Poole

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1970

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'Poole', An Inventory of the Historical Monuments in Dorset, Volume 2: South East (1970), pp. 189-240. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=127537 Date accessed: 28 July 2014.


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26 POOLE

(0090)

(O.S. 6 ins. aSY 99 SE, bSY 99 NE, cSZ 08 NW, dSZ 09 SW, eSZ 09 SE, fSZ 09 NW, gSZ 09 NE)

The parish, which is coterminous with the municipal borough, covers 24 square miles and extends some 8 m. N.–S. and 6½ m. E.–W. It includes the town of Poole together with the former parishes of Branksome, Hamworthy, Longfleet and Parkstone, incorporated in 1905, and most of the parish of Canford Magna which was added to it in 1933. In mediaeval times the major part of the present parish came within the manor of Canford.

The town of Poole is built on an alluvial peninsula flanked on the N.W. by Holes Bay and on the S.W. by Poole Harbour. The hinterland comprises a large tract of Bagshot Beds which, where undeveloped, are seen as open rolling heathland, nowhere much over 200 ft. above sea level. This land yields brick earth and pipe-clay which is used in the pottery industry in Poole.

The area of the town covered by building development prior to 1850 may be described, roughly, as the whole of the peninsula S.W. of the present railway. The mediaeval town was more compact and situated in close proximity to the church, at the S.W. end of High Street and in the region of Strand Street. This latter street (which perhaps once continued to meet Paradise Street in front of the Town Cellars) may indicate the natural shore line before encroachment by building development with numerous alleys leading to the S. These alleys are reminiscent of the Yarmouth rows (Archaeologia, XCV (1953), Pl. LXVI). Many of the houses in them were superseded by warehouses after the building of the New Quay between 1751 and 1774 and particularly after the amalgamation and re-alignment of the three quays after 1788. Most of the present warehouses are modern, but the group (Monuments 247, 255) N. and E. of the Custom House is older and dates from the early 19th century. Storage cellars with external access were also built below many of the larger merchants' houses, particularly those of 18th-century date, and may have served to house some of the more valuable merchandise.

Although not specifically referred to in Domesday Book the town is of ancient origin, its first charter granted by William de Longespée, lord of the manor of Canford, dating from the 13th century. With the silting up of the higher W. reaches of Poole Harbour it captured much of the important seaborne trade of Wareham. The Town Cellars (Monument 17) remains as evidence of the importance of Poole's mercantile connections in the 15th century, while Scaplen's Court (26) is indicative of the wealth in the town in the period c. 1500. According to Leland, this prosperity had come suddenly. In his Itinerary begun in c. 1538 he notes that Poole 'is no town of ancient occupying in merchandise', that men alive remembered almost all the town covered with sedge and rushes and that 'it is in hominum memoria much increased with fair building and use of merchandise' (L. Toulmin Smith, Leland's Itinerary I (1907), 254). St. George's Almshouses (80) reflect another aspect of the mediaeval life of the town. Camden remarks that in the 16th century Poole 'has been decaying: so that the houses for want of inhabitants are quite out of repair'. Some time before Camden wrote, however, the status of Poole was advanced by an Act (10 Eliz. I) constituting it a 'county corporate, separate from the County of Dorset and stiled the County of the Town of Poole', and in fact much building activity must have continued during the 16th century, as is attested by over twenty buildings of this period which have survived to be recorded here.

Hutchins (1st ed. 1774) also disputes the accuracy of Camden's remarks; he suggests that 'Spanish merchants much frequented the town before the wars with Spain in Elizabeth's reign' and says 'there still remain many old houses of Flemish building, viz. timber and plaister in the Spanish taste'. Twelve buildings listed here (46, 60–2, 67, 99, 104, 123, 206, 233, 261, 272) retain or retained evidence of timber-framed construction and all are ascribed to the 16th century, while other similar buildings which survived into the present century included a range of cottages N.E. of (78) and three gabled houses N.W. of (272). (fn. 1) The only example of earlier timber construction to survive is a cruck truss in Castle Street (57).

Of the 16th-century houses, only 9 Bay Hog Lane (46) can definitely be said to have had all its external walls framed, although this may also have been true of 27 Castle Street and 30 High Street (60, 104); others are of stone incorporating timber framing to a greater or lesser degree. The King Charles public house in Thames Street (272) alone has a timber front to the street, although 29 Castle Street (61) may also have been originally of this type. Nos. 12–14 High Street (Plate 123) and 6–8 Market Street (99, 206) have framed rear walls, and other examples of mixed construction have been noted under (62), (123) and (261). The former inn in Castle Street (67), largely of stone but with a timber-framed rear gallery, was a notable example of a late mediaeval hostelry.


Eighteenth-Century Mansion Houses in Poole

Eighteenth-Century Mansion Houses in Poole

No complete building of importance survives here from the 17th century, although traces of several stone buildings remain including Rogers' Almshouses in West Street (295), dated 1604; other remains are largely fragmentary or concealed by later work. Brick was introduced as a building material during this century, the earliest fragment within the old town being in the form of brick and stone chequer work adjacent to West End House (300). Brick was used exclusively from the end of the 17th century: the best early example is 9 Church Street (78), others being (235) and (289).

From the late 16th century a marked increase in the prosperity of the port was brought about by the opening of the Newfoundland trade: cargoes of cod, salmon, oil, seal skins and furs being brought back in return for fishing implements and household necessities. This trade flourished particularly in the 18th century and especially during the Napoleonic wars, but after 1815 it rapidly collapsed in the face of foreign competition, being replaced by a less lucrative general foreign and coastal trade.

The period of prosperity is marked by a notable series of merchants' houses, the earliest being 87 High Street (138), dated 1704 though subsequently altered, 13 Thames Street (277) of c. 1730 (Plate 132), 8 New Street (233), 32 West Street (308), and 129 High Street (141); the last was much altered in the mid 18th century at a time when the leading citizens appear to have vied with each other in building imposing residences equal to their social position. Sir Peter Thompson's House (203), built 1746–49, is particularly notable (Plates 54, 127), as are also 20 Market Street and West End House (210, 300). Of a slightly later date are James Oliver's mansion house in High Street, 6 New Street and 11 West Street (140, 232, 290); while at the end of the century come the two largest houses, Samuel Rolles's house in High Street (144) of 1798 and the mansion house of the Lesters in Thames Street (276) of c. 1800.

This age of affluence is further illustrated by the rebuilding of the Guildhall (14) in 1761, a notable building standing in the centre of Market Street; the Congregational Chapel in Skinner Street (8) built in 1777 is also of importance.

Many houses of lesser quality also date from the 18th century; all are brick-built and many, including some of the mansion houses, are carried out in header-bond at the front; about sixty examples have been noted. The earlier houses are more generally double-fronted (plans p. 216); at first the staircase was tucked away at the rear (e.g. 78, 103, 234), but in the mid 18th century and later it was set opposite the entrance either at the front of the house (e.g. 44, 196) or, in deeper houses, at the back (e.g. 27, 256). Apart from the smaller cottages (e.g. 219) single-fronted houses (plans p. 222) mainly date from the mid 18th century onwards and reflect a rise in land values in the more crowded streets (e.g. 102); this is particularly noticeable towards the end of the century as in 18 Market Street (209) dated 1797. In the earlier single-fronted houses the staircase is set between the front and back rooms and this continued into the 19th century in the smaller cottages (e.g. 226, 227), but in the later houses a staircase at the rear of the entrance hall is more common.

The 19th century did not produce any houses of outstanding merit in the town; the decline in the Newfoundland trade removed the opportunity for further building of mansion houses and the existing buildings were adequate for contemporary needs, with some additions, such as the wings to 32 West Street (308) and the provision there and elsewhere of more elaborate reception rooms. Some public building of importance was undertaken, notably the rebuilding of St. James's Church (1), and the erection of most of the other churches and chapels, the Custom House (18), Old Library (21) and the Harbour Office (16).

In the period between 1811 and 1821 a remarkable increase in the population of the town is recorded, an increase of 1,574 persons compared with 55 and 69 for the preceding and succeeding decades. This is reflected in the large number of poorly-built cottages which were run up immediately after the Napoleonic wars, such as Waterloo Buildings (288) dated 1815 and 81–9 West Street (299); the whole of Baiter Street (31–8) was symbolic of unplanned speculative building between c. 1820 and 1830; the piecemeal and speculative nature of some of the developments was also clearly seen in the building of Augustus Place (238) between 1817 and 1830.

The smaller houses of the 18th and 19th centuries are generally without external decoration, but many have flat hoods above the front doorways and these are usually carried on shaped brackets of varying degrees of elaboration. Several types of boot-scrapers still survive though in diminishing numbers, the taller 18th-century ones being of wrought iron (Fig. p. 192, nos. 1–4) and those of the following century of cast iron (nos. 5–9). Some of the larger houses retain iron railings with decorative finials (Plate 63). Muchmoulded panelling also survives inside these houses (e.g. 138).

Since 1850 the large-scale building development which has followed the rise of Bournemouth and the linking of the two towns in one conurbation has had an adverse effect on the use and maintenance of properties in the old town. In recent years, slum clearance and replanning schemes have taken an increasing toll of the remaining old buildings, and of the 329 monuments in the central area standing c. 1950 over 150 have since been demolished, including 15 of the 46 monuments dating from before 1714.

The outlying parts of the town contain a few isolated buildings of note: The Old Rectory, Hamworthy (330), is a good example of mid 17th-century carved brickwork; Planefield House and The Elms (338, 349) are villa residences of the late 18th or early 19th century; Canford Magna, which remains physically separate from Poole, on the S. bank of the river Stour, is of note for the important church partly of pre-Conquest date and the remarkable Manor House (6, 30); Merly House (29) is also one of the principal monuments and retains some fine mid 18th-century plaster ceilings.

In the following Inventory, references to the town plans of 1774 and 1888 are to Hutchins (1st edn. 1774) and the Ordnance Survey 1: 500 plan (1888); the latter is reproduced as a base to the Monuments map (in pocket). C.F.S.


Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Boot-Scrapers in Poole

Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Boot-Scrapers in Poole

Ecclesiastical

d(1) The Parish Church of St. James (Plate 118) stands at the S.W. end of the old town 160 yds. N. of the Quay; the walls are faced with Purbeck stone ashlar and the roofs are slate-covered. The present building stands on the site of the mediaeval church which had become dilapidated and was demolished in 1819; the new church was designed by John Kent of Southampton and Joseph Hannaford of Christchurch (plan p. 195).

In the original specification for the rebuilding (Poole Vestry Minutes, 17 Feb. 1819) at a cost of £5,600, the walls were to be of 'Stone from the old church with new Purbeck stone of the same sort and stuccoed to represent Portland stone', and the new timber including the window frames was to be of Memel fir. This specification was later amended to allow for the facing of the outer walls in Purbeck stone. The rebuilding of the tower was not agreed upon until the following year (ibid. 12 Jan. 1820). The plan proposed at this time was similar to that now existing, with a nave, N. and S. aisles with galleries over, and a W. tower, but the present sanctuary was to have been separated from the nave and divided into two storeys, the lower to form a vestry and the upper a schoolroom; an offset on the N. and S. walls of the sanctuary suggests a possible provision for an upper floor, but a vestry minute of 20 Sept. 1820 notes that 'Subscribers to the Church Sunday School have subscribed £300 for the cost of erecting the wings of the tower' and it was agreed 'that they shall have perpetual use of the N.W. wing and 1st floor of the Tower for the purpose of educating Sunday School children therein'; the project for so utilising the E. end had presumably been abandoned.

The church is designed in a plain late Gothic style typical of the early 19th-century Gothic revival; doors and windows have two or four-centred heads with continuous wide and plain chamfered jambs and labels and the walls are surmounted by moulded strings and battlemented parapets.

In St. James's the timber columns supporting the nave roof and the plaster-vaulted ceiling are of particular note. The fittings include an early 18th-century reredos, a portable font contemporary with the church, and many wall-monuments of the 18th century.

Architectural Description—The Sanctuary (15 ft. by 31 ft.) has an E. window of five four-centred cusped lights with vertical tracery in a four-centred head with a label; the E. wall, which extends to N. and S. to include the N. and S. staircase vestibules, has a chamfered plinth and an embattled parapet with a moulded string-course. The N. and S. walls have a heavily moulded skirting and an offset at mid height with an enriched cresting. The chancel arch is four-centred in one order with a panelled soffit and rises from moulded capitals above square panelled responds. The North and South Vestibules (each 16½ ft. by 8 ft.) contain staircases to the N. and S. galleries; each vestibule has in the N. or S. wall an external doorway with a four-centred head and chamfered jambs with a window of two four-centred lights above, and in the W. wall an entrance from the N. or S. aisle.

The Nave (91 ft. by 28½ ft.) is divided into five bays: the N. and S. arcades each comprise four lofty timber quatrefoil piers with half piers forming the E. responds and corbelled capitals on the W.; each pier consists of four circular shafts about 10½ ins. diameter, bolted together, without bases but with a plaster bell-shaped capital to each shaft above a moulded necking and with a circular moulded abacus. The piers carry the roof structure which is concealed by a vaulted plaster ceiling and at mid height support the front of a gallery which extends around the N., S., and W. sides of the nave. Beneath the gallery at the W. end of the nave is an inner vestibule divided from the nave by a panelled screen and having staircases to the galleries at the N. and S. ends.

The North Aisle (91 ft. by 13 ft.) has a gallery above; in the E. wall is a doorway to the N. vestibule and a corresponding doorway above from the stairs to the gallery. The N. wall is in five bays divided and flanked by buttresses of two stages; centrally in each bay are two timber windows each of three lights under a four-centred head, one to the aisle and the other to the gallery, the latter having an internal moulded label, ogee-shaped, with triangular finial and moulded stops. In the W. wall is a similar pair of windows but of two lights, the lower window being against the staircase in the W. vestibule. The South Aisle (91 ft. by 13 ft.) is similar to the foregoing.

The West Tower (13 ft. square) is of four storeys divided into three stages externally by moulded string-courses and has a chamfered plinth which is carried around the two western diagonal buttresses; the lower parts of the eastern buttresses are concealed, and all have weathered offsets at about string-course levels. The ground floor forms an entrance vestibule; in the E. wall is a two-centred arch of two orders closed with glazing above a doorway to the inner vestibule; in the N. and S. walls are similar arches with doorways to the N. and S. vestries; the W. door is set in a two-centred arched opening with a moulded label and glazed tympanum. The soffits of all four arches are enriched with cinquefoil-headed and quatrefoil panels. In each of the N., S. and W. walls of the second stage is a two-centred arched window of two lights with a circular panel above containing a clock face. In each face of the upper stage is a two-light louvred belfry window.

The North Vestry (24 ft. by 16½ ft.) is of one storey with a flat roof; the E. wall is separated from the nave by a narrow passage, 3 ft. wide, entered from an external doorway at the N. end and a doorway in the E. wall of the vestry; at the S. end of the passage is a stair down to the heating chamber. In the middle of the E. wall is a fireplace and in the S.E. corner a small closet. Centrally in the W. and N. walls are two-light windows. The South Vestry is similar to the foregoing, but at the N. end of the corresponding passage is a newel stair leading to the tower.

The Ceilings of the sanctuary, nave, N. and S. aisles and inner vestibule are four-centred plaster vaults with moulded ribs ornamented with paterae at the intersections; that to the tower is similar to the foregoing but two-centred.

Fittings—Bells: eight, of 1821, by William Dobson of Downham, Norfolk. Benefactors' Tables: 19th-century panelling on E. wall of inner vestibule under W. gallery inscribed with extensive list of benefactors, from 1612. Brasses and Indent. Brasses: in S. aisle on S. wall, (1) to Edward Man, son of Edward and Elenor Man 1608/9; (2) to Edward Man, merchant, 1622. Indent: in inner vestibule, of inscription plate. Chairs: two, in N. aisle, arms and backs carved with Gothic tracery, early 19th-century. Clocks: two, (1) in tower, faces on N., S. and W. walls, 8-day movement by William Conway (estimate for £186 accepted 8 Jan. 1823, Vestry minutes); (2) on E. face of gallery, by Watts of Poole, gift of James Seager, 1821. Doors: in entrance vestibule and inner vestibule, with Gothic tracery, of c. 1820. Font (Plate 9): in N. aisle, of mahogany with metal-lined bowl and wooden cover, c. 1820; circular bowl surrounded by six lozenge-shaped quatre-foiled panels with central leaf ornament and ballpendants; central shaft of three attached columns with capitals, similar to nave piers, and attic bases; hexagonal plinth with panelled sides and three projecting scrolled feet on castors; circular reeded cover with urn finial, inner flat cover of later date. Galleries: at W. end of nave and over N. and S. aisles, supported by nave piers and by two smaller wooden columns of quatre-foiled plan in the W. bay of nave. Fronts with large panels flanked by smaller cinquefoil-headed panels. Glass: in gallery and aisle windows, coloured quatrefoils in spandrels, c. 1820. Inscriptions: in tower, on E. wall of first floor, stone tablet inscribed 'This church was erected A.D. 1820. Revd Petr Wm Joliffe Minister J. B. Bloomfield Robt Slade Junr Churchwardens Thoa Benham, Builder'.

Monuments and Floor-slabs. Monuments: in sanctuary, on S. wall, (1) to Rev. Samuel Fawconer, M.A., 1788, Martha his wife, 1818, and another, white marble tablet with semicircular grey marble apron, surmounted by urn against grey marble pyramidal backing, erected 1788. In N. aisle—on E. wall, (2) to George Hyde, 1763, and Elizabeth his wife, 1762, veined white marble framed tablet with scrolled sides above an enriched apron and surmounted by a closed pediment with a shield-of-arms; (3) to Robert Young, 1773, and Ann his wife, 1775, white marble oval tablet surmounted by urn; on N. wall, (4) to Thomas Jubber, 1778, his sons Robert and Thomas, Ursula his wife, 1793, and Ursula his daughter, 1797, also to Benjamin Skutt Gaden, 1820, white marble oval tablet over rectangular panel, surmounted by shield-of-arms; (5) to William Spurrier, 'Alderman and Merchant of this town', 1809, Mary his wife, 1781, William his son, 1800, and Ann his second wife 1841, white marble tablet (Plate 18) with moulded base and cornice, surmounted by draped female mourner clasping funerary urn against black marble obelisk-shaped backing with shield-of-arms, signed I. Hiscock; (6) to Robert Henning, 'Merchant and Alderman of this corporation', 1757, Margaret his wife, 1736, and others, white marble tablet with gadrooned base, shaped apron with cherub's head, moulded cornice and shaped raised pediment with cartouche enclosing shield-of-arms; (7) to Sir William Phipard, M.P., 1723/4, Mary his wife, 1725, and others, white marble tablet with cherub's head and urn above, erected c. 1774, signed M. Meatyard; (8) to Samuel Bowles, 1750, Mary (Culme) his first wife, 1746, Margaret (Bowles) his second wife, 1789, and others, white marble tablet with scrolled sides, gadrooned base and enriched apron, surmounted by semicircular pediment and urn, all restored 1825. In S. aisle—on S. wall, (9) to John Masters 'Mercht. of this town', 1755, stone tablet in eared and enriched frame with scrolled sides, veined marble surround, shaped and enriched apron and entablature with central semicircular pediment surmounted by urn and lamps; (10) to Alderman Francis Lester, 1738, Rachell his wife, 1768, and others, also to Alderman Benjamin Lester, M.P., 1802, Susannah his wife, 1798, and others, and to Sir John Lester, 1805, white marble oval tablet above a sarcophagus and inscribed base, surmounted by moulded cornice carrying a figure of Hope reclining against an urn, all on a grey marble backing with obelisk-shaped head, signed Shout, London, and with separate shield-of-arms below; (11) to George Tito, merchant, 1774, Elizabeth his wife, 1767, and Elizabeth Brice their daughter, 1761, white marble tablet (Plate 17) with veined marble backing above moulded base and shaped apron, flanked by pilasters and consoles supporting a moulded cornice, carrying at the ends flaming urns and in the centre a shaped panel bearing a death's head above a vase backed by a scythe and twined serpent and a trumpet and fragments of a laurel wreath, with moulded pediment above supporting a cartouche with shield-of-arms and crest; (12) to Peter Jolliff, 1730, with later inscription to his son William, merchant and alderman, 1763, and Elizabeth wife of the latter, 1747, white marble tablet (Plate 16) in the form of drapery knotted at upper corners with two cherubs' heads below and a narrow enriched base, surmounted by scrolled cartouche with shield-of-arms, erected 1737. In N. gallery—on E. wall, (13) to Thomas Parr, deputy provincial Grand Master, 1824, 'Erected by the Bretheren of the most antient and venerable order of Free and accepted Masons resident within the Province of Dorset . . .', white marble bas-relief of cherub and masonic symbols in narrow grey marble border above moulded base and inscribed apron; on N. wall, (14) to Thomas Gregory Hancock, merchant, councillor and churchwarden, 1848, Elizabeth his wife, 1830, and another, white marble pedestal-shaped tablet with female mourner against black marble backing above a deep base with corbels decorated with anthemion ornament, signed J. Chapman, Sc., Frome. In S. gallery—on S. wall, (15) to John Slade, merchant, 1847, and others, white marble tablet surmounted by urn on black marble backing, signed Collins; (16) to Mary, wife of Robert Slade, 1816, and others, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet surmounted by urn, on black marble backing, signed Hiscock, Blandford; (17) to George Lewen, former mayor, 1718, white marble scrolled cartouche (Plate 16) surmounted by shield-of-arms, backed by drapery with cherubs' heads and skull; (18) to Alderman Thomas Strong, 1781, Elizabeth his wife, 1801, John their son, a former mayor, 1817, and others, finely carved white marble tablet framed by enriched pilasters and entablature with scrolled pediment on black marble backing bearing shield-of-arms at base. In W. gallery—on W. wall, (19) to Sir Peter Thompson, F.S.A., M.P. for St. Albans, 1770, white marble tablet surmounted by obelisk-shaped tablet with shield-of-arms and crest, flanked by two pyramidal finials, on black slate backing; (20) to James Seager, merchant and alderman, 1808, Rebecca his wife, 1821, also James Seager, magistrate, 1838, Amy his first wife, 1819, and Ursula Scutt Jubber his second wife, 1825, and others, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet on a base bearing shield-of-arms and surmounted by female mourner resting against an urn, on veined grey marble backing. In churchyard, worn ledger stones, including, S. of S. aisle, (21) to Young Green, merchant, 1751. Floor-slabs: in inner vestibule—several 18th-century floor-slabs from the earlier church, reset and much worn, include (1) to [E]liz. Maxwell, 1763, (2) to C . . . Allen, 1731, and others, (3) to Sarah Jennings, 1722, and others, Purbeck marble slab, (4) to James Trew, Mayor.

Plate: a cup of 1743 (Plate 23), maker's initials W.W., given by Samuel Bowles, 1743; a flagon of 1718 (Plate 24), maker's initials S.L., given by Joseph Bowles, churchwarden 1711 and 1712, the under side of the base inscribed 'Anno 1711 / The Yew tree Sett, the / head in both Gutters new Cast / two new windoes therein made / and the Church well Repaired / Glased and Cleaned under the / direction of Joseph Bowles / Sr Wm Phipard & Sr Wm / Lewin gave 20l / each'; a pair of tazzas of 1694, maker's initials I.W., with lozenge-of-arms on face, given by Mrs. Ann White 1777; a paten of 1717 with maker's initials S.L., inscribed 'Henry Price & / Iohn Strong / Church Wardens / Anno 1718', a paten of 1835, makers' initials J.S. / A.S., given by 'The Mayor, Bailiff, Burgesses and Commonalty of the Town and County of Poole, 1835'; a pair of alms-dishes of 1835, makers' initials as above, given by the Corporation of Poole, 1835; an alms-dish of 1731, maker's initials G.H., given by Rev. Samuel Fawconer and Martha his widow, 1818; a spoon inscribed 'Watts & Anstey C–W. 1774', Rainwater Heads: seven, dated 1819.


The Parish Church of Saint James, Poole

The Parish Church of Saint James, Poole

Reredos (Plate 29): in sanctuary, of mahogany partly gilt, gift of Richard Pinnell, 1736, in three bays divided by Corinthian pilasters carrying, over the side bays, a modillioned entablature which breaks forward over the pilasters, and over the centre bay an open pediment surmounted by vases of flowers and a pelican in piety; each bay contains two panels above a moulded dado, the three smaller panels at the base inscribed with biblical texts, the upper panel on the N. side with the Lord's Prayer, on the S. side with the Creed, the centre panel divided into two round-headed sub-panels inscribed with the Ten Commandments; in the pediment is a representation of the Holy Ghost in the form of a dove emerging from clouds pierced by a sunburst; between the capitals, above the side panels, are winged cherubs' heads and swags. Royal Arms (Plate 60): in front of W. gallery, of George IV, of wood with flat painted shield and supporters carved in the round, given by George Welch Ledgard, 1821. Seating: in galleries, with panelled fronts and backs with moulded cappings. Table: in S. aisle, mahogany with square cabriole legs, 18th-century. Miscellanea: in inner vestibule, stone fragments including two panels with quatrefoil decoration, 15th-century, a small circular mortar with four projecting lugs, and two small cartouches for shields-of-arms from 18th-century wall-monuments.

d(2) The Parish Church of St. Paul (500 yds. N.E.), of brick with stucco dressings and a slate-covered roof, was built by public subscription under an Act of Parliament of 1830 and consecrated 17 January 1833. The chancel and N. W. end of the nave were rebuilt in 1880 in a 13th-century Gothic style by G. R. Crickmay. (H. P. Smith, History of the Lodge of Amity, no. 137, Poole (Poole, 1937).) (Demolished 1963)

Architectural Description—The conventional W. front, actually facing S.E. (Plate 179), is in grey brick divided into three bays by pilasters carrying a plain entablature and pediment; in each of the side bays is a round-headed window; the centre bay originally formed an open porch with two Ionic columns in antis between the pilasters and a large round-headed window at the back. An enclosed vestibule was added later. Above the porch is a square bell turret, with pilasters and a modified entablature, surmounted by a dome.


The Church of St. Paul, Plan

The Church of St. Paul, Plan

The Nave, which is aligned N.W.–S.E., has a segmental plaster vault. The N.E. and S.W. walls have plain round headed windows. In the corners of the S.E. bay vestries with galleries above were inserted in the mid 19th century.

