Eardisley

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1934

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50-56

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'Eardisley', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 3: North West (1934), pp. 50-56. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=124611 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


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22 EARDISLEY (B.d.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XVII, S.E., (b)XXIV, N.E., (c)XXIV, S.E.)

Eardisley is a parish and village 5 m. S.S.E. of Kington. The church, with its 12th-century font, and the early house at Eardisley Wootton are the principal monuments.

Ecclesiastical

b(1). Parish Church of St. Mary Magdalene (Plate 7) stands at the S. end of the village. The walls are of local sandstone rubble with dressings of the same material; the roofs are covered with stone slates. The font is evidence to the existence of a church here in the middle of the 12th century, but the earliest surviving part of the fabric is the S. arcade of the Nave and the South Aisle of c. 1200. It probably represents the extent of the whole church at that period from E. to W., the division between the nave and chancel being indicated by the larger pier on the S. Early in the 13th century a N. aisle of three bays was added to the early nave; the arcade seems to have been re-built later in the same century. The Chancel was added c. 1300, and a little later the North Aisle was widened and extended to the E., the two E. arches of the N. arcade being built to open into it. The clearstorey was added on the S. of the nave c. 1330, and late in the same century the South Porch was added. The old tower was burnt down probably early in the 18th century, and the existing West Tower was built probably in 1708, the date of the bells. The church was restored in 1862–3.

The church is of some architectural interest from its development, and among the fittings the font and the sallet are noteworthy.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (33½ ft. by 16½ ft.) is of c. 1300. The E. window is of three lights, the two side lights trefoiled and the mullions run up into the two-centred head to form the middle light; the label is chamfered. In the N. wall is a modern opening. In the S. wall are two windows, the eastern of two trefoiled lights and the western of three graduated lancet-lights; the doorway has chamfered jambs and two-centred head. There is no masonry chancel-arch.

The Nave (Plate 12) (70½ ft. by 19 ft.) has a N. arcade of five bays, of which the two eastern are of c. 1330; the first arch is segmental-pointed and of two moulded orders continued down the responds; the labels have carved head-stops, crockets, and finials; the wider and taller second arch is segmental-pointed and of two sunk-chamfered orders with a moulded label on the S. face; the responds are similar to the arch and have moulded capitals and hollow-chamfered bases; the three westernmost arches are of the 13th century, the first two being later than the third and than the two responds; they are two-centred and of two chamfered orders; the octagonal columns and half-round responds have moulded capitals and chamfered bases; E. of the arcade is a 14th-century squint with a trefoiled ogee head. The S. arcade is of c. 1200 and of four bays with segmental arches of one plain order; the E. arch is lower than the others; the piers and responds have moulded imposts and bases and chamfered angles, having carved stops in the W. bays; E. of the arcade are the 14th-century upper and lower doorways to the rood-loft staircase; both have square heads. The clearstorey over the S. arcade has four restored 14th-century windows, the three eastern each of three trefoiled ogee lights in a square head; the western window is similar, but of two lights. The blocked 14th-century doorway in the W. wall has moulded jambs and two-centred arch; the W. window, of the same date, is of three cinque-foiled lights in a two-centred head.

The North Aisle (14½ ft. wide) has an E. window similar to the E. window of the chancel, but with no label. In the N. wall are four early 14th-century windows, the first is of two trefoiled lights and the second of three similar graduated lights; the third window is of two trefoiled lights in a two-centred head; the westernmost window is of one trefoiled light; the N. doorway has chamfered jambs and two-centred arch.

The South Aisle (7½ ft. wide) has a partly restored E. window of c. 1300 and of two trefoiled lights. In the S. wall are three windows, the easternmost of c. 1300 much restored, modern externally, and of three trefoiled lights with tracery in a two-centred head; the two western windows are of the 14th century and of two trefoiled ogee lights with trefoiled spandrels; the late 14th-century S. doorway has moulded jambs and four-centred head.


