House of Lords Journal Volume 12
27 October 1673

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 12: 27 October 1673', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 12: 1666-1675 (1767-1830), pp. 588-591. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=12844 Date accessed: 01 October 2014.


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Anno 25 Caroli Secundi.

DIE Lunæ, Vicesimo Septimo die Octobris, 1673, Anno Regni Serenissimi Domini Nostri Caroli Secundi, Dei Gratiâ, Angliæ, Scociæ, Franciæ, et Hiberniæ Regis, Fidei Defensoris, &c. Vicesimo Quinto; quo die præsens hæc Undecima Parliamenti Sessio tenenda est apud Civitatem Westm. ibi tam Spirituales quam Temporales Domini, quorum Nomina subscribuntur, præsentes fuerunt:

REX.

His Royal Highness the Duke of Yorke.
Arch. Cant.
Epus. London.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Ely.
Epus. Hereford.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Rochester.
Epus. Landaff.
Epus. Chichester.
Epus. Oxon.
Epus. Bristoll.
Epus. Gloucester.
Epus. Bath & Wells.
Epus. Chester.
Dux Cumberland.
Antonio Comes de Shaftesbury, Cancellarius Angliæ.
Thomas Vicecomes Latymer, Thesaurarius Angliæ.
Arthurus Comes Anglesey, Ds. Custos Privati Sigilli.
Dux Bucks.
Dux Monmouth.
Marq. de Worcester.
Robertus Comes de Lyndsey, Magnus Camerarius Angliæ.
Henric. Comes Norwichiæ, et Comes Marescallus Angl.
Jacobus Comes de Brecknock, Senescallus Hospitii Domini Regis.
Henricus Comes St. Albani, Camerarius Hospitii Domini Regis.
Comes Huntington.
Comes Suffolke.
Comes Dorsett.
Comes Sarum.
Comes Bridgwater.
Comes Warwick & Holland.
Comes Bristoll.
Comes Midd.
Comes Bollingbrooke.
Comes Manchester.
Comes Mulgrave.
Comes Dover.
Comes Sunderland.
Comes Scarsdale.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Bath.
Comes Craven.
Comes Arlington.
Vicecomes de Stafford.
Vicecomes Fauconberg.
Vicecomes Mordant.
Vicecomes Hallyfax.
Vicecomes Yarmouth.
Ds. Berkeley de Berkeley.
Ds. Eure.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Arundell de Warder.
Ds. Grey de Warke.
Ds. Lovelace.
Ds. Maynard.
Ds. Howard de Esc.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Powis.
Ds. Herbert de Cherbury.
Ds. Newport.
Ds. Byron.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Carrington.
Ds. Widdrington.
Ds. Lucas.
Ds. Gerard de Brandon.
Ds. Delamer.
Ds. Townsend.
Ds. Arundell de Treric.
Ds. Butler de Moore Parke.
Ds. Butler de Weston.

PRAYERS.

King present.

His Majesty being present this Day, and sitting in His Royal Throne, adorned with His Regal Ornaments (the Peers sitting in their Robes uncovered), the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod was commanded to let the Commons know, "That it was His Majesty's Pleasure, that they come up presently to attend His Majesty."

Who being come, with their Speaker; His Majesty made a short Speech, as followeth:

King's Speech.

"My Lords and Gentlemen,

"I thought this Day to have welcomed you with an Honourable Peace; My Preparations for the War and Condescensions at the Treaty gave Me great Reason to believe so: But the Dutch have disappointed Me in that Expectation, and have treated My Ambassadors at Cologne with the Contempt of Conquerors, and not as might be expected from Men in their Condition. They have other Thoughts than Peace.

"This obligeth Me to move you again for a Supply, the Safety and Honour of the Nation necessarily requiring it: It must be one proportionable to the Occasion; and I must tell you besides, that if I have it not speedily, the Mischief will be irreparable in My Preparations for the next Spring. The great Experience I have had of you, Gentlemen of the House of Commons, will not suffer Me to believe, that the Artifices of our Enemies can possibly divert you from giving Me this Supply, or that you can fail of adjusting the Proportion of it.

"I hope I need not use many Words to persuade you that I am steady in maintaining all the Professions and Promises I have made you concerning Religion and Property; and I shall be very ready to give you fresh Instances of My Zeal for preserving the Established Religion and Laws, as often as any Occasion shall require.