Fittings—Bells: one, in turret, inaccessible. Glass: in rear window of porch, an open eye with sunburst and clouds and orange and blue scroll-work, mid 19th-century. Inscription: in nave, on S.W. wall, tablet inscribed 'This Church built and endowed by voluntary subscriptions under the Act 1 and 2 W. IVth Cap. 38 . . . ' recording the date of consecration and that the patronage was vested in a board of trustees. Panelling: in nave, on N.E. and S.W. walls, plain panelling to dado.

a(3) Former Parish Church of St. Michael, Hamworthy (1 m. W.N.W.), of rubble with brick dressings entirely rendered in stucco, and with slate-covered roofs, stands on the site of a mediaeval church which was demolished during the Civil War; the present building was commenced 8 September 1825 and consecrated 17 August 1826; the contractors were Mr. Hiscock of Christchurch and John Tullock of Poole (Salisbury Journal, 29 Aug. 1825). The church is designed in a plain Gothic style with projecting eaves and uncusped windows, generally of two lights under a two-centred head, with rendered brick mullions some of which have been replaced in stone; at the base of the walls is a high chamfered plinth. (Demolished 1964)


The Church of St. Michael, Hamworthy, Plan

The Church of St. Michael, Hamworthy, Plan

Architectural Description—The Chancel (7½ ft. by 17¼ ft.) is semi-octagonal with irregular sides and angle buttresses. The E. window is of three lights under a four-centred arch, with single-light windows in the adjacent sides; the chancel arch is four-centred with square responds. The Nave (57 ft. by 28 ft.) is without aisles; the N. and S. walls are divided into four bays by weathered buttresses and terminated with angle buttresses, the latter rising above the eaves and each with an hexagonal upper stage with moulded cap and pyramidal finial; in each bay is a two-light window with the mullions stiffened by iron transoms from which intermediate vertical bars have been removed. The tower arch is four-centred with chamfered responds; it is closed beneath the gallery and contains a doorway. The West Tower (9¾ ft. by 10 ft.) is of four storeys divided externally into three stages with weathered strings, an embattled parapet and weathered angle buttresses which become hexagonal above the first stage and are terminated with moulded caps and obelisk-shaped pinnacles; the lowest storey forms a west porch; the W. door is set in a two-centred arch with a glazed tympanum of four lights and plain tracery, the mullions being continued as vertical bars on the two leaves of the door. Above, in the second storey, is a circular iron-framed window lighting the ringing chamber and rear gallery; the middle stage has in the N. and S. walls a blocked two-light window in a two-centred head; the upper stage has belfry windows in each wall similar to those in the stage below but not blocked, and in the middle of the parapet on the W. side is a tablet with the date 1826. The North Vestry (8½ ft. by 5½ ft.) is entered from the W. porch and has a two-light window in the W. wall; a corresponding projection to the S. of the tower accommodates the stair to the W. gallery. The Roofs of the chancel and nave have plaster ceilings with moulded ribs.

Fittings (fn. 2) —Bell and Bell-frame: in W. tower, early 19th-century. Clock: in middle stage of W. tower, by Hansford of Poole, circular face on W. wall with painted numerals. Gallery: originally comprising the first floor of the W. tower, was extended into W. bay of nave c. 1840; the extension has a panelled front with moulded capping and is supported by a pair of iron columns. Inscriptions: in nave, on W. wall above doorway, (1) stone tablet with dropped ends recording the rebuilding of the church and a grant from the 'Society for promoting the enlargement and building of churches and chapels', c. 1826; in W. porch, over nave doorway, (2) wooden panel with dropped ends roughly inscribed with text from Genesis XXVIII, 17. Monuments: in nave, on N. wall, (1) to Samuel Spratt Strong, 1845, Susan his wife, 1820, and Carter their son, 1834, rectangular white marble tablet on dark grey marble backing. In churchyard, S.W. of tower, (2) to Jane H, 1706, and John H, 1708, headstone; (3) to Joane Tizza[rd], 1687, headstone; (4) to M., 1713, and DG, [17] 14, headstone. Panelling: in nave, to lower part of walls, early 19th-century. Plate: includes a cup, cover paten and small alms-dish inscribed 'The Gift of the Revd. M. Irving B.D. Official 1826'. Royal Arms: Victoria, c. 1840.

d(4) The Parish Church of St. Mary, Longfleet (1 m. N.E.), is situated on the S.E. side of Longfleet Road. The original church of 1833, designed by Edward Blore (I.C.B.S. records), was entirely rebuilt in 1915, but the following fittings are retained—Plate: includes a paten of 1813 and a cup, paten and flagon of 1832. Miscellaneous: reset in N. wall of vestry, inside, foundation stone of 1833.

d(5) The Parish Church of St. Peter, Parkstone (1¾ m. E.N.E.), stands on the S. side of Church Road. The original structure was commenced in 1832 but has been entirely rebuilt since 1850. It contains the following fittings—Bench: in nave, formed of reused 17th-century carved panels and turned enriched table legs. Chest: in nave, with three panels at front and arcaded top rail, two panels and similar rail at ends and a plain back, the lid renewed in 1907, 17th-century. Inscription: reset in S. porch, date-stone of 1833 carved in relief. Monuments: in N. transept, on N. wall, (1) to Henry Festing, 1838, also Sarah his wife, 1861, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet with achievement-of-arms above, on grey marble backing.

d(5a) The Parish Church of St. Osmund, Parkstone (23/8 m. E.N.E.) in Bournemouth Road, built between 1905 and 1914, contains the following fittings—Font-bowl: roughly decagonal with twenty flutes on the sides, from Sturminster Marshall, mediaeval. Railings: reset in ambulatory and crypt, of wrought iron, from monument to Thomas Newton, Bishop of Bristol (ob. 1782), in Bow church, London.

f(6) The Parish Church of Canford Magna, dedication unknown (Plate 117), stands in Canford Park 1¼ m. S.E. of Wimborne Minster (032988). The walls are of carstone and the roofs are covered with tiles.

Historical evidence suggests that Canford was the site of a minster of pre-Conquest type served by a small ecclesiastical community (see Preface, p. xlv). The earliest architectural remains bear this out. The present Chancel (originally the nave) has contemporary arches which led to the N. and S. chapels (or porticus), now destroyed, indicating a cruciform church. The W. wall of the original nave has not survived, nor is there any trace of the eastern arm, but these features may be assumed by analogy with similar churches of late pre-Conquest date. Cruciform buildings of this type usually belong to minster churches, while the irregularity of the setting out of the arcades of the present nave suggests that the original building was set out with irregular angles, which is a further pre-Conquest characteristic (A. W. Clapham, English Romanesque Architecture Before the Conquest (1930), 103). A date for the present chancel in the 11th century, possibly as early as c. 1050, may be postulated on architectural grounds.

Between 1190 and 1196 the church was given by William (fitz Patrick), Earl of Salisbury, to the canons of the Augustinian Priory of Bradenstoke in Wiltshire (W. Dugdale, Monasticon Anglicanum (1830), VI, 338–9, no. II), and in c. 1200 the aisled Nave together with the North Tower and an aisle linking this last with the original N. chapel (or porticus) were added; whether a similar aisle was also added on the S. of the present chancel is uncertain. These additions were designed to provide a separate parochial church so that the canons serving Canford could continue to observe the office laid down by the Rule of St. Augustine in the old minster church, which then became the choir.

The institution of a vicarage at Canford was authorised in 1256 (Dugdale, 339, no. V), marking the end of the attempt to serve the church directly by canons of Bradenstoke. This phase is marked in due course by the insertion of the present early 14th-century chancel arch, destroying the W. wall of the old minster church, and a replanning on lines that brought the building more nearly into conformity with a normal parish church. This included the building or rebuilding, also in the 14th century, of the present South Chapel in the position of the original S. chapel (or porticus), but on a larger scale, and the South Aisle of the present chancel, when too the nave aisles were heightened and the E. archway of the S. aisle of the nave was inserted or enlarged. Plans dated 1828 preserved in the Library of the Society of Antiquaries show the church as it then was and a proposed W. extension, which was made soon thereafter. The principal 19th-century alterations and additions were made in 1876–8 under the direction of D. Brandon, when the W. bay of the nave was added in place of the extension of c. 1829 and the North and South Porches, which had been demolished in c. 1829, were rebuilt (The Builder, 28 July 1877, 755–6; Dorset Procs. XXXIX (1918), 115). The North Vestry, in the position of the pre-Conquest N. chapel and adjacent aisle of c. 1200, is modern.


The Parish Church, Canford Magna

The Parish Church, Canford Magna

Canford church is of considerable interest, not only as a building in substantial part dating from before the Norman Conquest but as one demonstrating the architectural changes made during the Middle Ages to adapt it to changing uses, from its beginning as a minster church of a small community, then as a parochial church served directly by canons of an Augustinian priory and finally as a normal parish church.

Architectural Description—The Chancel (40½ ft. by 15½ ft.) is of the mid 11th century; originally it was the nave of an aisleless cruciform church of which the E. arm and the N. and S. chapels (or porticus) have been destroyed. The E. wall has been extensively patched; the position of the S.E. quoin is certain and shows that the chancel was at least 4 ft. narrower than the nave. The E. window is of the mid 19th century. In the N. wall at the E. end is a round arch to the former N. chapel with plain jambs and chamfered imposts; the position of the E. wall of the porticus here, and similarly of that on the S., is clear, with the inner face 9 ins. E. of the jamb of the arch; the indications of the W. walls are far less distinct, but there is evidence on the N. side of stones dressed back indicating a wall with the W. face 1 ft. 6 ins. W. of the W. jamb of the arch. The position of the W. wall of the S. porticus is obscured by a wall-monument but cannot have been more than 3 ft. 6 ins. W. of the arch. The width of each porticus cannot have been more than 9 ft. 6 ins. W. of the arch to the former N. chapel is part of the rear arch and splay of a mid 11th-century window with polychrome dressings of red carstone and white Portland stone; the W. jamb has been destroyed by enlargement of an opening to the W., which is shown on the plan of 1828 and represents the processional archway of c. 1200. Further W. is a 12th-century doorway with flat lintel supported on moulded corbels, square jambs and a round rear arch. At the W. end is a 19th-century round-headed opening to the N. tower. The openings in the S. wall correspond approximately to those on the N.; they include a round-headed mid 11th-century opening to the former S. chapel, a 19th-century opening replacing the processional archway of c. 1200, and a semicircular-headed doorway with traces of a blocked mid 11th-century window in the pier to the W. of it. The 19th-century opening at the W. end of the wall replaces one of uncertain date shown on the plan of 1828. The early 14th-century chancel arch is two-centred and of two chamfered orders, the outer continuous and the inner dying into the responds.

The North Vestry (28½ ft. by 7¼ ft.) has a rebuilt 14th-century E. window of two lights with two-centred heads. The N. wall and roof are modern but the line of the earlier roof is visible at a lower level on the E. wall of the N. tower. The North Tower (10 ft. by 11¼ ft.) is of four stages divided by weathered offsets, with clasping angle buttresses to the N.E. and N.W. corners of the lower stage and a plain parapet with a moulded coping. The ground stage has in the E. wall a two-centred opening of c. 1200 to the N. vestry and a single lancet window above with attached nook shafts inside having moulded bases and capitals carved with grotesques. In the N. wall is a similar window but larger and with the capitals enriched with stiff-leaved foliage and with a moulded rear arch. In the W. wall is a two-centred arch of two rectangular orders, the inner supported by paired attached shafts with capitals enriched with stylised foliage; on the W. face are remains of the weathering of the earlier aisle roof. The second stage is approached through a doorway high in the W. wall of the lower stage via a wall passage and a stair. In the E. wall is a single-light window with a square head; the rear arch of a similar window remains in the N. wall and a blocked window in the S. The third stage has in each wall a window of c. 1200 of two round-headed lights with a central column in a semicircular embracing arch, but the upper part of the S. window has been destroyed. In each face of the fourth stage is a single-light window with rounded head.

The South Chapel (16¼ ft. by 15¾ ft.) represents a rebuilding in the 14th century of the former chapel or porticus the evidence for which is described above. It has in the S. wall an early 16th-century window of three trefoiled lights with pierced spandrels in a square head; in the W. wall is a 14th-century segmental arch of two chamfered orders. The South Chancel Aisle (23½ ft. by 10½ ft.) has in the S. wall an 18th-century doorway and a late 14th-century window of three cinque-foiled lights in a square head with a segmental-pointed rear arch. In the W. wall is a late 14th-century segmental pointed arch of two chamfered orders.

The Nave (53 ft. by 19 ft.) has in the N. wall two arches; the first is semicircular, of two orders, square to the N. and moulded to the S. with a roll-moulding to the inner order and a pointed-bowtell to the outer, and with roll-moulded labels with up-turned stops; the half-round responds have scalloped capitals with plain semicircular abaci and moulded bases. The responds in the next bay are similar to the foregoing but the two-centred arch of two chamfered orders is a rebuilding of the 14th century. Over the W. haunches of both arches are circular sex-foiled openings and at the W. end is a single lancet window, all three of 1876. In the S.E. corner is an opening at a high level from the former rood stair. The treatment of the S. wall is similar to that on the N. except that both arches are original and semicircular and the capitals of the responds include stiff-leaved foliage and have square abaci. The North Aisle (36½ ft. by 9½ ft.) has in the N. wall at the E. end a repaired late 14th-century window of three cinque-foiled lights in a square head; to the W., flanking the N. doorway, are two small lancets in deeply splayed recesses with semicircular rear arches of c. 1200; the N. doorway, also of this date, has a semicircular head of two moulded orders springing from hollow-chamfered imposts supported under the outer order by angle shafts with enriched capitals, moulded bases, and a central moulded band. At the W. end of the N. wall is an angle buttress added in the 14th century. The W. wall has a window of c. 1200, of one round-headed light with round rear arch; a creasing for the original roof is visible on the E. wall and its line also appears in the W. wall externally. The South Aisle (37 ft. by 9½ ft.) has angle buttresses at the E. and W. ends of the S. wall; the windows in the S. and W. walls are uniform with the corresponding windows in the N. aisle. The S. doorway is contemporary with that on the N. and of similar design but with a more elaborate inner order enriched with trefoiled cusping. The line of the earlier roof is also visible externally on the W. wall.

Fittings—Bells: six, 1st modern; others recast in 1739, by William Knight. Brackets: In N. vestry against S. wall, two for bearer of former aisle roof. Brasses and Indents. Brass: in N. vestry, on N. wall, to Richard Cheke, 1502/3, son and heir of William English, black-letter inscription on rectangular panel. Indents: in churchyard, against S. wall of S. chancel aisle, Purbeck marble slab (7 ft. 11 ins. by 4 ft. 5 ins.) in two pieces with large indents of (i) a knight in armour, (ii) a lady, (iii) a surrounding inscription fillet, late 14th-century. Chairs: three; in chancel, (1) with panelled back, shaped arm-rests, carved front and side rails and turned and moulded legs, mid 17th-century; in S. chapel, (2) with moulded back panel and carved framing, shaped arm-rests with turned and moulded supports and wedge-shaped seat, early 17th-century; in S. aisle, (3) with arched and enriched back panel, carved framing and shaped top rail, shaped arm-rests with turned and moulded supports, made up of 17th-century material. Chest: in S. chapel, 4½ ft. long, with moulded lid, panelled sides and moulded framing, late 17th-century. Collecting Box: of oak, rectangular box, partly closed, with trefoil-ended handle, inscribed IG 1679. Font: of Purbeck marble, octagonal bowl with two shallow trefoiled panels in each face and hollow-chamfered lower edge, on round central shaft with eight subsidiary shafts and chamfered octagonal base, 13th-century. Font Cover: of wood, octagonal with moulded frame, iron straps and spikes, 17th-century. Inscriptions: in S. aisle, on S. wall at W. end, marble tablet recording the enlargement of the church and a grant from the Incorporated Church Building Society in 1829. In tower, on W. wall of ground floor, framed board recording the recasting of the bells in 1739 and giving 'changes' for five bells, signed 'July 29, Joseph Card Pinxt. 1827'.

Monuments: In S. chapel—on N. wall, (1) to Thomas Macnamara Russell, Admiral of the White and late commanderin-chief in the North Seas, 1824, and Elizabeth his wife, 1818, white marble tablet with naval trophies above and shield-of-arms on apron, on grey marble backing, by H. Harris of Poole, erected 1825 (Salisbury Journal 8 Aug. 1825); on S. wall, (2) to Catherine, wife of John Willett Willett of Merly, 1798, and their daughter Annabella, 1795, white marble tablet with stele carved with allegorical figure with censer on grey marble backing with shield-of-arms below, signed J. Bacon R.A. Sculpt. 1799. In S. chancel aisle—on E. wall, (3) to Rudolf Willett, 1795, and Annabella his wife, 1779, white marble tablet with kneeling figures holding a heart and with a shield-of-arms; on N. wall, (4) to John Willett Willett, F.R.S., F.A.S., of Merly, 1815, white marble tablet surmounted by allegorical figure holding urn with profile portrait and with child holding quenched torch, on black marble, signed Turner Elli (sic) Sculptor London; on S. wall, (5) to Henry Constantine of Merly, 1613, erected by his widow Elizabeth (Evelyn) 1651, black marble wall-monument with moulded cornice, round pediment and shaped apron with shield-of-arms of Constantine impaling the quarterly arms of Evelyn. In N. aisle—on N. wall, (6) to Lewis William Brouncker, 1812, Harriet his wife, 1850, and their children, Louisa, Susanna and William, 1809, white marble tablet with draped urn and shield-of-arms, signed Smith sculptor London; (7) to John Willis Savary, 1789, and Willis Hart, 1792, white and grey marble tablet with urn; (8) to Rev. George Tito Brice, vicar, 1826, and Frances his wife, 1833, white marble tablet on black marble backing with shield-of-arms; (9) to Rev. Richard Lloyd, A.M., 1732, and Elizabeth his wife, 1733 (Plate 16) white marble draped cartouche with Latin inscription, cherubs' heads, a skull, and surmounted by shield-of-arms and crest; on S. wall, (10) to Rev. Robert Henning, 1798, and Maria (Franklin) his wife, 1796, grey and white marble monument with Latin inscription and double urn, signed H. Rouw, London. In S. aisle—on N. wall, (11) to Caroline widow of Richard Anthony Salisbury, 1830, white marble Gothic tablet with enriched ogee head and lozenge-of-arms, signed Harris, Bath; on S. wall, (12) to Henrietta Mary Wilkie, 1790, white marble shield-shaped tablet (Plate 17) carved with allegorical figure holding inscription tablet surmounted by draped urn with shield-of-arms, on grey marble backing, signed J. Bacon R.A. Sculpt London 1791; (13) to Rev. William Oldfield Bartlett, vicar, 1842, and Eliza his wife, white marble tablet on black marble backing, signed Currie 240 Oxford Street; (14) to Samuel Martin, 1788, (Plate 17) white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet with enriched panels, surmounted by veined marble obelisk with portrait head in medallion (Plate 18) and shield-of-arms, signed J. Bacon sculptor. An altar tomb from here is in Stock Gayland church in Lydlinch parish (Dorset III). In churchyard—N.E. of N. vestry, (15) to Francis White, early 18th-century headstone with cross, cross bones and hour glass; (16) to Bridget, wife of Thomas Trim, early 18th-century headstone; (17) to Thomas Trim, 1713, headstone; (18) to Charles, son of William and Eleanor Budden, 1827 (Plate 21); S. of S. aisle, (19) former floor-slab inscribed 'Constantine Spirituale Resurgam, 1666'; S.W. of S. porch, (20) to Rt. Hon. Sir Henry Austen Layard, G.C.B., 'The Discoverer of Nineveh', 1894, memorial of Scottish granite. See also Indents, under Brasses.

Sundials: (1) on apex of gable of S. chapel, 19th-century; (2) on E. jamb of S. door inside porch, scratch dial. Table: in N. vestry, with carved bearers, enriched bulbous legs, moulded and carved stretchers, c. 1600.

d(7) Baptist Chapel, on N.W. side of Hill Street (¼ m. N.E.), with brick walls and a slate-covered roof, was built c. 1815 replacing an earlier chapel in West Butts Street, the site of which is marked by a modern stone tablet with the date 1735.


Congregational Chapel, Skinner Street, Poole

Congregational Chapel, Skinner Street, Poole

The building is rectangular (50 ft. by 36 ft.). The entrance front at the E. end has a pedimented centrepiece with a central round-headed doorway covered by a later porch and traces of blocked doorways to N. and S.; the front has been embellished with modern yellow terracotta dressings. The interior was refitted, and the E. gallery rebuilt, in the late 19th century; an organ recess and vestries were built at the W. end c. 1879.

Fittings—Monuments: in chapel yard, late 18th and early 19th-century headstones removed from former burial ground in West Butts Street. Organ: case with pilasters and classical detail, by T. J. Duncan, London, 1839, inscribed 'Erected by Contribution A.D. 1879' said to have come from St. Paul's Church, Poole, presumably when the latter was enlarged. Panelling: at E. end in vestibule, early 19th-century, reset.

d(8) Congregational Chapel (Plate 119), on N. side of Skinner Street (¼ m. E.), with brick walls partly slatehung and a half-hipped slate-covered roof, was built in 1777 at a cost of £1,400, a vestry was added on the N. side in 1814 and the chapel was extended to the E. in 1823 at a cost of £2,000 which probably included a general refitting and the erection of the present galleries; in 1833 the W. porch and the Infants School (Monument 24) to the N.W. were built. The organ was replaced in 1851 and again in 1886, the interior and vestries were renovated and reseated in 1880 and some alterations made to the galleries in 1886. (W. Densham and J. Ogle, The Story of the Congregational Churches of Dorset (Bournemouth, 1899).)

Architectural Description—The Chapel is aligned E.–W. with the pulpit towards the E. and the principal entrance on the W. The W. front is in five bays and has a shaped gable with obelisks above the terminal bays (Plate 119); the ground storey has in both the N. and S. bays a window with pointed head in three orders of brickwork, plain imposts and a keystone, enclosing a simple wooden frame of two pointed lights; the central bay has a wide semicircular arched doorway, apparently inserted after 1833, flanked by two narrower doorways, now blocked, which were the original entrances. The second stage is pierced by five pointed windows similar to those described and in the gable is an attic storey with three windows also similar to the foregoing, but blind. Above the middle window of the second stage is a cartouche enclosing the date 1777. In front of the three middle bays of the ground storey is a hexastyle portico with a central pediment added in 1833 in a simplified version of the Doric order.

The N. and S. walls have two heights of pointed windows with wooden frames; the windows in the E. wall, which dates from 1823, have semicircular heads; the S. and E. walls and the E. bay of the N. wall are slate-hung. At the E. end of the S. wall is a projecting staircase wing, also slate-hung, providing access to the gallery; a similar wing was removed from the W. end of this wall in the early 19th century. There is a further staircase wing, of the early 19th century, at the N.W. corner which incorporates access to the burial ground on the N. side of the chapel. Projecting from the N. wall is a single-storey vestry built in 1814 and later extended.

Inside, the Meeting Room (Plate 119) is rectangular (76¼ ft. by 47½ ft. inclusive of the E. vestries) and divided by N. and S. arcades, the piers of which support a gallery and carry the roof structure. The arcades are in six bays, the easternmost bay having been added in 1823. The piers, which are of painted wood and stand on plain stone bases, comprise a central circular shaft with four attached three-quarter round shafts and moulded capitals and carry flattened elliptical arches. The gallery, which originally extended along the N., S. and W. sides with the front spanning between the piers, was enlarged in 1823 and projected beyond the line of the piers and additionally supported by sex-foiled cast-iron columns. It has a continuous panelled front rounded at the E. and W. ends and the moulded architrave is enriched with regularlyspaced paired balls. The ceilings are plastered, those above the galleries being flat and that in the centre of the room coved. The roof over the central space is supported by roof trusses with a king post and struts rising from a collar; there were probably smaller trusses above the galleries as at the Congregational Chapel, Wareham (4). The present slate-covered roof which eliminates the intermediate valleys dates from the early 19th century.

Fittings—Chair: in N.E. vestry, of oak with spirally turned and carved side standards and bearers, and rails enriched with crowns, late 17th-century. Clock: on front of W. gallery, early 19th-century. Monuments: In N.E. vestry—on E. wall, (1) to Thomas Durant, pastor, 1849, white marble tablet on grey marble backing. In S.E. vestry—on E. wall, (2) to Edward Ashburner, M.A., pastor, 1804, white marble sarcophagus-shaped tablet on grey marble backing. In burial ground—N. of chapel, (3) to Edward Ashburner, M.A., 1804, and Frances his widow, 1836, fragments of table-tomb including inscribed side panel and top reset above vault. Also in burial ground, damaged remains of other table-tombs and head-stones, early 19th-century. Plate: set of four cups each with straight-sided bowl, slightly everted rim, moulded foot and two reeded handles, inscribed 'Independent Meeting Skinner Street Poole 1810' with assay mark for 1810 and maker's initials Reeb in quatrefoil; also pair of flagons and four patens, of base metal plated with silver, inscribed and dated 1836. Pulpit: of wood, rectangular, with three-sided central projection, in two tiers of fielded panels with central moulded string, and flanking stairs to N. and S. with cast-iron balusters and mahogany handrail, mid 19th-century. Railings: on S. side of W. entrance court, cast-iron, mid 19th-century. Seating: around front of gallery, plain wooden pews contemporary with gallery extension of 1823.

d(9) Former Friends Meeting House (380 yds. E.N.E.), on N. side of Prosperous Street, of brick with a hipped roof formerly covered with tiles and a verge of stone slates, has been considerably altered and re-roofed in recent times. It was largely rebuilt in 1795–6 and extended to the S. with a gallery and entrance porch in the early 19th century.

The E. and W. walls of the 1795–6 building each have two round-headed windows with moulded stone architraves and later cast-iron glazing bars, joined, on the E. only, by a plat band at impost level; a third window to the S. on each side is an early 19th-century copy; under the eaves is a moulded wooden cornice. The interior has a high plaster-vaulted ceiling of the early 19th century. No original fittings survive. A Burial Ground lies to the W., but the tombstones have been removed.

d(10) Former Methodist Chapel (600 yds. N.E.), on N. side of Chapel Lane, with brick walls and a hipped tile-covered roof with later roofs covered in slates, was built, according to a tablet in the S. wall, in 1793 and extended to N. and S. in 1843; it ceased to be used for worship in 1878 when a new chapel was built near by; the S. front was altered in 1956.

In each of the E. and W. walls of the original building are three windows with pointed two-centred heads. The S. extension incorporates a gallery with panelled front supported on a fluted cast-iron column. The Meeting Room has a coved plaster ceiling and moulded cornice.

d(11) Church of St. Mary and St. Philomena (R.C.), on the E. side of West Quay Road (500 yds. N.N.E.), has walls of Portland stone ashlar with diagonal tooling and a slate-covered roof. The Chancel and Nave were built in 1839. The building was considerably enlarged in the late 19th or early 20th century by the addition of matching N. and S. aisles and arcades, an E. vestry and a W. porch.

