Weobley

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1934

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192-203

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'Weobley', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 3: North West (1934), pp. 192-203. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=124663 Date accessed: 23 August 2014.


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74 WEOBLEY

(O.S. 6 in. (a)XVIII, S.W., (b)XVIII, S.E., (c)XXV, N.E.)

Weobley is a parish and small town 8 m. S.W. of Leominster. The town contains a large and interesting church and an unusual number of mediæval houses. In spite of the destruction of the market-hall and a large block of buildings in the middle of the town about the middle of the last century sufficient remains to make Weobley a highly remarkable and interesting collection of timber-framed buildings of 14th to 17th-century date. Outside the town the most remarkable monuments are the Ley, Fenhampton and Little Sarnesfield.

Ecclesiastical

c(1). Parish Church of St. Peter and St. Paul (Plates 170, 171) stands at the N. end of the town. The walls are of local sandstone rubble and ashlar with dressings of the same material; the roofs are covered with stone slates and ordinary slates. The two ashlar quoins imbedded in the S. angle between the chancel and aisle are probably remains of a 12th-century church, and some indication of the length of the former chancel may be preserved in the break in the line of the existing S. wall. The South Aisle was added to this church probably in the first half of the 13th century and the earlier S. doorway re-set in the S. wall; the Chancel was re-built c. 1250. Towards the end of the 13th century a general reconstruction of the Nave was undertaken which continued on well into the 14th century; the N. arcade was built and a narrow N. aisle added with a North Transept at the E. end; the W. front was re-built and, rather later, the S. arcade was re-built and the clearstorey added; the chancel-arch also was re-built. The walls of the chancel seem to have been raised a few feet and the North Vestry added. The South Porch was added probably soon after. The completion of these alterations is probably indicated by the consecration of three altars by Bishop Orleton in 1325. The North Tower was built c. 1330–40, at an angle with and probably just touching the then existing narrow N. aisle; the tower would seem to be in some sort defensive as is indicated by the small size of the windows and by the provision of a draw-bar inside the only entrance doorway. In the 15th century the early N. aisle was pulled down and extended to form the existing North Aisle. The upper part of the spire was destroyed by lightning late in the 17th century, and afterwards re-built. The church was restored in 1865.

The church is of considerable architectural interest, the tower and spire being on an unusual scale. Among the fittings the mediæval effigies and coffin-lid, the glass and the early 18th-century door and communion table are noteworthy.


Weobley, The Parish Church of St. Peter and St. Paul

Weobley, The Parish Church of St. Peter and St. Paul

Architectural Description—The Chancel (54 ft. by 23 ft.) has a much restored 15th-century E. window of five trefoiled lights with modern vertical tracery in a two-centred head. In the N. wall are two windows each of two plain pointed lights in a two-centred head; the jambs are possibly of early 13th-century date and the heads of c. 1300; between them is an early 14th-century doorway with chamfered jambs and segmental-pointed head; it perhaps incorporates 13th-century material. In the S. wall are three windows, the easternmost of early 14th-century date and of three trefoiled ogee lights; the middle window is similar to that opposite in the N. wall; the partly restored westernmost window is of mid 13th-century date and of three graduated lancet-lights; the mullions have internal shafts with moulded capitals and bases and support moulded rear-arches springing from moulded corbels on the splays; the S. doorway is similar to the vestry doorway. The early 14th-century chancel-arch is two-centred and of three sunk-chamfered orders, the two outer dying on to the wall and the inner springing from triple shafts with moulded capitals and bases resting on crowned head-corbels; the N. shaft, and probably the corbels, are modern; the moulded label on the W. face has a head-corbel at the apex; the square responds have double-chamfered W. angles finished with trefoiled stops at the top; the N. respond is corbelled out towards the W. to support the splayed face of the rood-loft staircase.

The North Vestry is of the 14th century, but the window in the N. wall is modern.

The Nave (63 ft. by 22¾ ft.) (Plate 171) has a late 13th-century N. arcade of five bays with two-centred arches of two hollow-chamfered orders, with moulded labels and modern head-stops; the easternmost arch has ballflower ornament on both orders on the S. and one order on the N.; the octagonal columns and semi-octagonal responds have moulded capitals and bases; E. of the arcade is the upper doorway to the rood-loft staircase; it has a segmental-pointed head; below the threshold level are three blockings, no doubt connected with the former rood-loft; the blocked sockets of the front beam may also be seen. The early 14th-century S. arcade has arches generally similar to those of the N. arcade but without ball-flower ornament; the octagonal columns and semi-octagonal responds have moulded capitals and bases; the walling of the S. arcade finishes in rough toothing short of the E. wall of the aisle, the thinner wall which it joins being presumably of earlier date. The early 14th-century clearstorey has four windows on each side each of two cinque-foiled lights with a trefoil or quatrefoil in a two-centred head; the easternmost pair of windows now open into the transepts; the others are all partly blocked. The W. wall (Plate 169) is faced externally with ashlar; the W. doorway of c. 1300 has a two-centred arch of four moulded orders, two of which are enriched with ball-flowers; there is a moulded label; the jambs are moulded and similarly enriched, and had each a shaft of which only the moulded capital and band remain; the splays and rear-arch have ball-flower ornament and a moulded label; the W. window is of the same date and has a two-centred head and moulded label; the mullions, tracery and external head are modern.