"In the last Place, I am highly concerned to commend to your Consideration and Care the Debt I owe the Goldsmiths, in which very many other of My good Subjects are involved. I heartily recommend their Condition to you, and desire your Assistance for their Relief.

"There is more that I would have you informed of, which I leave to the Chancellor."

Then the Lord Chancellor, going to His Majesty, received Directions from Him, and made the Speech following:

L. Chancellor's Speech.

"My Lords; and you the Knights, Citizens, and Burgesses of the House of Commons;

"His Majesty had Reason to expect that He should have met you with the Olive Branch of Peace: His Naval Preparations, greater than in any former Years, together with the Land Forces He had ready for any Occasion, gave Him Assurance to obtain it before this Time; and the rather, because His Aims were not Conquest, unless by Obstinacy enforced: But His Condescensions at the Treaty have been so great, that the very Mediators have declared, they were not reasonably to be refused: He could not be King of Great Brittaine without securing the Dominion and Property of His own Seas; the first, by an Article clear, and not elusory, of the Flag; the other, by an Article that preserved the Right of the Fishing, but gave the Dutch Permission, as Tenants, under a small Rent, to enjoy and continue that gainful Trade upon His Coasts. The King was obliged, for the Security of a lasting Peace, as also by the Laws of Gratitude and Relation, to see the House of Orange settled, and the Lovesteine, that Carthaginian Party, brought down; neither in this did the King insist beyond what was moderate and agreeable to their Government, and what the Prince's Ancestors enjoyed amongst them. Besides these, there was necessary to the Trade of England, that there should be a fair Adjustment of Commerce in The East Indies, where the King's Demands were reasonable, and according to the Law of Nations; and their Practice of late Years hath been exorbitant and oppressive, suitable only to their Power and Interest, and destructive, if continued, to our East India Company. These were all of any Moment the King insisted on, as judging aright, that that Peace that was reasonable, just, and fair to both Parties, would be sacred and durable; and that by this Means he should depress the Interest and Reputation of that Lovesteine Party amongst them, who sucked in with their Milk an inveterate Hatred to England, and transmit it to their Posterity as a distinguishing Character, wherein they place their Loyalty to their Country. In Return to this candid and fair Proceeding on the King's Part, His Majesty assures you, He hath received nothing but the most scornful and contemptuous Treatment imaginable: Papers delivered in to the Mediators, owned by them to be stuffed with so unhandsome Language that they were ashamed and refused to shew them; never agreeing to any Article about the Flag, that was clear or plain; refusing any Article of the Fishery, but such a one as might sell them the Right of Inheritance for an inconsiderable Sum of Money, thought it be a Royalty so inherent in the Crown of England, that I may say (with His Majesty's Pardon for the Expression) He cannot sell it. The Article of the Prince of Orange, and the Adjustment of the East India Trade, had neither of them any better Success; and, to make all of a Piece, they have this last Week sent a Trumpeter, with an Address to His Majesty, being a Deduction of their several Offers of Peace, as they call them, and their Desires for it now; but it is, both in the Penning and the Timing of it, plainly an Appeal to His Majesty's People against Himself. And the King hath commanded me to tell you, He is resolved to join Issue with them, and print both their Address and His Answer, that His People, and the World may see how notorious Falshoods and Slights they endeavour to put upon Him. In a Word, in England, and in all other Places, and to all other Persons of the World, they declare they offer all Things to obtain a Peace from the King of England; but to Himself, His Ministers, the Mediators, or His Plenipotentiaries, it may with Confidence and Truth be affirmed, that to this Day, nay, even in this last Address, they have offered nothing. They desire the King's Subjects would believe they beg for Peace; whilst their true Request is, only to be permitted to be once Masters of the Seas, which they hope, if they can subsist at Land, Length of Time may give them, and if once got, is never to be lost, nor can it be bought by any State or Emperor at too great a Rate; and what Security their Agreement with us in Religion will afford, when they shall have the Power, former Instances may give Demonstration of. Joint Interests have often secured the Peace of differing Religions; but agreeing Professions have hardly an Example of preserving Peace of different Interests. This being the true and natural State of Things, His Majesty doth with great Assurance throw Himself into the Arms of you His Parliament, for a Supply suitable to the great Affairs He is engaged in. When you consider we are an Island, 'tis not Riches nor Greatness we contend for, yet those must attend the Success; but 'tis our very Beings are in Question; we fight pro Aris et Focis in this War. We are no longer Freemen, being Islanders and Neighbours, if they master us at Sea. There is not so lawful or commendable a Jealousy in the World, as an Englishman's of the growing Greatness of any Prince at Sea. If you permit the Sea, our Brittish Wife, to be ravished, an eternal Mark of Infamy will stick upon us: Therefore I am commanded earnestly to recommend to you, not only the Proportion, but the Time of the Supply; for, unless you think of it early, it will not be serviceable to the chief End, of setting out a Fleet the next Spring.

