St. Martin's Church Street

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English Heritage

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Year published

1977

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Pages

121-122

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'St. Martin's Church Street', Ancient and Historical Monuments in the City of Salisbury (1977), pp. 121-122. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=129756 Date accessed: 29 August 2014.


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St. Martin's Church Street

(279) Toll Gate Inn, the 'New Inn' in 1880 (O.S.), is of two storeys with brick walls and tiled roofs. The S.W. range dates from early in the 18th century; the parallel N.E. range was added before 1854 (Kingdon & Shearm). A barn to E., with walls partly of brick and partly of cob, could perhaps be of 17th-century origin.

(280) Cottages, range of four, Nos. 1–7, are of two storeys with brick walls and slated roofs and stylistically are of c. 1830. Some original casement windows have panes with 'pointed' heads.

(281) Cottages, range of ten, Nos. 17–35, are of two storeys with brick walls and slated roofs and date from c. 1840.

(282) Houses, range of four, Nos. 18–24, are three-storeyed with brick walls and slated roofs and date from c. 1840.

(283) House, No. 16, of two storeys with an attic, with brick walls and a slated roof, was built c. 1830.

(284) House, No. 14, of two storeys with an attic, has brick walls and a tiled roof and was built c. 1830. The N.E. front is symmetrical and of three bays, with a central doorway and with sashed windows with keystones.

(285) The Retreat, in 1880 (O.S.) a Female Penitentiary, is of two storeys with attics and has brick walls and tiled roofs. The N. part of the building originated c. 1810 as a house or pair of houses. By 1850 it had become a penitentiary, and additions were made on the south. Later in the 19th century further additions were made and the W. elevation was rebuilt.



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