Architectural Description—The chancel and nave are structurally undivided. The E. wall is gabled, with moulded kneelers, stone coping and, at the apex, a pedestal base for a cross-finial, now gone. Behind the altar is a blind window with thin cusped tracery in a two-centred head with a label internally; in the centre is a painting of the Virgin flanked by angels and with the Holy Monogram in the tracery; the lower part of the window forms a reredos of eight cusped and pointed panels. N. of the altar is a doorway with two-centred head, to the vestry.

Above the N. and S. arcades are twelve windows each of one trefoiled light in a two-centred head with a label; the lower parts of these windows were destroyed when the arcades were inserted. At the W. end of the N. and S. walls are two four-centred openings with labels. The W. wall has a chamfered plinth, a two-stage angle buttress at each end and a gable similar to that on the E. Above the gable is a gabled bell-cote surmounted by a cross finial. The W. doorway has a two-centred head with continuously moulded jambs and a label. Above the porch roof is a niche of similar design to the clearstorey windows.

The roof is in six bays with seven scissor trusses with braces to form two-centred arches and segmental-pointed wall arches with wall posts supported by moulded stone corbels; all members are hollow-chamfered.

Fittings—of c. 1839 unless otherwise stated. Altar and Altar Rails: in chancel, with trefoil-headed Gothic arcading. Font (Plate 9): in S. aisle, painted stone, octagonal bowl with cusped oblong panel in each face, moulded rim and under-edge, on slender octagonal stem with cinquefoil-headed panels and moulded octagonal base; interior of bowl leadlined and divided into two compartments with separate lids; cover, of wood, octagonal pyramid with moulded ribs and finial. Gallery: at W. end, with Gothic arcaded front supported on hexagonal posts with cusped spandrels in the openings. Plate: includes a chalice, silver-gilt, perhaps Italian, late 18th-century, and cruet with Sheffield plate tray and two cut-glass vessels with silver mountings, the tops bearing finials with the letters A and V respectively, with hall-marks for Birmingham, 1838. Pulpit: square with plain wooden balustrade.

d(12) Unitarian Chapel (280 yds. N.E.), first built in 1705 but rebuilt in 1868, retains the following:

Fittings—Pulpit: oval, late 18th-century, reconstructed, from South Street Wesleyan Chapel, Halifax. Wall-clock: signed Jos. Jackeman, London Bridge, mid 18th-century.

Secular

f(13) Canford Bridge and Viaduct (016992) were built in the early 19th century.

The Bridge (Plate 34), over the Stour, of Portland stone ashlar, has three high segmental arches, pointed cutwaters, and parapets which terminate against square piers. In the N. jamb of the central archway is a panel inscribed 'This Bridge finished, in the year 1813, by JOHN DYSON Engineer, JESSE BUSHROD, Mason'. The Viaduct, of six arches, immediately S. of the bridge, is generally similar to it in appearance but with arches and parapet of brickwork and cutwaters, abutments and spandrels of carstone.

Railway Station and Bridges, see pp. 416–7.

d(14) The Guildhall (Plate 120), in Market Street (220 yds. N.E.), is of two storeys with brick walls, stone dressings and a hipped slate-covered roof. Two inscribed tablets on the N.W. and S.E. walls record that it was built in 1761 by John Gulston and Col. Thomas Calcraft, Members of Parliament for Poole. The ground floor, which is now enclosed, was originally open at the S.W. end and formed a market; the upper floor comprises a large council chamber with a smaller chamber at the N.E. end.

The building has stone quoins, a plat-band at first-floor level and a moulded cornice and parapet; at the S.W. end the cornice rises to form a pediment. The openings of the lower stage have semicircular-arched heads in three receding orders of brickwork with keystones and a plat-band at impost level. Windows in the first-floor rooms have segmental-arched heads with keystones. The principal façade, which faces S.W., has a central feature combining a rusticated arched entrance to the lower stage and a balustraded and pedimented porch to the principal storey, approached on each side by a segmental staircase with iron balusters and handrails. In the centre of the tympanum of the main pediment is a keystoned roundel enclosing a clock face, and above the apex of the pediment is a sundial with gnomon and figure xii. The roof has a flat central area supporting a square lantern with splayed angles having in each face one round-headed window with rusticated surround; the lantern is surmounted by a cornice and octagonal dome supporting a weather-vane.

The principal room on the first floor has at the S.W. end a doorway with fluted pilasters carrying a Doric entablature and pediment, partly covered by a later internal porch. At the N.E. end of the room is a platform with a doorway in the back wall with an eared architrave and pedimented head carried by enriched consoles; beneath the pediment are the Royal Arms of Queen Victoria. In the S.E. wall and masked externally by a blind window is a fireplace with architrave enriched with egg-and-dart ornament, frieze with lion's head and swags and cornice supported by consoles; the overmantel has a broken pediment above an eared panel containing a pre-1603 Royal Arms, perhaps from the former town hall in Fish Street. The ceiling is sub-divided by moulded bands and has a domed lantern light in the centre and an enriched coved cornice.


Poole: The Guildhall

Poole: The Guildhall

(15) Corporation Insignia and Plate etc. The Corporation possesses a very notable series of seals, the earliest dating from the 14th century, and two pairs of maces etc.

(i–ii) Maces, pair, 21½ ins. long, silver parcel-gilt with iron cores, are primarily early 17th-century (Plate 38); the heads, which differ from each other slightly in their dimensions, are conoidal, enriched in the lower part with four winged cherubs' heads, and bear the maker's initials I.G.; they are crowned by fleur-de-lys cresting; both heads bear the Stuart royal arms and the cypher WM R, the former letters combined as a monogram, for William and Mary; the stem has circular moulded knops at top and bottom, and two similar knops divide the length into three parts; the base has a round knop with six sea-horse brackets above. (iii–iv) Maces, pair, 45 ins. long, silver gilt, bearing assay marks for 1776 and the maker's initials IV, were presented to the town by William MortonPitt, one of the members of Parliament for the borough; the head of each (Plate 39) is bowl-shaped with foliate necking and ornamented with crowned roses and thistles alternating with the royal arms and the arms of Poole in scrolled cartouches; the head is surmounted by a crown enclosing on the upper surface of the bowl a contemporary achievement of the royal arms; the stem has at the top and bottom two knops with gadrooned ornament, and two knops dividing its length into three parts, the upper knop being similar to those described, the lower of simpler form; the base is formed of a larger gadrooned knop with a lower roundel bearing below it the shield-of-arms of Morton-Pitt. (v) Water Bailiff's Badge, 12 ins. long, silver, in the form of an oar; the handle bears assay marks for 1780 and the maker's initials I.P.; the blade has on one side an oval cartouche suspended from the beak of a flying bird and inscribed 'The / Gift of Capt. / Alexr Scott / to the Corpn / of Pool (sic) / 1780', and on the other side a shield-of-arms of Poole. (vi) Borough Seal (Plate 35), of silver, 2½ ins. diam., 14th-century, with representation of single-masted ship with battlemented poop and forecastle, clinker-built hull with large rudder at the stern, and prominent anchor; between the mast and forecastle is a shield bearing in pale a sword, hilt in base; on the mainmast is a flag divided quarterly but bearings indecipherable; the whole is enclosed in a quatrefoil with external cusps and a circular inscription band with the words + SIGILLVM . COMMVNE: DE: LAPOLE. (vii) Borough Seal, of silver, 1 in. diam., with moulded iron handle 25/8 ins. long, the latter inscribed PH 1696; on the matrix is a shield-of-arms of Poole surmounted by the legend AD . MOREM . VILLÆ . DE . POOLE. (viii) Borough Seal (Plate 35), of silver, 11/8 in. diam., with mahogany handle, inscribed 'Peter Jolliff Esqr Mayor 1732'; the matrix bears the arms and motto of Poole with helm, mermaid crest and foliate mantling. (ix) Borough Seal (Plate 35), of silver, 13/8 in. diam, with moulded ivory handle 37/8 ins. long; the matrix bears on the back assay marks for 1835 and maker's initials J H, the handle is inscribed 'Robert Slade Junr Esqr Mayor, 1st Jan. 1836'; the seal depicts the arms of Poole with helm, crest and mantling and is inscribed 'BOROUGH OF POOLE / COUNCIL'. (x) Mayoral Seal (Plate 35), of latten, 1¼ in. diam., 15/8 in. high, 14th-15th-century, with open trefoiled handle and hexagonal stem splayed out to circular matrix, the latter bearing a shield-of-arms of Poole within a cusped circle and surrounded by the black-letter inscription: 'Sigillū ∷ maioritatis ∷ ville ∷ de ∷ Pole'. (xi) Mayoral Seal (Plate 35), of silver, of similar design and date to (ix) but inscribed 'BOROUGH OF POOLE / MAYOR'. (xii) Comptroller's Seal (Plate 35), of latten, 13/16 in. diam., 15/8 in. high, late 15th-century, with open trefoiled handle surmounted by pierced circle and with a stem similar to the foregoing, bears on the matrix a lion statant gardant cowed surrounded by a scroll inscribed in black letter 'S ∷ contrar de pool'. (xiii) Port Seal (Plate 35), of silver, 13/16 in. diam., 1½ in. high, 15th-century, with trefoiled handle pierced with three holes and with a stem similar in shape to (xi), bears on the matrix a lion's mask within a quatrefoil with a fleur-de-lys in each foliation and surrounded by the black-letter inscription 'sigill[um] stapule in portu de pole'. Also preserved are two seal-head Spoons of silver, one dated 1649, and a Gold Medal awarded to Capt. Peter Joliffe by William III for capturing a French privateer in 1694.

d(16) Harbour Office (150 yds. S.), on The Quay, was built in 1822 (Plate 124). It is of two storeys with an open colonnade of four bays carrying part of the upper storey. The first floor comprises one large room 26 ft. by 20½ ft. and a small office in one corner. In the E. wall is a stone tablet with a half-length figure in low relief and the inscription BENJAMIN SKUTT MAYOR AN 1727. JN° AWBREY FECIT; in the centre of the front wall is a sundial inscribed s. WESTON ESQ. MAYOR 1814: both of these are reused from an earlier building.

d (17) Town Cellars (140 yds. S.), of one storey partly divided into two, with walls of coursed rubble with ashlar dressings and a tiled roof, was built in the 15th century (Plates 122, 124). It is approximately 120 ft. long but was divided into two unequal parts when Thames Street was extended S. through it in the late 18th century. It was formerly known as the 'Wool House' or the 'King's Hall'. (fn. 3)


Poole, Dorset: The Town Cellars

Poole, Dorset: The Town Cellars

The E. section has a gable at the E. end with inclined parapet and the remains of a finial at the apex. The S. wall is divided into six bays separated by two-stage buttresses and with a large corbel of four courses of masonry at the E. end. In the E. bay is a blocked two-centred archway with continuously chamfered head and jambs. In the second and fourth bays are windows of two cinque-foiled lights with blind sunk spandrels: that to the E. has been altered to form a doorway; that to the W. has been blocked. In the W. bay, formerly the centre of the S. side of the building, is a wide doorway with segmental-pointed head and continuously chamfered jambs. The N. wall, partly covered by Monument (254), has two two-stage buttresses and three two-light windows of similar form to those in the S. wall.

The W. section is enclosed by later buildings apart from the wall facing Thames Street, which is of late 18th-century brickwork laid to English bond; the W. wall, which is gabled and has the remains of a finial at the apex, contains a blocked transomed window of two cinque-foiled lights with a frame rebated for shutters; in the S. wall are two blocked openings at ground-floor level and two above. Against the S. wall is a lead pump inscribed 'J. Strong Esq Mayor 1810'.

The roof was originally divided into eleven bays by trusses (Plate 122, Fig. p. 213) with arched-braced collars, with tie beams in alternate trusses. There are two purlins to each slope with arched wind braces below the lower purlin.

Lock-up, in Sarum Street, N.W. of Town Cellars, see Monument (254).

d(18) Custom House (Frontispiece, Pt. 2), on The Quay, 30 yds. E. of (16), is of three storeys with walls of brick and a hipped slate-covered roof. It was built soon after the destruction by fire on 22nd April 1813 of the previous custom house, of which it was a replica in form though with modification in detail (Gentleman's Magazine, 1813, pt. ii, 478). The earlier building was itself a late 18th-century rebuilding of the 'Red Lion Coffee House'.


The Custom House

The Custom House

The front of the building faces W. along the Great Quay and overlooks a triangular open space formed when the Quays were re-aligned in 1788. It is of three bays; the central bay projects slightly and is crowned by a low pediment. The gnote idoris treated as a basement storey and has round arched doorways and windows connected at the springing by a moulded plat-band. The first floor is approached by a double segmental staircase with a doorway to the ground floor in the centre and the principal entrance above with a flat-headed porch supported by Tuscan columns and carrying a Royal Arms in cast iron of more recent date. The windows of the upper floors have flat-arched brick heads. The first floor plan comprises a large room 32–39 ft. by 20½ ft. and four minor rooms. The ground floor is similarly arranged but with more subdivisions; the second floor consists of a single storage loft with four paired king-post roof trusses, two trusses resting on each tie beam.

In front of the building are the remains of a Wool Scales (Plate 124); the woodwork has been renewed but some original iron fittings remain.

d(19) Powder House (7/8 m. E.), on Hospital Island, is a rectangular building 22⅓ ft. by 18 ft. The roof has been destroyed; the walls, which stand to a maximum height of 7 ft., are of coursed rubble with an inner lining of brickwork. The building was erected in 1775 following the appointment of a committee of burgesses on June 14 of that year 'to order the Building of a Store house or Magazine for depositing and keeping Gunpowder landed and brought into the said town [Poole] at any place on the Point beyond windmill' (E. F. J. Mathews, The Economic History of Poole, 1756– 1815, unpublished London Ph. D. thesis, 1957).

d(20) 'Town Wall', in St. Clement's Lane, 30 yds. S.W. of Thames Street, behind Monument (273), extends approx. 15 yds. and is 1⅓ ft. to 3 ft. thick. It is of squared and in part coursed rubble, with a short portion of the S. end carried forward on rounded stone corbels above which are traces of three openings, now blocked. It was built in the 16th century and contains a doorway with chamfered jambs and four-centred head of this date.


The Old Library

The Old Library

d(21) The Old Library, at the S. end of High Street (130 yds. S.S.E.), of two storeys with walls of brick rendered and rusticated in the lower storey and a hipped slate-covered roof, was built in 1830. The ground floor originally had an open arcade of five bays at the front, the archways of which are now filled. On the first floor is a large reading room (31¼ ft. by 21 ft.) and a small office in the N. corner. The plan of this floor resembles that of the Harbour Office (Monument 16). Set in the pedimented blocking course of the central feature externally is an iron tablet inscribed 'PUBLIC LIBRARY / THE GIFT OF / BANJAMIN LESTER LESTER ESQUIRE / AND / THE HONOURABLE W.F.S. PONSONBY / REPRESENTATIVES OF POOLE / IN PARLIAMENT 1830'. (Demolished).

d(22) Former Poole Union Workhouse, now St. Mary's Hospital, at the junction of St. Mary's Road and Shaftesbury Road, 300 yds. W.S.W. of St. Mary's church (Monument 4), with walls of brick and stone and a slate-covered roof, was built in 1838–9 to the designs of John Tulloch of Parkstone (D.C.C. 3 May 1838).

The original building has a central octagonal block of three storeys with two-storeyed wings to N.W., N.E., and S.E., and a detached entrance range to the S.W. facing Shaftesbury Road (cf. Dorchester (18), Wareham (10), Weymouth (16)).

d(23) School, at N. end of Lagland Street (550 yds. E.N.E.), of one storey with brick walls, stone dressings and a slate-covered roof, was built in 1835; this date and the words Infant School are inscribed in a panel above the parapet. (Demolished)

d(24) Infant School, in Skinner Street, immediately N.W. of the Congregational Chapel (8), is of one storey with walls of brick and a slate-covered roof. It was built in 1833 as a Lancasterian Free School, possibly as an addition to a school built in 1813 nearby in Lagland Street and now rebuilt.

The Infant School faces the entrance courtyard on the W. side of the chapel. The front is in five bays with a semicircular-headed window in each of the three central bays and a panel above the parapet with the words Infant School in bold raised letters.

d(25) Longfleet Church Schools, in Longfleet Road, opposite St. Mary's Church (4), of one storey with walls of grey brick with some stone dressings and a slate-covered roof, was built in 1839; the date is recorded on a plaque in the central gable facing the road.

The building is in the Gothic style with stepped buttresses at the corners and a bell-cote above the original S.E. gable; the windows have mostly been enlarged. The plan formerly comprised a large schoolroom parallel to the street with a central wing at right-angles to it to the S.E.; adjacent on the N.W. is the Master's House with windows with four-centred lights and labels. The school was later extended on both sides of the S.E. wing.

d(26) Scaplen's Court, at the S.W. end of High Street (110 yds. S.E.) is of two storeys with a cellar, walls of coursed rubble and later brickwork, and roofs covered with tiles and stone slates. The building is basically of Purbeck stone with some dressings of Bath stone, but many cobbles are incorporated which are not of local origin and may have been brought to Poole as ship's ballast.

The building dates from the late 15th or early 16th century and has been identified (fn. 4) as the mediaeval Town House and Guildhall, but the evidence for this is inconclusive and it might equally well have been the home of a substantial merchant. Little is known of its early history although it is said to have housed the George Inn, perhaps in the 17th century, and in the early 18th century it was the home of John Scaplen from whom it takes its name.

The structure comprises four ranges set around a rectangular courtyard. The ranges to the S.E. and S.W. appear to have been built first, but these were closely followed by the other ranges enclosing the courtyard. A further range which formed a wing projecting from the N.W. side has been demolished; this appears to have been an addition of the 18th or 19th century. The first floor was approached by a wooden staircase to a gallery on the S.E. side of the courtyard, but the whole structure is now renewed in concrete. In the late 17th century a chimney-stack was inserted at the S.W. end of the N.W. range and the stack in the S.W. range was partly rebuilt together with the fireplace it served. Early in the 18th century the ceiling at the S.W. end of the kitchen was heightened and a screen built to provide an additional parlour. This is described in the will of John Scaplen as his 'best parlour'. At the same time a cellar was constructed beneath this room. The building was divided into tenements in the mid 18th century, involving the conversion of the roof space into attic rooms and the insertion of partitions; the S.E. wall facing the street was at this time cased in a 9 in. skin of brickwork. The house was badly damaged by a storm in 1923. Restoration was commenced in 1927 involving the removal of much of the 18th-century insertions. The building is now used as a museum. (W. A. Pantin, 'Medieval English TownHouse Plans', in Medieval Archaeology, VI–VII (1962–3), 213, fig. 69.)

Scaplen's Court is an interesting example of a quayside merchant's house of the late mediaeval period, which developed from an L-shaped plan into a quadrangle.

The South-east Range which faces the street and forms the entrance front has been largely destroyed above first-floor level. The ground floor is divided into three rooms of which the small hall or lower hall in the centre is the only one of any importance, that to the S.W. being a small inner chamber or perhaps a strong-room and that to the N.E., which has separate access from the street, being evidently a storage room for merchandise or household necessities. N.E. of the lower hall is a through passage, originally entered from the street through a porch of which the foundations and a fragment of the return walls survive. The first floor of this range included an upper hall approached from a timber gallery at the S.E. end of the courtyard and from the adjacent wings. The two original outer doorways in the S.E. front have four-centred heads, that to the store having continuously chamfered jambs and that to the passage being moulded. The store has a small rectangular loop with moulded surround and an iron grille. The lower hall had a bay window of which only the moulded and panelled reveals remain; the latter have trefoiled two-centred heads. The window was presumably carried up and repeated on the first floor. The wall facing the courtyard has at the N.E. end a doorway from the passage with moulded four-centred head and continuous jambs. At the N.W. end of the cross wall to the inner room one jamb of a doorway survives; adjacent to this is a door-surround of Bath stone to the Parlour, with four-centred head and continuous moulded jambs and shaped stops. The fireplace to the lower hall has much decayed and weathered Purbeck marble jambs. In the upper hall is a small fireplace with depressed four-centred head and chamfered jambs.


Scaplen's Court

Scaplen's Court

The South-west Range butts against the S.W. end of the S.E. range from which it is accessible at both levels and is gabled at its N.W. end. It now comprises two rooms on each floor; the ground-floor room to the N.W. was formerly divided by a timber partition of which part remains. The S.E. ground-floor room, the Parlour, has in the N.W. wall a restored timber door-frame with four-centred moulded head and jambs; the fireplace, of Purbeck stone, had a four-centred head with enriched spandrels but has been much damaged; the jambs and remaining parts of the head are moulded and enriched with floral decoration. The ceiling, much restored, is divided by moulded intersecting beams into nine square bays, each sub-divided by subsidiary beams. The three-light window in the S.W. wall is reduced in width but retains its original moulded inner lintel. The adjacent room to the N.W. retains part of an original timber-framed partition with wattle and daub infilling, and with a doorway at the S.W. end with four-centred chamfered head and continuous jambs; into the head of this partition is framed a deeply chamfered ceiling beam to the rooms at each side. In the N.E. wall is a fireplace added in the 17th century, and a flight of steps down to an 18th-century cellar below the N.W. wing. In the S.E. wall was an 18th-century fireplace now removed and in the opposite, gable, wall is an original outer doorway, now blocked. The chamber above the parlour is entered from the gallery and has doorways in its S.E. and N.W. walls to the adjoining rooms; in the N.W. wall is an original fireplace with moulded depressed four-centred lintel and continuous moulded jambs with moulded stops; the lintel carries graffiti including the dates 1634 and 1650. A doorway, now blocked, above the fireplace was inserted in the 18th century to give access to the former attics. The original roof structure is exposed; it is in two main bays, each sub-divided. The main trusses have braces forming continuous arches rising from the wall plates, the intermediate trusses have arch braces rising from the level of the second purlin; above the collars are two inclined struts; there are four purlins to each roof slope and two pairs of curved wind braces to each bay between the purlins. The N.W. chamber has a roof of three bays, the S.E. bay partly taken up by the chimney-stack, with trusses of the same general character as the foregoing, but much simpler and with less elaborate arrangement of wind braces; tie beams were inserted in the early 18th century to support the inserted attic floor. In the courtyard, over the doorway to this wing is a stone with shield-of-arms of Poole with the initials and date W P 1554 and a later date 1729.

The North-west Range comprises a kitchen on the ground floor with a late 15th-century fireplace at the N.E. end and an original doorway in the middle of the outer N.W. wall; the footings of earlier partitions are exposed. In the S.E. wall is a 17th or 18th-century doorway, now blocked, and to the N.E. an 18th-century doorway with three-centred arched head which replaces an original three or four-light window; above it is a relieving arch inserted in the late 17th century when the original opening was widened. An early stop-chamfered ceiling beam in this room bears a later inscription T P E B 1717. The chamber above has an early 17th-century fireplace with Bath stone jambs and a timber lintel; it had a plaster overmantel and moulded border enclosing a fleur-de-lys with lion and unicorn supporters, a small leopard's face above it, and round bosses at the top corners (plasterwork now gone). The roof, which has been largely rebuilt, is in four bays; the trusses are mostly modern.

The North-east Range is narrower than the other three ranges of building and has minor rooms on the ground floor which may have been divided into buttery and pantry; it dates from the second half of the 16th century. In the N.W. wall was one jamb and part of the head of a wooden door-frame, the head only about 4 ft. above floor level, thought to have provided access to an earlier cellar beneath the kitchen (now gone). The ceiling has heavy chamfered beams. The chamber above has a modern timber-framed window in the S.W. wall facing the courtyard, and an original five-light timber window in the N.E. wall with hollow-chamfered mullions and intermediate diamond iron bars. The original fireplace has a depressed four-centred chamfered head and continuous jambs. The roof trusses have plain tie beams and collars and are largely renewed. The first floor is approached from the gallery through a reset timber door-frame with four-centred head. In the S.E. wall on the first floor is a narrow doorway with a four-centred head and chamfered jambs.

d(27) The Rectory immediately N.E. of St. James's church, of two storeys with cellars and attics, with walls of brick laid to header bond at the front and a tiled roof, was built in 1786 (plan p. 216). The front is in five bays with a central doorway with round head and fanlight and surmounted by a thinly-moulded open pediment. Windows have segmental-arched brick heads with keystones. Original iron railings survive enclosing the front garden (Plate 63).

a(28) Upton House (993929) is of two storeys with basement and attics, with walls of brick rendered in stucco and a slate-covered roof. It was built in the early 19th century by Christopher Spurrier, M.P. for Bridport, 'in the Italian style of architecture' and between 1834 and 1853 Sir Everard Doughty, Bart., added the E. wing and chapel 'in the cottage style of architecture' (Hutchins III, 308).

The entrance front (Plate 136) has a central rusticated and pedimented bay and flanking recessed wings with single storey Ionic colonnades of quadrant form to E. and W. The garden front is of three bays, the terminal bays having bowed fronts. The plan is approximately square with a central hall and staircase to one side. Hutchins states that 'the chimney piece in the drawing room of Italian statuary marble was carved originally for a palace of the Emperor Napoleon I'.

f(29) Merly House (008983) is of three storeys and cellars with walls of brick, partly rendered, and ashlar, with ashlar dressings and a hipped slate-covered roof. The house (Plate 133) was commenced in 1752 on an estate purchased the previous year by Ralph Willett, F.S.A., whose fortune derived from the West Indies, to replace the manor house of the Constantine family which stood about ½ m. away in the valley of the Stour. The work was probably well advanced by 1756, the date of the present rainwater-heads, and completed by 1760, including two wings, since demolished, flanking the house on the N. In 1772 Willett added two wings to the S.E. and S.W. of the house: the former, including a library 84 ft. by 23 ft., was demolished soon after its contents were sold in 1813 and the other wing was demolished perhaps at a similar date. A description of the decoration of the Library appears in Hutchins (III, 305) and a sketch plan of the house with the names of the rooms is in Willett's library catalogue (private collection). The stabling, orangery and garden layout date from the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The house retains some decorated plaster ceilings and contemporary fittings.

Architectural Description—The house is rectangular in plan with slightly projecting terminal bays to the S. and a central entrance feature on the N. It stands on a rusticated basement course and has rusticated quoins, a plat band at first-floor level and, except in the centre of the N. side, a second plat band in place of a cornice, above which is a brick parapet with ashlar dies formerly surmounted by urns and with open balustrades above the N. and S. windows. The windows have moulded architraves: those on the N. and S. sides are eared at top and bottom; those on the S. wall of the ground floor have cornices surmounted by triangular pediments, except the central window which has a segmental pediment supported by scrolled consoles; those on the corresponding N. wall have cornices.

