Aston Ingham

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1932

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5-6

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'Aston Ingham', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Herefordshire, Volume 2: East (1932), pp. 5-6. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=124876 Date accessed: 21 September 2014.


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3 ASTON INGHAM (D.f.)

(O.S. 6 in. (a)LII, N.W., (b)LII, N.E., (c)LII, S.W.)

Aston Ingham is a parish in the S.E. corner of the county, 5½ m. E. of Ross.

Ecclesiastical

b(1). Parish Church of St. John the Baptist (Plate 7), stands in the middle of the parish. The walls are of local sandstone rubble with ashlar dressings of the same material; the roofs are covered with slate. The building is of late 12th or early 13th-century origin, but was almost entirely re-built in 1891. The Chancel retains traces of original work; the Nave incorporates some original features in the N. and S. walls, and the W. wall is of 13th-century date. The West Tower is of the 16th century.

Among the fittings the two 13th-century carved coffin lids and the 17th-century lead font are of interest.

Architectural Description—The Chancel is modern except the W. wall, which was incorporated in the rebuilding. In the N. wall is a lancet-window in which some old stones have been re-used, and in the S. wall is a re-set and restored 13th-century doorway with moulded jambs and a two-centred head. The chancel-arch is of 12th-century origin, re-built probably in the 13th century, and has responds and a two-centred arch of two chamfered orders with a hollow chamfered impost-moulding at the springing and chamfered plinths; the responds have been heightened and have modern repairs.

The Nave has in the N. wall a re-set lancet-window and a 13th-century doorway with chamfered jambs and a two-centred head. In the S. wall is a re-set and restored 13th-century doorway with jambs and two-centred head of two orders, the inner chamfered and the outer moulded with a keel-roll. In the W. wall can be seen the outer splays and springers to the rear-arches of two 13th-century windows which were blocked by the insertion of the W. tower within the nave.

The West Tower (9 ft. by 9¼ ft.) was added in the 16th century, and was built within the nave, the W. wall of which was incorporated in the W. wall of the tower. It is in three stages with a high splayed plinth to the N., S. and E. walls, and is surmounted by a pyramidal roof. In the E. wall of the ground stage is a round-headed doorway opening into the nave, and in the W. wall a square-headed window of three trefoiled lights with a restored sill and modern mullions. The second stage has in each of the N., S. and W. walls a narrow loop light, and in each wall of the bell-chamber is a square-headed louvred opening.

Fittings—Bells: tenor inscribed in Lombardic capitals, "Sancta Margareta ora pro nobis," probably 15th-century, and another bell without inscription may be mediæval. Churchyard Cross: Incorporated in modern cross, lower part of octagonal stem and square base, with angle-stops, of 15th-century cross. Coffin-lids: In chancel—re-set vertically against E. wall, (1) with hollow chamfered edges and top carved in high relief with head and shoulders of a priest (Plate 49), set within trefoiled headed recess with cross below with elaborate foliated head, small portion of bottom of lid missing; S. of E. window, (2) carved with crudely shaped figure of a priest (Plate 49) in low relief, with head on cushion within trefoiled arch and hands in prayer, much worn and mutilated; both c. 1300. Communion Table: In W. tower—with moulded top, turned legs and plain stretchers, late 17th-century. Font (Plate 56): with cylindrical lead bowl with moulded top and bottom rims and drum ornamented in relief with initials W.R. and W.M. and date 1689, cherub-heads acanthus-leaves and foliage; modern stem with 13th-century moulded capital and chamfered base. Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: In churchyard— S. of nave (1) to Thomas Perkins, 1712, head-stone with scrolled top carved with cherub-head and drapery; (2) to William Perkins, 1708, head-stone, with scrolled top carved with cherub holding book; (3) to William and William, sons of William Perkins, 1700 and 1701 respectively, twin head-stone with scrolled top; (4) to William Perkins, 1686, head-stone with scrolled top; S.W. of chancel (5) to John Lodge, 1707, and Jane his wife, 1711, head-stone; (6) to Margaret (Wingod), wife of BenjaminRudg, 1692, head-stone with flat pedimental top; (7) to William, son of William Wingod, 1705–6, headstone; (8) to William Wingod, 1700, head-stone; (9) to Richard Colwell, 1711–12, and Mary his wife, 1716, twin head-stone with scrolled top; N. of chancel, (10) to John Colwell, 1714, headstone. Floor slabs: In nave—at W. end (1) to John Rudge, 1712, Alice his wife, 1723, with later inscription below; S. of porch (2) to Thomas Moris, 1702–3. Plate: Includes an Elizabethan cup (Plate 69) of typical design with bands of incised ornament round bowl, but without dateletter. Stoup: In S. porch, re-set, with circular bowl and rounded outer face, probably mediæval. Miscellanea: In churchyard—on N. side re-used as support to sundial, fragment of moulded jamb (?), 15th-century. By N.E. gate, fragment of coffin-lid with incised 'stiff-leaf' foliage.