Eardisley, the Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

Eardisley, the Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene

The West Tower (12 ft. square) is of c. 1708 and of four storeys with a battered plinth and an embattled parapet. The ground storey has a round-headed doorway in the E. wall; in the N. wall is a doorway with a pointed head, and in the W. wall is a square-headed window. The second storey has a square-headed window in the N. and W. walls and a blocked window in the S. wall. The third storey has a square-headed window in the S. wall. The bell-chamber has, in each wall, a square-headed window with a round arch above filled with rubble.

The South Porch is of the 14th century, and of stone. The outer archway has jambs and two-centred arch of two moulded orders with moulded imposts. In the E. wall is a window of one trefoiled ogee light.

Fittings—Bells: six; 2nd to 6th by Abraham Rudhall, 1708. Brasses: In N. chapel—(1) to Sidney, daughter of Thomas Conyngesbye, 1627, with shield-of-arms; (2) to Sir Humphrey Baskervile, 1617, inscription and achievement-of-arms. In nave—(3) to George Coke, Bishop of Hereford, 1646, inscription only in stone slab with carved shield-of-arms, mitre, etc.; (4) to Henry Harper, 1687, inscription only, with enrichments. Churchyard Cross: S. of church, moulded octagonal base, probably 15th-century with modern shaft. Coffin-lids: In tower—slab with cross in trefoil-headed panel, 14th-century. In churchyard— by S. porch, tapering slab, mediæval. Door: In N. doorway—modern but with one old strap-hinge, with ornamental curved braces, possibly 13th-century. Font (Plate 105): cup-shaped bowl with cable-necking on splayed base, upper part of bowl and base with bands of interlacement, main part of bowl with figures in relief representing the Harrowing of Hell, two men with sword and spear fighting, and a large lion: the figures are shown in quilted garments and the fighters have conical caps, mid 12th-century, and the work is by the same carver as Castle Frome font. Helms: In nave— high on E. wall, (a) sallet of late 15th-century date with brass rivets and remains of leather lining, vizor removed, said to have been found at Eardisley Castle; (b) late 16th-century combed helmet with vizor and arabesque enrichment. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In S. aisle—on N. wall, (1) to Alice, wife of Thomas Harper, 1680, stone tablet (Plate 69) with scrolls, pediment and cartouche-of-arms. In churchyard—by S. porch, (2) to Mary, second wife of William Badham, 1690, flat slab; against S. wall of churchyard, (3) to John West, 1711, headstone. Floor-slabs: In nave—(1) to Henry Harper, 1608 (? 1687) and Elizabeth his daughter, 1708; (2) to Katherine Price, 1708; (3) to Jenkin Crump, 1705 and Elizabeth his wife, 1707; (4) to John Duppa, senior, 17th-century; (5) to John Duppa, junior, 17th-century; (6) to Walter Badham, 1687–8 and Elinor Badham, 1702. In N. aisle—(7) to John Phillips, 1703–4. In S. aisle—(8) to Emund Fyzjo[hn ?] broken slab with middle part missing, marginal inscription in Lombardic capitals, late 13th or early 14th-century. In tower—(9) to Elizabeth, wife of John Rowlands, senior, 1693; (10) to William Badham, 168(3 ?). Niches: In nave—in W. face of S.E. pier, shallow recess with ogee head, 14th-century; in W. face of S.E. respond, with trefoiled ogee head and embattled cornice, 14th-century. Piscinæ: In chancel —recess with chamfered jambs, ball-flower stops and cinque-foiled head, early 14th-century, sill modern. In S. aisle—in S. wall, recess with trefoiled head and square drain, 13th-century. Plate: includes three pewter plates. Recess: In E. pier of S. arcade of nave—with moulded jambs and round head, 6¼ ft. high, 14th-century, use uncertain. Stoup: In S. porch —round bowl with square top and shaped angle, probably mortar.

Condition—Good.

a(2). Bollingham Chapel stands 2¼ m. N.N.W. of the parish church. The walls are of local sandstone rubble with dressings of the same material and of limestone; the roofs are covered with stone slates. Owing to restoration there is little or no evidence of the date of the building, but the plan suggests that it is a structure of 12th or 13th-century date. It was restored in 1867 and 1890, and the South Porch is modern.


The Church, Plan

The Church, Plan

Architectural Description—The Chancel (16 ft. by 17 ft.) and Nave (43¾ ft. by 19¼ ft.) have now no ancient features; the N. wall has been refaced, but the quoins of the S.E. angles of the chancel and nave are old. There is a bell-cote over the W. gable.