"As for the next Part of the King's Speech, I can add nothing to what His Majesty hath said; for, as to Religion and Property, His Heart is with your Heart, perfectly with your Heart. He hath not yet learned to deny you any Thing; and He believes your Wisdom and Moderation is such, He never shall: He asks of you to be at Peace in Him, as He is in you; and He shall never deceive you.

"There is One Word more I am commanded to say, concerning that Debt (fn. *) is owing to the Goldsmiths; the King holds himself in Honour and Conscience obliged to see them satisfied: Besides, you all know, how many Widows, Orphans, and particular Persons, the public Calamity hath overtaken, and how hard it is that so disproportionable a Burden should fall upon them, even to their utter Ruin. The whole Case is so well and generally known, that I need say no more: Your great Wisdoms hath not done it at the first, peradventure, that the Trade of Bankers might be suppressed, which End is now attained; so that now your great Goodness may restore to those poor People, and the many innocent ones that are concerned with them, some Life and Assurance of Payment in a competent Time.

"My Lords and Gentlemen,

"I have no more in Command; and therefore shall conclude, with my own hearty Prayers, that this Session may equal, nay exceed, the Honour of the last; that it may perfect what the last begun for the Safety of the King and Kingdom; that it may be ever famous for having established upon a durable Foundation our Religion, Laws, and Properties; that we may not be tossed with boisterous Winds, nor overtaken by a sudden dead Calm; but that a fair Gale may carry you, in a steady, even, and resolved Way, into the Ports of Wisdom and Security."

After this, His Majesty withdrew.

Then it was ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal assembled in Parliament, That the Lord Great Chamberlain of England, the Lord Steward, and the Lord Chamberlain of His Majesty's Houshold, the Lord Maynard, and the Lord Newport, do present the humble Thanks of this House to His Majesty, for His Gracious Speech made this Day in the House of Peers; and to desire that His Majesty would be pleased to give Order, that both it and the Lord Chancellor's Speech may be printed.

L. Grey de Rolleston introduced.

This Day Charles North, Lord Grey de Rolleston, Chevalier, was introducted, in his Robes, between the Lord Grey de Wark and the Lord Howard of Esc. the Lord Great Chamberlain, the Earl of Suffolke (executing the Office of the Earl Marshal), and Garter King of Arms, going before; the Writ of Summons to Parliament being read, bearing Date the 24 of October, Anno Regni Caroli IIdi Vicesimo Quinto.

Then his Lordship was brought and placed at the lower End of the Barons Bench.

Bill to encourage English Manufactures.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, "An Act for encouraging the Manufactures of England."

Committee of Privileges.

Lords Committees appointed to take Consideration of the Customs and Orders of this House, and Privileges of Parliament, and the Peers of this Kingdom and Lords of Parliament.

His Royal Highness the Duke of Yorke.
D. of Cumberland.
L. Chancellor.
L. Treasurer.
L. Privy Seal.
D. of Bucks.
D. of Monmouth.
Marq. of Worcester.
L. Great Chamberlain.
E. Marshal.
L. Steward.
L. Chamberlain.
Comes Huntington.
Comes Suffolke.
Comes Dorsett.
Comes Sarum.
Comes Bridgwater.
Comes Warwick & Holland.
Comes Bristoll.
Comes Bollingbrooke.
Comes Manchester.
Comes Mulgrave.
Comes Dover.
Comes Sunderland.
Comes Scarsdale.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Bath.
Comes Craven.
Comes Arlington.
Vicecomes de Stafford.
Vicecomes Fauconberg.
Vicecomes Mordant.
Vicecomes Hallyfax.
Vicecomes Yarmouth.
Arch. Cant.
Epus. London.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Ely.
Epus. Hereford.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Rochester.
Epus. Landaffe.
Epus. Chichester.
Epus. Oxon.
Epus. Gloucester.
Epus. Bath & Wells.
Epus. Chester.
Ds. Berkeley de Berk.
Ds. Eure.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Arundell de Ward.
Ds. Grey de Wark.
Ds. Lovelace.
Ds. Maynard.
Ds. Howard de Esc.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Powis.
Ds. Herbert de Cherb.
Ds. Newport.
Ds. Byron.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Carrington.
Ds. Widdrington.
Ds. Lucas.
Ds. Gerard de Brandon.
Ds. Delamer.
Ds. Townsend.
Ds. Arundell de Trerice.
Ds. Butler de Moore Park.
Ds. Butler de Weston.
Ds. Grey de Roleston.