Condition—Good, mostly re-built.

Secular

b(2). Rectory, 250 yards E.N.E. of the church, is of two storeys with attics and cellars. The walls are of brick and the roofs are tiled. The W. wing was built c. 1700 and has a brick band between the storeys. The interior has been largely modernised, but retains some original ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

b(3). Coldwell Cottage, 1,100 yards E. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of local rubble and the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 17th century, and retains some original chamfered ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

b(4). Yew Tree Inn, nearly 1¼ m. S.E. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble with some timber-framing and the roofs are tiled. It was built in the second half of the 17th century and retains some chamfered ceiling-beams.

Condition—Good.

b(5). Hay Farm, house, 1 m. S.E. of the church, is of two storeys with attics and cellars; the walls are of brick with a stone base and the roofs are covered with slates. It was built in 1714, on a T-shaped plan, with the cross-wing at the E. end. There is a brick band between the storeys, and most of the window-frames are original. In the S. gable is a stone with the initials and date T. and A.P. 1714. The door to the cellars is original and has strap-hinges.

Condition—Poor.

c(6). Old Oaks Farm, house, ¾ m. S.S.E. of the church, is of two storeys with cellars; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are covered with slates. It was built in 1601, the date inscribed above the doorway on the E. side, with the initials W.G. The windows have original moulded frames and mullions. Inside the building, some timber-framing and chamfered ceiling-beams are exposed.

Condition—Ruinous.

b(7). Blakemoor Farm, house, about ¾ m. S. of the church, is of two storeys; the walls are timber-framed with brick nogging and the roofs are tiled. It was built early in the 17th century. The timber-framing is exposed on the N. front, and on the W. gable is the date, 1739, of its repair. Inside the building the timber-framing and ceiling-beams are exposed.

Condition—Good.

c(8). Upper Coldridge Farm, house and barns, 1¼ m. S.S.W. of the church. The House is of two storeys; the walls are of rubble and brick and the roofs are covered with slates. It was built probably in the 16th century, but has been much altered. The Barns form a block N. of the house; the middle and largest barn is of late 16th-century date, timber-framed with brick nogging; the roof is of queen-post type. The eastern barn is of the 17th century, also timber-framed with brick nogging. The W. barn is probably mediæval, and has rubble walls, patched with 16th-century brick.

Condition—Good.

b(9). Knightshill Farm, house, nearly 1¼ m. S.W. of the church, is of two storeys with cellars and attics; the walls are of rubble and the roofs are covered with slates. It was built c. 1600, on a T-shaped plan with the cross-wing at the N. end, and there are later extensions on the S. and E. The 17th-century door to the cellars has hinges with foliated ends; one window has a chamfered wooden frame and mullions. The chimney-stack has two diagonal shafts. Inside the building are some chamfered ceiling-beams.

Condition—Fairly good.

a(10). Warren Farm, house, 1¼ m. W.S.W. of the church, is of two storeys with attics and cellars; the walls are of plastered timber-framing and rubble, and the roofs are tiled. It was built in the 16th century on an L-shaped plan, with the wings extending towards the S.E. and S.W.; the S.E. wing was extended towards the N.W. in the 17th century, and there are modern additions. On the W. side of the extension is a window with chamfered wooden frame and mullions, and in the original end of the S.E. wing is a window of six lights with diamond-shaped mullions; it is now internal and is blocked. Inside the building are some chamfered ceiling-beams, and the roof is of queen-post type.

Condition—Good.



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