The centrepiece on the N. side (Plate 133) stands on a continuation of the rusticated basement course and has a plain ashlar lower stage above which is a blind colonnade of four half-round Roman Ionic columns supporting an entablature with pulvinated frieze and a pediment. The ground stage has a round-arched central entrance with doorway behind, the area between forming an internal porch. The outer archway is rusticated and carries a cornice and triple blocking course; it is flanked on each side by a window with rusticated architrave and keystoned head above which is a cornice. In each of the intercolumniations of the upper stage is a semicircular-headed window with keystone and moulded imposts; over that in the centre bay is a swag, and over the side bays apron-shaped tablets with dropped ends.

An illustration of the house in Hutchins (1st ed. (1774), II, opp. 109) shows the house with the ground at a lower level than at present with four courses of rustication to the basement and the N. door approached by a double flight of steps with balustrade; the doorway itself differs considerably from that now existing and has a square head and flanking Ionic columns supporting an entablature and pediment. The swag above the central window is replaced by an apron tablet. Also shown are the wing pavilions on the N., each with a central octagonal turret surmounted by an ogee dome and weather-vane. These pavilions were connected to the house by curved screen walls punctuated by piers supporting urns and ball finials. The N.E. wing contained the kitchens and offices and the N.W. wing the stables; the later wings to the S. comprised to the S.E. the new library, with billiard room, bedroom and dressing room, and to the S.W. the new stables.

The ground floor of the house is divided into six principal compartments together with the staircase hall, minor staircase, and an inserted staircase to the cellar on the W. side of the entrance hall. The entrance hall, in the centre of the N. side, has in the E. wall an inserted fireplace and in the centre of the S. wall a tall statuary niche with flanking pilasters, moulded imposts and cornice beneath a round head. Doorways at the S. end of the E. and W. walls are each flanked by pilasters carrying a cornice above which is a semicircular fanlight. The doorway to the N.W. room is a later insertion. The ceiling is surrounded by a Doric frieze and cornice and has a central oval panel with the surrounding area sub-divided into squares and rectangles, the divisions being moulded and enriched with leafwork and strapwork. The main staircase (Plate 57) has a handrail veneered in lignum vitae, moulded balusters and circular newels. The central room on the S. side, designed as a saloon and later the (old) library, has panelled walls and a fireplace of white and green marble with a central panel depicting Orpheus playing the harp with other attendant musicians and dancers. The ceiling (Plate 134) has a central feature of clouds and sunbursts within an arabesque and garlanded border. The N.W. room, the 'best dining parlour', has a fireplace with fluted Ionic side columns supporting a fluted frieze and enriched cornice, with a central panel showing a greyhound chasing a hare. The walls are enriched with plain panels framed in rococo plaster decoration (Plate 56), that above the fireplace containing at the top a cartouche with a prancing horse, and have an enriched frieze and cornice. The ceiling has a central oval panel enclosing a representation of Bacchus receiving a cup of wine from Ceres (Plate 135) and corner roundels with human busts, all surrounded by elaborate floral and foliage plaster decoration. The S.W. room, the 'best drawing room', has a fireplace of white and green marble with fluted jambs and moulded entablature with three panels depicting putti. The ceiling (Plates 134, 135) has a large central oval panel with a representation of the judgement of Paris, and four smaller panels at the corners each containing a nude figure with a dog, a book, a torch or cornucopia, and birds respectively. The N.E. room, the 'common dining parlour', and the S.E. room, the 'common drawing room', have work of similar but less elaborate character. The principal bedroom is over the entrance hall.


Merly House

Merly House

A walled Garden, 100 yds. N.E. of the house, approximately square on plan, was laid out in the late 18th century. The boundary walls 10–12 ft. high are of brick with intermediate brick piers with stone caps and at the corners square pavilions of two storeys with pyramidal roofs. The N. boundary wall projects in a series of convex curves and has in the centre a doorway with segmental head and rusticated brick jambs. There is a second gateway in the W. wall with scrolled wrought-iron gates of later date. In the centre of the S. side is an Orangery with brick walls and tiled roof, rectangular on plan with splayed corners to the S. and with large hung-sash windows with flat heads. The Stable Buildings, 160 yds. N.E. of the house, designed by John Nash, (fn. 5) were built c. 1805 to a U-shaped plan with an enclosed courtyard on the N. They are of two storeys in the centre with single-storey wings; the centre block has an octagonal weather-boarded cupola with lead-covered domed roof and weather-vane.

f(30) Canford Manor (Plates 137, 156), immediately E. of Canford church, stands on the site of a building referred to in 1221 when it was owned by William Longespée, Earl of Salisbury. The only mediaeval part now remaining is the kitchen wing ('John of Gaunt's kitchen') which dates from the 14th and 15th centuries. According to Hutchins other outbuildings also survived until 1765; these lay immediately N. and E. of the kitchen. The house, which in the 18th century stood to the S., was a gabled structure probably dating from 1611 when the Webb family became owners of the property. This house was completely rebuilt in 1825–36 for the Hon. W. F. Spencer Ponsonby, afterwards Lord de Mauley, who had married the heiress to the Webb property in 1814. The architect for the new work was Edward Blore who designed a larger mansion in the mid-Tudor style, some parts of which remain, particularly in the S. and E. fronts of the present building. In 1846 the property passed by sale to Sir Josiah John Guest, and the following year he called in Charles Barry to make considerable alterations and extensions to the house; much of the present building is of this period.


Canford Manor: John of Gaunt's Kitchen.

Canford Manor: John of Gaunt's Kitchen.

It is not possible to distinguish the work of Blore from that of Barry in every particular since Barry continued the style already adopted by his predecessor, but his work tends towards greater elaboration. Existing drawings include two perspectives by Blore now in the R.I.B.A, collection which show S.E. and S.W. views of the house including the central features on the S. side largely as they exist today, but the other parts of the façades were evidently altered by Blore before the work was completed, or later by Barry. An extensive set of plans in the Dorchester County Record Office signed by Charles Barry and dated 7 April 1848 shows his proposed alterations. The plans indicate that, of the ground-floor rooms, the walls of the Hall and all rooms to the S., E., and W. of it were to be retained as well as the E. and W. walls of the entrance gallery and the E. wall of the House Court and some walling N. of the principal stair. They also show as existing a conservatory set on the axis of the E. porch of the Dining Room. The proposed new work comprised the Victoria Tower and buildings around the House Court. All these proposals were realised, and additions continued to be made in the later 19th century, notably the building in 1851 of the Nineveh Court, E. of the kitchen, to house the Assyrian antiquities collected by Sir Henry Layard, son-in-law of Sir John Guest. A plan published by the Rev. Alfred Barry in 1867 (fn. 6) shows the house largely as it is today but with a conservatory immediately S. of 'John of Gaunt's kitchen'; this has since been replaced by a screen wall around a service yard.

The principal staircase was rebuilt after a fire in 1885 and in 1887 a wing was added to accommodate a smoking room and billiard room W. of the Victoria Tower. In 1923 the house was converted for use as a boys' public school.

Architectural Description—The Kitchen Wing (82 ft. by 20 ft. internally) is a single-storey building (Plate 137) with walls of coursed and squared limestone rubble with carstone at head and base, and with ashlar chimneystacks and a tiled roof with a verge of stone slates to the S. The S. wall has a moulded external cornice with 15th-century grotesques. The building is divided into two unequal rooms by a large double chimney-stack in addition to which each room also has a fireplace and chimney-stack in the N. wall. The building was heightened and a first floor inserted in the 16th century, but the floor was later removed. The E. wall, which formed part of an earlier building to the E., is 14th-century and has diagonal buttresses to N. and S., the former now largely cut away. In the middle of the wall is an original doorway, now opening outwards, with a two-centred head in two orders, the outer order chamfered, the inner moulded, and a segmental-pointed rear arch. N. of the doorway at a higher level is a later blocked opening, and, at the top of the wall, a 14th-century window facing W. with ogee trefoiled head and chamfered jambs. The N. wall of the E. room has at the E. end a 15th-century doorway, now converted to a cupboard, with four-centred head, continuously moulded jambs with shaped stops and four-centred rear arch; above it is a 16th-century two-light mullioned and transomed window rebated for shutters. W. of this is a 15th-century fireplace with moulded segmental-pointed head, projecting external chimneybreast and a stack, rebuilt in the early 16th century, with a rectangular shaft and a plain rectangular opening at the top of each face, with moulded and embattled capping. In the S. wall of the E. room are two two-light 16th-century windows originally similar to that in the N. wall but with sills deepened at a later date. The W. wall has a 15th-century fireplace with a moulded segmental-pointed head rounded on to the jambs; S. of this is a contemporary doorway with moulded four-centred head leading to the W. room and above it a rough modern opening. The roof of this room is in two bays with wind-braces and a tie-beam roof-truss with arch-braced collar beam.


Canford Manor

Canford Manor

The western room is approached from the E. through a vaulted passage to the S. of the fireplace; the passage has a single-light window in the S. wall and at the W. end a four-centred arch. Above the passage is an upper chamber probably of the 16th century entered from the W. through a doorway with four-centred head; in the N. wall is a chamfered square-headed recess with an old lead pipe embedded in the walling and opening out of the bottom of the recess. At a height of about 10 ft. a slight set-back in the wall face marks the line of the former roof.

N. of the passage in the E. wall of the W. room is a fireplace with segmental-pointed head. On the N. side of the fireplace at first-floor level is a small vaulted chamber entered from the W. through a doorway with four-centred head; the chamber is lit by a small square-headed window in the N. wall. The N. wall of the W. room has a fireplace 20 ft. wide with segmental-pointed head; to the W. is a doorway with four-centred head, continuously moulded jambs, and segmental-pointed rear arch, and at the W. end is a 16th-century three-light window above which is a contemporary transomed window of two lights. The S. wall has two two-light windows similar to those in the E. room and W. of them a blocked doorway with segmental-pointed rear arch. At the W. end of the wall at first-floor level is the E. jamb of a blocked 16th-century doorway. In the W. wall is a doorway with four-centred rear arch. The roof of the W. room (Plate 123) is in four bays with a narrow fifth bay at the W. end, with wind-braces and four 15th century roof-trusses with collars and tie beams, and wall posts springing from stone corbels.

About 30 yds. N.E. of the kitchen is a mediaeval drain outflow in the river bank. This is about 3 ft. high and has a two-centred arch. The drain extends about 20 yds. S. and terminates in a blocked round-headed doorway.

The House is principally of two storeys and attics with towers rising to four storeys. The walls are of gault brickwork with stone dressings and the roofs are covered with slates. The S. front (Plate 137) has near the middle a three-storey semi-octagonal bay with battlemented parapet of c. 1825 marking the former entrance, and W. of it a four-storey octagonal tower of similar date. The walls E. of the bay and the E. return wall appear to be of this date, but the private apartments to the W. are more elaborate in detail and are a reconstruction by Barry of 1876 and earlier. They are marked on the plan published by Rev. A. Barry (1867) as 'Lady Charlotte's room' to the E. and 'Sir John's room' to the W. Sometime after the death of Sir John Guest in 1852 the latter was altered to form a boudoir and ornamented with rococo panelling with a frieze above; only the frieze now survives. Possibly at the same time the E. room was embellished with reused panelling and a timber fireplace surround partly of 19th-century work but with an older upper part dated 1625; this last, which has a central panel containing a royal arms and flanked by round-headed panels divided by Corinthian columns, was brought from a house near Salisbury. (fn. 7) The doors, door-frames and dado of this room incorporate elaborately carved late 15th and early 16th-century panels of English and French workmanship including representations of St. John the Baptist, St. Barbara, St. Michael the Archangel, and the arms of France modern and the Dauphin. Other carved panels, including some in the former smoking room, are of late 17th or 18th-century date and are said to have come from Prague. (fn. 8)

The lofty Hall (61 ft. by 36 ft.) in the S. block, originally approached from the entrance vestibule, later the drawing room, through a doorway at the W. end of its S. wall, was rebuilt c. 1850. It is lit by windows high in the E. and W. gable walls, each of seven cinque-foiled lights with vertical tracery in a four-centred head; each window is blind below a transom and has in the lower part a series of seven cinque-foiled ogee-headed niches originally empty but now filled with full-length historical figures in mosaic. The main lights of the W. window contain fourteen shields-of-arms in stained and painted glass by Hardman, executed in 1850; other glass from this workshop was in the E. window, and the N. window of the staircase, but has since been replaced, the former in 1931 and the latter c. 1885. The roof, in five bays, is supported by six arched-braced trusses springing from carved stone corbels, with wind braces below the purlins and curved braces below a moulded cornice, all with elaborate painted and gilded enrichment. The Drawing Room, S. of the hall, has a flat plaster ceiling with painted decoration of ornamental panels and swags in the Roman manner.

The Entrance Gallery or long gallery evidently existed in some form prior to Barry's alterations but he transformed it into an elaborate corridor between the Victoria Tower and the garden porch which serves as an ante-room to the hall. The plaster ceiling is elaborated with a geometrical pattern of moulded ribs. A fireplace is shown in the 1848 drawings in the W. wall opposite the position of the present fireplace; the latter is richly carved Italian work with enriched brackets and a tapered hood of the late 15th century. The Victoria Tower (Plate 156) has an octagonal stair projection at the S.E. corner which rises above the rest as a battlemented turret; the other angles are masked by square projections capped by lower turrets. In the N., E. and W. faces of the lower stage are four-centred arches with quatre-foiled tracery in the spandrels and surmounted by shields-of-arms, above which are three heights of three-light mullioned windows with shields-of-arms below the upper two and cinque-foiled heads and vertical tracery to the topmost window on each side. The Bell Tower at the N.E. corner of the house next to the kitchen, square on plan, has sculptured animals carrying banners at the corners; the tower is crowned by an octagonal belfry with cinque-foiled lights and a shaped octagonal dome in two stages. The belfry contains a bell by Peter Vanden Ghein with an inscription in Flemish and the date 1592. Nineveh Court, built in 1851, is planned as a Greek cross with gabled arms and porch with two-centred Gothic arch to the S. The outer doors are of timber covered on both faces by an ornamental cast-iron grille. The windows, each of three lights with vertical tracery, are designed in a 15th-century style and contain coloured glass of c. 1851 with formalised patterns partly of eastern derivation. The floor is covered with encaustic tiles; these and the grilles to the doors are decorated with Assyrian motifs.

The Stables and Coach-houses, partly rebuilt in 1963, lie S.W. of the house around a rectangular courtyard. The Lodge N.W. of the house, with arched entrance, bell turret on the N. and lodge-keeper's cottage on the S., was built c. 1850 and later extended to the S. South Lodge, 1,040 yds. S. of the house, was built in 1850 and has a shield with this date in the W. gable and a shield-of-arms in the original E. gable; the lodge was at first of two rooms but was doubled in size by additions to the N. in the late 19th century. S.E. of South Lodge are a pair of stone gate piers and three pairs of wrought-iron gates with intermediate wrought-iron standards and scrolled overthrows of the late 18th century. They were removed from a site nearer the house in 1936.

Monuments (31–360)

Unless otherwise described, the buildings are of two storeys with or without attics, with brick walls, some rendered, and roofs covered with slates or tiles, and of the early to mid 19th century.

The streets in the centre of Poole are listed in alphabetical order, and their position on the town map (in end pocket) is indicated by references in brackets after each street name.

dBaiter Street (C4)

(All demolished)

The section E. of South Road stands on the site of Baiter Green (Hutchins, 1st ed. I, map opp. 1); in 1888 it formed the E. half of East Street and more recently was known as Pound Street. The road was laid out in the early 19th century and developed with cheap speculative housing of varying types in the first half of that century, the N. side probably being developed first.

Monument (33) dated 1820 was amongst the earliest to be built; Monuments (35) and (37) attempt a modest degree of elegance, the remainder are of little merit.


Castle Street, New Street, Thames Street

Castle Street, New Street, Thames Street

N. side

(31) Terrace of three single-fronted cottages, Nos. 3–7. Nos. 5 and 7 are entered from a common passage.

(32) Terrace of four cottages, Nos. 13–19.

(33) Terrace of six cottages, Nos. 21–31, of two storeys and attics at the front and one and attics at the rear, has a tiled roof. On the S. wall is a stone tablet inscribed 'G.H. 1820', the date of erection. The individual cottages are one room wide and two deep and planned in alternating pairs with windows adjacent. At the E. end is an arched passage to a garden at the rear; the latter is shown on the 1888 O.S. map as a communal garden (67 ft. by 85 ft.) divided by paths into six plots and with a pump and two pairs of privies.

(34) Cottage, No. 33.

(35) Gray's Place, a terrace of three houses, Nos. 37–41, is of three storeys and has a hipped roof. Protecting the ground-floor doorways and windows is a verandah with a slate-covered lean-to roof; each house has a single hung-sash window to each floor at the front with blind windows between the houses. The front is set back behind cast-iron railings terminated by brick piers with ball finials.

(36) Cottages, Nos. 43, 45, were built as a single doublefronted cottage, one room in depth, which was subsequently divided and extended to the rear.

(37) Houses, a pair, No. 47 and No. 2 South Road ('Baiter House'), are of two storeys and attics with a half-hipped slate-covered roof. They are set back from the street and have a ground-floor verandah at the front with Gothic trelliswork.

S. side

(38) Cottages, three, Nos. 58–62.

dBallard Road (C4)

(Formerly the E. end of East Quay Road)

(39) Terrace of four cottages, Nos. 1–4 Marine Cottages, was built in the early 19th century; Nos. 2 and 3 may have been built first and later extended. The S. and W. walls have been rendered in stucco. (Demolished)

(40) House, No. 6, formerly 'Marine Villa', of two storeys with rendered walls and a slate-covered roof, was built in the mid 19th century. The house faces S.E. and has a symmetrical elevation; the garden, now reduced in size, originally extended 100 yds. to the N.N.E.

dBarbers Piles (C1)

N. side

(41) Houses, two, with stone walls refronted in rendered brickwork and a slate-covered roof, were built in the 17th century, perhaps as one house, and drastically altered in the late 18th century. (Demolished)

S. side

(42) Terrace of four cottages, Nos. 22–28, was built in the late 18th century. Each cottage is single-fronted; the doorways have flat hoods with shaped brackets. (Demolished)

d Bay Hog Lane (B1)

(All demolished)

S. side (elevations opp. p. 235)

(43) Houses, Nos. 1, 2, were built in the late 18th century.

(44) House, No. 7, with a verge of stone slates to the roof, was built in the mid 18th century. The symmetrical front elevation is in header bond; the central doorway has a pedimented hood carried by shaped brackets.

The plan (p. 216) is L-shaped with a central hall and staircase flanked by two rooms, with one room at the back in which is a secondary stair; the absence of any original windows at the rear of the house is notable. Many original fittings survive.

(45) Cottage, No. 8, immediately E. of the above and a continuation of the same elevation, was built in the late 18th century filling the space between Nos. 7 and 9; the front wall is in header-bond brickwork.


Roof Construction in Poole

Roof Construction in Poole


Eighteenth-Century Mansion Houses in Poole

Eighteenth-Century Mansion Houses in Poole

(46) Cottage, No. 9, of two storeys to the N. and one storey with cellar and attic to the S., is timber-framed above a stone plinth and has been partly refronted in brickwork and rendered.

It was built in the early 16th century as a house of three bays with the chimney-stack and staircase in the central bay; in the S. bay was the hall above a cellar and with attic space above; the N. bay, rebuilt in the early 18th century, probably comprised a ground-floor room and solar above. Original framing remains in the W. wall of the S. bay; it has square panels in one of which is a diagonal brace. The hall ceiling is divided by chamfered beams into four rectangular panels; at the N. end of the room the tie beam of the roof truss is exposed and the joints of the wall-posts strengthened with short braces. The truss, which had a collar and two queen posts, has been partly destroyed; a curved wind brace remains between the two purlins in the S. corner of the roof. The hall fireplace has an early 18th-century bolection-moulded architrave.


No. 9 Bay Hog Lane, Poole (46)

No. 9 Bay Hog Lane, Poole (46)

(47) Cottages, three. No. 10, S. of the above, was built in the late 18th century and has one room on each floor. Nos. 11, 12, E. of Monument (46), with a front wall in English-bond brickwork, were built in the mid 19th century.

dBeaconsfield Terrace (B3)

(1888: part of Waterloo Buildings)

(48) Terrace of four single-fronted cottages at the E. end of Waterloo Buildings was built in the mid 19th century. (Demolished)

dBennett's Alley (C2)

(49) Boundary Wall of brickwork laid to English bond, standing about 7 ft. high and now incorporated in a later building; early 18th-century.

dBlue Boar Lane (C2)

(1774: Pellys Lane) (All demolished)

E. side

(50) Cottages, Nos. 1, 3, 5, were built in the mid 19th century. Nos. 1 and 3 are double-fronted, all have hung-sash windows with segmental-arched brick heads.

W. side

(51) Cottages, Nos. 2, 4, 6, and Nos. 19, 21 Strand Street, are single-fronted and of similar date and construction to the foregoing.

(52) Cottages, pair, Nos. 12, 14, with a verge of stone slates to the roof, were built in the third quarter of the 18th century. The brickwork of the front is in glazed headers with red brick dressings to the jambs of doorways and windows. They were, perhaps, built as a single house and divided into two single-fronted cottages in the 19th century.

(53) House, No. 16, with a verge of stone slates to the roof, was built in the early 18th century. The front elevation, which is symmetrical, has a central doorway with flat canopy supported by shaped wooden brackets and flanked by segmental-arched windows with hung sashes set flush with the wall face. There are similar windows to the first floor and a blind window above the door. The front wall is laid in Flemish bond brickwork and has a coved plaster cornice.

The ground-floor plan (p. 216) originally comprised an entrance directly into the northernmost of two rooms, divided by a partition of fielded panelling with which the other walls of the S. room were also lined; a separate passage was constructed in the 19th century. The two attic rooms are approached by separate staircases from the first floor. Many original fittings remain.

dCaroline Row (C2)

(All demolished)

W. side

(54) Terrace of five single-fronted cottages with mansard roofs.

(55) Terrace, immediately S. of the above, of eight single-fronted cottages arranged in symmetrical pairs; the front doorways and ground-floor windows have segmental-arched heads.

E. side

(56) Warehouse, with brick dentil cornice and tiled mansard roof, was built c. 1800. The roof purlins are supported by a truss comprising a pair of cruck-like principal rafters curved to the shape of the mansard.


Smaller Double-Fronted Houses of the 18th & 19th Centuries in Poole

Smaller Double-Fronted Houses of the 18th & 19th Centuries in Poole

dCastle Street (C2)

(1774, 1888: Fish Street)

N.E. side (elevations opp. p. 213)

(57) Cottage, No. 19, partly of one storey and attics, incorporates in the N. wall, forming the S. wall of No. 21, a cruck truss (p. 213) with tie beam and two collars and a spur tie visible on the W. side. No other late mediaeval features are apparent in the cottage. A doorway with ogee-moulded head and jambs was inserted in the lower part of the N. wall in the 16th century and subsequently blocked; in the late 18th century the cottage was divided, the S. part being raised to two storeys and embellished with a door-frame with pedimented head. (Cottage demolished)

(58) Warehouse, No. 21, of two storeys with walls of coursed rubble, is of 15th or early 16th-century date. It has in the centre of the W. wall a doorway with chamfered stone jambs and springing for a pointed arch of which the upper part has been rebuilt. The first floor is supported by chamfered beams. The window openings are modern.

(59) House, No. 23, was built in the late 17th or early 18th century. It retains an original fireplace with moulded and eared architrave, a staircase with turned balusters and a large brick chimney-stack. (Demolished)


Nos. 27, 29 Castle Street, Poole (60–1)

Nos. 27, 29 Castle Street, Poole (60–1)

(60) House (1888: 'County Court Offices'), No. 27, was built in the 16th century. The walls were originally timber-framed but only a small fragment remains in the back wall at the S.E. end. The 16th-century roof structure survives largely intact and is in six bays with curved wind braces between a pair of purlins on each side and trusses with cambered tie beams and collars. A three-light window with timber mullions survives in the back wall at first-floor level; the mullions are ovolo-moulded externally and ogee-moulded internally. In the S.E. room of the front range is a wide bolection-moulded fireplace of the late 17th century. In the late 18th or early 19th century the walls were encased or largely rebuilt in brickwork, the staircase standing beyond the line of the original back wall was redesigned, and wings were built at the rear. N.E. of the S.E. wing is the shell of a stone building approximately 42½ ft. by 21¼ ft. which retains no datable features but may be of the 17th century. (Demolished)

(61) House, No. 29, was built in the 16th century and retains contemporary roof trusses with evidence of collars, possibly with braces below. The back wall is of stone but the front wall, perhaps originally timber-framed, was rebuilt in brick in the 19th century. Few original features survive internally. On the ground floor are two rooms with exposed ceiling beams and a fireplace in the N.W. room. (Demolished)

(62) Wall, behind No. 31, of rubble with one end corbelled out 1½ ft., is the N.E. gable wall of a building perhaps of the 16th-century. The N.W. wall was evidently timber-framed with a jetty at first-floor level masked at the N.E. end by the existing stone corbelling. (Cf. Black Dog p.h., Weymouth, Monument (173).) (Demolished)

S.W. side (elevations opp. p. 213)

(63) House, No. 10, with an entrance in Strand Street, is of three storeys with a cellar and has a low-pitched hipped roof. It was built c. 1800 and has round-arched door and window heads to the ground floor, the latter set back in semicircular-headed recesses and with impost mouldings continued around both exposed faces of the building. In the S. wall are traces of the gable of a 17th-century building of stone which formerly lay to the S.

