Luston

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English Heritage

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1934

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138-140

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'Luston', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 3: North West (1934), pp. 138-140. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=124640 Date accessed: 02 August 2014.


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51 LUSTON (D.c.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XII, N.W., (b)XII, N.E.)

Luston is a parish and village 2½ m. N. of Leominster. Tudor House is the principal monument.

Secular

b(1). Tudor House (Plate 18), on the E. side of the road in the village, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are slate-covered. It was built early in the 17th century on a T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the S. end. There are modern additions on the E. side. The timber-framing is exposed on the W. front and on the other free sides of the cross-wing. The upper storey projects on the whole of the W. front on moulded and dentilled bressummers and shaped brackets; the end of the cross-wing has ornamental framing, that of the lower storey having half-round cuttings in the studs of the square panels; the panels of the upper floor have ornamental curved braces with projecting nibs; the gable projects on a dentilled bressummer, and the barge-boards are also dentilled. The main chimney-stack has projecting diagonal nibs. Inside the building, the cross-wing has original moulded ceiling-beams and the N. wing has chamfered ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

Monuments (2–29)

The following monuments, unless otherwise described, are of the 17th century and of two storeys, timber-framed, and with stone, slate or tile-covered roofs. Many of the buildings have exposed external framing and internal ceiling-beams.


Luston, Plan Shewing the Position of Monuments

Luston, Plan Shewing the Position of Monuments

Condition—Good or fairly good, unless noted.

b(2). House, 140 yards N. of (1), has diagonal framing in the upper part of the W. front. The E. wing has been partly re-built.

b(3). House, immediately N. of (2), has been recased in brick but incorporates three king-post trusses of a mediæval building, with cambered tie-beams and curved braces. The timbers are smoke-blackened. The first floor was inserted in the 17th century.

b(4). Cottage, immediately N. of (3), has a cross-wing at the N. end. The upper storey projects at the W. end of the cross-wing on an original moulded bressummer and shaped brackets.

b(5). House, 15 yards N. of (4), is of two storeys with attics and cellars and is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the E. and S. In the N. wall is an original two-light window with a diamond-shaped mullion.

Condition—Poor.

b(6). Cottage, on the S.E. side of the road, 120 yards N. of (5), has an 18th-century extension on the W. and a thatched roof.

b(7). Luston Court, 50 yards N.E. of (6), has been much altered and added to.

b(8). Cottage, on the E. side of the road, 220 yards N.N.W. of (7), has a thatched roof.

Condition—Poor.

b(9). Cottage, on the W. side of the road nearly opposite (8), has later extensions on the N. and S.

a(10). Cottage, 370 yards N.W of (9), has a thatched roof.

b(11). Cottage, 110 yards W.S.W. of Luston Court (7), has a thatched roof.

b(12). Cottage, 50 yards S.E. of (11), has been heightened in front.

b(13). House, 25 yards S. of (12), has a large modern addition on the W. side.

b(14). House, 40 yards S. of (13), was built late in the 16th century and has an added 17th-century cross-wing at the W. end. The upper storey formerly projected at the E. end, but has been under-built.

b(15). House, immediately S. of (14), was built probably early in the 16th century. The E. cross-wing was added or re-built in the 17th century. The original roof has braced tie-beams.

b(16). Cottage, two tenements, 80 yards S. of (15), has a thatched roof and probably incorporates earlier material.

b(17). House, called the Hollies, 140 yards S. of (16) and nearly opposite (1), is of mediæval origin and retains one crutch-truss. The roof is thatched.

b(18). Cottage, immediately W. of the Methodist Chapel, has a thatched roof.

b(19). White House and barn, 80 yards S.S.E. of (18). The House incorporates earlier material. The upper storey projects at the N. end and on part of the E. side, on moulded bressummers and shaped brackets. In the gable is an original four-light window, with moulded mullions; it is now blocked. The chimney-stack has three diagonal shafts. The Barn, S. of the house, is partly of stone. The E. gable has diagonal framing.

Condition—Poor.

b(20). House, 180 yards S. of (19), was built c. 1500. Much of the original close-set timber-framing is exposed. The upper storey formerly projected at the E. end but has been under-built.

b(21). Cottage, on the E. side of the road, 210 yards S.S.E. of (1), has a thatched roof.

b(22). Ivy Cottage, 70 yards N. of (21), was built probably early in the 16th century and formed part of a larger building. In the N. wall is a two-light window with a diamond-shaped mullion.

Condition—Poor.

b(23). Bury Farm, house and barn, 520 yards S.S.E. of (1). The House (Plate 23) has a cross-wing at the S. end and a modern addition on the N. The E. gable of the cross-wing has original moulded barge-boards, and in the gable is a three-light window with original moulded mullions. The two chimney-stacks have grouped diagonal shafts. Inside the building, the staircase has an octagonal central newel and solid treads. The Barn, S.W. of the house, is of four bays and of two dates in the 17th century. The gables have diagonal framing.

b(24). Cottage, on the S. side of the road at Blackpole, 720 yards S.E. of (23), has a thatched roof.

Condition—Poor.

b(25). Cottage, 270 yards E.N.E. of (24), has a corrugated-iron roof.

b(26). Cottage, 50 yards S.S.E. of (25), has an original chimney-stack with diagonal nibs on the outer faces of the two shafts.

Condition—Poor.

b(27). Cottage, on the E. side of the road at Lydiatts, ½ m. S.W. of (23).

b(28). Cottage, 300 yards S.S.E. of (27), has been heightened.

a(29). Croase Farm, house, 1,050 yards N.W. of (1), is of L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the N.W. and N.E. The N.W. wing is of early 17th-century date, and the N.E. wing was added or re-built later in the same century and extended in the 18th century. There are various modern additions. The upper storey formerly projected at the end of the N.W. wing but has been under-built.



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