.

The Nave (41¼ ft. by 15 ft.) has an early 16th-century N. arcade of three bays with two-centred arches; the details are similar to those of the N. arch in the chancel, the piers being formed of two responds set back to back; on the N. face the small shafts are carried up the wall for some four feet, probably to take roof-corbels. The face of the E. respond is partly cut square and a shaft brought out below the cutting to form a pedestal for an image; it is now defaced. The mid 13th-century S. arcade, perhaps re-built in the 16th century, is of three bays with two-centred arches of one splayed and moulded order; the cylindrical columns have moulded capitals and 'hold-water' bases; the E. arch dies on to the wall; the W. respond is similar in date and detail to the responds of the N. arcade. The early 16th-century clear-storey has on each side three windows each of two trefoiled lights in a four-centred head with casement-moulded external reveals.

The North Aisle (8¾ ft. wide) is undivided from the N. chapel. In the N. wall are two 15th-century windows each of three cinque-foiled lights with tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label and carved beast or grotesque stops; the 15th-century N. doorway has moulded jambs and two-centred arch with a moulded label.

The South Aisle (11¼ ft. wide) has an E. window similar in date and detail to the E. window of the N. chapel. The S. wall has a 13th-century wall-arcade of three bays, extending for most of its length; the arches are of one plain order and the responds and intermediate piers have chamfered angles and trefoiled stops at the springing-level and hollow-chamfered imposts on the reveals; each recess has a stone bench; the two eastern bays of the arcade each enclose a window, the eastern modern and the second similar to those in the N. aisle but with modern mullions and tracery; the S. doorway is probably of the 13th century, perhaps subsequently re-built; it has chamfered jambs and two-centred head with a moulded label.

The West Tower (11 ft. square) is of early 16th-century date and of three stages with an embattled parapet and plain pinnacles at the angles. The two-centred tower-arch is of two orders, the outer hollow-chamfered and continuous and the inner chamfered and springing from attached shafts with crudely moulded capitals and bases. The splay of the stair-turret, in the S.W. angle, is carried on a segmental arch. The W. window is of three four-centred lights with uncusped vertical tracery in a two-centred head with a moulded label; the W. doorway has moulded jambs, two-centred arch and label; it is now blocked. The second stage has in the N. wall a single four-centred light; on the S. wall is a clock-face. The bell-chamber has in each wall a window of two four-centred and transomed lights in a four-centred head with a moulded label.

The South Porch has an early 13th-century outer archway, two-centred and of two chamfered orders; the outer order of the jambs has free shafts with moulded capitals and bases, the abaci being continued round the inner order of the jambs. The side walls have each a 15th-century window of two four-centred lights in a four-centred head with a modern mullion.

The Roof of the chancel is of early 16th-century date and of two bays; it is flat-pitched and has four-centred arched trusses with traceried spandrels; at the foot of each wall-post is a standing figure; the figures include men and women but their attributes are not sufficient for identification; the main timbers are moulded; at the base of the intermediate principals are carved figures. The late 15th- or early 16th-century roof of the nave is of three bays, with moulded main timbers; the trusses have traceried spandrels and a carved foliated boss (one modern) in the middle of each. The early 16th-century roof of the N. chapel is of pent form with chamfered principals, wall-posts and curved braces.

Fittings—Bells: three; 1st by William Dawe, c. 1400, inscribed "Non venit ad veniam qui nescit amare Mariam"; 2nd by Tobias Norris, 1671. Bracket: In N. chapel—in N.E. angle, plain shaped bracket of stone. Brass: In N. chapel— on S. wall, to Thomas Cowche, 1641–2, inscription only. Communion Table: (Plate 151) In N. chapel—of oak with turned legs, enriched upper rails with scrolled brackets, late 16th- or early 17th-century. Font: octagonal bowl with quatre-foiled panel in each face and moulded under-edge, plain stem and splayed base, 15th-century. Glass: In N. aisle—in westermost window, collection of fragments including crowned M., fragments of tabernacle-work and borders and quarries with rose in middle, 15th-century. Monument and Floor-slab. Monument: In N. chapel—on N. wall, to Charles Trimnell, rector of the parish, 1702, and Mary his wife, 1684, plain grey marble tablet. Floor-slab: Now used as step to N. doorway of N. chapel, to C.T. (Charles Trimnell), 1702. Piscinae: In chancel—splayed recess with two-centred head and round bowl, date uncertain, partly restored. In N. chapel—in S. wall, plain square recess with corbelled shelf and remains of drain, date uncertain. In S. aisle—in S. wall, recess with chamfered jambs and trefoiled head with lobes to cusp-points, round drain, 13th-century, restored.