(64) House with shop, No. 12, with front wall in header bond brickwork, was built in the mid 18th century. (Demolished)

(65) Houses, pair, Nos. 14, 16 (Plate 125), were built in the late 18th century, probably on the site of the S. room of a 16th-century Inn (see Monument (67) below). The houses are identical in plan (p. 218) with two rooms on each floor separated by a central staircase. The basements each contain two heated rooms, one with a copper. (Demolished)

(66) House, No. 18 (Plate 125), of three storeys with a basement, was built in the early 19th century. It appears to have replaced 18th-century work of which traces of a former staircase survive in a cavity in the party wall with No. 20 (plan p. 218). A mid 18th-century fireplace has been reset in the basement together with some linenfold panelling from the former Inn of which this formed a part (see Monument (67) below). (Demolished)


14–22 Castle Street, Poole

14–22 Castle Street, Poole

(67) House, with shop, and Rising Sun p.h., Nos. 20 and 22 (Plate 125), and outbuildings to the W. (plan p. 218), incorporate portions of a late 16th-century inn with stone walls, stone-slated roofs partly re-covered in tile and slate, and with the remains of a timber-framed gallery at the rear. By analogy with similar buildings elsewhere (e.g. The New Inn, Cerne Abbas (16), Dorset I) the building probably comprised three rooms on the ground floor with an entrance passage, and at least one large room on the upper floor together with smaller chambers. The inner parlour on the ground floor is represented by the lower room of No. 22 and a larger ground-floor hall by the corresponding room of No. 20; the latter may have extended into the site of No. 18 but it is likely that a passage also existed on part of this site and that Nos. 14 and 16 occupy the site of a minor room beyond the passage. Both the existing ground-floor rooms have original fireplaces. A timber gallery survives at the rear of No. 20 at a lower level than the first floor. The upper rooms must have been approached from the gallery by steps up to a pair of timber-framed doorways one of which survives. The N. doorway led to a narrow ante-room divided from the room to its S. by a timber-framed partition, and thence to an inner heated room on the first floor of No. 22. The doorway to the S. gave access to a larger room with an open truss, only part of which remains; it had chamfered arched braces below a collar. The outbuildings which may have served as a kitchen and other offices were originally of a single storey and were of similar length and approximately parallel to the front range.

In the 17th century a wing was added at the back of No. 22 with access from the gallery. In the following century the Inn appears to have suffered from a movement of the political and social centre of the town exemplified in the replacement of the Town Hall and prison built in 1572, (fn. 9) formerly standing in Fish Street, by the present Guildhall in Market Street in 1761. Thereafter the property came to be divided into a number of separate houses. Nos. 14 and 16, and No. 18 represent two phases of this work, each a rebuilding of part of the former Inn. Nos. 20 and 22 were divided and No. 20 included a shop on the ground floor. The ale-house functions of the Inn were apparently continued but eventually confined to No. 22. The outbuildings were partly rebuilt and divided to serve the new tenements at the front, except that behind No. 22 which was converted into a cottage in the 18th century.

No. 20 has an original doorway in the back wall with chamfered jambs and relieving arch, but the head has been destroyed; the doorway between Nos. 20 and 22 has a four-centred head and chamfered jambs with pyramidal stops. The original fireplace retains its relieving arch and jambs but the head was removed when the floor level was raised in the 18th century. The front wall of the ground floor was removed in the 18th century and replaced by a pair of bow-fronted shop windows and the upper wall supported by iron columns and timber beams. This room was divided in the 18th century by a bricknogged partition to the S. and a staircase inserted on the W. side; it was then lined with reused linenfold panelling. The original ceiling was supported by joists which followed the camber of the soffit of the main beams; it was plastered and divided into a geometrical pattern by moulded oak ribs some of which remain above the staircase lobby. The upper floor at the front is divided into two rooms by an original timber-framed wattle and daub partition, pierced by a late 18th-century doorway. Both rooms have 18th-century sash windows at the front. The original doorways from the gallery, of which that to the N. survives, were a pair and had oak frames with four-centred heads. The gallery retains the principal timbers of its W. wall at first-floor level and evidently had a line of windows in the upper part of this wall.

The Rising Sun, No. 22, has in the E. wall an original bay window of stone of two storeys with straight-chamfered and beaded mullions. The ground-floor room at the front had a fireplace with chamfered jambs, most of which has been destroyed; the fireplace in the upper room retains its four-centred head and chamfered jambs with pyramidal stops but has been fitted with a smaller fireplace in the 18th century.

The outbuildings have been very much altered but contain some original work. That behind No. 20 has ogee stone heads to the door and window. (Demolished)

(68) Houses, Nos. 24, 26 (Plate 125), were built in the early 18th-century against the N. wall of the Rising Sun as a single dwelling with two rooms on each floor (plan p. 216). This was divided in the early 19th century and the front wall was rebuilt with doorways at each end and apparently a two-storey bay window to each house; both the latter have since been replaced and shop windows inserted. The interior retains some doorcases with egg-and-dart enrichment and an original fireplace with pulvinated frieze and moulded and enriched cornice. (Demolished)

(69) Houses, Nos. 28–38 (even), were built in the late 18th and 19th centuries. Nos. 28 (Plate 125), 36 and 38 face the street and are of three storeys with cellars and mansard attics. Nos. 28 and 36 were built first and flank a passage to a courtyard at the back. No. 38 is of generally similar form. Nos. 32 and 34, of early 19th-century date, are cottages of one storey with mansard attics, in English bond brickwork, standing on the N. side of the courtyard behind No. 38; on the W. side is a further cottage, No. 30, built in the late 19th century. (Demolished)

(70) House, No. 40, was built in the late 18th century; the front wall, in header bond brickwork, is in five bays with the original doorway beneath a blind window in the centre bay. A shop window and second doorway were added in the early 19th century. (Demolished)

(71) Houses, Nos. 42, 44, were built in the late 18th century and may have formed one house with a central doorway. The upper part of the front wall is now carried by a timber bressummer below which are two early 19th-century shop windows; flanking the latter are two round-headed and pedimented doorways of similar date. (Demolished)

dChapel Lane (A3)

(1774: Pound Lane)

(72) Cottages, seventeen, Nos. 3–19 (odd) on N. and 2–8, 18–24 (even) on S. side. Nos. 3 and 5 were built first and have a brick dentil cornice, front doorways with moulded architraves and pediments, and windows under segmental brick heads; all the cottages are single fronted and grouped in terraces. (Demolished)

dChurch Street (C1,2)

N.W. side (elevations opp. p. 229)

(73) Houses, Nos. 2, 4, 6, of three storeys with cellars and attics, are taller than most buildings of this character in Poole. The doorcases at the front of Nos. 4 and 6 have reeded mouldings below the fanlights and on the door panels. No. 2 formerly had a shop window facing the street, now replaced by a close-set pair of segmental-headed windows.

(74) House, No. 8, was built in the early 18th century; a shop window, now replaced, was added to the front in the late 19th century. The front wall is in header bond brickwork with red brick quoins and reveals. At first-floor level is a platband of four courses and below the eaves is a moulded brick dentil cornice. There is a verge of stone slates to the roof. The front and rear walls are not parallel, the deeper and larger rooms being to the S.W. of the entrance passage. N.E. of this is a small room at the front and an even smaller one at the rear; all ground-floor rooms except the last have corner fireplaces. The staircase is at the back of the house. Some moulded ceiling cornices and much original panelling remains.

(75) Cottages, pair, Nos. 10, 12, have a front wall in Flemish bond brickwork with a plat-band and moulded wood eaves cornice of the early 18th century, but from the general low proportions of the building it may be of earlier origin, perhaps a single house of the late 16th or 17th century, later refronted in brickwork and converted into a pair of cottages. Each of these had large segmental-headed windows to the ground floor but that to No. 12 was altered when the position of the front door was changed.

(76) House, No. 14, with a stone-slate verge to the roof, was built in the early 18th century. It has a plat-band at first-floor level and a coved and moulded eaves cornice. The central window above the door has been blocked but perhaps retains its original wooden frame; the other windows have all been renewed.

S.E. side (elevations opp. p. 229)

(77) Houses, Nos. 1, 3, have a rear wall partly of coursed rubble, perhaps of earlier date than the rest of the building, and including a tall narrow loop as for a barn. The houses were built in the 18th century; the front doorway to No. 1 appears to have shared a common cornice with its flanking windows; other windows are regularly spaced and have segmental heads and flush hung sashes. The roof (p. 213) is supported by a series of collar-beam trusses strengthened at the junctions between the collars and principal rafters by large curved wooden braces bolted to the soffit.

(78) House, No. 9, is largely of c. 1700 but may be built on earlier foundations and incorporates the roughly coursed squared rubble of an older house in the rear wall. The house is noteworthy in that it retains most of the fittings of c. 1700.

The front wall is in Flemish bond brickwork with a tall plinth, plat-band at first-floor level and moulded and coved plaster eaves cornice. The original door surrounds have gone; windows have flat-arched heads of gauged brickwork and flush hung sashes with original soft-wood glazing bars. In the centre of the rear wall is a large chimneybreast incorporating much masonry in the lower half; the upper part in English bond brickwork incorporates the conjoined initials M D in glazed headers. Where not of stone the remainder of the wall is also in English bond, with 9 in. brick segmental-arched heads to three windows. The plan (p. 216) has a separate through passage at the W. end, a central doorway opening into a small lobby and a wooden newel stair, much repaired, in the S.E. corner of the building. On all floors the partitions are of vertical plank and muntin panelling. The plaster ceilings of the first-floor rooms are decorated with irregularly arranged embossed paterae.

(79) Blenheim House, No. 31, was built about the middle of the 18th century; the front wall is in header-bond brickwork with a serrated brick eaves cornice; the roof has a verge of stone slates.

(80) St. George's Almshouses are of one storey with walls of coursed rubble, brick chimneys and a tiled roof with a verge of stone slates. The almshouses are a mediaeval foundation, referred to in 1429 (Hutchins, I, 65), which was originally the property of the Guild of St. George; in the 16th century the property passed to the Corporation of Poole. The building has been much altered but may date from the early 15th century. In the 3rd edition of Hutchins (1861) it is stated that 'the lower part of the walls are portions of the first erection, on which a projecting timber storey was afterwards built, and this again so cut away by modern alterations as to be recognised with difficulty'. In 1904 the building was drastically restored and no trace of the 'timber storey' remains. Prior to restoration, the building had, facing Church Street, a series of doorways and two dormers and four small casement windows to the attics.


Elevation to Church Street Before 1904

Elevation to Church Street Before 1904

The W. wall has six modern windows but retains in the lower part some slight indications of straight joints and blocking; the wall has an exposed timber wall-plate. In the centre of this front are two gables, perhaps of 17th-century date, in English-bond brickwork with small patterns in glazed headers; above each gable is a pair of chimneystacks rising from a rectangular base. The S. wall is gabled and has near the W. end a small stone niche with pointed head. The interior has been greatly altered, but the roof retains old trusses with tie beams, cambered collars and wind braces below the upper of two purlins.

dCinnamon Lane (C2)

N.W. side

No. 1 Cinnamon Lane—see Monument (235)

(81) House, No. 5, with cellars and with a stone-slate verge to the roof, was built in the late 18th century. It is one room in width, has segmental-headed windows and a blind window above the doorway. The architrave of the front doorway is a recent addition.

(82) House, No. 6, with rendered walls and a mansard roof with verge of stone slates, was built in the early 18th century. It is double-fronted and has a plat-band at first-floor level. The single dormer window has shaped cheeks.

S.E. side

(83) House, No. 7, and adjacent Building to the W. have front walls of header-bond brickwork. The latter was built in the mid 18th century and has a moulded timber eaves cornice. The former, added in the later 18th century, has a serrated brick eaves cornice and a mansard roof. The outer doorways have similar pedimented architraves of the date of the later house.

dEast Street (B, C3)

(1774: Baiter Lane) (All demolished)

(84) Cottages, Nos. 9, 11, with a verge of stone slates to the roof, were built in the early 19th century as a coach house (No. 9) and a tenement and soon afterwards converted to their present form. The cottages are entered from a common passage.

(85) Cottages, Nos. 13, 15, were built c. 1830; the brickwork is in English bond. They are single-fronted but unusually wide; each has a front door under a semicircular-arched head in two orders enclosing a blind fanlight; the windows to the ground floor have flat-arched brick heads.

(86) Cottage, No. 17, with a lean-to roof, was built in the mid 19th century against the side of No. 23 and is separated from No. 15 by a high brick wall incorporating a pair of brick gate-piers with stone capping.

(87) Cottage, No. 23, is single-fronted and was built in the mid 19th century.

dEast Quay Road (C3)

N. side

(88) House, No. 2, formerly Sailor's Home p.h., with rendered walls and a half-hipped mansard roof, was built at the end of the 18th century. The front is in three bays with semicircular-arched heads and keystones to the upper windows; the parapet has a raised stucco panel with the name of the Inn incised in bold characters and with jugs and other emblems in relief. (Demolished)

Fish Street (see Castle Street)

dGreen Road (B, C4)

(1774, 1880: Green Lane)

Buildings on the W. side were erected in the early 19th century and were followed by those on the E. side in the mid 19th century.

E. side

(89) Houses, pair, Nos. 17, 19, have a hipped roof of low pitch. Each house is single-fronted, two rooms in depth with a scullery wing behind and has a ground-floor verandah to the W. (Demolished)

(90) Terrace of four houses, Nos. 75–81, with rendered walls and low-pitched roof, has a wooden verandah on the S. side which formerly extended around the W. and N. sides. The W. elevation comprises alternating doorways and windows, with windows above; six of the thirteen windows and two of the five doorways are blind.

(91) House, No. 109 (1888: 'Foundry Cottage'), with rendered walls and low-pitched roof, has a symmetrical front.

W. side (all demolished):—

(92) Cottages, pair, Nos. 36, 38, are single-fronted and have rendered walls and a brick dentil cornice.

(93) House, No. 44, is double-fronted with a central doorway under a semicircular-arched head with blind fanlight and blind window above; the windows have flat-arched brick heads.

(94) Terrace, of six cottages Nos. 48–58, have rendered walls. Each cottage is single-fronted; Nos. 56 and 58 are of a different phase of build.

(95) Terrace, of three single-fronted cottages Nos. 68–72, has rendered walls and a low-pitched roof.

dHigh Street (C2–A4)

Unless otherwise described Monuments in High Street are of two storeys, some with cellars and attics, and have brick walls and tiled roofs; the roofs frequently have verges of stone slates; many were built in the early 19th century as private houses but most now have modern shop fronts to the ground floor.

N.W. side

(96) King's Head p.h., with rendered walls of rubble and brick, was built in the mid 16th century; it was much altered and refitted in the 18th century and later and the front wall entirely refenestrated. The original building comprised a front range and a rear wing at the S.W. end; on both of these the original roof structure survives.

The roof of the front range (p. 213) is in six bays with shaped wind braces and trusses with cambered collars and tie beams. The roof of the wing is in three bays with similar trusses but without wind braces. Numerous carpenter's assembly marks are visible on the roof timbers and on the original ceiling joists framed between the tie beams.

(97) The Antelope Hotel was built in the 16th century and remodelled in the 18th century with a front range of two storeys and mansard attics later refaced in brick and heightened to three storeys in the early 19th century. Some 16th-century details survive in the range at the S.W. end at right angles to the street which forms, in part, the present rear wing; these include two fireplaces, one with a large roughly-shaped lintel of Purbeck marble, and a second with shaped corbels supporting a hollow-chamfered lintel. Some exposed ceiling beams and a fragment of stone cusping also remain in this wing.

(98) House, No. 10, was built in the 16th century and retains a roof structure of this period in six bays; the roof trusses have tie beams, cambered collars and queen-struts. At the S.W. end of the front range is a carriage entrance above which the floor is carried by stop-chamfered beams. The building was extended to the rear and refronted in the early 19th century and it retains a doorway of this date (Plate 131).

(99) Shop and Offices, Nos. 12, 14, with walls of rubble and timber framing, were built as a single house in the 16th century. The building comprises a front range facing the street and two wings at the back partly enclosing an open courtyard (Plate 123). The S.E. elevation was refenestrated and rendered in the early 19th century and retains a shop front of this date.

The rear wall of the front range projects into the courtyard as a staircase wing; this is timber-framed with a slight jetty at first-floor level and a gable with carved barge boards; a long window to the upper floor has moulded wood mullions. The N.W. wing is of rubble in its lower storey but timber-framed above, the lower walling being an alteration perhaps of the 17th century. The S.W. wing at the opposite side of the courtyard is of stone and may represent the rebuilding of an earlier wing also in the 17th century. The interior of No. 14 retains on the first floor a plaster ceiling with moulded ribs forming a pattern of quatrefoils enclosing quartered squares and with foliage bosses and intermediate ornament of floral and animal forms and a double-headed eagle with shield and merchant's mark T B for Thomas Bingley (fl. c. 1570). In the first floor of No. 12 in the S.W. gable wall is a stone fireplace with four-centred lintel. The roofs are supported by ten trusses of 16th and 17th-century dates, some (Fig. p. 213) with cambered collars and tie beams.


Single-Fronted Houses of the 18th & 19th Centuries in Poole

Single-Fronted Houses of the 18th & 19th Centuries in Poole

(100) House with shop, No. 20, is superficially of early 19th-century date but retains traces of an earlier roof structure with cambered tie beams and collars. It may embody 16th-century features beneath the later work.

(101) Shop, No. 22, in Flemish bond brickwork, was built c. 1800.

(102) Shops, two, formerly a pair of houses, Nos. 24, 26, of two storeys with cellars and attics, were built in the mid 18th century. The front wall is in header bond brickwork with a serrated brick eaves cornice. Front doorways are paired and have flat hoods supported by shaped brackets. No. 24 (plan p. 222) retains in the front ground-floor room an original fitted cupboard with glazed doors in the centre and fielded panelled doors at the sides.

(103) Shop, former house, No. 28, was built in the early 18th century; it was altered internally and the rear wing extended in the early 19th century. The front wall is in glazed header bond brickwork with red brick dressings and a moulded brick eaves cornice; the ground-floor openings have been replaced by a shop front, the upper floor has four flat-arched windows with keystones. The plan (p. 216) is L-shaped with two rooms at the front on each floor, and a dog-leg staircase against the back wing. The interior retains many original features.

(104) Houses with shops, Nos. 30, 32, are rendered at the front. They were built in the 16th or early 17th century and extensively altered and refronted in the 18th century and later; little remains visible of the earlier work except for the roof structure, chamfered stone door jambs in the back wall, and part of a stone-mullioned window in the S.W. wall with moulded label and square stop, partly covered by No. 28. The roof of No. 30 is in seven bays and has trusses with cambered tie beams and collars and evidence of brackets below the ends of the tie beams, perhaps indicating a junction between the tie beams and vertical posts of a timber-framed building. The doorways to Nos. 30 and 32 are similar with fluted half-columns and caps supporting entablature blocks and open pediments with blind fanlights (Plate 131).

(105) Houses with shops, Nos. 34, 36, and No. 1 New Street, each of three storeys, were built c. 1830.

(106) Offices, Nos. 40, 42, facing the old Corn Market, of three storeys and attics with rendered walls and a slate-covered roof, were built in the mid 19th century; the ground floor has been refaced in stone. The first-floor windows are linked by an arcade of six round arches with moulded imposts.

(107) Shops, three, No. 48 and part of No. 46, were built as a single house in the 16th century but much altered and divided in the mid 18th century to form two houses. The front wall retains an 18th-century moulded cornice and parapet and four windows with moulded architraves and keystones to the first floor. The 16th-century roof structure which survives is of seven bays with trusses with cambered tie beams and collars. One of the first-floor rooms has a plaster ceiling divided into squares by moulded ribs.

(108) Shops, Nos. 50, 50a, were built c., 1800, perhaps as a house of two storeys, later raised to three storeys and attics.

(109) Café, at N.W. corner of New Orchard, with a rendered front wall, rusticated quoins, moulded cornice and parapet, was built in the 18th century; the ground floor was converted for use as a shop in the late 19th century. The first floor has at the front three windows with moulded architraves and triple keystones; the single dormer window has moulded cheeks.

(110) House with shop, No. 70, of three storeys with a slate-covered roof, has brick pilasters inset at each end of the frontage.

(111) House with shop, No. 78, is a fragment of a house of which the N.E. end has been rebuilt. The original building was erected between 1755 and 1758 (fn. 10) and appears largely unaltered in a photograph of 1896 in Poole Museum. This shows it to have been of five bays with ground-floor windows under semi-circular heads with keystones, and first-floor windows with segmental heads with keystones. The angles of the elevation were embellished with quoins and the wall was capped by a moulded cornice and parapet. The surviving portion is in header bond brickwork; parts of two of the original first-floor windows remain.

(112) House with shop, No. 82, was built in the early 18th century, slightly altered c. 1790 and a shop front added in recent times. The original first-floor windows have plain architraves with keystones and above them is a block cornice and parapet.

The London Hotel, N. of the above, has been rebuilt; it was formerly of three storeys in header bond brickwork with a block cornice below the eaves and windows with flat-arched heads with triple keystones; it was built in the mid 18th century.

(113) Shops, Nos. 90, 92, of three storeys, were built in the mid 18th century as one or perhaps two houses. The front wall is in header bond brickwork with red brick dressings, stone quoins and a block cornice below the eaves. The front elevation is of five bays; over the central bay is a small gable enclosing the semicircular head of the central second-floor window; other windows have flat-arched heads with triple keystones. The ground floor was converted into shops in the 19th century.

(114) Shop, No. 94, formerly a house, of three storeys, was built in the early 19th century; the original front doorway survives and has a semicircular-headed opening with fanlight, flanked by attached columns supporting a dentilled cornice and pediment.

(115) Shops, No. 96, were built as a house in the early 18th century. The front wall is faced with a light-coloured brick with red brick dressings and has a plat-band in place of a cornice and a parapet with ogee-headed panels above the windows. The original lead rain water heads survive. The interior has been much altered but the upper flight of the staircase remains.

(116) Shop, No. 98, of three storeys, was built between 1817 and 1819 (fn. 11) as a private house. The front elevation is of three bays with plat-bands at the floor levels and a moulded cornice and parapet.

(117) Barclay's Bank, No. 100 (Plate 129), was built in the mid 18th century. It is of importance for the largely unaltered front elevation with a giant order and brick details; this, which is in glazed header-bond brickwork with red brick dressings, is in five bays with pilasters flanking the central bay and at each end of the façade. The pilasters carry entablature blocks with triglyphs and a moulded dentil-cornice which extends horizontally across the elevation except in the central bay where it rises to form a pediment. Below the pediment is an elliptical-arched window over the front doorway with an arched head of similar form; other windows have flat-arched heads and all have brick aprons with dropped ends. The interior retains some original panelling.

(118) House, No. 102, with a low-pitched slate-covered roof, is set back slightly from the adjacent buildings; the front elevation is in Flemish-bond brickwork with fine joints and has deeply overhanging eaves. The front doorway has a projecting porch with a flat head supported by columns and to each side a semi-circular-headed window. In front of the first-floor windows is a balcony with cast-iron balustrade.

The ground floor (plan p. 216) has a segmental-ended staircase hall at the rear approached through a passage.

(Ground floor gutted)

(119) Shops, Nos. 136–140, 144–152 (even), were built in the late 18th century but have been much altered. Nos. 140 and 148–150 are in header bond brickwork.

(120) Shops, Nos. 176, 178, are continuous with Nos. 50 and 52 Towngate Street (Monument 287), but the original mansard roof has been partly rebuilt.

(121) Shops, Nos. 186, 188, date principally from the 18th century but have been much altered.

S.E. side

(122) Warehouses, of three storeys, with segmental-headed windows and a serrated brick cornice, were built in the late 18th century. The ground floor has been converted to shops.

(123) Houses with shops, Nos. 21–27, with walls of coursed rubble with some timber framing and later brickwork, and with roofs covered in slates, tiles and stone slates, were built in the late 16th century and much altered in the late 18th and 19th centuries. It is not certain on the available evidence whether they were originally occupied as a whole or divided into two parts: Nos. 21–25 all contain rooms with ceilings divided into patterns of squares, diamonds or hexagons by moulded oak ribs; Nos. 21 and 25 have original rear wings with stone-mullioned windows and traces of a third wing remain behind No. 27. The wing behind No. 25 has been partly demolished; the surviving portion has a timber-framed wall to the N.E. with an original timber-mullioned window on the ground floor and a gallery at first-floor level in front of it which evidently formerly extended the full length of the wing. At the S.E. end of the passage between Nos. 25 and 27 is a stone doorway with a four-centred lintel. The presence of the gallery suggests that the building may have been occupied in part at least as an inn. (Nos. 21 and 23 demolished)


Nos. 21 & 23 High Street

Nos. 21 & 23 High Street

(124) Bell and Crown p.h., was built of stone in the 17th century, and some original walling survives at the rear. It was largely rebuilt in brick in the late 18th and 19th centuries. The S. part is faced in header bond brickwork.

(125) Houses, Nos. 31, 33, with slate-covered roofs have front doorways under elliptical heads with moulded imposts. The ground floor has recessed flat-fronted bow windows.

(126) Shop, No. 35, has a single window to the first floor with a flat-arched head and keystone; the lower floor has been refronted and incorporated into Monument (127).

(127) Shop, No. 37, was built as a private house in the second half of the 18th century. The front is of five bays with a moulded cornice, the wall, now rendered, is in header bond brickwork. The front doorway was in the middle bay but all ground-floor openings have been replaced by a modern shop front. First-floor windows have flat heads with keystones.

(128) Shop, No. 39, of two storeys with a modern flat roof was largely rebuilt or refronted in the mid 18th century perhaps as a private house. The front wall is in header bond brickwork and has a 19th-century shop front and five 18th-century windows with moulded architraves and shaped keystones each with a moulded capping. The interior retains several moulded ceiling beams of the 16th century. (Demolished)

(129) Shops, Nos. 41, 43, with a rendered front wall, were built as a single house in the 18th century or earlier and were refronted in the mid 19th century. (Demolished)

(130) Cottage, No. 45, of one storey and attics with a rendered front wall and roof with verge of stone slates, was built before the middle of the 17th century. (Demolished)

(131) Houses with shops, two, Nos. 47, 49, with rendered front walls and roofs covered with stone slates at the rear and with verges of the same material at the front, were built in the 17th century but much altered in the 18th century and later. The original walls were of rubble. No. 49 retains a moulded ceiling beam and a staircase with turned balusters of the late 17th century. The 18th-century front elevations are each of four bays with shops in the lower storey. (Demolished)

(132) Houses with shops, Nos. 51, 53, are of three storeys with a hipped slate-covered roof. (Demolished)

(133) House, No. 57, with hipped mansard attics, was built in the late 18th century but refronted in the following century. (Demolished)

(134) Houses with shops, Nos. 63, 65, were built as a single structure in the 17th century, and two rear wings were added in the late 18th century and later. The front range has a stone back wall, but the upper part of this and the whole of the front wall have been rebuilt in brick.

(135) Shop, No. 71, with a slated roof, was built in the late 17th or early 18th century and comprised a range facing the street and a rear wing: the latter was extended in the early 19th century. The front range has a moulded brick coping to the S.W. gable.

(136) Offices, formerly The Bull's Head Inn, and adjacent house, Nos. 73, 75, with walls of rubble partly rebuilt in brick and rendered at the front, were built as a single structure in the early 16th century.