The North Transept and Aisle (21½ ft. wide) has, in the E. wall, a window of c. 1300, and of two cinque-foiled lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred outer order. In the N. wall, the E. bay or transept is gabled and has an early 14th-century window of two trefoiled lights with a trefoil in a two-centred head with moulded labels and internal head-stops; the W. part of the N. wall is of the 15th century and has a window of four restored cinque-foiled ogee lights with restored vertical tracery in a two-centred head; the re-set 14th-century N. doorway has chamfered jambs and segmental-pointed head; it is now blocked and fitted with a modern window. In the W. wall is a partly restored 15th-century window of three cinque-foiled ogee lights with vertical tracery in a two-centred head; the window appears to have been set inside out.

The South Aisle (17 ft. wide) has a much restored E. window of c. 1300 and of three trefoiled lights; the rear-arch has an early 13th-century re-set label with dog-tooth ornament and scrolled and star-stops. The E. bay of the S. wall is carried up in a modern gable and has two single-light windows and a round window above, all modern; further W. there are two windows, the eastern of three graduated lancet-lights, nearly all modern externally but with a re-used internal label somewhat similar to that over the E. window; the western window is of two lights with tracery in a pointed head, nearly all restored externally and with a plain internal label with head-stops; the re-set late 12th-century S. doorway has a round arch of two moulded orders, the inner continued down the jambs and the outer with cheveron-ornament and formerly resting on shafts of which only the foliated capital on the W. and the defaced bases remain; the moulded label is of the 13th century; above the doorway is the mark of the gable of the earlier roof of the porch. In the W. wall is a 13th-century window of two lancetlights with a plain label; higher up is a two-light 14th-century window, the upper parts of which are modern.

The North Tower (14 ft. square) is of five storeys (Plate 170), undivided externally; it is ashlar-faced and finished with a deep plinth and an embattled parapet with gabled and crocketted pinnacles at the angles, the faces of the pinnacles being enriched with window-tracery panelling. The tower was built c. 1330–40, and the spire is of much the same date. The ground floor is entered by a skewed passage in the S. wall with a segmental-pointed vault and a chamfered rib on the inner face; across the passage is a doorway with chamfered jambs, segmental-pointed head and sockets for a draw-bar on the inside. The S. face of the wall within the aisle shows rough cutting and a set-back above the passage; this perhaps implies that the tower was built against the former aisle and when this was removed the wall-face was roughly straightened. The E., N. and W. walls have each a recess with window panelling (Plate 15) of three trefoiled lights with net-tracery in a two-centred head; the middle light only is pierced to form a window, the side lights having each a bracket head-corbel for an image. The ground storey has a flat barrel-vault springing from deep corbelling on the N. and S. walls. The second storey has a window of one trefoiled light in the W. wall. There are similar windows in the E. wall of the third storey, the N. wall of the fourth, and the S. wall of the fifth storey. The fourth storey appears to have had an intermediate floor, now removed. The octagonal spire rests on pointed squinch-arches and has rolls at the angles; it is supported at the base by four flying-buttresses springing from the anglepinnacles. At the base, towards the cardinal points, are four windows or spire-lights, each of two trefoiled ogee lights with a quatrefoil in a two-centred head, set in a crocketted gable with side-pinnacles. Higher up the spire are several loop-lights, and there are remains of two wooden floors; the base of the spire forms the bell-chamber.

The South Porch is of stone, and is perhaps of early 14th-century date, subsequently heightened. The partly restored outer entrance is two-centred and of two chamfered orders, the inner springing from modern corbels with old capitals. The side walls have each a window of one lancet-light. On the aisle-wall is the mark of the original steep-pitched roof.

The Roof of the nave incorporates some old timbers, perhaps of early 16th-century date; before the restoration this roof was continued down over the aisles without a break. The roofs of both aisles were reconstructed with gables and that over the N. aisle is entirely modern; the S. aisle roof retains two original trusses at the E. end; these are of early 16th-century date and of low-pitch, with moulded and cambered tie-beams, curved braces and a carved foliage-boss in the middle of each truss. In the W. part of the aisle, above the arcade, is a series of corbels, possibly of a former corbel-table; further E. are the corbels of the early 16th-century roof; they are carved with a lion's head, angel, ape, and a grotesque man; at a lower level are two moulded head-corbels of the 14th century. The 15th-century roof of the S. porch is of low pitch and of two bays, with curved and moulded principals, moulded wall-plates, double-chamfered purlins and ridge.