Their Lordships, or any Seven of them; to meet on Monday next, and every Monday after, at Three of the Clock in the Afternoon; and to adjourn to what other Time as they please.

Committee for Petitions.

Lords Committees appointed by the House to receive and consider of Petitions, and afterwards to make Report thereof to the House.

His Royal Highness the Duke of Yorke.
D. Cumberland.
L. Chancellor.
L. Treasurer.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Bucks.
D. Monmouth.
Marq. Worcester.
L. Great Chamberlain.
E. Marshal.
L. Steward.
L. Chamberlain.
Comes Huntington.
Comes Suffolk.
Comes Dorsett.
Comes Sarum.
Comes Bridgwater.
Comes Warwick et Holland.
Comes Bristoll.
Comes Bollingbrooke.
Comes Manchester.
Comes Mulgrave.
Comes Dover.
Comes Sunderland.
Comes Scarsdale.
Comes Rochester.
Comes Bath.
Comes Craven.
Comes Arlington.
Vicecomes de Stafford.
Vicecomes Fauconberg.
Vicecomes Mordant.
Vicecomes Hallyfax.
Vicecomes Yarmouth.
Arch. Cant.
Epus. London.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Ely.
Epus. Hereford.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Rochester.
Epus. Landaff.
Epus. Chichester.
Epus. Oxon.
Epus. Bristoll.
Epus. Gloucester.
Epus. Bath & Wells.
Epus. Chester.
Ds. Berkley de Berkley.
Ds. Eure.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Arundell de Warder.
Ds. Grey de Wark.
Ds. Lovelace.
Ds. Maynard.
Ds. Howard de Esc.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Powis.
Ds. Herbert de Cherb.
Ds. Newport.
Ds. Byron.
Ds. Vaughan.
Ds. Carrington.
Ds. Widdrington.
Ds. Lucas.
Ds. Gerard de Brandon.
Ds. Delamer.
Ds. Townsend.
Ds. Arundell de Trer.
Ds. Butler de Moore Park.
Ds. Butler de Weston.
Ds. Grey de Rolleston.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them; to meet on Tuesday the 4th of November next, at Three of the Clock in the Afternoon, in the Painted Chamber; and to adjourn from Time to Time, as they please.

Committee for the Journal.

Lords Sub-committees appointed to consider of the Orders and Customs of this House, and Privileges of the Peers of this Kingdom and Lords of Parliament, and to peruse and perfect the Journal Book.

L. Privy Seal.
Comes Huntington.
Comes Suff.
Comes Dorsett.
Comes Sarum.
Comes Bridgwater.
Comes Bollingbrooke.
Comes Dover.
Comes Scarsdale.
Comes Craven.
Vicecomes de Stafford.
Vicecomes Fauconberg.
Vicecomes Hallyfax.
Epus. London.
Epus. Winton.
Epus. Ely.
Epus. Sarum.
Epus. Rochester.
Epus. Oxon.
Epus. Bath & Wells.
Epus. Chester.
Ds. Berkley de B.
Ds. Eure.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Grey de Wark.
Ds. Maynard.
Ds. Howard de Esc.
Ds. Mohun.
Ds. Herbert de Cherb.
Ds. Byron.
Ds. Delamer.
Ds. Grey de Rolleston.

Their Lordships, or any Three of them; to meet on Saturday next, at Three of the Clock in the Afternoon, in or any where near the House of Peers; and after, when and as oft as they please.

House to be cleared, when the King is present.

ORDERED, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That it be referred to the Consideration of the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Privileges of the House of Peers, &c. to prevent for the future the coming in and sitting of divers Persons (not being Peers of this Realm) upon the Earls, Bishops, and Barons Benches in the House of Peers, at such Times as His Majesty shall be present there; and make Report thereof unto the House.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque in diem Jovis, 30um diem instantis Octobris, hora decima Aurora, Dominis sic decernentibus.

Footnotes

* Sic.