A stone window, of two rectangular lights with hollow-chamfered roll and casement-moulded jambs and head, remains in the rear wall of No. 75. Over the first-floor rooms of No. 73 is an enriched 17th-century plaster ceiling divided into a geometrical pattern with moulded ribs having foliate bosses at some of the intersections, roses and formal sprays of fruit and foliage in the panels and a frieze of arabesque ornament. The original roof survives and is of three bays to the N. and two and a half bays to the S.; the latter are sub-divided by intermediate trusses. Roof trusses are plain with straight collars and tie beams, and had pairs of curved wind braces alternately on the E. and W. side in each bay.

(137) Shops, Nos. 79, 81, with a rendered front wall, were built as a single structure in the early 18th century; the front of four bays has been drastically refenestrated but retains its original proportions and a coved and moulded eaves cornice. The attics formerly had two hipped dormers with shaped cheeks. A fragment of walling of square-panelled timber-framing remains in an outbuilding at the rear, next to No. 77.


No. 87 High Street, Poole

No. 87 High Street, Poole

(138) House, No. 87, of three storeys and a cellar, was built in 1704 together with No. 89 (now largely rebuilt) as a single large mansion house. The date appears on a rainwater head. The front of this house had a central three-bay projection flanked by slightly recessed two-bay wings; the divisions were defined by quoins of alternating widths at the outer angles and by quoins of uniform width ('French quoins') to the centre portion. So much as survives has a moulded plinth and is divided by a plat-band at first-floor level and a cornicemoulded string at second-floor level and has an enriched cornice with carved brackets and a plain parapet. The windows have moulded architraves.

In 1777 the house was divided into two ownerships and the present structural division evidently dates from this time. The front doorway of c. 1777 is generally similar to that of No. 18 Market Street (Monument 209) (Plate 131) but with a less elaborate fanlight, a fluted keystone, and reeded fluting in the lower third of the columns as used at 13 Thames Street (Monument 277); the original doorway was presumably central. The present entrance hall and staircase are also part of the reorganisation of 1777 but the staircase is a rebuilding of the earlier one. The interior retains some early 18th-century bolection-moulded panelling and doorcases.

(139) Shops, Nos. 121–125, of three storeys, were built as houses in the second quarter of the 19th century; the two to the N. are double-fronted and separated by an arched entrance to Ballard's Passage.

(140) Amity Cinema, No. 127, was built between 1764 and 1770 (fn. 12) as a mansion house for James Oliver; it passed in ownership to the Garland family by 1783. It was extended at the rear in the mid 19th century and again in 1882 when a large hall was built. The building was used as a Freemasons' Hall for the Poole Lodge of Amity before being converted for use as a cinema.

The front range, although altered, retains much of the original structure. The plan of this was L-shaped with two rooms at the front and a central entrance passage with narrow room above, one room at the back on the N.W. side and a staircase at the rear opposite the front door. (Demolished)

(141) Shop, No. 129, of three storeys, was built in the early 18th century as a mansion house of two storeys and attics, one room in thickness, which is represented by the front part of the present building; this has been refenestrated and the ground floor lowered, but the first floor remains at its original level and the S. gable was visible when the adjacent property was rebuilt. In the mid 18th century the house was considerably increased in size with a large extension to the rear and the attics converted into a full storey. The rear wall is in headerbond brickwork and has windows with flat-arched heads and keystones. The floor levels in the extension are higher than those in the original building.

(142) Terrace of four houses, Nos. 143–149, was built in 1819. (fn. 13) It is of three storeys with a plat-band joining the sills of the first-floor windows, a moulded cornice and parapet. No. 149 is of three bays, the other houses which are set forward slightly are of two bays; the ground floors have been converted to shops but formerly had semicircular-headed doorways and windows. Each house had two rooms on each of the lower floors and three on the upper. The original kitchens appear to have been in the cellars but the other offices were in single-storey wings at the rear.

(143) Westminster Bank, partly of three storeys, was built as a detached private house c. 1800. The ground-floor windows have semicircular heads.

(144) Beech Hurst, of three storeys with cellars, is an imposing free-standing mansion house of 1798 (Plate 130). This date and the initials of Samuel Rolles, for whom it was built, appear on a marble tablet beside the back door.


Beech Hurst

Beech Hurst

The front has a three-bay pedimented centre-piece with slightly recessed wings of a single bay each. The ground floor is raised about six feet above street level and marked by a platband, and a moulded band is carried beneath the sills of the first-floor windows. The wall is capped by a Doric cornice and parapet. In the central pediment is a shield-of-arms surmounted by a helm and supported by four curving branches of palm above a motto scroll.

The central doorway has a segmental head and is protected by a semicircular porch of four columns with Tuscan bases, supporting Doric entablature blocks and a cornice. Above the doorway are two windows with moulded architraves, the lower with a cornice supported by consoles. Ground-floor windows flanking the front door have semicircular heads, the inner pair being recessed in semicircular-headed niches with moulded imposts; other windows have flat-arched heads.

The plan (p. 190) provided a central entrance hall flanked by reception rooms and with minor rooms at the rear. The principal staircase, of which the lower flight has been removed, rises through the upper floors in an open stair well in the centre of the house, around which cantilevered landings give access to the rooms. Many original fittings survive on the upper floors.

(145) Shops, Nos. 161, 165, were built in the late 18th century. No. 161 is in header-bond brickwork; the first-floor windows have arched heads with keystones.

(146) Shops, Nos. 167, 169, 197, 201 have been much altered. No. 201 retains a house doorway with blind fanlight and pediment.

(147) Houses with shops, Nos. 219–231, 237–251 (odd), 100 yds. E.N.E. of the foregoing, of two and three storeys, were built in the mid 19th century as private houses, some of which were semi-detached. Modern shops have been built in front. Nos. 245–251 form a three-storey terrace with rendered front; the first-floor windows have rounded heads, those to the two middle houses being grouped to form an arcade.

dHill Street (B2, 3)

S.E. side

(148) House, No. 5, with a verge of stone slates to the roof was built in the late 18th century; the ground floor was partly refronted in the following century retaining to the S.W. a segmental-arched opening to Fricker's Alley. The front wall is in header-bond brickwork and has a plain wooden-framed Palladian window to the first floor. (Demolished)

(149) House, No. 7, with a mansard roof, was built c. 1800; it has a narrow frontage with a bow window to the ground floor.

(Demolished)

(150) House with shop, No. 9, is of three storeys with one window to each of the upper floors. (Demolished)

(151) House, No. 11, of three storeys and attics with the lower part of the front wall rendered in stucco, was built in the mid 18th century and much altered in the 19th century. It is a large building five windows wide at the front and probably originally had a central entrance door; the exposed brickwork of the front wall is in header bond and the upper windows have segmental brick heads with key blocks in the centre and at the sides; the cornice has been renewed. (Demolished)

(152) House, No. 15, of two storeys with cellars and double mansard attics was built in 1787; two bricks in the back wall are inscribed IL 1787 (for John Leer) and HL 1787. The house is single-fronted and two rooms in depth with an entrance hall and staircase on the S.W. The doorway has a semicircular-arched head and pedimented cornice supported by console brackets. The cellar is approached by an internal staircase and by a separate flight of steps in the back yard. The front room on the ground floor was converted into a shop in the 19th century and its windows are modern; the back room retains an original fireplace with fretted cornice. The front room on the first floor has a moulded dado and an original fireplace with marble architrave, frieze with applied swags and a moulded dentil cornice; another original fireplace of less elaboration remains in the rear room; alongside the front room is a small dressing room above the entrance hall. (Demolished)

(153) Cottage, No. 27, was built in 1724 as one of a pair of which the N. cottage has been demolished; the numerals 24 appear in glazed headers in the front wall. The brickwork of the front wall is in Flemish bond, the S.W. gable wall is rendered and has a parapet with a moulded brick coping and corbelled kneeler. (Demolished)

(154) Terrace, of four single-fronted cottages, was built in the late 18th century. It is symmetrical, with the doors of the central cottages placed together under pedimented heads supported by console brackets and enclosing blind fanlights. The front wall is in English bond with glazed headers, the segmental window heads are constructed of alternating red and glazed headers. The dormer windows have moulded cheeks.

(Demolished)

N.W. side (elevations opp. p. 229)

(155) House, No. 6, was built in the mid 18th century. The front wall is in header bond with red brick dressings to the quoins and to the jambs of doorway and windows.

(156) House, No. 8, was built in the mid 18th century. The front wall is in header bond; the front doorway has a flat moulded hood supported by enriched angular console brackets.

(Demolished)

(157) House, No. 10, of three storeys with cellars, was built in the late 18th century. The front elevation is in header bond; the front doorway has a semicircular-arched head with fluted key-block and fanlight, beneath a pedimental head supported by half-round Roman Doric columns and entablature blocks. The plan (p. 222) has two rooms on each floor in the front range and minor rooms in an early 19th-century wing at the back.

(Demolished)

(158) House, No. 18, of two storeys with cellars and attics, was built in the late 18th century. The front elevation in headerbond brickwork with flat-arched window heads is symmetrical and has a central doorway with half-round Roman-Doric columns supporting entablature blocks and a pediment. To each side of the doorway are two windows; the first floor has three windows. (Demolished)

(159) Houses, pair, Nos. 20, 22, with a mansard roof, were built in the late 18th century. The front wall is in header bond; the ground floor has been refenestrated.

(160) House, No. 24, of three storeys, was built c. 1800. The front wall in Flemish bond has a thinly-moulded cornice and parapet; the front door has a depressed three-centred arched head; the two ground-floor windows have semicircular heads and are set in semicircular-arched recesses with moulded imposts.

dKing Street (B2)

(1774: Market Lane) (All demolished)

N. side

(161) Terrace of houses and shops, Nos. 1–7 (odd), is of three storeys and cellars and has a slate-covered roof; Nos. 1 and 5 are symmetrical and separated by a through passage with a semi-circular-arched entrance at the street front, now closed by a door and numbered 3. Each of these two houses has a bow-fronted shop window with frieze and moulded cornice carried forward over the window and extended to cover the adjacent doorway where it is again bowed forward. The front doorway to No. 7 is similar to that numbered 3; all the other windows have flat-arched heads.

(162) Former Coach House and Stables, No. 19, of two storeys with a half-hipped slate-covered roof, were built in the early 19th century on an irregular site adjacent to the garden of No. 46 Market Street (Monument 221) which they served. The stables, at the N.W. end, with accommodation for three horses in boxes with boarded arcaded fronts, have a central doorway with a window above, and a blind window and loft door, perhaps an alteration, above flanking lunettes; next to the stables is a harness room with a small fireplace; the coach house, at the S.E. end, has a wide three-centred brick-arched entrance above which is a window to the first floor; the first floor comprises two rooms, one heated.

(163) House, No. 23, at corner of West Street, has a verge of stone slates to the roof. The front to West Street (opp. p. 235) is in irregular Flemish bond with glazed headers and has a moulded coved cornice. The gable wall to King Street is in an irregular bond and includes the letters RRD and numerals 24, presumably for 1724, formed in headers. A rear wing was added later in the 18th century.

S. side

(164) Cottages, Nos. 2–12 (even), now form a continuous terrace with No. 6 in the yard behind No. 10. Nos. 8 and 10 were built in the second half of the 18th century; the former has a door combined with two flanking windows, one blocked, perhaps for a shop; the doorway of No. 10 is in the centre of the combined elevation and has two windows to the W.; hung-sash and blind windows alternate on the floor above. No. 6, also 18th-century, has wooden casement windows with central mullions. In the early 19th century Nos. 2, 4, and 12 were added and Nos. 8 and 10 altered.

dKingland Road (A4)

N. side

(165) Terrace of 14 houses, Nos. 11–37 Kingland Place (1,000 yds. N.E.), of two storeys with rendered brick walls and a slate-covered roof, was built in the early 19th century. Each house is single-fronted with a blind window above the door; in front of the ground-floor windows is a continuous verandah.

S. side

(166) House (250 yds. E.S.E. of the foregoing), of two storeys with rendered brick walls and a hipped slate-covered roof, was built in the early 19th century on a T-shaped plan with porch and staircase in the re-entrant angles and later enlarged to the E.

dLagland Street (B, C3) (All except (190) demolished)

N.W. side

(167) Cottages, pair, Nos. 2, 4, set back from street frontage, with common entrance passage; early 19th-century.

(168) Terrace of seven single-fronted cottages, Nos. 10–22, has a slate-covered roof; it was built in the early 19th century together with two adjacent houses in Strand Street and had a narrow courtyard at the back containing a row of nine privies, (fn. 14) later rebuilt.

(169) Terrace of three cottages, Nos. 24–28, one including a shop front, is similar to the foregoing.

(170) Cottages, pair, Nos. 30, 36, with rendered front walls and raking parapets to the gables, were built, perhaps as a single house, in the mid 18th century and converted and refenestrated early in the following century.

(171) Cottages, pair, Nos. 62, 64, were built in the early 19th century.

(172) Wellington House, with a rendered front wall and a verge of stone slates to the roof, was built as a single dwelling in the early 18th century; it has a central doorway with pedimented hood with two hung-sash windows to each side and a blind window above. The house was divided into two cottages in the early 19th century.

S.E. side

(173) Warehouse, of three storeys and attics, with segmental-arched heads to doors and windows; early 19th-century.

(174) House, No. 7, of two storeys with cellar and attics, was built in the early 18th century. The front wall is in header-bond brickwork and has a block cornice and flat plaster quoins. The doorway at the S. end has a flat hood and shaped brackets; the wnote idwoto the ground floor and three above, have flat arched heads with keystones. The S. end of the house is built over a narrow alley leading to East Quay Road.

(175) Terrace of four cottages, Nos. 17, 19, 29, 31, has rendered walls and a slate-covered roof; in the middle is a passage to a yard with further cottages; at the N. end the terrace encloses the N.W. end of Gray's Yard, an alley leading to East Quay Road.

(176) House, No. 33, of two storeys with rendered walls and a slate-covered roof, was formerly two dwellings: at the S. end is a double-fronted house built c. 1830 and with a shop window added in the mid 19th century; to the N., partly blocking the end of Stoke's Alley but leaving a narrow passageway, is a smaller cottage of the mid 19th century.

(177) House with shop, No. 35, has rendered walls and a half-hipped mansard roof with a gable wall facing the street. The shop has a recessed bow window and flat fascia and moulded cornice which also covers the shop door; the house door is in Stoke's Alley.

(178) Maltster's Arms p.h. was built in the late 18th century; the windows have segmental-arched heads.

(179) House, No. 65, was built in the mid 18th century. The front wall is in header bond and has a central doorway flanked on each floor by hung-sash windows with segmental-arched heads; there is a blind recess above the doorway.

(180) House, No. 67, was built in the early 18th century; the front wall is in English bond. It was refenestrated and heightened in 1851 when the adjacent house, No. 79, was erected.

(181) Norton's Buildings, terrace of five cottages, in yard behind Nos. 65 and 67, of three storeys, was built c. 1840.

(182) Cottages, pair, Nos. 91, 105, of two storeys with a half-hipped slate-covered roof, were built in the mid 19th century. In the middle is a segmental-arched entrance leading to a yard at the back containing further cottages, Burgess's Buildings.

(183) House, No. 109, was built in the late 18th century. The front wall is in header bond with a dentil cornice, the front doorway is central and raised some 3 ft. above the street level.

(184) Terrace of five cottages, Nos. 111–19, of two storeys with a slate-covered roof.

(185) House, No. 121, with a semicircular-arched doorway and flat-arched heads to the windows, was built c. 1800.

(186) Terrace of three cottages, Nos. 123–7, of two storeys with rendered walls, was built c. 1800.

(187) Cottage, No. 129, retains a contemporary bow-fronted shop window with a matching hood over the doorway.

(188) Terrace of four cottages, Nos. 131–37. No. 131 retains a bow-fronted shop window.

(189) Terrace of four cottages, Nos. 1A-4A Perry Gardens.

(190) Terrace of three cottages, Nos. 145–9, has rendered walls and a hipped slate-covered roof of low pitch.

dLevet's Lane (C1)

(191) Blake House, No. 3, was built in the second half of the 18th century; the front wall is in header bond, the doorway has a moulded architrave and pedimented head. (Demolished)

dLongfleet Road

(192) Houses, Nos. 1, 3, on N.W. side of road (1,140 yds. N.E.), of two storeys with rendered walls and a hipped slate-covered roof, are a pair of semi-detached villa residences of the early 19th century. The front doorways have arched heads with fanlights. In front of the building is a single-storey trelliswork verandah. The plans (p. 222) are similar, with kitchen and offices in a rear wing.

d Market Street (C2–A3)

S.E. side (elevations opp. p. 229)

(193) House, No. 1, with walls of brickwork laid in English bond at the front and open Flemish bond in the exposed gable wall, was built in the late 18th century. Above the ground-floor bay window and doorway is a flat canopy supported by three shaped brackets. There is a moulded timber cornice supporting a concealed gutter.

(194) Lawton House, No. 3, with the front wall in headerbond brickwork, was built in the second half of the 18th century. The front doorway is flanked by columns carrying entablature blocks and a pedimented head. The doorway and windows have triple keystones; the middle window on the first floor has been blocked.

(195) Houses, Nos. 5, 7, with a stone plinth and front wall of header-bond brickwork, were built in the mid 18th century as a single house which was divided in the early 19th century. The door surrounds (Plate 131) are of the latter date and have moulded architraves and paterae and pedimented heads. The doorway to No. 7 is on the site of the former front doorway, that to No. 5 replaces a window, part of the flat-arched head of which is visible on the N. side.

(196) Bowden House, No. 9, has a front wall of header-bond brickwork with a serrated brick eaves cornice; the roof has a verge of stone slates. The house was built in the mid 18th century with a wide frontage to the street but only one room in thickness and without any window openings in the rear wall. The plans (p. 216) provide for two rooms on each floor with a central staircase. A kitchen, not shown on the plans, was added at the back in the 19th century. Some original fireplaces and other fittings survive.

(197) Houses, Nos. 11, 13, were formerly one dwelling. No. 13 was built in 1722, the date and initials IM appearing on a brick in the N.W. gable wall. The original internal arrangement of No. 13 has been much altered, and a shop door and flanking windows have been added to the N.W., but a wide fireplace remains in the wall adjacent to No. 11 and the room at the S.E. end, now sub-divided, retains a dado of two heights of fielded panels. No. 11 was built in the early 19th century as an annexe to No. 13 with internal access only; the present doorway has been inserted in place of a window of which the voussoirs of the head remain above the door surround.

(198) House with shop, No. 33, with half-hipped mansard attics partly covered with slates, was built in the late 18th century. The narrower end wall facing the street is in headerbond brickwork and is carried up as a rectangular panel to give the illusion of a full upper storey.

(199) House with shop, No. 35, was built in the mid 18th century. The lower part of the front wall has been replaced by a modern shop front. The upper storey, of glazed headers, has three windows with segmental heads and keystones, and red brick jambs and quoins. The wall has a moulded cornice and parapet.


Poole: Market Street, Church Street, Hill Street

Poole: Market Street, Church Street, Hill Street

(200) House, No. 47, was built in the mid 18th century. The front elevation is symmetrical and is in header-bond brickwork. The front doorway has a moulded and eared architrave, pulvinated frieze and pediment and is given increased size and importance by a coved member between the architrave and the reveals of the door opening; it is flanked by two windows with segmental-arched heads with keystones; there are three similar windows to the first floor, the middle one blind.

(201) Houses with shop, Nos. 53–59, are of two nearly contemporary builds of which Nos. 53 and 55 are the earliest, the former incorporating a shop window. All have cellars. Details are generally similar; the houses are double-fronted and have front doorways with panelled pilasters and flat cornices and windows with segmental heads. The front wall has a brick dentil cornice. (Demolished)

(202) House, No. 61, was built in the mid 18th century to an L-shaped plan; the roof has at the rear a verge of stone slates. The front wall has a high brick plinth, and in the centre has been added a two-storey semi-octagonal porch of rusticated masonry with a moulded cornice and a sub-cornice at first-floor level. Windows have segmental heads with keystones. The S. gable wall is in English-bond brickwork of high quality and has three lozenge patterns in the gable.

(203) Sir Peter Thompson's House (1888: 'Poole House'), of three storeys with cellars, was built between 1746 and 1749 by John Bastard of Blandford (fn. 15) for Sir Peter Thompson (16981770), a Hamburg merchant and native of Poole, whose principal residence was in Bermondsey but who retired to his house in Poole in 1763. (fn. 16) The house was extended to the S. in the early 19th century with a single-storey wing with attics.


Sir Peter Thompson's House

Sir Peter Thompson's House

The house has an H-plan (p. 190), the wings at the front being of very slight projection. Walls are of brick laid in Flemish bond with a simple stone block cornice with ogee brackets and plain upper members and a brick parapet with stone dies at the angles and a stone capping. The central recessed bay at the front is faced in stone and has a balustraded stone parapet. The front doorway (Plate 127) has a pedimental hood with coffered soffit supported by carved brackets; over the doorway between S-shaped scrolls with egg-and-dart enrichment are a helmet and motto; over the hood, resting on a moulded corbel, is a cartouche with the arms of Thompson. Above the doorway is a Palladian window to the first floor and a lunette with keystone to the second floor, the sills being supported by brackets; between the windows, resting on a semicircular moulded corbel, is a sculptured lion, rampant and gorged with a coronet, the crest of Thompson.

The front wings have, in the uppermost storey, windows with segmental-arched heads with keystones and plain aprons with dropped ends; other windows have flat heads and keystones. The central bay at the rear has a balustraded parapet; the ground floor is obscured by later building; the windows to the upper storeys are similar to those at the front except that the lunette has a triple keystone. Between the upper windows is a panel, with moulded cornice and dropped ends, inscribed P T 1749.

The interior retains much original panelling in the principal rooms and several contemporary fireplaces of note, including one in the N.W. room of the ground floor (Plate 54) with the lion from the Thompson arms in the frieze, and one in the room over the entrance hall (Plate 54) with a frieze and centre panel carved with fruit and flowers amidst rococo scroll-work. The plaster ceilings in these two rooms are also noteworthy: the former is decorated with amorini, festoons and birds including an eagle, pelican and pigeons; the latter has figures of amorini, garlands and a centrepiece of horses and includes the arms, the motto and crest of Thompson. The principal staircase (Plate 127) has alternately plain and twisted turned balusters with moulded caps and bases and fluted columnar newels; the handrail has a scrolled stop similar to those at No. 20 Market Street and West End House, West Street (Monuments 210 and 300). Thus these staircases are probably by the same craftsman.

The house originally faced a garden which stretched between Market Street and West Street in which was an ornamental canal aligned on the axis of the house; this is shown on the town plan in Hutchins (1774) and on the 1888 O.S. map, where the garden is named 'The Shrubbery'.

N.W. side (elevations opposite)

(204) House with shop. No. 2, has a rendered front wall with a modern shop window and hung-sash windows to the upper floor. It was built in the early 18th century and has a large, perhaps rebuilt, chimney-stack at the N. end.

(205) House, No. 4 (Plate 125), with a rendered front wall with low stone plinth was built in the early 18th century. It occupies what may have been a vacant space between Nos. 2 and 6/8 and is clearly built around the chimney breast of the latter (see plan p. 230) with the ground-floor room of which it was once connected by a doorway. The front doorway has an eared architrave and a flat hood supported by shaped brackets, the latter now replaced. The fireplace in the front room of the first floor has a surround of Delft tiles with biblical scenes, moulded architrave, plain frieze with shaped ends and a moulded and dentilled cornice.

(206) Houses, Nos. 6, 8 (Plate 125), were built as a single dwelling in the late 16th century. The original house was of two storeys and attics with the front wall and chimneystacks of stone and the rear wall, including a double-gabled wing, of timber-framed construction.

This building is an interesting example of contemporary use of two structural materials, stone and timber, in the same building in the late 16th century.

In the front range facing the street were two rooms of unequal size, with an entrance between them (perhaps where the present doorway to No. 8 now stands) which may have opened into a through passage. The larger of the two rooms had a fireplace in the centre of the gable wall, with a stone chimney breast projecting externally; in the N. corner of the room were two doorways, one, now blocked, in the partition wall alongside the through passage, and the other, in the N.W. wall, with ogeemoulded wooden jambs and stops, leading to the staircase. The smaller of the two front rooms had a fireplace in the N.W. wall with a corresponding fireplace behind it to a smaller room in the back wing.


Nos. 4,6 & 8 Market Street, Poole (205–6)

Nos. 4,6 & 8 Market Street, Poole (205–6)

The staircase, which survives intact, is constructed in a square timber-framed compartment with quarter landings and flights of four steps in between, and an enclosed well, 2½ ft. square, which has timber-framed sides with wattle and daub infilling.

The first floor and attics are approached from the staircase through doorways with moulded timber jambs, but of the attic doorway only one jamb with a sunk chamfer remains. The arrangement of rooms on the upper floors probably repeated the plan of the ground floor with two rooms at the front and one in the timber-framed wing at the rear, but with the addition of a small closet, at least on the first floor, above the N.W. end of the supposed through passage.

About 1700 the top of the S.W. chimney-stack was rebuilt in brick with panelled sides, and the fireplace it served modernised by the addition of wooden bolection-moulded architraves.

In the mid 18th century the house was divided into two separate dwellings and the original front doorway replaced by the present pair of doorways with eared architraves and flat cornice. The ground-floor room of the S.W. house, No. 6, was reduced in size by the insertion of a passage between the new outer doorway and the staircase and another passage at right angles to it along the N.W. side of the room with a store cupboard at its S.W. end. The latter was ventilated from the room with an open partition of shaped slats now covered over; this work may have coincided with the conversion of the room for use as a shop and the insertion of a slightly projecting shop window (since replaced). The first-floor room above was also sub-divided at this date, with plank and muntin partitions, to provide two rooms. The N.E. house, No. 8, was converted by the addition of a small newel staircase between the two ground-floor rooms, which remains as the only means of access to the attics at this end of the building. The front ground-floor room of this house also was modernised, the front windows of the whole building were replaced by vertical sliding sashes, the dormers were renewed or added, and the front wall was rendered.

In the early 19th century a living room and scullery were added at the rear of No. 6 with a bedroom above the former approached from the first quarter landing of the staircase. No. 8 was more thoroughly renovated at this date: the entrance passage was given a plaster barrel-vaulted ceiling, a staircase was inserted at the N.W. end of the passage and a plaster-vaulted porch with flanking kitchen and wash-house added beyond the original back wall.