The Roof of the chancel is mediæval, partly restored; it has a modern central truss. The 14th or 15th-century roof of the nave is of six bays with braced collar-beam trusses, alternating with trusses having tie-beams and king-posts; below the middle purlins are cusped wind-braces, partly modern.

Fittings—Bell: one, uninscribed. Floor-slab: In nave—to Sarah (Higgins), wife of Henry Harper, 1711. Plate: includes mid 17th-century cup and cover-paten, the former with the arms of George Coke, Bishop of Hereford, 1636–46, in a lozenge. Stoup: In nave— E. of S. doorway, mutilated flat bowl with round basin. Miscellanea: Incorporated in S. wall of chancel, externally, carved man's head, probably corbel.

Condition—Good.

Secular

b(3). Eardisley Castle (Plan, p. xxix), mount and bailey earthwork, 50 yards W. of the church. The existence of a "domus defensabilis" at Eardisley is recorded in the Domesday survey, and this was perhaps the origin of the existing earthwork. It consists of a roughly oval moated enclosure with a motte on the S.W. side. The motte is about 33½ yards in diameter at the base and rises some 14 ft. above the level of the bailey from which it is now not separated by any ditch. The moat is still wet and encloses an area of about 1¼ acres; along its W. and S.W. sides is an outer bank, and still further W. a stream appears to have been used to form an outer enclosure of irregular form. A second stream and bank, again to the W., form a second enclosure.

Condition—Poor.

c(4). Eardisley Park, house and outbuildings, about ¾ m. W.S.W. of the church. The House is of three storeys with cellars, the walls are of brick and the roofs are covered with stone slates. It was built early in the 18th century on a rectangular plan, but the existing top storey is a later addition. The front is symmetrically designed, and has a brick band between the lower storeys, continued round the sides. The windows have flush frames. The basement retains some mullioned windows. Inside the building, many of the rooms have 18th-century panelling, and some of the fireplaces have moulded surrounds. The S.W. room on the first floor has a fireplace (Plate 52) with a panelled overmantel and flanked by fluted pilasters supporting a Doric entablature. There is a little re-used 17th-century panelling in the S.E. room on the ground floor. The early 18th-century staircase (Plate 75) has turned balusters, straight strings and moulded handrails.

The Pigeon-house, N. of the house and of early 18th-century date, is a square building of brick with a hipped roof, square timber lantern and weather-vane. The Stable, W. of the pigeon-house, is a two-storeyed brick building of the same period; further W. is a Cider Mill partly of brick and partly timber-framed; it has two pedimented dormer-windows and remains of an eaves-cornice. To the W. of the house are an early 18th-century Cottage and Barn; the former is of brick and the latter timber-framed; the barn incorporates some 16th-century timbers. The Stable, W. of the yard, is a brick building also of early 18th-century date.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(5). Upper House Farm (Plate 31), house and out-buildings on the E. side of the road, 650 yards N.N.W. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed; the roofs are covered with stone slates. The middle part of the house was built probably in the 15th century, and consists of a hall with a screens-passage at the S. end and a solar-wing at the N. end. Late in the 16th or early in the 17th century a chimney-stack and an upper floor were inserted in the hall and additional blocks added on the W. and S. sides and on the N.E., the S. wing probably replacing the earlier kitchen-wing. On the N. front the original building has close-set timber-framing and a projecting window with moulded head, sill and mullions and lead glazing; the N.E. addition has exposed framing and a large gable fronting N., projecting at the first floor level and finished with cusped barge-boards; the staircase-projection has a window of four lights with moulded mullions and contemporary glazing. The E. side of the main block retains some of its original close-set framing. The framing of the added S. wing is mostly exposed, and the upper storey projects at the W. end on curved brackets. The added W. wing is plastered; the upper storey projects on the whole of the W. side and at the N. end; it has turned pendants under the angle and intermediate posts; between it and the hall-block is a chimney-stack with two diagonal shafts.