Fittings—Bells: six; 3rd by R. Oldfield, 1605; 4th by Isaac Hadley, 17..; 5th and 6th by John Martin, 1657. Brackets: In chancel—on E. wall, two, with chamfered shelves and moulded corbels, 14th-century; near southern, plain semi-octagonal bracket with splayed underside. In N. aisle—on E. wall, moulded bracket, 14th-century. In S. aisle—on E. wall, square with broken underside, set on a piece of 13th-century string-course. Chest: In N. aisle—moulded framing with panelled front, lid and ends, late 16th or early 17th-century. Churchyard Cross (Plate 46): S. of chancel— moulded octagonal base with trefoil-headed panels on three faces and trefoil-headed niche on N. face, five octagonal steps, 14th-century, shaft and head modern. Coffin-lids: In chancel—incorporated in Monument (3), two pieces of 13th-century coffin-lids with foliated crosses. In S. aisle—against E. wall, tapering slab (Plate 47) with foliated cross and foliated stem flanked by a crozier and a mitre, inscription at top "Hic jacet Hugo B(i)ssop," 13th-century. Communion Table (Plate 50): with turned legs and feet, moulded rails and shaped brackets, with the date 1707 on front-brackets. Doors: In S. aisle—in S. doorway, of moulded framing with riveted battens, shaped pendant at head and shield with initials and date S.H., I.B., CH.W. 1712, plain ring-handle. In doorway to tower—of plain battens in two leaves, probably 17th-century, also door of rough battens to ringing-chamber. Font (Plate 58): octagonal bowl with a panel of window-tracery in each face, moulded underside, plain stem and moulded base, early 14th-century. Font-cover, with moulded edge and long straight handle, late 17th or early 18th-century. Glass: In N. aisle—in E. window, fragments of grisaille and coloured borders, 14th or 15th-century; in tracery of middle window in N. wall, figures of six seraphim (Plate 172) holding instruments of the Passion, remains of tabernacle-work in heads of lights and various fragments, 15th-century. In S. aisle—in middle window, fragments forming border, 14th-century. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In chancel—against N. wall, (1) to Col. John Birch, M.P., 1691, monument (Plate 173) of white and grey marble consisting of a pedestal and round-headed niche flanked by Corinthian columns supporting entablatures and broken pediment with achievement-of-arms, trophies of arms flanking main composition, in niche, standing figure of man in armour holding baton; (2) altar-tomb and effigy, usually ascribed to Sir William Devereux, 1402, but bearing the crest of Marbury, freestone altar-tomb with three quatre-foiled panels in front and one at each end enclosing blank shields and divided by smaller panels with trefoiled heads, alabaster effigy (Plate 174) of man in armour of c. 1430 with hip-belt, collar of SS., feet on lion, head on helm with Moor's head crest, both arms missing and figure much defaced; against S. wall, (3) recess, altar-tomb and effigies (Plate 174), ascribed to Sir John Marbury, 1437, recess with moulded jambs, two-centred arch and label, altar-tomb made up of old and modern material, effigies of alabaster, of man in plate-armour with hipbelt, collar of SS., feet on lion, head on helm with Moor's head crest, both arms missing, of lady with sideless gown, cloak, collar and horned head-dress, angels supporting cushion, both arms missing, c. 1450. In N. aisle—against N. wall, (4) altar-tomb with modern side and ends, moulded plinth and marble slab with four round sinkings at the angles, probably early 16th-century. Floor-slabs: In N. aisle—(1) part of slab with remains of incised cross; (2) broken slab with ornamental cross and book; (3) broken double slab, with two plain crosses; (4) fragment, built into S.E. angle of tower, with base of cross and remains of Lombardic inscription; all 14th or 15th-century. In S. aisle—(5) part of slab with incised cross, mediæval; (6) to Simon Bridgis, 1707–8 (?), with shield-of-arms. Niches: On S. side of chancel-arch, gabled crocketted and finialed canopy with cinque-foiled arch, springing from two heads, moulded bracket below carved with the bust of a king and with a re-used base-moulding below, 14th-century. On W. front of nave—flanking W. window, two with cinque-foiled heads and moulded labels, early 14th-century. Paintings: On upper parts of nave-columns, traces of simple painted scroll-work and black-letter inscriptions, late 16th or early 17th-century. Piscina: In chancel— recess with trefoiled head and broken drain, late 13th-century. In S. aisle—in S. wall, recess (Plate 61) with moulded trefoiled head enriched with dog-tooth ornament, semi-circular moulded label with similar ornament, projecting defaced drain, early 13th-century. Plate: includes cup of 1595 (?) with band of engraved ornament and a cup of 1636, perhaps remade. Pulpit: Loose in nave-aisles—various portions of stone pulpit with moulded cornice and moulded underside, stem with moulded top and chamfered plinth, 14th-century. Scratchings: On various parts of nave—mason's marks. Screen: Across N. aisle—part of base of screen with moulded framing and three large panels, remains of painted spiral bands; against N. wall, square moulded post, with crocketted niche, moulded finial and a shield with the symbol of the Trinity; in tower—portion of the same or a similar screen; late 15th-century. Miscellanea: In chancel—at back of Monuments (2 and 3), wooden shields repainted with the arms of Devereux and Marbury, probably 16th-century. Incorporated in modern stalls—panels of carved woodwork, late 16th or early 17th-century.

