House of Lords Journal Volume 62
4 February 1830

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History of Parliament Trust

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3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 4 February 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 3-8. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16290 Date accessed: 23 August 2014.


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Anno 11 Georgii Quarti.

DIE Jovis, 4° Februarii 1830, Annoque Regni Serenissimi Domini nostri Georgii Quarti, Dei Gratiâ, Britanniarum Regis, Fidei Defensoris, Undecimo; in quem Diem hæc Quarta Sessio Parliamenti, per seperalia Adjournamenta et Prorogationes continuata fuerat, in Superiori Domo Parliamenti Britanniarum apud Westmonaster. convenere, Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales, quorum Nomina subscribuntur, et præsentes fuerunt:

Dux Cumberland.
Archiep. Cantuar.
Ds. Lyndhurst, Cancellarius.
Epus. Londinen.
Epus. Dunelm.
Epus. Elien.
Epus. Lich. et Cov.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Exon.
Epus. Glocestr.
Epus. Cestrien.
Epus. Bristol.
Epus. Carliol.
Epus. Landaven.
Epus. Oxon.
Vicecom. Gordon.
Vicecom. Granville.
Vicecom. Goderich.
Ds. Dacre.
Ds. Saye & Sele.
Ds. Arundell of Wardour.
Ds. Clifton.
Ds. Dormer.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Stafford.
Ds. Gower.
Ds. Saltoun.
Ds. Colville of Culross.
Ds. King.
Ds. Montfort.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Vernon.
Ds. Ducie.
Ds. Montagu.
Ds. Auckland.
Ds. Mendip.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. Northwick.
Ds. Lilford.
Ds. Fitz Gibbon.
Ds. Alvanley.
Ds. Rivers.
Ds. Ailsa.
Ds. Hill.
Ds. Melbourne.
Ds. Harris.
Ds. Maryborough.
Ds. Ravensworth.
Ds. Bexley.
Ds. Somerhill.
Ds. Wharncliffe.
Ds. Fife.
Ds. Tenterden.
Ds. Clanwilliam.
Ds. Durham.
Ds. Wallace.
Ds. Wynford.
Comes Bathurst, Præses.
Comes Rosslyn, C. P. S.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux St. Albans.
Dux Leeds.
Dux Manchester.
Dux Newcastle.
Dux Wellington.
March. Conyngham, Senescallus.
March. Lansdowne.
March. Salisbury.
March. Hertford.
March. Camden.
March. Anglesey.
March. Cholmondeley.
March. Hastings.
March. Ailesbury.
March. Bristol.
March. Cleveland.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Winchilsea & Nottingham.
Comes Chesterfield.
Comes Essex.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Doncaster.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Abingdon.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Erroll.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Cowper.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Macclesfield.
Comes De Lawarr.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Norwich.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Liverpool.
Comes Charlemont.
Comes Mayo.
Comes Verulam.
Comes Brownlow.
Comes Howe.
Comes Som;ers.
Comes Amherst.
Vicecom. Strathallan.
Vicecom. Torrington.
Vicecom. Leinster.
Vicecom. Sidmouth.

Parliament opened by Commission.

The Lord Chancellor acquainted the House, "That it not being convenient for His Majesty to be personally present here this Day, He had been pleased to cause a Commission under the Great Seal to be prepared, in order to the holding this Parliament."

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, to robe.

The House was resumed.

Then Five of the Lords Commissioners, being in their Robes, and seated on a Form placed between the Throne and the Woolsack, The Lord Chancellor in the Middle, with The Lord President and The Duke of Wellington on his Right Hand, and The Lord Privy Seal and The Earl of Aberdeen on his Left; commanded the Officiating Yeoman Usher of the Black Rod to let the Commons know, "The Lords Commissioners desire their immediate Attendance in this House, to hear the Commission read."

Who being come, with their Speaker;

The Lord Chancellor said,

"My Lords, and Gentlemen,

"We are commanded by His Majesty to let you know, That it not being convenient for Him to be present here this Day in His Royal Person, He hath thought fit, by Letters Patent under the Great Seal, to empower His Royal Highness The Duke of Clarence, and several Lords therein named, to do all Things in His Majesty's Name which are to be done on His Majesty's Part in this Parliament, as by the Letters Patent will more fully appear."

Then the said Letters Patent were read by the Clerk as follow; (viz t.)

"GEORGE R.