Inside the building, the original hall (28 ft. by 19 ft.) has a central roof-truss with arched braces under the collar; the doorway at the W. end of the screenspassage has original moulded jambs, but the head has been removed; the passage retains its open-timbered ceiling supporting a gallery, now incorporated with the inserted floor. In the N. wall of the hall is an original doorway with a four-centred head and sunk spandrels. In the 17th-century chimney is set a 14th-century stone with a trefoiled and traceried head. Elsewhere in the house some of the ceiling-beams are exposed. A room on the first floor is lined with 17th-century panelling, and at the head of the stairs is an octagonal newel with a finial.

The Outbuildings, N. of the house, are timber-framed and weather-boarded and probably of late 17th or early 18th-century date. The timber-framed stables and loft E. of the house are probably of the 17th century, and on the S. side are two windows with diagonal mullion-bars.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (6–68)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tile, slate or stone-covered roofs. Most of the buildings have exposed external timber-framing and internal ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good or fairly good.

b(6). Cottage and smithy, 50 yards S.S.W. of (5), is of 16th-century date. The upper storey projects on the W. side and has an original moulded bressummer; the projection at the S. end has been under-built.

b(7). Range of three cottages, W. of (6), has been heightened.

b(8). Range of three cottages, W. of (7), was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century. The E. wing is a later addition.

b(9). Cottage (Plate 26), on the S. side of the road, 600 yards N.N.W. of the church, was built probably in the 14th century. It is of two bays with a central crutch-truss; there is also crutch-construction in the E. wall.

b(10). Cottage, two tenements, 50 yards E. of (9), is of late 16th or early 17th-century date, heightened in the 18th century.

b(11). Tram Inn, S.E. of (10), has an extension, probably of later date, on the S. There is a stable and loft S.E. of the house and probably of the same period.


Eardisley, Plan Showing the Position of Monuments

Eardisley, Plan Showing the Position of Monuments

b(12). House, 40 yards S.E. of (11), has been re-built except for the S.W. wing.

b(13). Cottage, two tenements, 30 yards S.E. of (12).

b(14). The Forge, cottage S.E. of (13), was built in the 14th century and has a central block of two bays with a central crutch-truss; the truss has a collar with curved and chamfered braces below it. The adjoining bay on the S. has plain crutch-trusses on the N. and S.

b(15). Cottage, S.E. of (14), was built probably early in the 18th century.

b(16). House, on the W. side of the road immediately S. of Eardisley bridge, has been largely re-built except for the 16th or early 17th-century N. wing. The upper storey of the wing projects on the E. and part of the N. side on curved brackets.

b(17). House, 20 yards S.E. of (16), was built probably late in the 16th century, and is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. and N. The upper storey projects and is gabled on the S. part of the E. front. In the upper storey is a window with original moulded mullions.

b(18). Cottage, 20 yards S. of (17), was built probably early in the 18th century.

b(19). Range of three cottages, 55 yards S. of (18).

b(20). Cottage, 10 yards S. of (19), was built probably early in the 18th century.

b(21). Castle Farm, house and outbuildings, 100 yards W. of the church. The House is of two storeys with attics, and the walls are of brick. It was built early in the 18th century and has a moulded stone plinth. The front has a modillioned eaves-cornice, and the doorway has a moulded frame and a shell-hood resting on carved brackets. Some of the windows retain their original solid frames with mullion and transom. The N.W. doorway has a moulded wooden cornice supporting a hipped roof. Inside the building, the original staircase has turned balusters and moulded newels.

The Outbuilding, N. of the house, is of the same date and of brick; it forms an L-shaped block with the wings extending towards the N.E. and S.E. The doorway in the S.E. wall has a moulded frame with a shaped inner head. Another doorway also has a moulded frame. The Farm-buildings N.E. of the house, include two timber-framed barns, the western of nine bays.

b(22). White House, two tenements, 130 yards S.S.E. of the church, is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. and S.

b(23). Range of four tenements on the E. side of the road, 230 yards N. of the church, has a cross-wing at the S. end and three gabled dormers in the main block; one of these has moulded barge-boards and a pendant at the apex.

b(24). Cottage, 10 yards N.W. of (23).

b(25). Cottage, 22 yards N.W. of (24), was built probably early in the 18th century.