Condition—Good.

Secular

c(2). Weobley Castle (Plan, p. 198), earthworks, at the S. end of the town, ¼ m. S. of the church, occupies a slight rise in the ground and consists of a much damaged main work to the S., with a bailey to the N. of it. The defences are most complete on the E. half of the work, but even here they seem to have been much altered and the outlines are difficult to reconcile with the early plan of the buildings reproduced in Robinson's Castles of Herefordshire. As it now exists the main work consists of a high semi-circular bank towards the E. and defended towards the S. by a deep double ditch with a high intermediate bank; the two ditches unite with the single ditch of the bailey on the E. of that work, thus isolating the intermediate bank. The bailey is of roughly oval form and retains its bank and ditch on the E. side, but remains of its ditch only on the W. On this side the whole work has been much denuded and reduced to little more than a series of scarps representing the general outline of the enclosure. A footpath traverses the whole site from N. to S., crossing the N. ditch of the bailey by a causeway which no doubt represents the original entrance. It crosses also a slight causeway over the outer S. ditch, but this is probably modern. The round towers shown on the early plan seem to indicate that the former masonry castle was of the 13th century, but of this there are no remains above ground. The castle belonged to the family of Lacy in the early Middle Ages, passing from them to the families of Verdon, Crophull and Devereux. Leland states that in his day it was a goodly castle but somewhat in decay. (Arch. Camb. XV, 1869.)

Condition—Bad.

b(3). Homestead Moat, nearly 1 m. W.N.W. of the church, is now dry and encloses a roughly rectangular island with an entrance on the N. There are remains of a bank and other works to the E. of the moat.

Condition—Poor.

a(4). Nunsland Farm, outbuilding and moat, nearly 2 m. N.W. of the church. The Outbuilding is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with a tiled roof. It was built perhaps early in the 18th century and has exposed external framing and internal ceiling-beams.

The Moat formerly surrounded the site and was of almost square form. It is still wet on the S.E. but has been largely obliterated on the N.W.

Condition—Of outbuilding, fairly good.

b(5). Brockaly, cottage, ½ m. N.E. of (4), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built late in the 17th century and has been partly heightened. The external framing is exposed, as are some of the ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

a(6). The Birches, house, 1¾ m. W.N.W. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with stone and slate-covered roofs. It is of T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the E. end. The date of the main block is uncertain, but the higher cross-wing is probably of the 16th century and has some exposed and close-set timber-framing; the upper storey projects on part of the E. face. The framing of the main block is in large panels, and there is a doorway with a flat triangular head cut in a cross-beam.

Condition—Good.

b(7). Little Sarnesfield, house and barn, nearly 1 m. W. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed, and faced with later brickwork; the roofs are slate-covered. It was built probably in the 14th century and consists of a central hall with crosswings at the N. and S. ends. The hall was later divided into two storeys, and there are 18th-century and modern additions on the E. Inside the building, the S. wing retains two original trusses, one with a tie-beam, having curved braces below and two struts above forming foiled openings; the second truss has a collar with curved braces, the principals being cut to a trefoil above the collar. The N. wing has some original framing in the E. wall. There are exposed ceiling-beams in the lower rooms.

The Barn, N. of the house, is a timber-framed building of six bays, and probably of early 17th-century date.

Condition—Good.

c(8). The Ley, house (Plate 103), nearly ¾ m. S.W. of the church, is of two storeys with attics; the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are stone-covered. It was built c. 1589 on a modified H-shaped plan with the crosswings at the E. and W. ends and with a lower wing extending S. from the E. cross-wing.

The house is a good example of its period, with the external appearance very little altered.


Weobley, the Ley

Weobley, the Ley

The exterior has the timber-framing in large squares, almost entirely exposed. The N. front has a moulded beam between the two main storeys. In the middle of the main block is a projecting and gabled bay-window of two storeys each with a window of five transomed lights with moulded frame and mullions; below the lower window the studs of the framing are moulded, and above the window is an enriched band; the gable has enriched barge-boards and plaster panels with pomegranates and other devices. At the back of this bay a gabled dormer rises from the main roof, with moulded and enriched barge-boards and two scrolled brackets. In the angle of the W. wing is a two-storeyed and gabled porch. The porch (Plate 176) itself has moulded framing and carved scrolled brackets supporting the projecting upper storey; the doorway has a flat pointed head, and above it are two carved panels, (a) an impaled shield-of-arms with the initials I.B. for James Bridges, (b) the words "In Dei nomine," the date 1589, and two leaves. The upper storey has moulded angle-posts, moulded barge-boards with scrolled brackets at the base and a pendant at the apex; the slightly projecting window, of three transomed lights, has a moulded frame and mullions. The inner doorway of the porch has a moulded frame with ornamental stops and has a panelled door with two wooden latches; above it are three lights with moulded frame and mullions. The gabled ends of the wings have each a projecting bay-window of two storeys and also gabled; they generally resemble the bay of the main block, without the ornamental details; the barge-boards of the gable of the E. wing have decayed enrichments. The E. elevation has a chimney-stack with three brick shafts, set diagonally and probably re-built; there are two windows of two transomed lights, perhaps later insertions; the windows of the lower S. wing appear to have been altered. Inside the building, the principal rooms have original moulded ceiling-beams and joists. The hall has some original panelling, and there is a door of similar panelling.