(207) Houses, Nos. 10, 12 (Plate 125), were built as a single dwelling in the mid 18th century, perhaps c. 1762. The front wall, in header-bond brickwork, has a low stone plinth, a block cornice at the eaves with ogee-shaped brackets, and rusticated stone quoins. The original doorway, to No. 10, has fluted attached columns with entablature blocks decorated with urns in low relief and an open pediment; a second doorway was added to the N.E. in the late 18th century replacing an original window (Plate 131). The dormer windows have shaped cheeks. Above the doorways is a lead rainwater head with the initials and date WB 1762.

(208) House (Plate 125), formerly a public house, of two storeys with cellars and attics, was built in the mid 18th century. The front wall is in header-bond brickwork with stone quoins; the moulded cornice and rendered parapet are alterations of the early 19th century. The outer doorway, which has a fanlight and pediment supported by brackets, opens into a covered passage from which the house is entered (plan p. 222). Apart from the front room on the ground floor which was altered in the early 19th century, the house retains most of its original fittings. (Demolished)

(209) House, No. 18, was built in 1797; the date is recorded on an oval tablet in the rear wall inscribed S V 2 May 1797, and on an adjacent rainwater head. The house was extended at the back in the mid 19th century. It is a typical example of a town house of its day (plan p. 222), one room in width on the ground floor, with a kitchen in the basement, an open area protected by iron railings (Plate 63) at the front, and with three full storeys above. The doorway is flanked by fluted three-quarter columns carrying entablature blocks and open pediment (Plate 131). Some original fireplaces remain in the upper floors.

(210) House, No. 20, was built in the mid 18th century as the mansion house of a substantial merchant.

The front elevation is five bays wide, unevenly spaced, with the entrance in the middle bay; the wall is in header bond brickwork with a moulded stone block cornice with ogee-shaped brackets and a plain parapet; the front doorway has fluted pilasters and a pedimental head; the windows have flat-arched heads and triple keystones. The rear wall is in Flemish-bond brickwork and has no cornice; the windows are disposed symmetrically in three bays, the centre bay has a Venetian window to the half landing of the staircase and a single-light semicircular-headed window with moulded architrave and plain impost blocks to the second floor; the flanking bays have Venetian windows to the ground floor and semicircular-headed windows to the two upper floors. The back doorway, set asymmetrically beneath the staircase window, has a pedimental hood supported by scrolled brackets.

The interior (plans p. 214) has four principal rooms on each floor with a staircase (Plate 57) at the back; the latter has alternately plain and twisted balusters and a handrail with scrolled termination similar to Monuments (203) and (300). Much original panelling remains on the upper floors.

(211) Printing Works and adjacent Shop, Nos. 22, 24, formerly three houses, were built in the late 18th century; the ground-floor windows have been replaced by more recent shop fronts. The two houses to the S.W. are in header-bond brickwork; that to the N.E. is in Flemish bond.

(212) House, No. 26, has been drastically altered in the late 19th or early 20th century but retains some plain panelling of the late 18th century on the first floor.

(213) The Angel Inn, with brick walls in header bond was built in the late 18th century. The walls have a serrated brick eaves cornice.

(214) Houses, Nos. 30, 32, formerly the Greyhound Inn, were built in the second half of the 18th century. The front wall, in header-bond brickwork except the parapet, which is in Flemish bond, has a stone block cornice with ogee brackets. The ground-floor windows to No. 30 were replaced in the mid 19th century by a double shop window with central doorway. No. 32 has on the ground floor a late 18th-century doorway and bay window formerly under a continuous cornice. The elevation to King Street is in open Flemish bond. There are slight indications that the second floor may be an addition. (Demolished)

(215) Wellington House, No. 34, is a small house of the mid 18th century of which the ground floor has since been converted to a shop. The front wall is in header-bond brickwork and has a gadrooned lead rainwater head. (Demolished)

(216) House, No. 36, which includes a cellar, was built in the late 18th century with the front wall in header-bond brickwork and a wide doorway to one side for a passage to the rear. The ground-floor windows and house doorway were replaced in the 19th century and a shop front, since removed, was inserted. (Demolished)

(217) House with shop, No. 38, has a recessed centre bay. The shop window is an addition of the mid 19th century. (Demolished)

(218) House with shop, No. 40, with rendered walls and a slate-covered roof, probably dates from the mid 19th century. (Demolished)

(219) Cottage, No. 42, with a rendered front wall and three courses of stone slates to the eaves, was built in the first quarter of the 18th century on a very restricted site against a pre-existing building to the N. The S. wall may originally have been exposed, at least in part. The front wall has a coved plaster cornice; some windows have thick softwood glazing bars. The plan (p. 222) provides for two rooms on each floor with a newel stair in the rear room. (Demolished)

(220) Houses, two, Nos. 44, 44B, are of two distinct builds: that to the N. was built first in the late 18th century and that to the S. added soon afterwards, replacing an earlier structure. Both buildings share a single front doorway and may have been one house. The front walls are in header-bond brickwork. (Demolished)

(221) House, No. 46, was built c. 1800 as a town house, similar in its general layout to No. 18 (Monument 209). It is, however, different in its details: the ground-floor windows have arched heads set in larger arched recesses; the porch has a flat roof and is supported by Tuscan columns carrying entablature blocks. The rear wall has to the S. a bow rising the full height with three-light windows to each storey. The former stables to this house are in King Street (Monument 162).

(222) Houses, Nos. 48, 50, were built as one house in the mid 18th century; the front wall is in header-bond brickwork.

(223) House, No. 52, was built in the early 18th century; the front wall, in Flemish bond, has a coved plaster cornice; the ground-floor openings have been much altered in the 19th century and later; the first-floor windows have flat heads of bricks laid on edge and supported by the boxing of the sash windows.

(224) Masonic Lodge, former house, No. 54, was built in the late 18th century. The front wall is in header-bond brickwork with red brick window jambs and quoins. The front doorway formerly at the N. end has been replaced by a window matching those to the S.

(225) House, No. 62, of two storeys with a cellar, has a verge of stone slates to the roof. It is single-fronted with the front doorway at the S. end of the front wall; the doorway has a reused 18th-century moulded and enriched pediment supported by enriched brackets. The cellar and ground-floor windows have segmental heads. (Demolished)

(226) Wellington Row, a terrace of seven houses, Nos. 90–102, built in c. 1814, has a mansard roof with attics at the front and a roof of single slope without attics at the back. The plan of No. 90 is typical (p. 222). (Demolished)

(227) Earl Grey Row, a terrace of six houses, Nos. 104–14, was built in 1832; an original painted inscription with this date and the name of the row remains visible at the front. The front wall is in Flemish garden-wall bond. Each house has one window to each floor facing the street. The paired doorways are under flat hoods supported by shaped brackets. Ground-floor windows have segmental heads. The plan of No. 104 (p. 222), apart from the angular boundary line at the S. end, is typical of the row. (Demolished)


Garland's Almshouses

Garland's Almshouses

(228) Garland's Almshouses, Hunger Hill, were erected by George Garland in c. 1812 and given to the town in 1814. The building has a half H-shaped plan with a small open courtyard to the N.E. and contains twelve tenements arranged on two floors. The walls are of brick, those facing the courtyard being in Flemish bond with glazed headers; the roofs are tiled. The recessed N.E. front centres upon an inscribed tablet with a circular window above; flanking these are doorways (one now a window) with round heads which both gave access to a central room, 11 ft. square, and thence to a corresponding room over. All the tenements are approached through doorways and stairhalls in the wings, the landings being lit by small circular windows to the court. For the rest, the windows have segmental heads. (Demolished)

dNew Orchard (B2)

(229) House, No. 5, was built in the mid 18th century. The brickwork of the front wall is in header bond; that of the rear wall is in English bond. The front doorway has an eared architrave with plain frieze and a moulded pediment. E. of it are two windows with 9 ins. brick segmental-arched heads. There are three upper windows in the front wall, the middle one being blind. Single dormers to front and rear have shaped cheeks. (Demolished)

dNew Street (C2)

N.E. side (elevations opp. p. 213)

(230) House with shop, No. 2, was built in the 17th century and retains a reset four-light stone-mullioned window at the rear, and five roof trusses with cambered tie beams and double collars; some of the collars are now removed. The building was refronted and partly rebuilt in the late 18th century with a wide doorway with Roman Doric columns supporting Ionic entablature blocks and a pediment above a blind fanlight.

(231) House, No. 4, of three storeys, was built in the late 18th century; the front doorway is narrower than that of No. 2 but the details are otherwise similar.

(232) House, No. 6, of three storeys, is a substantial building of the second half of the 18th century. The front wall is in headerbond brickwork with triple keystones to the windows above the central doorway, and three-storey bay windows to each side added in the early 19th century. The elaborate door surround, now gone, had flanking three-quarter Corinthian columns carrying an entablature with enriched frieze and pediment above a fanlight. The interior retains some panelling and a late 18th-century fireplace. The rear wall of rubble with a blocked four-light stone-mullioned window survives from an earlier, 17th-century, house. (Demolished)

(233) House, No. 8, of two storeys with cellars and attics, was built in the early 18th century. The front wall, in Flemish bond with jambs and quoins in a darker colour brick than the main walling, has a coved plaster eaves cornice with later brackets. A plat-band at first-floor level steps up over the doorway, which has a semicircular head and fanlight and is flanked by a pair of Tuscan columns supporting a semicircular pediment. The rear windows have segmental brick heads.

The plan (p. 214) is L-shaped, with a dog-leg stair at right angles to the entrance passage. The house was partly refitted in the 19th century but retains much original fielded panelling. In the exposed W. gable wall is a fragment of a timber-framed building which formerly stood to the W. (Demolished)

S.W. side

House, No. 1, see High Street, Monument (105).

(234) Houses, Nos. 3, 5. No. 3, of two storeys and cellar with a verge of stone slates to the roof, was built in the first half of the 18th century. The front elevation, in header-bond brickwork with a brick plat-band at first-floor level, is symmetrical and has a blind recess over the doorway. The plan (p. 216) provides two rooms to each floor; a third segmental-ended room was added in the mid 19th century. The roof has collar-beam trusses. No. 5, to the W., with front wall in header-bond brickwork, was built soon after No. 3.

(235) Houses, two, No. 9 and No. 1 Cinnamon Lane, were built c. 1700 as a single dwelling and divided in the early 19th century. The N. and E. elevations have brick plat-bands at first-floor level and a coved eaves cornice; the plan was originally L-shaped with a staircase in the re-entrant angle. (Demolished)

(236) House, No. 10, with rendered walls was built in the early 18th century. The front doorway, of the 19th century, has flanking pilasters with debased Corinthian capitals supporting a flat hood.

(237) House, No. 11, built in the second half of the 18th century, has a bow window to the first floor.

dNile Row (A3)

(238) Augustus Place, a terrace of seven single-fronted cottages, Nos. 2–14 (even), was built in the early 19th century by Joseph Swaffield. (fn. 17) The S. cottage was built first in 1817–19 and two similar cottages were added to the N. in 1824; Nos. 8–14 were built, projecting slightly beyond the earlier cottages, in 1827–30. Nos. 2–6 now have a half-hipped slate-covered roof. Each cottage has a flat hood over the front door, supported by shaped brackets. (Demolished)

(239) House, No. 16, of two storeys with a hipped slate-covered roof of low pitch was built between 1838 and 1844. (fn. 18) The N. elevation is symmetrical with a central entrance doorway and flanking pair of windows (one blind) under semi-circular-arched heads. (Demolished)

dNorth Street (A3)

(1774: Water Lane)

S.W. side

(240) Terrace of four cottages, Nos. 2–5, of two storeys with a mansard roof, was built c. 1800.

(241) House, No. 6, formerly one of a pair, was built in the early 19th century. (Demolished)

(242) Terrace of three houses, Nos. 10–12, was built c. 1824 and advertised for sale in the Salisbury Journal, 7 June 1824 as 'three substantial new-built messuages . . . situated on the west side of North Street'. The plans of No. 11 (p. 222) are typical of each house, with two rooms on each floor and a single-storey kitchen wing at the rear. The front room on the ground floor has vertically sliding shutters to the window and a boarded dado with moulded rail and skirting. (Demolished)

(243) Terrace of four cottages, Nos. 13–16, of two storeys with a verge of stone slates to the roof, was built in the early 19th century. (Demolished)

dOak Alley (C2)

(1774: Petty Lane)

(244) Cottages, pair, Nos. 1, 2, were built in the early 19th century. (Demolished)

dProsperous Street (B, C3)

(245) Terrace of four single-fronted cottages, Nos. 3–6, was built in the early 19th century.

(246) House, No. 13, with a stone tablet inscribed 'Motley Place', was built c. 1800; the front is symmetrical with a central doorway recessed under a semicircular arch of two orders, the outer springing from moulded imposts; the two ground-floor windows have flat-arched heads and wide double-hung sashes; there are similar windows to the floor above, but with the heads concealed by the eaves, and a blind recess above the doorway.

dThe Quay (C1–3)

(1774: Great Quay, Little Quay and New Quay)

(247) Warehouses, two, immediately E. of the Custom House (18), are of four storeys, one with attics; that to the W. is rendered in stucco and has a half-hipped slate-covered roof; that to the E. has a tiled roof. Both are of early 19th-century date and were probably built after 1813 when a fire destroyed the Custom House and adjacent buildings (Gentleman's Magazine, 1813, pt. ii, 478).

(248) Portsmouth Hoy, p.h. was built in the late 18th century; the front wall has subsequently been rendered; the S. elevation is symmetrical with a block cornice and three windows to the first floor with segmental-arched heads with keystones. The ground-floor windows were replaced in the late 19th century.

(249) Warehouse, E. of the above, has at the rear, fronting on Hosier's Lane, a wing of two storeys in Flemish-bond brickwork of the early 19th century.

(250) Poole Arms, p.h. was built in the early 17th century, at which time it comprised a square block facing The Quay with a detached kitchen at the rear; of the latter a fireplace remains in the E. wall with chamfered jambs and four-centred lintel. The front block has been considerably altered or rebuilt but retains its original proportions with a wide gable facing The Quay; in the N. wall are remains of early 17th-century fireplaces, now blocked or altered. A wing was added to the N. in the late 17th or 18th century.

dSarum Street (C1)

(formerly Salisbury Street)

N.W. side

(251) House, No. 1, former p.h., of two storeys, was built in the early 19th century; the front has been much altered.

(252) Cottages, two, of three storeys with brick walls in English bond and a mansard roof, were built as a single house in the early 19th century. The original doorway at the N.E. end of the combined frontage has a pediment supported by shaped brackets. (Demolished)

(253) House, No. 4, was built in the late 18th century. The S.E. elevation of five bays is symmetrical with a central pedimented doorway and windows with segmental-arched brick heads with keystones. There are three hipped dormer windows with shaped cheeks. The ground floor N. of the doorway has been altered to form a shop.

S.E. side

(254) Lock-up, of one storey with walls of brick and stone faced with Portland stone ashlar and a slate-covered lean-to roof, was built against the N.W. side of the Town Cellars (Monument 17) in 1820. The N.W. wall has a doorway with diagonally tooled jambs and head and a keystone inscribed with the date of erection; the door is nail-studded; flanking the doorway are two small rectangular windows with iron bars. In the S.W. wall is a wide carriage entrance of the later 19th century inserted when the building was converted for use as a fire-engine house. The building is vaulted internally with a series of segmental iron plates.

(255) Warehouse, four storeys incorporated in a later building of five storeys; the N.W. front has the hoist doorways in the middle flanked on each floor by windows with segmental heads; floors are supported by heavy timber beams and posts. The original structure is of the early to mid 19th century.

dSkinner Street (C3)

(256) Houses, eight, Nos. 18–25, were built in the late 18th century; the front walls are in header-bond brickwork. No. 18 has a flat hood above the doorway carried by shaped brackets. Nos. 19–21 each have a two-storey bay window to the N. and flat cornices above the front doors.

Nos. 22–25 were built between 1786 and 1792 (fn. 19) as a symmetrical group, of which Nos. 23 and 24 formed one house and Nos. 22 and 25 projected slightly in advance to form wings. Nos. 23 and 24 (plan, p. 216) were divided in 1833 (fn. 20) when the rear of the house was extended and partly rebuilt. Nos. 23 and 24 are together five bays wide with a plat-band in place of a cornice and a parapet supporting urns; the doorways are combined under a single pediment; the doorway of No. 22 has a pulvinated frieze and broken pediment. The front room of No. 23 retains original woodwork and an original cornice. (Demolished)

dSouth Road (B3, C4)

(The road follows the line of a Rope Walk marked on the 1774 map.)

E. side

(257) Houses, pair, Nos. 15, 17, of two storeys with the front walls rendered in stucco, slate-covered roofs, and a single-storey verandah, were built in the mid 19th century.

(258) Factory, of three storeys with a slate-covered roof, incorporates a two-storey factory building of the mid 19th century with round-headed windows to the first floor. (Demolished)

W. side

House, No. 2, see Baiter Street, Monument (37).

(259) Terrace of three cottages, Nos. 52–56, of two storeys with rendered walls and low-pitched slate-covered roof, was built in the mid 19th century.

dStrand Street (C2)

(All except (265) demolished)

N. side

(260) House, of two storeys, with walls of coursed and squared Purbeck stone rubble was built in the late 16th or early 17th century and largely rebuilt c. 1700. The S. wall has a stone plat-band of three narrow courses at first-floor level; door and window heads on the ground floor have flat arches in stone. At the W. end of the frontage is a 19th-century doorway; to the E. of it is another, now blocked, with chamfered jambs of c. 1600 in the lower part, probably originally supporting a stone lintel removed and replaced by a flat arch at a higher level c. 1700. E. of the above is a wide blocked window. Other fragments of stone buildings lie to the W.

(261) House, No. 8, of two storeys with walls of brick and timber and a slate-covered roof, was built in the 16th century but has been much altered. It has a through passage to the rear, now blocked. A rear wing at the W. end has a timber-framed jetty with exposed joists.

(262) Houses, Nos. 22, 24, with slate-covered roofs were built c. 1800; No. 24 has a flat stone hood over the doorway supported by shaped stone brackets.

(263) House, No. 26, with a verge of stone slates to the roof, was built in the late 18th century. The S. elevation, in headerbond brickwork, is symmetrical and of three bays with a central doorway and casement windows to the first floor.

(264) House, No. 36, of three storeys with a hipped roof was built in the mid 19th century. 30 yds. N.N.E. is a stone Boundary Wall, perhaps of 17th-century date, running approximately parallel to Strand Street.

S. side

(265) Cottage, No. 9, of two storeys, was built in the mid 19th century.

(266) House, No. 13, of two storeys with cellar and attic, was built in the mid 18th century; the front wall is in Flemishbond brickwork with glazed headers.

(267) House, No. 15, of two storeys with a roof covering of stone slates partly replaced by tiles, was built in the early 18th century. The N. wall has a three-course plat-band at first-floor level and a moulded timber cornice. Two original wooden casement windows remain to the first floor.

Cottages, Nos. 19, 21, see Blue Boar Lane, Monument (51).

(268) Cottages, three, Nos. 23–27, formerly four, the easternmost originally forming two dwellings, are of two storeys with slate-covered roofs and were built in the mid 19th century.

dSwan Alley (C2)

(269) Cottages, three, Nos. 1, 2, 5, of two storeys with slate-covered roofs, were built in the early 19th century. (Demolished)

dThames Alley (C1)

(1888: Hancock's Alley)

(270) Boundary Wall on S.W. side, of brickwork with remains of blocked doorway and windows of an early 19th-century range of cottages.

dThames Street (C1)

(1774: Quay Street)

N.E. side

(271) Cottages, three, Nos. 1–3, are of three storeys with slate-covered roofs; No. 1 retains a bow window to the ground floor.

S.W. side (elevations opp. p. 213)

(272) The King Charles p.h., formerly the New Inn, with timber-framed walls partly rebuilt and rendered, was built in the late 16th century. The range facing the street is of this date: the first floor is jettied and has two original gabled square-sided oriel windows. Each of the two original first-floor rooms has an open false hammer-beam truss with solid brackets below the hammer beams carved with trefoils and rosettes.

Some reset panelling of c. 1600 remains in the S.E. ground-floor room. In the dining room at the back are two cased ceiling beams and the remains of a large fireplace, now partially blocked, which may be part of an original detached kitchen; this was re-roofed and extended to join the front range and the whole much altered in the 19th century.

(273) Houses and shop, Nos. 5, 7, were built in the early 19th century, probably as an inn; the house to the S.E. of the carriage entrance was in use as a public house in 1888 (O.S. map). The roof, which is slate-covered, has boldly projecting eaves carried by paired wooden brackets. No. 7 has an early shop front. See also Monument (20).

(274) House, No. 9, is set back from the street frontage; it was built in the early 19th century and replaced a lower-built house, part of the outline of the gable wall of which is visible on the S.E. wall of No. 10. There is a bow window to the ground floor.

(275) House, No. 10, was built c. 1800, but has at the front a reused mid 18th-century doorway with broken pediment and egg-and-dart enrichment of the architrave.

(276) The Mansion House (Plate 121) is of two storeys with a basement and attics. The walls are of red brick laid in Flemish bond; the slate-covered roof is concealed behind a parapet. Although it is one of the largest of the merchants' houses in Poole, no documentary evidence for its date is known; it may be ascribed stylistically to the last decade of the 18th century or to the following decade. At the former period the property belonged to Benjamin Lester (1724–1802) who was one of the two representatives of Poole in Parliament from 1791 to 1796 and was prominent in the Newfoundland trade; a marble representation of dried cod which appears in the frieze of the dining-room fireplace is an allusion to the source of the family's wealth.

The street elevation and the entrance hall and principal rooms are designed in what is, for Poole, a grand manner, and are clearly intended to impress. The illusion of grandeur is heightened by a street frontage which extends beyond the rear width of the house (plan, p. 190), and, internally, symmetry and some increased importance are given to the entrance hall by the liberal use of false doorways. The entrance hall and staircase are combined, the latter returning above the front door in a half landing which breaks forward, perhaps for a seat. The first-floor landing is supported by and supports two wooden columns with capitals derived from those of the Tower of the Winds. The staircase balusters, every third one of which is of elaborate form, are of cast iron. The dining room at the back of the house is the principal room and has at the N.W. end a recessed alcove with flanking attached columns. The kitchen and offices, which retain some original fittings, are in the basement. The first-floor rooms are irregularly planned and may have been altered later in the 19th century, at which date the attics appear to have been added.

(277) House, No. 13 (Plate 132), is of two storeys and attics; the walls are of brickwork laid in header bond at the front with stone and stucco dressings and in English bond at the S.E. side, which may incorporate some brickwork of slightly earlier date than the house. The house was built c. 1730, apparently by the Weston family, a number of members of which were mayors of the town during the same century. The house later passed to the Slade family, who were Newfoundland merchants and who in the early to mid 19th century altered the back of the house, raising the ridge of the roof and extending the house to the N.W. (plan, p. 214).

The original elevation is symmetrical in three bays divided by rusticated pilaster strips. The door-case in the centre bay has Ionic pilasters carrying a pedimented entablature with a pulvinated frieze; above it is a semicircular-headed window with rusticated surround. The parapet has an open balustrade in the centre bay and is surmounted by urns above the pilasters. On the ground floor at the front are two small rooms separated by an entrance hall; the larger room, to the S.E. (13 ft. 10 ins. by 14 ft. 4 ins.), has an original fireplace with eared architrave and pulvinated frieze and retains some original fielded panelling, dado rails and a dentilled cornice. The staircase at the back of the house is partly of the early 18th century, but the balusters and handrail have been renewed. A back room, which is considerably larger and taller than those at the front, was built in the early to mid 19th century and perhaps replaces an earlier room of which parts survive in the S.E. wall. Many original details including fireplaces, panelling and doorcases remain.

The front wall was rebuilt more or less to the original design and the upper part of the door-case renewed in 1965–6.


West Street, Bay Hog Lane, Poole

West Street, Bay Hog Lane, Poole

dTowngate Street (A, B3)

(1774: Towngate Lane)

S. and E. sides

(278) Houses, four, Nos. 17–23, are of two storeys with cellars. and attics. (Demolished)

(279) Brewer's Arms p.h., of two storeys, comprises two late 18th-century houses, one double-fronted, each with blind window recesses above the former front doorways. Some original fireplaces and two chamfered ceiling beams survive internally.

(280) House, No. 51, with a slate-covered roof, was built in the second half of the 18th century but was extended and a porch and bay window added in the late 19th century. The front, in header-bond brickwork, was originally symmetrical with a thinly-moulded cornice and parapet; the windows have segmental-arched brick heads with keystones.

(281) Shops, Nos. 61–65, of two storeys, were built as three cottages but have been drastically altered. They retain an original brick dentil eaves cornice.

N. and W. sides

(282) Houses, pair, Nos. 4, 6, were built in the late 18th century. The front wall is in Flemish-bond brickwork with glazed headers and has a stepped brick cornice. The front doorways are paired and have a flat hood with shaped brackets; ground-floor windows have segmental heads.

(283) Terrace of four houses, Nos. 8–14, was built after the Act of Union in 1801 and named 'Union Buildings'. Each house is single-fronted and has a thinly-moulded cornice and parapet; the front doorways are under semicircular-arched heads of two orders, the outer order springing from moulded imposts; above the doorways are blind window recesses, these and the other windows having flat-arched brick heads and projecting sills.

(284) Queen Charlotte p.h. is similar to the foregoing but without the parapet; the front wall has been rendered.

(285) Houses, Nos. 28–38 (even), of two storeys, were built in the late 18th or early 19th century. Nos. 28 and 30 have been converted to a garage and shop.

(286) House, No. 44, of three storeys with a slate-covered roof, was built c. 1800. It has two three-storey bow windows flanking a central entrance doorway with round-arched heads of two orders without imposts. The E. bow has been partly rebuilt.

(287) Shops, Nos. 50, 52, have mansard attics; the doorway to No. 50 has pilasters and brackets supporting a pediment; the shop fronts are modern.

dWaterloo Buildings (B3)

(see also Beaconsfield Terrace)

(288) Cottages, eight, are of various builds; each is single-fronted, with doors and windows generally under segmental-arched brick heads 4½ ins. deep. Nos. 4 and 5 are a pair with blind window recesses above adjacent doorways; a brick on the S.W. angle of No. 4 is inscribed 'W B [for Waterloo Buildings] 1815'. (Demolished)

dWest Street (C1–B2)

E. side (elevations opposite)

(289) Houses, Nos. 1, 3, were built as a single house c. 1700 but have been much altered. The external brickwork of No. 1, which is of this date, is laid in English bond and had a threecourse plat-band at first-floor level, now largely cut away. In the ground-floor room of this house is an original fireplace with a bolection-moulded architrave and moulded shelf, a corner cupboard with shell head, and an exposed stop-chamfered ceiling beam. The ground floor is sub-divided by plank and muntin partitions with a moulded top rail above which is an open ventilation grille with flat slats shaped in the form of balusters. The roof is supported by pairs of principal rafters, the westernmost rafter of each couple being bent inwards at the foot to bring the dormer windows nearer to the outer face of the wall. No. 3 was refronted and the houses partly refitted and divided in the early 19th century.