b(26). Cottage, now police-station, 130 yards N.W. of (25).

b(27). Cottage, 12 yards N.W. of (26), has been refaced with stone and heightened.

b(28). Cottage, two tenements, 10 yards N.W. of (27), was built probably early in the 18th century, but has been refronted.

b(29). House, N.W. of (28) and 500 yards N.N.W. of the church, was built in the 15th century on a T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the W. end. The cross-wing has been partly refaced in stone, but the N. gable retains its original barge-boards with traceried panelling. Inside the building, both wings have remains of original roof-construction with chamfered tie-beams; the cross-wing was of four bays, and the E. wing retains some curved braces. There is a little 17th-century panelling.

b(30). Eardisley Wootton, house and barn, nearly 1 m. N.N.W. of the church. The House was built probably in the 13th century, but was much altered in the 17th century when the upper floor was inserted and the E. cross-wing built.

The house has an interesting early feature in its doorway and roof-construction.

Some of the original timber-framing in large squares is exposed. The original doorway on the N. of the main block is constructed of two massive timbers forming a two-centred arch; a later doorway with a square head has been inserted within it. Inside the building, the original block is of four bays with remains of crutch-trusses with collars.

The Barn (Plate 37), W. of the house, appears to be of the same date. It is of three bays with crutch-trusses between them and in the end walls.

b(31). Bower Cottage (Plate 30), nearly 1½ m. N.N.W. of the church, is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the E. and S.

b(32). Little Quebb, house and barn, about 1¾ m. N.N.W. of the church. The House consists of a mediæval central block with a late 16th or early 17th-century S.W. cross-wing and a later wing at the N.E. end. An upper floor has been inserted in the original block and gables added on the N. and S. sides. Inside the building are the remains of three original crutchtrusses, partly visible. The Barn, W. of the house, is of four bays, weather-boarded.

b(33). Great Quebb, house and barns, 50 yards S.W. of (32). The House may be of mediæval origin as there appear to be remains of a crutch-truss in the middle block. The S.W. wing was added or re-built late in the 16th century, but the rest of the building has been extensively altered. The upper storey projects on two sides of the S.W. wing on curved brackets; it also projects on the S.E. side of the main block. Inside the building, the main block has three doorways with four-centred heads. A room in the S.W. wing is lined with late 16th or early 17th-century panelling, and the fireplace has an early 18th-century moulded surround and panelled overmantel. The early 17th-century staircase has flat shaped balusters and square newels with turned finials.

The Barn, N. of the house, is of three bays, weather-boarded. A second barn, W. of the house, is partly of brick and stone.

b(34). Upper Welson, house and barn, nearly 1¾ m. N.W. of the church. The House (Plate 22) consists of a low W. wing of uncertain date but probably earlier than the early 17th-century cross-wing at the E. end. The cross-wing is of two storeys with attics. The Barn, S.W. of the house is weather-boarded.

b(35). The Dukes, cottage, nearly 1½ m. N.W. of the church, was built of stone probably early in the 18th century.

b(36). Hurstwood, cottage, on the E. side of the lane, 620 yards S.W. of (35).

b(37). Cottage, on the N. side of the lane, 150 yards E.S.E. of (36), has been partly refronted in stone.

b(38). Lower Welson Farm, house, on the W. side of the lane, 70 yards S. of (37), is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the E. and S. The walls are partly of stone. Inside the building are some original moulded ceiling-beams with shaped brackets under them. The late 17th-century staircase has turned balusters and moulded handrails.

b(39). Middle Farm, house, on the W. side of the lane at Lower Welson, and 150 yards S. of (38). The upper storey projects at the E. end.

b(40). Cottage, 30 yards S. of (39).

b(41). Cottage, on the N.E. side of the lane, 70 yards S.E. of (40), has an original moulded ceiling-beam.

b(42). Cottage, 100 yards E. of (41).

b(43). Cottage, in the road fork, 120 yards E. of (42), was built early in the 18th century.

b(44). Cottage, immediately S. of the brook, and 120 yards S.S.E. of (43), has been heightened.

b(45). Stone Cot, cottage, on the E. side of the road 120 yards S.S.E. of (44) and 1 m. W.N.W. of the church, has been heightened.