Condition—Good.

c(9). Fenhampton, house, nearly 1¼ m. S.W. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with stonecovered roofs. The N. and middle parts of the house were built early in the 17th century, and the S. part is probably an 18th-century addition. There is a later addition on the W. side. Much of the timber-framing is exposed. The E. front has a gable at each end and a two-storeyed and gabled porch (Plate 43) projecting from the middle block; the upper storey projects on the free sides with a moulded bressummer and scrolled brackets; the porch itself has a flat pointed outer archway and four large posts in the side walls, forming openings in the upper part. Inside the building some of the ceiling-beams are exposed.

Condition—Good.

c(10). Ivy Cottage, 600 yards S. of (9), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with slate-covered roofs. It was built in the 17th century and heightened in the 18th century. The external framing and internal ceiling-beams are exposed.

Condition—Good.

c(11). The Field, house, nearly 1 m. S.E. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with stonecovered roofs. It was built probably early in the 18th century and has exposed external framing.

Condition—Good.

Meadow Street, E. side

c(12). House (Plate 181), 230 yards W. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tile-covered roofs. It was built probably in the 16th century and has exposed external framing and internal ceiling-beams. The upper storey projects at the W. end on a moulded bressummer and curved brackets, springing from shafts attached to the main posts. The chimney-stack has diagonal projecting nibs and is probably of the 17th century.

Condition—Good.

c(13). House, 50 yards S.S.E. of (12), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with slate-covered roofs. It was built early in the 17th century and has exposed external framing and moulded ceiling-beams. An outbuilding N.W. of the house is of the same date and character.

Condition—Good.

c(14). House, 80 yards S.S.E. of (13), is of two storeys, timber-framed and with stone-covered roofs. It was built probably in the 14th century with a central hall and a cross-wing at the N.W. end. The hall was divided into two storeys, probably late in the 16th century, and there is a 17th-century addition at the back. The timber-framing, in large squares, is exposed. The upper storey of the cross-wing projects at the S.W. end on curved brackets. In the S.E. end of the hall is an original crutch-truss, and inside it is a second crutchtruss with a collar, having struts forming foiled openings above and curved braces below; several cusped wind-braces remain. Elsewhere the ceiling-beams are exposed and the inserted floor in the hall has a wall-post with a shaped head.

Condition—Good.

S.W. side

c(15). House, nearly opposite (12), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It probably formed one wing of a 15th-century building and has some exposed framing, that in front being close-set and original; the upper storey formerly projected in front but has been under-built; the gable has original bargeboards with traceried enrichment. Inside the building, the ceiling-beams are exposed.

Condition—Good.

c(16). House (Plate 182), 150 yards S.S.E. of (15), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with stone-covered roofs. It formed the main block of a larger building which was built perhaps in the 15th century, but the existing building has been much altered and perhaps re-built at a subsequent date. The external framing is exposed, as are the ceiling-beams. The destroyed wing on the S.E. had a projecting upper storey and part of an original moulded beam remains at the first-floor level.

Condition—Fairly good.

c(17). House (Plate 182), 8 yards S.S.E. of (16), is of two storeys with attics; the walls are timber-framed and the roofs are tiled. It was built in the 17th century and has exposed external timber-framing, but has been much altered internally.

Condition—Good.

c(18). Public Hall (Plate 182), formerly a barn or outbuilding, 15 yards S.S.E. of (17), is of one storey, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built probably in the 17th century and has exposed external framing.

Condition—Fairly good.


Weobley, Plan Showing the Position of Monuments

Weobley, Plan Showing the Position of Monuments

c(19). The Old Vicarage (Plate 182), house, immediately S.S.E. of (18), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with stone and tile-covered roofs. The date of the original building is uncertain, but the two closely adjoining gabled wings on the front are apparently of late 16th-century date. Both have exposed framing, and the upper storey projects on curved brackets and plain attached shafts on the main posts. In the upper storey of each wing is the scrolled bracket and moulded sill of a window which formerly projected but is now replaced by a modern frame. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

Bell Square, S. side

c(20). House and shop, 170 yards S.S.W. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built late in the 14th or early in the 15th century, with a cross-wing at the E. end and has later additions on the S.E. and S.W. The original timber-framing in large panels is exposed in front and the upper storey of the cross-wing projects and retains one curved bracket. The barge-boards have original traceried enrichment. The return-walls of the wing have each remains of original wood tracery, either window-heads or panels. Inside the building are exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

c(21). House (Plate 180), immediately E. of (20), is of two storeys, timber-framed and with tiled roofs. It was built in the 14th century with a central hall and crosswings at the E. and W. ends. At a later date the hall was divided into two storeys.

The house is a complete example of 14th-century work with original roof-trusses in the hall and wings.