"GEORGE the Fourth, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith; To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting: Whereas We did lately, for divers difficult and pressing Affairs, concerning Us, the State and Defence of Our United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Church, ordain this Our present Parliament to begin and be holden at Our City of Westminster on the Twenty-fifth Day of July, in the Seventh Year of Our Reign; which Parliament was from thence by Our several Writs prorogued to and until the Fourteenth Day of November then next following; on which Day Our said Parliament was begun and holden, and from thence, by several Adjournments and Prorogations, hath been adjourned and prorogued to and until Thursday the Fourth Day of February instant, then to be holden and sit at Our City of Westminster aforesaid: And for as much as for certain Causes We cannot conveniently be present in Our Royal Person in Our said Parliament upon the said Fourth Day of February instant; Know ye, that We, trusting in the Discretion, Fidelity and Care of Our most dear Brothers and faithful Councillors William Duke of Clarence, Ernest Duke of Cumberland, Augustus Duke of Sussex, Adolphus Duke of Cambridge; Our most dear Cousin and faithful Councillor William Frederick Duke of Gloucester; The Most Reverend Father in God and Our faithful Councillor William Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate and Metropolitan of all England; Our well-beloved and faithful Councillor John Singleton Lord Lyndhurst, Chancellor of that Part of Our United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland called Great Britain; Our most dear Cousins and Councillors Henry Earl Bathurst, President of Our Council; James Earl of Rosslyn, Keeper of Our Privy Seal; James Duke of Montrose, Chamberlain of Our Household; George William Frederick Duke of Leeds, Master of Our Horse; William Duke of Devonshire, William Henry Duke of Portland, Arthur Duke of Wellington, Henry Marquess Conyngham, Steward of Our Household; Charles Marquess of Winchester, Groom of Our Stole; Henry Marquess of Lansdowne, Richard Marquess Wellesley, John Jeffreys Marquess Camden, Henry William Marquess of Anglesey, John Earl of Westmorland, George Earl of Carlisle, Cropley Ashley Earl of Shaftesbury, George Earl of Aberdeen, One of Our Principal Secretaries of State, William Earl Fitzwilliam, George John Earl Spencer, John Earl of Chatham, John Earl of Eldon, John William Earl of Dudley, Robert Viscount Melville, Henry Viscount Sidmouth, Frederick John Viscount Goderich; Our well-beloved and faithful Councillors, Henry Richard Lord Holland, William Wyndham Lord Grenville, Edward Lord Ellenborough, Nicholas Lord Bexley, and Charles Lord Tenterden, by the Advice and Consent of Our Council, do give and grant, by the Tenor of these Presents, unto the said Duke of Clarence, Duke of Cumberland, Duke of Sussex, Duke of Cambridge, Duke of Gloucester, Archbiship of Canterbury, Lord Lyndhurst, Earl Bathurst, Earl of Rosslyn, Duke of Montrose, Duke of Leeds, Duke of Devonshire, Duke of Portland, Duke of Wellington, Marquess Conyngham, Marquess of Winchester, Marquess of Lansdowne, Marquess Wellesley, Marquess Camden, Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Westmorland, Earl of Carlisle, Earl of Shaftesbury, Earl of Aberdeen, Earl Fitzwilliam, Earl Spencer, Earl of Chatham, Earl of Eldon, Earl of Dudley, Viscount Melville, Viscount Sidmouth, Viscount Goderich, Lord Holland, Lord Grenville, Lord Ellenborough, Lord Bexley and Lord Tenterden, and any Three of them, full Power, in Our Name, to hold Our said Parliament, and to open and declare, and cause to be opened and declared, the Causes of holding the same, and to proceed upon the said Affairs in Our said Parliament, and in all Matters arising therein, and to do every thing which for Us and by Us, for the good Government of Our said United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of other Our Dominions belonging to Our said United Kingdom, shall be therein to be done; and also, if necessary, to continue, adjourn and prorogue Our said Parliament: Commanding also, by the Tenor of these Presents, with the Consent of Our said Council, as well all and every the Archbishops, Bishops, Earls, Viscounts, Barons, and Knights, as all others whom it concerns to meet in Our said Parliament, that to the same Duke of Clarence, Duke of Cumberland, Duke of Sussex, Duke of Cambridge, Duke of Gloucester, Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Lyndhurst, Earl Bathurst, Earl of Rosslyn, Duke of Montrose, Duke of Leeds, Duke of Devonshire, Duke of Portland, Duke of Wellington, Marquess Conyngham, Marquess of Winchester, Marquess of Lansdowne, Marquess Wellesley, Marquess Camden, Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Westmorland, Earl of Carlisle, Earl of Shaftesbury, Earl of Aberdeen, Earl Fitzwilliam, Earl Spencer, Earl of Chatham, Earl of Eldon, Earl of Dudley, Viscount Melville, Viscount Sidmouth, Viscount Goderich, Lord Holland, Lord Grenville, Lord Ellenborough, Lord Bexley, and Lord Tenterden, or any Three of them, they diligently intend in the Premises, in the Form aforesaid. In Witness whereof We have caused these our Letters to be made Patent.

"Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Third Day of February, in the Eleventh Year of Our Reign.

"By the King Himself, signed with His own Hand.

"BATHURST."

Which done, The Lord Chancellor said,

Lords Commissioners Speech.

"My Lords, and Gentlemen,

"We are commanded by His Majesty to inform you, that His Majesty receives from all Foreign Powers the strongest Assurances of their Desire to maintain and cultivate the most friendly Relations with this Country.

"His Majesty has seen with Satisfaction that the War between Russia and The Ottoman Porte has been brought to a Conclusion. The Efforts of His Majesty to accomplish the main Objects of the Treaty of the 6th July 1827 have been unremitted.

"His Majesty, having recently concerted with His Allies Measures for the Pacification and final Settlement of Greece, trusts that He shall be enabled, at an early Period, to communicate to you the Particulars of this Arrangement, with such Information as may explain the Course which His Majesty has pursued throughout the Progress of these important Transactions.

"His Majesty laments that He is unable to announce to you the Prospect of a Reconciliation between the Princes of the House of Braganza.

"His Majesty has not yet deemed it expedient to re-establish, upon their ancient Footing, His Majesty's Diplomatic Relations with the Kingdom of Portugal; but the numerous Embarrassments arising from the continued Interruption of these Relations encrease His Majesty's Desire to effect the Termination of so serious an Evil.

"Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

"His Majesty has directed the Estimates for the current Year to be laid before you. They have been framed with every Attention to Economy, and it will be satisfactory to you to learn that His Majesty will be enabled to propose a considerable Reduction in the Amount of the Public Expenditure, without impairing the Efficiency of our Naval or Military Establishments.

"We are commanded by His Majesty to inform you, that although the National Income during the last Year has not attained the full Amount at which it had been estimated, the Diminution is not such as to cause any Doubt as to the future Prosperity of the Revenue.

"My Lords, and Gentlemen,

"His Majesty commands us to acquaint you, that His Attention has been of late earnestly directed to various important Considerations connected with Improvements in the general Administration of the Law.

"His Majesty has directed that Measures shall be submitted for your Deliberation, of which some are calculated, in the Opinion of His Majesty, to facilitate and expedite the Course of Justice in different Parts of the United Kingdom, and others appear to be necessary Preliminaries to a Revision of the Practice and Proceedings of the Superior Courts.

"We are commanded to assure you, that His Majesty feels confident that you will give your best Attention and Assistance to Subjects of such deep and lasting Concern to the Well-being of His People.

"His Majesty commands us to inform you, that the Export in the last Year of British Produce and Manufactures has exceeded that of any former Year.

"His Majesty laments that, notwithstanding this Indication of active Commerce, Distress should prevail among the Agricultural and Manufacturing Classes in some Parts of the United Kingdom.

"It would be most gratifying to the paternal Feelings of His Majesty to be enabled to propose for your Consideration Measures calculated to remove the Difficulties of any Portion of His Subjects, and at the same Time compatible with the general and permanent Interests of His People.

"It is from a deep Solicitude for those Interests, that His Majesty is impressed with the Necessity of acting with extreme Caution in reference to this important Subject.

"His Majesty feels assured that you will concur with Him in assigning due Weight to the Effect of unfavourable Seasons, and to the Operation of other Causes which are beyond the Reach of Legislative Controul or Remedy.

"Above all, His Majesty is convinced that no Pressure of temporary Difficulty will induce you to relax the Determination which you have uniformly manifested to maintain inviolate the Public Credit, and thus to uphold the high Character and the permanent Welfare of the Country."

Then the Commons withdrew.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

PRAYERS.

Bp. Oxford takes the Oaths.

This Day Richard Lord Bishop of Oxford took the Oaths, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

Ld. Arundell of Wardour takes his Seat.

