New Street

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English Heritage

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1977

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78-80

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'New Street', Ancient and Historical Monuments in the City of Salisbury (1977), pp. 78-80. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=129741 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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New Street

The position of monuments (104)–(117) is shown on the map of New Street Chequer, p. 95.

(104) Houses, two adjacent, Nos. 73 and 71, of three storeys with brick walls and tiled roofs, were built early in the 19th century. The N. front of each house comprises a modern shop window in the lower storey and a sashed window in each upper storey.

(105) Houses, two adjacent, Nos. 63 and 61, of two storeys with brick walls and slate-covered roofs, date from c. 1820. The N. fronts have square-headed doorways and plain sashed windows.

(106) House, No. 47, of two storeys with attics, has walls partly of flint and rubble and partly of timber framework; the roofs are tiled. Of 14th-century origin, the building was enlarged and altered late in the 16th century and further enlarged in the 18th century.

Mediaeval rubble masonry in the N. front rises through two storeys in the eastern bay and extends into the gable; the lower part has large ashlar quoins. Wall thicknesses suggest that the rendered lower storey of the western bay and also the E. wall are contemporary. The upper storey and gable of the western bay of the N. front are now tile-hung but a photograph taken before 1948 shows timber framework, perhaps of the 16th century. A lead rainwater head is dated 1569.

In the timber-framed S.E. wing the first floor is jettied on the W., but the overhang is masked by the 18th-century stair bay. The W. ground-floor room of the N. range has an open fireplace with hollow-chamfered stone jambs and a later timber bressummer. The N.E. room has 18th-century panelling. (Illustration, p. 79.)

(107) New Inn, of two storeys with timber-framed walls and tiled roofs, is of the late 15th or early 16th century; the S.W. wing was added late in the 18th century. In the three-bay N. front (Plate 62), jettied at the first floor, the arrangement of doorways and windows suggests that the range was once divided to form three cottages, but this was not the original arrange ment. The roof, with four upper-cruck trusses, has pegholes and mortices which show that the second truss from the E. was originally arch-braced (section B-B) whereas the other trusses are closed with studwork and wattle; it thus appears that the two E. bays of the range originally contained a first-floor hall.



(106–7) No. 47 New Street and New Inn.

(106–7) No. 47 New Street and New Inn.

Inside, the ground-floor room of the middle bay has an original chamfered ceiling beam. The E. and S. fireplaces have chamfered timber bressummers. The S.W. wing contains a large first-floor room lined with pine panelling and lit by a Palladian window in the S. wall.

(108) Cottages, pair, Nos. 37–9, originally one, are two-storeyed with brick-faced and rendered timber-framed walls and tiled roofs. The two-bay N. range, probably of 15th or 16th-century origin, is masked by a 19th-century facade. The small brick S. wing is of the 18th century. Inside, some chamfered timbers are seen. The roof retains an original tie-beam truss with a cambered collar and upper struts.

(109) House, No. 35, of two storeys with attics, with brick walls and tiled roofs, is of the early 19th century. Now communicating with No. 33 by doorways cut through the party-walls, it appears originally to have been a separate dwelling. The N. front has two round-headed recesses flanking a central doorway with a pedimented door-case. Each recess originally contained two storeys of three-light sashed windows but in the W. recess these have now been altered.

(110) House, No. 33, mainly of two storeys with attics, but with a three-storeyed N. range, has brick walls and tiled roofs and was built about the middle of the 18th century. The four-bay facade has moulded brick plat-bands and cornice and a classical door-case with Tuscan columns and entablature. Inside, the staircase hall has plaster vaulting and the stairs have turned newel posts and plain balusters. A ground-floor room is lined with fielded panelling in two heights. Several 18th-century chimneypieces are preserved. Additions on the S. date from early in the 19th century.

A mid 19th-century block-plan of monuments (108)–(110), by Peniston, is in W.R.O. (451/179).

(111) House, No. 31, of two storeys with attics, has brick walls and tiled roofs. The tenement belongs to St. Nicholas's Hospital (26) and is probably mentioned in 13th-century records, (fn. 1) but the present structure is not earlier than the first half of the 18th century. The three-bay N. front has moulded brick plat-bands and plain sashed windows; three of the latter on the first floor form a three-sided projecting bay. Inside, several rooms have panelled dados and moulded cornices. Three rooms have 18th-century carved wooden chimneypieces (Plate 94).

(112) Cottage, No. 29, of two storeys with rendered timber-framed walls and a tiled roof, is of the early 16th century.

(113) Houses, three adjoining, Nos. 27, 25 and 21, of three storeys with brick walls and slate-covered roofs, are of the early 19th century. The unified N. front forms an approximately symmetrical four-bay facade in which the two middle bays of the first floor are occupied by a three-sided projecting window. Elsewhere there are plain sashed windows or modern shop fronts.

(114) Houses, pair, Nos. 11 and 9, now united as offices, are three-storeyed with brick walls and slate-covered roofs and date from c. 1840.

(115) House, No. 7, of two storeys with an attic, has rendered timber-framed walls and tiled roofs and probably is of 15th-century origin. The two-bay N. front, jettied at the first floor, has sashed windows and a plain doorway. Inside, the N. ground-floor room has 18th-century panelling.

(116) Houses, two adjacent, Nos. 5 and 3, formerly a single dwelling, are three-storeyed with brick walls and slate-covered roofs and were built c. 1840. The N. front is of five bays.

(117) House, No. 1, of two storeys with an attic, has brick walls and tiled roofs. The N. range is of the early 16th century; the stairs and S.W. wing were added in the 17th century. A large original fireplace in the gabled E. wall is blocked internally, but the brick chimneybreast remains. Inside, some rooms in the N. range have plain 18th-century panelling; 17th-century panelling remains in the S.W. wing.

For the N. side of New Street, see New Street Chequer, pp. 95, 105–7.

Footnotes

1 Wordsworth, St. Nicholas, 142–5.


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