The external timber-framing in large squares is exposed. The upper storey projects at the front end of both cross-wings on curved brackets and plain shafts attached to the main posts. The gables have original barge-boards with traceried enrichment, and below the base-beams of the gables are foiled struts. In the W. wing is the original doorway with a two-centred head and an old battened door with strap-hinges. In the Hall-block is a slightly projecting 17th-century window of four lights with moulded frame, sill, mullions and transom. In the return of the E. wing adjoining the main block are remains of two trefoil-headed panels or windows. Inside the building, the ceiling-beams are exposed. The original roof of the hall is of two bays with a central truss (Plate 38); this consists of curved timbers carried down to the ground and a collar-beam with curved braces below and struts above, forming foiled openings with the principal rafters; the wall-plates are moulded, and several foiled wind-braces remain. The roofs of the wings have original trusses with braced tie-beams resting on wall-posts and struts above forming foiled openings with the principal rafters. The 17th-century staircase retains its moulded grip-handrails, chamfered newels and moulded strings and risers.

Condition—Fairly good.

Broad Street (Plates 178, 179), W. side

c(22). Red Lion Hotel (Plate 180) and outbuilding, 140 yards S. of the church. The House is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. The E. cross-wing of the house was built in the 14th century, but the main block has been much altered and re-built in the 17th and 18th centuries. The timber-framing is mostly exposed, that in the original wing being mainly in large square panels. The upper storey of the original wing projected on the E. side and S. end, but has been under-built at the S. end; on the E. side it rests on curved and moulded brackets springing from shafts attached to the main posts; the angle-post has a moulded capping; at the N. end is an original doorway, now blocked, with moulded jambs and ogeehead. In the upper storey are two original windows, now blocked, each of three trefoiled ogee lights with cusped spandrels; the mullions have been removed. The upper storey of the S. end of the wing retains two curved braces forming an arch in the framing. The interior of the building has been much altered and the roof of the original wing re-built of old materials.

The Outbuilding (Plate 177), N. of the house, has been partly demolished. It is a timber-framed structure of mediæval date, and has two heavy crutch-trusses in the N. and S. walls; the framing of the side-walls is in large squares.

Condition—Good.

c(23). House (Plate 180), opposite and S. of (22), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tile and stonecovered roofs. It was built late in the 14th century, with a cross-wing at the N. end. The main or hallblock was divided into two storeys, probably in the 17th century. The timber-framing, in large panels, is mainly exposed, as are some of the ceiling-beams. The upper storey of the cross-wing projects on the N. and E. on curved brackets springing from shafts attached to the posts; the angle-post has a moulded capping and a heavy diagonal bracket. The gabled upper storey at the end of the wing retains two pairs of arched braces, forming arches in the framing. Inside the building, the main block has a central collar-beam truss with curved braces forming a round arch.

Condition—Good.

c(24). Range, formerly two houses, 70 yards S. of (23), is partly of two and partly of three storeys; the original walls are timber-framed and the roofs are tiled. The S. house is perhaps of mediæval origin altered and partly re-built in the 17th century; the N. house has been practically re-built in modern times but contains some 17th-century fittings. The S. house has exposed framing in large squares and a porch made up of old timbers from elsewhere. Inside the N. house is a 17th-century staircase (Plate 74) with moulded grip-handrail, shaped or moulded newels and twisted balusters. There is also a wood-carving, perhaps of the 15th century, representing the Virgin and St. Michael and flanked by two shields with merchants' marks.

Condition—Good.

c(25). House, immediately S. of (24), has been re-built late in the 18th century but incorporates at the N. end part of an older timber-framed wall and at the same end a passage with moulded ceiling-beams, probably of early 16th-century date. On the S. side of the passage is part of a panelled wood screen. Some timber-framing is also exposed on the W. side of the house.

Condition—Poor.

c(26). House, immediately S. of (25), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with slate-covered roofs. It was built probably early in the 15th century but has been much altered and re-built. The timber-framing is exposed at the back. Inside the building is one original roof-truss of collar-beam type, with curved braces below and a foiled spandrel above the collar.

Condition—Good.

c(27). House, immediately S. of (26), is perhaps of mediæval origin but has been practically re-built. There are indications that the upper storey formerly projected in front.

Condition—Good.

E. side

c(28). House, opposite (22), is of two storeys with attics, timber-framed, and with slate-covered roofs. It was built early in the 17th century, but was largely re-built in the 18th and 19th centuries. Some timber-framing and ceiling-beams are exposed.

Condition—Good.

c(29). House, 20 yards S.S.E. of (28), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built in the 17th century and has exposed external timber-framing and ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

c(30). House, immediately S.S.E. of (29), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century, and has exposed external timber-framing.

Condition—Good.

c(31). House, immediately S.S.E. of (30), is of similar type and date; the roofs are slate-covered.