This Day James Everard Lord Arundell of Wardour sat first in Parliament; his Lordship having first, at the Table, taken and subscribed the Oath appointed to be taken by the Act of the Tenth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty by Peers professing the Roman Catholic Religion.

E. of Glengall returned a Peer for Ireland.

The House being informed, "That Mr. James Dawes, from the Deputy Clerk of the Crown in Ireland, attended with the Writs and Returns for electing a Temporal Peer of Ireland in the room of Charles John Earl of Blesinton, deceased, with the Certificate of the Clerk of the Crown in Ireland annexed thereto;"

He was called in; and being sworn and examined, acquainted their Lordships, "That he received the same from the said Deputy Clerk of the Crown in Ireland, and that it was now in the same Condition as when he received it;" and then delivering the same at the Bar,

He was directed to withdraw.

Which Certificate was read, and is as follows; (viz t.)

"In pursuance of an Act passed in the Fortieth Year of His late Majesty King George the Third, entitled, "An Act to regulate the Mode by which the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and the Commons, to serve in the Parliament of the United Kingdom on the Part of Ireland, shall be summoned and returned to the said Parliament;" I do hereby certify, That the several Writs hereunto annexed, for electing a Temporal Peer of Ireland in the room of Charles John Earl of Blesinton did issue from this Office to the Peers therein severally named, and that the said Peers did severally make the Returns thereto which to the said Writs are respectively annexed; And I further certify, That it appears from the said Writs and Returns, that Richard Earl of Glengall has been chosen by a Majority of Votes to be the Peer to sit and vote on the Part of Ireland in the House of Lords of the United Kingdom, in the room of the said Charles John Earl of Blesinton: All which I attest this First Day of September One thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine.

"GRANARD.

To the Clerk of the Parliament of "the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland."

Tho. Bouchier, Dy. Clk. Crown & Hanr, Ireland."

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Bill pro formâ read.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the better regulating Select Vestries."

Lords Commissioners Speech reported:

The Lord Chancellor reported the Speech of the Lords Commissioners:

And the same being afterwards read by the Clerk:

Motion for Address thereon:

It was moved, "That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, to return His Majesty our most humble Thanks for the Gracious Speech which His Majesty has directed the Lords Commissioners to deliver to both Houses of Parliament.

"To express to His Majesty our grateful Acknowledgment of the Communication, that His Majesty has received from all Foreign Powers the strongest Assurances of their Desire to maintain and cultivate the most friendly Relations with this Country.

"To assure His Majesty that we participate in the Satisfaction with which His Majesty has been that the War between Russia and The Ottoman Porte has been brought to a Conclusion.

"To offer our humble Thanks to His Majesty for His unremitted Efforts to accomplish the main Objects of the Treaty of the 6th of July 1827.

"To assure His Majesty of the sincere Satisfaction with which we have learned that His Majesty, having recently concerted with His Allies Measures for the Pacification and final Settlement of Greece, trusts that He shall be enabled, at an early Period, to communicate to His Parliament the Particulars of this Arrangement, with such Information as may explain the Course which His Majesty has pursued throughout the Progress of these important Transactions.

"To express our Concern that His Majesty is unable to announce the Prospect of a Reconciliation between the Princes of the House of Braganza.

"To thank His Majesty for the Communication, that He has not yet deemed it expedient to re-establish, upon their ancient Footing, His Majesty's Diplomatic Relations with the Kingdom of Portugal; and to express our grateful Sense of the Assurance, that the numerous Embarrassments arising from the continued Interruption of those Relation encrease His Majesty's Desire to effect the Termination of so serious an Evil.

"To offer to His Majesty our humble Thanks for having acquainted us, that His Majesty's Attention has been of late earnestly directed to the various important Considerations connected with Improvements in the general Administration of the Law; and for the Directions which His Majesty has been graciously pleased to give, that Measures shall be submitted to the Deliberation of Parliament, of which some are calculated, in the Opinion of His Majesty, to facilitate and expedite the Course of Justice in different Parts of the United Kingdom, and others appear to be necessary Preliminaries to a Revision of the Practice and Proceedings of the Superior Courts.

"To assure His Majesty that we are impressed with a due Sense of the Confidence His Majesty justly reposes in us, that we will give our best Attention and Assistance to Subjects of such deep and lasting Concern to the Well-being of His Majesty's People.