(290) House (1888: Poplar House), No. 11, of two storeys with a basement and cellars and with a modern slate-covered roof, was built between 1783 and 1786 by Richard Penn[e]y. (fn. 21) The front wall, in header-bond brickwork, has a central doorway with rectangular fanlight and flanking windows; above these is a stucco plat-band with embossed floral and swag decorations. In front of the house is a small raised forecourt with cellars below and with original iron railings and overthrow above the gates. The interior has been entirely remodelled for commercial use.

(291) Houses, pair, Nos. 21, 22, with rendered front walls, were built in the second half of the 18th century and remodelled in the early 19th century. No. 23 retains 18th-century fielded panelling and a semicircular cupboard with shaped shelves. (Demolished)

(292) Millidges Buildings is an L-shaped group of poor quality cottages of two storeys in a yard behind Rockland Place (erected 1861), probably built c. 1850. (Demolished)

(293) House, No. 47, of two storeys with cellars and attics, was built in the mid 18th century (plan p. 222). The front wall is in Flemish-bond brickwork with shaped headers and has a moulded timber cornice below the caves. The front doorway has a flat hood supported by shaped brackets. Inside, the windows have shutters with fielded panels and window scats; other original fittings which survive include two fireplaces with wide architraves and moulded shelves, a rectangular cupboard with shaped shelves and a dog gate of trellis pattern on the staircase. (Demolished)

(294) Terrace of five cottages, Nos. 49–57, with rendered front walls and slate-covered roofs, was built in the mid 19th century. Each cottage has two principal rooms on each floor with a staircase between. (Demolished)

(295) Rogers' Almshouses, of one storey and attics, have walls of coursed rubble, except the N. gable wall and chimney-stacks which are of brick, and roofs covered with tiles and stone slates. The almshouses were erected c. 1604; a stone tablet with this date and the black-letter inscription 'Fundatore Roberto Rogers apud Londinenses Pellione Polæ nato' is set in the centre of the W. wall of the original building; this last comprised six cottages, of which the northernmost was largely demolished to widen the W. end of King Street, perhaps in the 19th century. In 1852 a further six almshouses were added to the S.; they bear a stone tablet with this date and are of similar general appearance to the foregoing, though the outer doorways on the W. are now removed. A third tablet records the reconstruction of the building in 1927.

The original building has oak-framed doorways with chamfered heads and jambs and two-light oak-framed windows; the doorways were partly blocked in 1927 and the dormer windows have been entirely renewed. The chimneys at the rear rise in pairs above brick gables and have rectangular shafts joined at the top.

(296) House, No. 59, of two storeys with a cellar and attics, is of the mid to late 18th century but may incorporate some earlier work; it was remodelled in the early 19th century when the present two-storey bay window was added. The front doorway has a flat hood supported by shaped brackets. (Demolished)

(297) Houses, four, Nos. 61, 63, 69, 71. Nos. 61, 63, were built as a single dwelling in the mid 18th century; above the former central doorway bricks of contrasting colour are set in a lozenge pattern. A further house, No. 69, was added to the N. in the late 18th century and No. 71 c. 1840. The joists of the ground floor of No. 69 are reused curved timbers from small clinker-built boats. (Demolished)

(298) Cottages, Nos. 65, 67, of two storeys, stand in the yard (1888: 'Willis's Yard') behind Nos. 61, 63. (Demolished)

(299) Terraces, two, of six houses, Nos. 79–89, and of three houses, Nos. 91–95, are of two storeys with slated roofs; No. 79 also has attics. Nos. 81–89 were built in 1821: a stone tablet with this date is set in the centre of the back wall. (Demolished)

W. side (elevations opp. p. 235)

(300) West End House (Plate 130), of two storeys with cellars and attics and walls of brick with stone dressings, is a mid 18th-century merchant's house and incorporates fragments of a slightly earlier building to the N.

The front elevation is symmetrical, of five bays with a stone plinth, quoins, moulded cornice and balustraded parapet surmounted by four urns and two stone pineapples. The front doorway is flanked by stone pilasters, the courses being alternately vermiculated and plain, with Ionic capitals supporting a pulvinated frieze and pediment. The windows have moulded architraves and keystones except that above the front doorway which has a scrolled and eared architrave. The other elevations are undistinguished. To the N. of the main elevation are two fragments of early 17th-century walling in stone and brick apparently laid in either a banded or chequer pattern and incorporated into a later building; these may represent the remains of an earlier house of which the present building is an extension or part rebuilding.

The 18th-century plan (p. 214) was L-shaped with a projecting lobby in the re-entrant angle to allow access between the entrance hall and staircase; a kitchen was added in the angle of the L in the early 19th century and the surviving portion of early 17th-century building largely replaced by a separate house or service quarters.

On the ground floor the S.E. room has an enriched modillion cornice and plaster ceiling with rococo decoration of garlands and swags; the window sills and skirting have egg-and-dart enrichment. In the N.E. room is a fireplace with an architrave of marble with beaded inner edge and wooden outer moulding with egg-and-dart ornament, pulvinated frieze carved with vine leaves and fruit in high relief, and moulded and enriched cornice. The staircase has turned balusters with moulded caps and bases and with shafts alternately plain and twisted; the wooden handrail terminates in the lower flight in a scrolled stop with foliage ornament (see also Monuments 203, 210). The first-floor rooms also retain original fittings including fireplaces and ceiling cornices. In front of the house is an 18th-century iron railing incorporating a gateway with scrolled overthrow and lamp bracket.

(301) House, No. 6, of two storeys with a cellar and attics, was built c. 1760. The front wall has a block cornice below the eaves; the front doorway has Roman Doric pilasters supporting a plain architrave without a frieze, and a segmental pediment.

(302) House, No. 8, of two storeys with a cellar and attics, was built in the late 18th century; the doorway has a pedimented hood supported by pilasters and entablature blocks.

(303) Houses, pair, Nos. 10, 12, of two storeys with cellars and mansard attics, were built c. 1800. The doorways have flat hoods supported by shaped brackets.

(304) House, No. 14, was built in the mid 18th century. The front wall is in header-bond brickwork and has a brick dentil cornice. The front doorway has a flat hood supported by scrolled brackets.

(305) Houses, Nos. 20, 22, with the front wall rendered in stucco and a verge of stone slates to the roof, were built in the late 17th or early 18th century but considerably remodelled in the late 18th century and later. No. 20 retains an exposed chamfered ceiling beam in the front ground-floor room and a moulded plank and muntin partition on the floor above. At the back of No. 20 a two-storey wing of better quality than the rest of the house was added in the mid 18th century; the W. wall is in header-bond brickwork. In the ground-floor room is a large semicircular cupboard with shaped shelves and a shaped apron; flanking fluted pilasters support a semicircular moulded architrave and key block. (Demolished)

(306) House, No. 24, is of generally similar design and date to No. 8 (Monument 302). (Demolished)

(307) Houses, Nos. 26, 28, of three storeys but originally two storeys and attics, were built as a single house in the mid 18th century. The ground-floor windows have flat arches of gauged brick with ogee sinkings; the jambs and quoins are in a brick of deeper colour than the rest of the walling. The plan, which originally comprised two principal rooms with a staircase hall between, has been modified by late 19th-century alterations. (Demolished)

(308) Houses, Nos. 30, 32, 34, of three storeys, in part with cellars and attics, are of brick rendered in stucco at the front and with stone dressings; the roofs are hipped and covered with slates. No. 32, formerly 'Eagle House', was built c. 1730 as the mansion house of a substantial merchant, probably William Joliffe. In the early 19th century the W. corner was demolished and rebuilt on a grander scale; at the same time the two wings, Nos. 30 and 34, were added.

The front elevation of No. 32 (Plate 126) has rusticated quoins, a moulded stone cornice and low parapet; the windows have moulded architraves and keystones; in front of the outer doorway is an early 19th-century flat-roofed porch with two free-standing Roman-Doric columns supporting an enriched frieze and cornice. The surviving part of the original rear wall has a moulded cornice, low parapet and windows with keystones, those in the centre lighting the staircase having semi-circular heads and plain impost blocks.

The plan (p. 214) has four principal rooms on each floor and smaller rooms above the entrance. The staircase (Plate 126), which is at the rear, has an open string with moulded soffit and enriched scrolled spandrels, fluted Roman-Doric newels, that at the base of the stair being a cluster of four, and turned balusters; the balusters are grouped three to each step, the centre one of each triplet being spirally carved. The upper flights were altered when the back rooms were rebuilt. The N. and S. wings were added between 1831 and 1835, (fn. 22) the former as a service wing and the latter possibly as extra guest accommodation, since it was accessible on ground and first floors from the rebuilt rear rooms.

(309) House, No. 58, of four storeys, with a slate-covered roof, is of unusual height; it is one room in width and may have been built as an annexe to a larger house or pair of houses which formerly stood to the S. Of the latter only the springing of the ground-floor window arches remains. (Demolished)

(310) Houses, Nos. 60, 62 (Nos. 1, 2 Balston Terrace), of two storeys, were built as a single house in the late 18th century. The front wall is in header-bond brickwork; the original windows have segmental-arched heads.

(311) Houses, Nos. 64, 66 (Nos. 3, 4 Balston Terrace), of two storeys, were built as a single house in the late 18th century. The front wall is in Flemish-bond brickwork; the original entrance, which has been divided, formerly had a pedimented head above which is a blind window. Windows have flat-arched heads with rusticated keystones.

(312) House with shop, No. 72, has been considerably altered, and the lower storey rendered. (Demolished)

(313) House with shop, No. 74, was built in the late 18th century. The front wall is in Flemish-bond brickwork with glazed headers; the shop front is of the late 19th century. (Demolished)

(314) Terrace of three cottages, Nos. 76–80, with a slate-covered roof, was built in the mid 19th century; front doorways have symmetrically-moulded architraves with round paterae and flat hoods supported by shaped brackets.

(315) Houses, pair, Nos. 82, 84, of two storeys with basements and attics, were built between 1786 and 1792. (fn. 23) They vary slightly in detail; No. 82 has a mansard roof. The front wall is in headerbond brickwork, windows have segmental-arched heads with keystones, front doorways have pilasters (No. 82) or attached columns (No. 84) (Plate 131) carrying entablature blocks and open pediments. The kitchen in the basement of No. 82 retains its original fireplace.

dWest Butts Street (A, B2)

(316) Terrace of four houses, Nos. 8–11, with a verge of stone slates to the roof, was built in the early 19th century. It has a serrated brick eaves cornice; windows have hung sashes at the front but hinged casements at the rear. (Demolished)

(317) Grove Place, a terrace of three houses of two storeys with a slate-covered roof, was built in the early 19th-century; outer doorways have segmental heads; part of a slate-covered verandah remains in front of the ground-floor windows. (Demolished)

dWeston's Lane (B3)

(1774: Weston's Lane. 1888: part of East Street)

N. side

(318) Weston's House, of three storeys and cellars, with front wall in header-bond brickwork rendered in stucco, and tiled roofs with three courses of stone slates at the eaves, was built in the mid 18th century.

The house faces S.E. and has a block cornice to the front; the front doorway is central and has a moulded architrave and fluted Ionic pilasters supporting a pulvinated frieze and pediment; the windows have flat heads. A wing at the back, perhaps added later in the 18th century, in Flemish-bond brickwork with glazed headers, has segmental-arched window heads with keystones and a block cornice and retains an original 18th-century rainwater head. The front range has a central staircase hall; the staircase has timber balusters with moulded caps and bases. Gate piers near the front of the house, of stone with alternate blocks vermiculated and plain, have moulded caps and bases and are surmounted by multilated heads of eagles(?) The wrought-iron gate with surround and overthrow is contemporary. (Derelict)

(319) The Hermitage, of two storeys with modern attics and slate-covered roof, was built c. 1770–80. The front wall is in header-bond brickwork; the front doorway has a semicircular head and fanlight with flanking Roman-Doric half-columns supporting entablature blocks and an open pediment; the windows have segmental heads with keystones. (Derelict)

dWest Quay Road (C1–A2)

E. side

(320) Warehouse, Nos. 10–13, is of two storeys and dates from the first half of the 19th century. The street front has a serrated brick eaves cornice and two ranges of segmental-headed windows.

(321) Cottages, Nos. 17, 19, were built c. 1800; No. 17 has a mansard roof. (Demolished)

(322) House, No. 21, of two storeys with rendered walls and a pyramidal slated roof of low pitch, was built in the mid 19th century on a square plan.

(323) Lion Cottage, No. 32, of two storeys with rendered walls and a hipped slate-covered roof, was built as a pair of cottages c. 1830. The W. elevation is divided into two bays by three pilaster strips with incised Greek anthemion decoration; shaped wooden brackets support widely overhanging eaves.

(324) Wheat Sheaf Inn, No. 38, of two storeys with walls rendered in stucco and roof covered with tiles and slates, was built in the late 18th century and extended to the S. in the mid 19th century. (Demolished)

W. side

(325) Dorset Iron Foundry, of one and two storeys with roofs of modern materials, was built as industrial premises in the early 19th century; it was extended to the S.E. in 1850 when a gabled wing was added facing the street. This has a wide central round-headed window with cast-iron frame flanked by smaller round-headed windows. A similar wing of like design was built to the N.E. in 1902. Below the apex of the two gables are rectangular panels formerly painted with the dates of erection.

(326) The Bridge Inn, of three storeys with moulded cornice and plain parapet, has a symmetrical elevation to the street. The front and side doorways have semicircular heads.

(327) Gate Piers, immediately opposite Monument (320), of brick with pine cone finials, are of the early 19th century.

(328) Garland Terrace, four cottages, with walls rendered in stucco at the front and slate-hung at the sides, and a hipped slate-covered roof, was built in the mid 19th century. It is of plain construction but is of interest in that the two end cottages, which are entered from the sides, have false doorways at the front including flat hoods supported by shaped brackets, thus giving each cottage a similar elevation to the street. (Demolished)

(329) Houses, five. Two to the W. were formerly part of 'Trafalgar Row'. (Demolished)

HAMWORTHY

Railway Station, see p. 416.

a(330) The Old Rectory, formerly the Manor House (998905), of two storeys and attics with brick walls and a tiled roof, was built in the mid 17th century as the seat of the Carew family. It is notable for the use of carved brickwork for the Classical order and mouldings of the S.E. front (Plate 128).

The front wall is punctuated by a series of giant Ionic pilasters supporting projecting returns of the main entablature at the wall-head. Above the cornice are three ogee-sided gables finished with small pediments. In the centre is a two-storeyed porch with pilasters, as before, supporting the returning entablature which here forms the parapet; entrance to the porch is through a semicircular-headed outer doorway. Windows throughout have flat-arched brick heads and modern wooden casements. Chimney-stacks at each end of the building have arched panels in the sides. The N.E. and S.W. end elevations have ogee-sided gables. The rear, N.W., elevation is divided by plat-bands at first-floor and attic levels and has three plain straight-sided gables. The interior has two principal rooms and a large entrance hall at the front and a staircase and minor rooms at the rear. The house was extensively altered internally in the 19th century.

d(331) The Shipwright's Arms p.h., Ferry Road, 250 yds. S. of St. James's Church, of two storeys with cellars and attics and a verge of stone slates to the roof, was built in the late 18th century on an L-shaped plan. The doorways have modern surrounds with pediments in an 18th-century style; the windows have segmental heads.

d(332) House, No. 8 Harbour Road (1888: Old Parsonage), on S. side of road 480 yds. S.W. of St. James's Church, with brick walls, stone dressings, and courses of stone slates at the eaves, was built in the early 18th century. The front is symmetrical, of five bays with a central doorway and a moulded eaves cornice; there are stone copings to the end gables. (Demolished)

d(333) House, No. 10 Harbour Road, immediately E. of the above, was built in the early 18th century but has been much altered. (Demolished)

d(334) Terrace of three houses, Nos. 15–19 Harbour Road, 40 yds. N.E. of the above, with a half-hipped slated roof, was built c. 1800. The front wall is in yellow brick, the other walls are in red brick; each house has a front doorway with rectangular fanlight and one ground-floor window with round-arched head in two orders.

a(335) Turlin Farm, former farmhouse (978912), with walls of brick and cob rendered in stucco and with a slate-covered gabled roof, was built c. 1800. On plan it has a central entrance with a lobby alongside a central chimney and one room to each side.

CREEKMOOR and WATERLOO

a(336) Creekmoor House (999931) is said to have been built in 1790 by Mr. Crew of Poole (Hutchins III, 303). The original E. range is three rooms in length and one in depth; a bay window has been added in the centre and the house has later been extended to the rear.

d(337) Creekmoor Mill, house and water-mill, 400 yards E.N.E. of the foregoing, was largely rebuilt in the mid 19th century, but the house retains a small late 18th-century wing in brick at the rear. The mill building is of two storeys with brick walls; the roof has collapsed, but some machinery and an iron overshot wheel remain. W. and S.E. of the house are, respectively, a single-storied Dairy and a small Barn, both of the mid 19th century.

d(338) Planefield House (009935), of two storeys and attics with brick walls rendered in stucco and a slate-covered roof, was built shortly before 1795, when it was advertised in the Salisbury Journal (8 June 1795) as a 'neat new-built villa, with two parlours, kitchen etc., ... and seven bedrooms'. The house faces S. and has a central semi-octagonal bay with a semicircular porch to the lower storey supported by Roman-Doric columns with debased entablature blocks and a flat roof. The eaves on this side of the house have a wide overhang. The windows here and in the return walls have stucco keystones. In the centre of the E. and W. sides are large semicircular bays with one hungsash window to each floor. The principal entrance is on the E., N. of the bay, and has double doors with a semicircular fanlight and is flanked by a pair of attached fluted columns with fluted caps and debased entablature blocks with fluted friezes and a dentil cornice returned as a pediment. (Demolished)


Poole: Planefield House

Poole: Planefield House

d(339) Terrace of three houses, at Nag's Head Farm (011938), was built c. 1815. It has a symmetrical elevation of five bays with a central gabled projection of three bays having a blind lunette in the gable. A serrated brick eaves cornice is carried up the gables.

TATNAM

d(340) Tatnam Farm, house (01289195), with rendered walls and a slate-covered roof, was built in the early 19th century; the front is symmetrical and has a central porch with flat roof supported by columns, flanked by hung-sash windows and with three widely spaced hung-sash windows to the floor above.

A Barn, 50 yds. N.E. of the house and of similar date, is of brickwork partly rendered and with a roof formerly slate-covered, half-hipped at the eaves and gabled over an entrance in the centre of one side.

d(341) Cottages, five, Nos. 4–8 Well Lane, formerly Tatnam Farm Cottages, 100 yds. N.N.E. of the foregoing, are of one storey and attics; the walls are of brick except the lower courses of Nos. 6–8 which are of stone; the roofs are tiled. Nos. 6–8 were built in the 18th century as a barn, of which some remains of ventilating slits survive; this building was divided and converted in the 19th century, and further cottages were added to the W. The lane derives its name from the well which was the town's principal water-supply until the mid 19th century. About 1545 the well was improved by the erection of a conduit head 16 ft. square (Hutchins I, 2); no trace of this survives. (Demolished)

PARKSTONE

(Including all suburbs E. and S.E. of Poole)

d(342) Houses, seventeen, Nos. 7–39 Commercial Road (odd nos.) on N. side ¼ m. W.S.W. of St. Peter's Church (5), were built in the second quarter of the 19th century. Some are grouped to form a terrace of semi-detached pairs, others are detached houses of villa type, many of them with verandahs and windows glazed with marginal panes.

d(343) House, No. 45 Commercial Road, E. of the foregoing, was built in the mid 19th century. In the centre of the roof is a battlemented tower-like projection with one semicircular-headed window in each face.

d(344) St. Peter's School, Parr Street, 80 yds. S.S.W. of St. Peter's Church, of one storey with rendered brick walls and a slate-covered hipped roof, was built in the early 19th century and later extended to the rear. The front has four windows with pointed heads, and end porches.

d(345) Houses, Nos. 11 and 57 Parr Street, of two storeys with brick walls and hipped slate-covered roofs were built in the early 19th century. No. 57 has since been divided.

d(346) Danecourt Rooms, St. Peter's Road, 100 yds. W.N.W. of St. Peter's Church, of two storeys with walls rendered in stucco and a slate-covered roof, was built as a private house c. 1840. The front elevation has two low-pitched gables rising from wide bracketed eaves and a central doorway flanked by pilasters.

d(347) Houses, pair, Nos. 33, 35 Sandbanks Road, 470 yds. S.S.W. of St. Peter's Church, are of two storeys with brick walls covered with modern rendering and a modern tiled roof. They were built in the late 18th century as a double-fronted house with gable chimneys and were divided and extended to the S.E. in the early 20th century.

d(348) 'The Castle', Castle Hill, 580 yds. E.N.E. of St. Peter's Church, of two storeys and attics with walls of cob, rubble and brick, mostly rendered, and slate-covered roofs, is an early 19th-century villa. It has seven round angle-towers, one at each external angle, with battlemented parapets, all but two being of solid construction. The S. entrance front has a blind wall-arcade of four bays rising through two storeys with pointed arches and enclosing two heights of blind window recesses, all between two towers; the porch, which occupies one bay, is segmental and has a battlemented parapet. The W. front is symmetrical and has a central projecting wing with a two-storey wall-arcade of three unequal bays with four-centred arched heads enclosing rectangular casement windows with late Gothic glazing bars. (Demolished)

d(349) The Elms, 1450 yds. S. of St. Peter's Church, is of two storeys; the outer walls are generally of cob rendered externally, the interior walls and eastern bow are of brickwork; the roof is hipped and covered with slates. The house was built c. 1830 as a detached villa residence and extended to the N. and S. in the late 19th century. The plan provides for two principal rooms with a kitchen and offices and for five bedrooms on the floor above.


The Elms, Poole (349)

The Elms, Poole (349)

d(350) Pottery Farm, cottage (041906), of one storey and attics with cob walls refaced and largely rebuilt in brick and a thatched roof, was built in the 17th century perhaps as a single-roomed dwelling; in the late 18th century a second room was added to the E. and further additions and alterations were made in the late 19th century. (Demolished)

e(351) Branksome Towers Hotel (067899) retains fragments of a mid 19th-century house of stone, illustrated in Hutchins (III, 303), but has been much rebuilt.

CANFORD MAGNA

(Including Merly, Oakley and Knighton)

f(352) Merly Hall Farm (005990) is a house of two storeys and attics with rendered walls and a tiled roof. It was built in the 17th century but considerably altered and extended by a W. wing, now divided from the rest, in the 19th century to make an L-plan. The house retains a good original staircase of oak with solid moulded string, bulbous turned balusters pegged to a moulded rail, and plain square newels; reset fragments of original panelling also survive.

f(353) Cottage, at Oakley (019986), of two storeys with brick walls and ashlar dressings and a slate-covered roof, was built in the mid 19th century. Fragments of an earlier building of the 16th or early 17th century of carstone rubble with ashlar quoins survive in the E. gable wall.

f(354) Oakley Farm (020986) is a symmetrical farm group of the mid 19th century. Flanking the entrance to the farmyard are two buildings, each designed as a pair of labourers' cottages, of two storeys with yellow brick walls and slate-covered roofs. The cottages adjacent to the entrance are set forward as semi-octagonal bays. Windows have brick mullions, lights with four-centred heads and square frames, with moulded labels or string-courses above those in the lower storey.

f(355) The Old Vicarage, Canford (031982), of two storeys and attics with rendered brick walls and a tiled roof, was built in the late 18th century. The front windows were altered in the mid 19th century when they were embellished with stone jambs and heads, some with labels.

f(356) The Brook, house (032982), of two storeys with brick walls and a tiled roof, was built in the late 18th century. The symmetrical front elevation is in header-bond brickwork and has a dentilled brick eaves cornice. The N. gable wall is hung with mathematical tiles.

f(357) Cottages, pair (032983), of two storeys with brick walls and a thatched roof, were built in the early 19th century. The front doorways have rustic porches with thatched roofs; the interior contains two chamfered ceiling beams.

f(358) Court House (032982), E.S.E. of (356), is of two storeys and attics with brick walls with stone dressings and a tiled roof. The N.E. wing is of 17th-century date and has a diaper pattern of glazed headers in the gable wall. Windows in this wing are generally of two lights, with central mullions and surrounds of Ham Hill stone, the heads having flat arches with voussoirs alternately long and short. The S. wing was added in the 19th century and a linking range on the W. was built c. 1914.

g(359) Knighton House (050976), of two storeys with walls of cob, brick and timber framing and a thatched roof, was built in the 17th century. The plan is T-shaped with an entrance hall and two flanking rooms in the front range; the rear wing retains some timber framing in its gable. The chimneystacks are partly original but the interior has been entirely modernised.

f(360) Cottages, two, in Knighton Lane (049974), have rendered walls and thatched roofs. The cottage to the S., of one storey and attics with cob walls, was built in the 18th century; that to the N., of two storeys and attics with brick walls, is of early 19th-century date.

Earthworks, Etc.

(361–401) Round Barrows, p. 447.

(402–5) Roman Remains, p. 603.

Footnotes

1 Photographs in Poole Museum.
2 The bell, clock, plate and royal arms have been transferred to the new parish church of St. Michael.
3 H. P. Smith, History of... Poole (1948), I, 189–91.
4 H. P. Smith, Official Guide to the Old Town House... (Poole, 1929).
5 J. Summerson, John Nash (1935), 282.
6 Rev. Alfred Barry, The Life and Works of Sir Charles Barry (1867).
7 E. C. Chancellor, Carvings and other Decorative Features at Canford (pamphlet undated, c. 1950), 12.
8 Ibid.
9 E. F. J. Mathews, 'The Economic History of Poole, 1756–1815', London University, Ph.D. Thesis, 1957.
10 Church Rate Books, St. James's Church.
11 Ibid.
12 Church Rate Books, St. James's Church.
13 Ibid.
14 O.S. 1:500 map, 1888.
15 Arthur Oswald, Country Houses of Dorset, 2nd. ed. (1959), 36–7.
16 Hutchins, 1, 66–7.
17 Church Rate Books, St. James's Church.
18 Ibid.
19 Church Rate Books, St. James's Church.
20 Ibid.
21 Church Rate Books, St. James's Church.
22 Church Rate Books, St. James's Church.
23 Church Rate Books, St. James's Church.


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