Condition—Good.

c(32). House and barn, 10 yards S.S.E. of (31). The House is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built probably late in the 14th century, with a central block and cross-wings at the N. and S. ends; the lower storey has been refronted in modern stonework, and the middle block has been otherwise altered. The timber-framing is exposed in the upper part of the W. front and is in large panels; the end of the N. wing has curved braces in two panels forming two-centred arches; the corresponding braces in the S. wing are foiled; the middle block has thinner framing and the middle panel has curved braces forming a round arch. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams.

The Barn, E. of the house, is timber-framed and of 17th-century date.

Condition—Good.

c(33). House and stable, 30 yards S.S.E. of (32). The House is of early to mid 18th-century date, but contains some re-set woodwork of 15th, late 16th and early 17th-century date. The 15th-century work includes moulded beams, carved heads and spandrels carved with flowers and foliage. The later work includes a certain amount of panelling, panelled doors, etc. There is also an iron fire-back with the initials and date I.W. 1633.

The Stable, S. of the house, is timber-framed and probably of mediæval origin. It formed part of a larger structure.

Condition—Good.

c(34). House, S.S.E. of (33), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It has been much altered, but the gabled E. end with exposed framing may be of late 16th or early 17th-century date.

Condition—Good.

c(35). Range (Plate 180), of three tenements, at the corner of High Street and 25 yards S. of (34), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. The main rectangular block was built probably in the 15th century and the cross-wing at the S. end is probably a 16th-century addition. The timber-framing in large panels is mostly exposed. The upper storey of the main block projects on the W. front on curved brackets, springing from shafts attached to the main posts; under the projection is an original moulded cornice. The gable of the S. wing appears to have been altered; two panels of the framing have curved braces in the angles. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

c(36). Block, of two houses, on the island site, 320 yards S.S.E. of the church, is of two storeys with attics, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built probably late in the 15th century, to which date belongs most of the N. house; the S. house was altered and largely re-built in the 17th century. The timber-framing is mostly exposed. The gabled E. front of the N. house has original close-set framing; on the W. side the upper storey projects and is gabled, and at the first-floor level is an original moulded beam. The E. part of the S. house has framing in large panels but the gable has foiled barge-boards, perhaps of the 15th century and re-set. The large gable on the S. front has four ranges of panels in the framing, and at the first-floor level is a moulded beam. Inside the N. house the ground floor has a 16th-century moulded ceiling-beam, and the N.W. room is lined with 17th-century panelling. There is similar panelling in a room on the first floor, which has original moulded ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

c(37). House (Plate 28), on the W. side of Portland Street, opposite (36), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with slate-covered roofs. It was built probably in the 15th century, with a central-hall and cross-wings at the N. and S. ends. The N. cross-wing has been destroyed. The timber-framing is mostly exposed. The hall-block has a framed cove in the E. front, bringing the eaves out to the front of the projecting wing; in the middle of the upper part of the wall is an original window of six lights. The upper storey projects at the E. end of the S. wing on curved brackets and with a moulded cornice above and below the projection; the original doorway has been replaced by modern work; in the first floor is an original window of five lights with restored mullions. Inside the building, the former screens passage is included in the S. wing; in its S. wall are two original doorways with ogee heads; the framing of the N. wall, formerly the screen, is partly original. The hall was formerly open to the roof but has a later inserted floor. Both the hall and the S. wing retain an original roof-truss of collar-beam type, with curved braces below and foiled principals above the collar-beam. The ceiling-beams are mostly exposed.

Condition—Poor.

High Street, N. side (Plate 179)

c(38). House and outbuilding, immediately E. of (35). The House (Plate 179) is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with slate and tile-covered roofs. It was built probably late in the 14th century, but the roofing seems to have been altered to form one long range, perhaps in the 15th century, coving being added to the recessed parts of the front to make the eaves continuous. The outbuilding projecting to the N. is probably a 15th-century addition. The original building would seem to have consisted of the two projecting wings with the block between them; the E. block was either an extension or the incorporation of a distinct 14th-century building adjoining on the E. The timber-framing is in large squares except for the closer set framed coving of the recessed parts. The upper storey projects on the S. front of the supposed original wings on curved brackets and also on the return face of the W. wing, with a diagonal brace at the angle. The upper storey of this wing has cusped braces to the framing of the S. end. Inside the building, some of the ceiling-beams are exposed. The E. block has a 14th or 15th-century roof-truss (Plate 38) of collar-beam type with curved braces below and a foiled spandrel above the collar-beam; the moulded wall-plates are original. In the W. wall of the supposed original E. wing is a blocked doorway with an ogee head.

The Outbuilding, N. of the house, is a timber-framed structure, perhaps of the 16th century, with a 17th-century extension on the E.

Condition—Of house, good.

c(39). Unicorn Inn (Plate 182), immediately E. of (38), is of two storeys with attics, timber-framed, and with slate-covered roofs. It was built in the 17th century and has a long wing, used as a barn, on the N. side. The timber-framing and ceiling-beams are exposed. The original staircase has shaped slat-balusters, moulded strings and newels.