"To express the Satisfaction with which we have received the Information which His Majesty has commanded to be given to us, that the Export in the last Year of British Produce and Manufactures has exceeded that of any former Year; and to assure His Majesty that we deeply lament that, notwithstanding this Indication of active Commerce, Distress should prevail among the Agricultural and Manufacturing Classes in some Parts of the United Kingdom.

"To express our sincere Belief that it would be highly gratifying to the paternal Feelings of His Majesty to be enabled to propose for the Consideration of Parliament, Measures calculated to remove the Difficulties of any Portion of His Subjects, and at the same Time compatible with the general and permanent Interests of His People.

"To offer to His Majesty our humble Thanks for the deep Solicitude His Majesty feels for those Interests, and to express our Conviction of the Necessity with which His Majesty is impressed of acting with extreme Caution in reference to this important Subject.

"To assure His Majesty that we shall concur with His Majesty in assigning due Weight to the Effect of unfavourable Seasons, and the Operation of other Causes which are beyond the Reach of the Legislative Controul or Remedy.

"To express our Gratitude to His Majesty for the Conviction He is graciously pleased to express, that no Pressure of temporary Difficulty will induce this House to relax the Determination it has constantly manifested to maintain Public Credit inviolate, and thus to uphold the high Character and the permanent Welfare of the Country."

Amendment moved, and Negatived:

Then an Amendment was proposed to be made to the said Motion, by leaving out from ("United Kingdom") at the End of the Tenth Paragraph, to the End of the Motion, and inserting ("That this House views with the deepest Sorrow and Anxiety the severe Distress which now afflicts the Country, and will immediately proceed to examine its Causes, and the Means of administering speedy and effectual Relief.")

Which being objected to;

After Debate,

The Question was put, "Whether the Words proposed to be left out shall stand Part of the Motion?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Protest thereupon:

DISSENTIENT:

"1.—Because it is the bounden Duty of Parliament to examine the Causes of Public Distress, and, as far as may be in its Power, to administer speedy and effectual Relief.

"2.—Because the grievous Distress which now afflicts the Country in many Branches of productive Industry appears to be the Result of Legislative Measures, and might therefore be relieved, if not altogether removed, by a different Course of Policy, particularly with respect to the Currency, as the Alteration in its Value has greatly increased the Weight of all the Public Burthens and of all the Private Engagements, which existed previously to that Alteration.

"3.—Because the Relief which ought to be administered cannot be delayed without Injury and Injustice, and also without Danger to the Country, of which the Welfare must be destroyed, and of which the Tranquillity might be disturbed, by a Continuance of the Distress which is now suffered.

"STANHOPE."

"RICHMOND, &c. for

"First and Third Reasons."

Another Amendment moved and Negatived:

Then it was moved, after ("Majesty") in the Thirteenth Paragraph, to insert ("That after Fifteen Years of uninterrupted Peace this House laments that the general Condition of the People is not materially improved, or the Prosperity of the Country perceptibly encreased; that, on the contrary, the Landed and Manufacturing Interests, as well as the Traders and Labourers of every Description, have frequently been afflicted and still continue to be weighed down by severe Distress: That it is the Duty of Parliament to examine into the Causes which have produced these Distresses, and to remove the Impediments which retard the Progress of the National Prosperity.

"That the Necessaries of Life and the Materials of Manufacture are rendered dear by Taxation and Regulation: By these Means too much is taken from the industrious Classes, and, in many Instances, too much is given to the privileged Classes of Society.

"That it is a grievous Aggravation of the Public Burthens, in addition to near Fifty Millions of Taxes deemed necessary for the Public Service, still further to permit enormous Sums to be extorted from the People by the intolerable Monopolies of Corn, Beer, Sugar, Tea, and other Articles, established for the private Benefit of powerful and favoured Classes, at the Expence of the great Body of Consumers and of the Public Good.

"By these Monopolies, the Cost of the first Necessaries of Life is enhanced, the Rate of Profit in all Trades diminished, Capital driven Abroad to seek a more profitable Employment, and the productive Powers of the National Industry are greatly reduced.

"By the Restrictions imposed on the Import of Foreign Corn, the Markets of other Nations are in a great Degree closed against us, the Demand for the Produce of the National Industry is limited, and the Symptoms of general Distress are manifested in the inadequate Reward of Labour, and in the encreasing Difficulty of finding any profitable Employment for Capital and Industry.

"By the partial and exorbitant Duties of Excise imposed upon Beer and Malt, combined with the double Monopoly conferred both on the Grower of Barley and on those who are licensed to sell Beer, the Price of that Necessary of Life is so greatly enhanced, that in the course of Eighty Years, whilst the Population has been more than doubled in Number, the Consumption of Malt has actually decreased.