Condition—Fairly good, tower out of perpendicular, but no signs of recent movement.

Secular

Homestead Moats

a (2). W. of Heath Farm, nearly 1¼ m. W N.W. of the church.

c (3). At Bellamy's Grove, about 1 m. S.E. of the church.

b (4). Moat Farm, house and moat, about ¼ m. E. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered; the roofs are covered with tiles and slates. It was built in the later half of the 16th century on a T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the W. end and has an 18th-century or modern addition on the N. side. On the W. side there is an original chimney-stack with offsets. Built into the front of the house is a mediæval stone gargoyle. Inside the building the S. room in the cross-wing has exposed timber-framing, a heavy central post and exposed ceiling-beams. The E. room of the main block has four refixed Composite pilasters of oak and four panels carved with swags; the fireplace-recess is fitted with late 16th- or early 17th-century carved panels. The early 18th-century staircase has close strings, square newels and some turned balusters.


Abbots Ripton, Plan Showing the
Position of Monuments

Abbots Ripton, Plan Showing the Position of Monuments

The Moat formerly surrounded the house.

Condition—Of house, good.

Monuments (5–34).

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys, timber-framed and plastered. The roofs are tiled or thatched. Some of the buildings have exposed ceiling-beams and original chimney-stacks.

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

b(5). House, on the N.E. side of the road, 160 yards N. of the church, was built probably early in the 18th century and has a cross-wing at each end.

b (6). Cottage, two tenements, on the S.W. side of the road, 130 yards S.E. of the church, was built probably early in the 18th century.

b (7). House, two tenements, S. of (6), is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N.W. and N.E. Some of the timber-framing is exposed on the S.E. side.

b (8). House, 50 yards S.E. of (7), has later additions on the S. side.

b (9). Cottage, 40 yards N.E. of (8).

b (10). Three Horse Shoes Inn, 200 yards S.E. of the church.

b(11). Cottage, 10 yards N.E. of (10).

b (12). Cottage, 40 yards E. of (10).

b (13). Cottage, 10 yards E. of (12).

b (14). Cottage (Plate 163), on the S. side of the road, 530 yards E.S.E. of the church, was built probably late in the 16th century. The timber-framing is exposed in front.

b (15). Green Farm (Plate 163), house, 250 yards S.E. of (14), has exposed timber-framing.

b (16). Cottage, 200 yards E. of (14).

b (17). Cottage, 40 yards S.E. of (16), was built probably early in the 18th century.

b (18). Cottage, 200 yards E. of (17).

b(19). Hall Farm, house, ¾ m. E. of the church, is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S.E. and N.E.; there is a modern addition on the S.W.

a (20). Shooter's Green Farm, house, about 1½ m. N.W. of the church, is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N.W. and N.E.

Wennington

b (21). Cottage, on the E. side of the road, 1,540 yards N.N.E. of the church.

b (22). House, 100 yards N.N.E. of (21).

b (23). Cottage, at cross-roads, 40 yards N. of (22).

b (24). Cottage, opposite and 20 yards W. of (23).

b(25). Cottage, two tenements, nearly opposite and 25 yards N.W. of (21).

b (26). Cottages (Plate 73), block of three tenements, on the N. side of the road, 50 yards N.N.W. of (24).

b (27). Cottage, two tenements, 100 yards E.S.E. of (26).

b (28). Cottage, E.S.E. of (27).

b (29). Cottage, N.E. of (28).

b (30). Farmhouse, 60 yards N.E. of (29), was built probably late in the 16th century on a half H-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S. At the end of the S.E. wing is a large chimney-stack of ashlar with a cross-shaped shaft of brick, set diagonally.

b (31). Cottage, 30 yards S.E. of (28).

b (32). Cottage, 30 yards S.E. of (31), was built probably early in the 18th century.

b (33). Royal Oak Inn and cottage, E.S.E. of (32).

b (34). Cottage, 40 yards S.E. of (33).

Unclassified

c (35). Mound, on the N.E. side of the St. Ives road, 1,600 yards E.S.E. of the church, is of roughly rectangular form with rounded angles. It is about 60 ft. by 54 ft. and 4 ft. high. The mound is said, locally, to be of recent origin.

Condition—Fairly good.