Condition—Good.

c(40). House (Plate 181), two tenements, 18 yards E.N.E. of (39), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with slate-covered roofs. The W. tenement was built probably early in the 16th century and has a 17th-century wing at the back; the E. tenement is probably of later 16th-century date. The timber-framing is exposed, and the upper storey projects on the whole of the S. front on curved brackets, with a moulded bressummer. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams and doorways with triangular heads.

Condition—Fairly good.

S. side

c(41). Cottage, nearly opposite the end of Portland Street, is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with stonecovered roofs. It was built in the 17th century and has exposed framing and ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

c(42). House (Plate 28), 15 yards N.E. of (41), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. The gabled E. wing is probably of late 14th or early 15th-century date, but the age of the low W. wing is uncertain. The framing in large panels is exposed and the gable has original barge-boards with foiled or cusped decoration. Some ceiling-beams are exposed.

Condition—Fairly good.

c(43). House and shop, immediately E. of (42), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It is probably of mediæval origin but has been altered and enlarged in the 18th century. Much of the timber-framing is exposed. The upper storey projects on the N. side, but is now enclosed in an early 18th-century addition.

Condition—Good.

c(44). House, two tenements, opposite (35), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with slate-covered roofs. It was built in the 17th century and has exposed framing in the upper part of the front.

Condition—Good.

c(45). House, on the N. side of the road, 70 yards E. of (40), is of one storey with attics, originally timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built early in the 17th century, but was refronted in brick in the 18th century. The framing is exposed at the E. end and part of the N. side. Inside the building the ceiling-beams are exposed.

Condition—Good.

Hereford Street, E. side

c(46). The Throne, house, at the N.E. corner of the street, is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tile and stone-covered roofs. It was built late in the 16th or early in the 17th century on an L-shaped plan with the wings extending towards the S. and E., with a small wing towards the S.E. There are 18th-century and modern additions on the S. and E. Much of the exterior is heavily overgrown with ivy, but some of the timber-framing is exposed. The W. gable of the E. wing has enriched barge-boards. The upper storey projects on the W. side of the S. wing and is supported on posts. The S.E. wing has a moulded beam on the N. side. Inside the building are some exposed ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

c(47). House, immediately S. of (46), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built possibly in the 16th century, but has been refronted and altered in the 18th century. Some of the framing is exposed. Inside the building the S. room has moulded ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

c(48). House, immediately S. of (47), incorporates some 17th-century timber-framing, but has been almost re-built in the 18th century.

Condition—Good.

c(49). Cottage, 45 yards S. of (48), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built early in the 17th century and has some exposed timber-framing. The chimney-stack has diagonal nibs on the long sides.

Condition—Good.

W. side

c(50). Old Grammar School, 45 yards S. of High Street, is of one storey with attics, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built early in the 17th century, and the E. front (Plate 181) is a well-preserved example of its period. The timber-framing is close-set, and the front has a projecting porch and two gabled dormers. The porch (Plate 43) has moulded framing and a square-headed entrance with scrolled brackets under the lintel; above it are three enriched scrolls and a moulded tie-beam; the gable has enriched barge-boards and a turned apex-post. The sides of the porch have turned balusters. Further N. is an original bay-window of five transomed lights and a moulded sill resting on three shaped brackets. The dormers have curved braces in the framing of the gables. Inside the building are some original moulded ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

Chamber Walk

c(51). House (Plate 182), on the E. side, 500 yards S. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century, but has been much modernised. The framing and a ceiling-beam are exposed.

Condition—Good.

c(52). House (Plate 182), on the W. side, 20 yards N. of (51), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built late in the 17th century, and has exposed framing and ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

c(53). House and forge, 40 yards N. of (52), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with stone-covered roofs. The W. wing is probably of mediæval date, but the main block was re-built probably early in the 18th century. The timber-framing is mostly exposed.

Condition—Good.

c(54). House (Plate 181), immediately N. of (53), is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with slate-covered roofs. It was built probably in the 14th century with a central hall and cross-wings at the N. and S. ends; the N. wing survives, but the hall and S. wing, now under one roof, seem to have been reconstructed at a later period. The timber-framing in large panels is exposed and the upper storey projects at the E. end of the N. wing on curved brackets and shafts attached to the main posts; the panels of the first floor retain a pair of original cusped braces, and the barge-boards have cusped enrichment. Towards the S. end of the main block is a five-light window, with chamfered mullions, and perhaps of the 15th century. Inside the building some ceiling-beams are exposed. The former hall has a roof-truss of collar-beam type, with braces forming a round arch. The N. wing has original cusped wind-braces on both sides of the roof. Projecting W. from the house is a long timber-framed outbuilding, perhaps of the 16th century.

Condition—Good.

Back Lane

c(55). Cottage, on the E. side, 275 yards S. of the church, is of two storeys, timber-framed, and with tiled roofs. It was built late in the 17th or early in the 18th century, and has exposed timber-framing.

Condition—Good.

c(56). Cottage, on the W. side of the road, 70 yards N.N.W. of (55), is of the same date and character. It has been heightened.

Condition—Good.

c(57). Cottage, two tenements, 10 yards N. of (56), is again similar in date and character. It also has been heightened.

Condition—Good.



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