"By the Monopoly conferred on the Cultivators of Sugar in the British West India Islands the Price of that great Article of Consumption is very much enhanced, at the Expence of the People of England, who might be better supplied if permitted to resort to other Markets, and who are also, for the Benefit of the Monopolists of the said Islands, burthened with the heavy Charge of defending those unhealthy and precarious Possessions.

"By the exclusive Privilege of Navigation and Trade to China conferred on The East India Company, the whole Supply of Tea consumed in the United Kingdom is placed at the Discretion of a single Company of Traders: Monopoly in this, as in every similar Instance, has produced its usual Consequences; the Price of Tea is greatly encreased, as compared with the Price of the same Article in the free Markets of Europe and America; the Quantity imported is limited by the narrow Views, of obtaining a large Profit on a small Supply, entertained by the Monopolist Company; the British Manufactures suited to the Chinese Markets are consequently exported in much smaller Amount; and the Public thus suffers in the encreased Price of Tea, in the diminished Demand for Home Manufactures, and in the Exclusion from all Navigation and Trade to one of the greatest Markets of the World.

"That it appears that these gigantic Monopolies, superadded to the heavy Load of Taxation, have impoverished the Country, and produced the Public Distress: That all Prohibitions and Restrictions imposed for the Benefit of particular Classes or Companies, for the Purpose of producing artificial high Prices, are no less impolitic than unjust: That our own Exclusion from the great Market of the World, and the Cessation of Demand at Home, are the necessary Consequences of our own Measures; because it is in the Nature of Things that a Nation which refuses to buy the Productions of other Countries cannot sell its own: That we can only expect to derive permanent Relief from our Distresses, and Improvement in our Condition, from the strictest Economy in every Branch of the Public Expenditure, from the Abolition of all exclusive Privileges and Monopolies, from an unrestricted Supply of the first Necessaries of Life and of the Materials of Manufacture, and from a real free Trade, by which the whole Community, as Consumers of Goods, will be greatly benefited, the Labouring Classes enabled to procure a fair Reward, the Capitalist to augment those Funds by which all Labour is supported, and the Efficiency of British Industry permitted to produce its natural Result in enriching the Country, and thus to restore and to secure the Public Prosperity.")

Which being objected to;

The Question was put, "Whether the said Words shall be there inserted?"

It was resolved in the Negative.

Then it was moved to agree to the said Motion for an Address as at first proposed.

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Com ee to prepare the Address:

Then the Lords following were appointed a Committee to prepare an Address pursuant thereto; (viz t.)

V. Sidmouth.
V. Gordon.
L. Bp. Durham.
L. Dacre.
L. Gower.
L. Saltoun.
L. Montagu.
L. Auckland.
L. Rivers.
L. Hill.
L. Bexley,
L. Wallace.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
D. Manchester.
M. Hertford.
M. Hastings.
E. Carlisle.
E. Doncaster.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Erroll.
E. De Lawarr.
E. Amherst.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet immediately, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure; and the Committee withdrew to prepare the Address.

After some Time, the House was resumed:

Address reported, & agreed to.

And The Earl of Doncaster reported from the Committee an Address drawn by them as follows; (viz t.)

"Most Gracious Sovereign,

"We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, beg leave to approach Your Majesty, to return to Your Majesty our most humble Thanks for the Gracious Speech which Your Majesty has directed the Lords Commissioners to deliver to both Houses of Parliament.

"We beg leave to express to Your Majesty our grateful Acknowledgment of the Communication, that Your Majesty has received from all Foreign Powers the strongest Assurances of their Desire to maintain and cultivate the most friendly Relations with this Country.

"We assure Your Majesty that we participate in the Satisfaction with which Your Majesty has seen that the War between Russia and The Ottoman Porte has been brought to a Conclusion.

"We offer our humble Thanks to Your Majesty for Your unremitted Efforts to accomplish the main Objects of the Treaty of the 6th of July 1827.

"We humbly assure Your Majesty of the sincere Satisfaction with which we have learned that Your Majesty, having recently concerted with Your Allies Measures for the Pacification and final Settlement of Greece, trusts that You shall be enabled, at an early Period, to communicate to Your Parliament the Particulars of this Arrangement, with such Information as may explain the Course which Your Majesty has pursued throughout the Progress of these important Transactions.