b(46). Cottage, on the N. side of the road at Hurstway Common and 240 yards S.S.E. of (45).

b(47). Parsonage Farm, house, 300 yards S.E. of (46), has a two-storeyed porch on the N.E. side; the upper storey projects and has turned pendants at the angles; the sides of the porch are open and fitted with turned balusters.

b(48). The Turn, cottage, on the N. side of the road, 230 yards N. of (47).

b(49). Cottage, on the S.E. side of the road at Field, about 1 m. N.W. of the church, has been largely refaced in brick.

b(50). Cottage, 50 yards N.E. of (49), has been heightened.

b(51). Cottage, 20 yards N.E. of (50), was built early in the 18th century.

b(52). Cottage, at Hobby Lyons, 930 yards N.W. of the church.

b(53). The Folly, house, 100 yards N.N.E. of (52), has been partly re-built in stone.

b(54). Woods Eaves Farm, house and barns, 1¼ m. W.N.W. of the church. The House (Plate 26) is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S.W. and N.W. The S.W. wing was built probably late in the 16th century, and the second wing is a later addition.

The Barn, E. of the house, is of three bays, weather-boarded. There is a second barn of the same character and immediately S.E. of the house is a late 16th or early 17th-century two-storeyed outbuilding.

b(55). St. Mary's Farm, house and barn, 220 yards W.S.W. of (54). The House has an 18th-century addition at the back. The Barn, N. of the house, is of five bays, weather-boarded.

b(56). Cottage (Plate 32), on the N. side of the road, 60 yards N.W. of (55).

b(57). Yew Tree House, 320 yards S.W. of (56), is of two storeys with attics, and has been partly refaced in stone. The wall-plate of the upper storey projects on the S.E. front on shaped brackets.

b(58). Cottage (Plate 32), 80 yards S.W. of (57).

c(59). Lady Arbour Farm, house and barn, 1,120 yards S.W. of the church. The House is of stone with a hipped roof and dormers. Some of the windows are original with solid frames, mullion and transom. Inside the building is an original staircase with slat balusters and square moulded newels. The Barn, S.W. of the house, is of seven bays, partly weather-boarded.

c(60). Parton (Plate 31), house, 1,050 yards S.E. of the church, consists of an early 17th-century L-shaped block at the N. end and an early 18th-century T-shaped extension on the S. The early block has been partly refaced in brick; the E. end has exposed square-framing with ornamental braces in the upper part. Inside the building are two early 18th-century fireplaces.

c(61). Upper Green Lane, cottage, about 1 m. S.S.E. of the church, was probably re-built early in the 18th century.

c(62). Old Crow Farm, house and barn, 470 yards W.S.W. of (61). The House is of T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the S.W. end. The main block is of mediæval origin and has a partly concealed crutch-truss at the S.W. end. Some of the walls have been refronted in stone and brick. The Barn, N. of the house, is of three bays.

c(63). Willersley House, 120 yards W. of (62), has a modern addition on the S.W. side.

c(64). Cottage, 60 yards S.W. of (63), has been largely re-built and added to.

c(65). Cottage, 70 yards S.W. of (64), is partly of stone.

c(66). The Old Crow, cottage, on the N.E. side of the road, 30 yards W. of (65), has a cross-wing at the N. end.

a(67). Bollingham Farm, house, 320 yards N.E. of Bollingham Chapel, is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the W. and N. It has been much altered and extended.

a(68). Upper Spond, house and barn, 1 m. N.E. of Bollingham chapel. The House has a cross-wing at the S.W. end. The main block was built in the 16th century and has some close-set timber-framing. The Barn forming an extension to the N.E. was added in the 17th century. The Barn, N.E. of the house, is of four bays partly weather-boarded.

Unclassified

b(69). Earthwork, called The Camp, nearly 2½ m. N.W. of the church, consists of a circular enclosure 46 yards in diameter, surrounded by a dry ditch with traces of an outer bank to the southern half.

Condition—Fairly good.

b(70). Earthwork or Moat, nearly 1¾ m. N. of the church, forms a circular enclosure surrounded by a partly wet ditch.

Condition—Fairly good.



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