"We cannot but express our Concern that Your Majesty is unable to announce the Prospect of a Reconciliation between the Princes of the House of Braganza.

"We thank Your Majesty for the Communication, that You have not yet deemed it expedient to reestablish, upon their ancient Footing, Your Majesty's Diplomatic Relations with the Kingdom of Portugal; and to express our grateful Sense of the Assurance, that the numerous Embarrassments arising from the continued Interruption of those Relations encrease Your Majesty's Desire to effect the Termination of so serious an Evil.

"We offer to Your Majesty our humble Thanks for having acquainted us, that Your Majesty's Attention has been of late earnestly directed to the various important Considerations connected with Improvements in the general Administration of the Law; and for the Directions which Your Majesty has been graciously pleased to give, that Measures shall be submitted to the Deliberation of Parliament, of which some are calculated, in the Opinion of Your Majesty, to facilitate and expedite the Course of Justice in different Parts of the United Kingdom, and others appear to be necessary Preliminaries to a Revision of the Practice and Proceedings of the Superior Courts.

"We assure Your Majesty that we are impressed with a due Sense of the Confidence Your Majesty justly reposes in us, that we will give our best Attention and Assistance to Subjects of such deep and lasting Concern to the Well-being of Your Majesty's People.

"We desire to express the Satisfaction with which we have received the Information which Your Majesty has commanded to be given to us, that the Export in the last Year of British Produce and Manufactures has exceeded that of any former Year; and to assure Your Majesty that we deeply lament that, notwithstanding this Indication of active Commerce, Distress should prevail among the Agricultural and Manufacturing Classes of some Parts of the United Kingdom.

"We assure Your Majesty of our sincere Belief that it would be highly gratifying to the paternal Feelings of Your Majesty to be enabled to propose for the Consideration of Parliament, Measures calculated to remove the Difficulties of any Portion of Your Subjects, and at the same Time compatible with the general and permanent Interests of Your People.

"We beg leave to offer to Your Majesty our humble Thanks for the deep Solicitude Your Majesty feels for those Interests, and to express our Conviction of the Necessity with which Your Majesty is impressed of acting with extreme Caution in reference to this important Subject.

"We assure Your Majesty that we shall concur with Your Majesty in assigning its due Weight to the Effect of unfavourable Seasons, and the Operation of other Causes which are beyond the Reach of Legislative Controul or Remedy.

"We offer the Assurance of our Gratitude for the Conviction Your Majesty is graciously pleased to express, that no Pressure of temporary Difficulty will induce this House to relax the Determination it has constantly manifested to maintain Public Credit inviolate, and thus to uphold the high Character and the permanent Welfare of the Country."

Which Address, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Address be presented to His Majesty by the Lords with White Staves.

E. of Shaftesbury to take the Chair in Com ees.

It was moved, "That the several Resolutions of the 23d of July 1800, touching the Nomination of a Lord to take the Chair of Committees of this House at the Commencement of every Session, be now read."

The same was accordingly read by the Clerk.

Resolved, Nemine Dissentiente, That The Earl of Shaftesbury be appointed to take the Chair in all Committees of this House for this Session.

Resolved, Nemine Dissentients, That The Earl of Shaftesbury do take the Chair in all Committees of the Whole House, unless where it shall have been otherwise directed by this House.

Resolved, Nemine Dissentiente, That The Earl of Shaftesbury do also take the Chair in all Committees upon Private Bills and other Matters, unless where it shall have been otherwise directed by this House.

Com ee for Privileges.

Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Orders and Customs of this House, and Privileges of Parliament, and of the Peers of Great Britain and Ireland, and Lords of Parliament:

D. CUMBERLAND.

V. Sidmouth.
V. Gordon.
V. Granville.
V. Goderich.
L. Bp. London.
L. Bp. Durham.
L. Bp. Ely.
L. Bp. Lichfield & Coventry.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. Exeter.
L. Bp. Gloucester.
L. Bp. Chichester.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Bp. Landaff.
L. Bp. Oxford.
L. Dacre.
L. Saye & Sele.
L. Arundell of Wardour.
L. Clifton.
L. Dormer.
L. Teynham.
L. Stafford.
L. Gower.
L. Saltoun.
L. Colville of Culross.
L. King.
L. Montfort.
L. Holland.
L. Vernon.
L. Ducie.
L. Montagu.
L. Auckland.
L. Mendip.
L. Calthorpe.
L. Northwick.
L. Lilford.
L. Fitz Gibbon.
L. Alvanley.
L. Rivers.
L. Ailsa.
L. Hill.
L. Melbourne.
L. Harris.
L. Maryborough.
L. Ravensworth.
L. Bexley.
L. Somerhill.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Fife.
L. Tenterden.
L. Clanwilliam.
L. Durham.
L. Wallace.
L. Wynford.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Chancellor.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
D. Beaufort.
D. St. Albans.
D. Leeds.
D. Manchester.
D. Newcastle.
D. Wellington.
L. Steward.
M. Lansdowne.
M. Salisbury.
M. Hertford.
M. Camden.
M. Anglesey.
M. Cholmondeley.
M. Hastings.
M. Ailesbury.
M. Bristol.
M. Cleveland.
E. Denbigh.
E. Westmorland.
E. Winchilsea & Nottingham.
E. Chesterfield.
E. Essex.
E. Carlisle.
E. Doncaster.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Abingdon.
E. Jersey.
E. Erroll.
E. Tankerville.
E. Cowper.
E. Stanhope.
E. Macclesfield.
E. De Lawarr.
E. Radnor.
E. Norwich.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Liverpool.
E. Charlemont.
E. Mayo.
E. Verulam.
E. Brownlow.
E. Howe.
E. Somers.
E. Amherst.
V. Strathallan.
V. Torrington.
V. Leinster.

Their Lordships, or any Seven of them, to meet on Monday next, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the House of Peers, and every Monday after; and to adjourn as they please.

Com ee for the Journals.

Lords Sub-Committees appointed to consider of the Orders and Customs of this House, and Privileges of the Peers of Great Britain and Ireland, and Lords of Parliament; and to peruse and perfect the Journals of this and former Sessions of Parliament:

V. Sidmouth.
V. Gordon.
V. Granville.
V. Goderich.
L. Bp. London.
L. Bp. Durham.
L. Bp. Ely.
L. Bp. Lichfield & Coventry.
L. Bp. Lincoln.
L. Bp. Exeter.
L. Bp. Gloucester.
L. Bp. Chichester.
L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Bp. Landaff.
L. Bp. Oxford.
L. Dacre.
L. Saye & Sele.
L. Arundell of Wardour.
L. Clifton.
L. Dormer.
L. Teynham.
L. Stafford.
L. Gower.
L. Saltoun.
L. Colville of Culross.
L. King.
L. Montfort.
L. Holland.
L. Vernon.
L. Ducie.
L. Montagu.
L. Auckland.
L. Mendip.
L. Calthorpe.
L. Northwick.
L. Lilford.
L. Fitz Gibbon.
L. Alvanley.
L. Rivers.
L. Ailsa.
L. Hill.
L. Melbourne.
L. Harris.
L. Maryborough.
L. Ravensworth.
L. Bexley.
L. Somerhill.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Fife.
L. Tenterden.
L. Clanwilliam.
L. Durham.
L. Wallace.
L. Wynford.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. Chancellor.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
D. Beaufort.
D. St. Albans.
D. Leeds.
D. Manchester.
D. Newcastle.
D. Wellington.
L. Steward.
M. Lansdowne.
M. Salisbury.
M. Hertford.
M. Camden.
M. Anglesey.
M. Cholmondeley.
M. Hastings.
M. Ailesbury.
M. Bristol.
M. Cleveland.
E. Denbigh.
E. Westmorland.
E. Winchilsea & Nottingham.
E. Chesterfield.
E. Essex.
E. Carlisle.
E. Doncaster.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Abingdon.
E. Jersey.
E. Erroll.
E. Tankerville.
E. Cowper.
E. Stanhope.
E. Macclesfield.
E. De Lawarr.
E. Radnor.
E. Norwich.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Liverpool.
E. Charlemont.
E. Mayo.
E. Verulam.
E. Brownlow.
E. Howe.
E. Somers.
E. Amherst.
V. Strathallan.
V. Torrington.
V. Leinster.

Their Lordships, or any Three of them, to meet when, where and as often as they please.

Stoppages in the Streets, Order to prevent.

The House taking Notice, "That there is such an Interruption by Hackney Coaches, Carts, and Drays, in the Streets and Passages leading to this House, that the Lords and others are frequently hindered from coming thereto:"

It is thereupon Ordered, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the High Steward of the City of Westminster or his Deputy, together with the Justices of the Peace of the said City, shall, by their strict Care and Directions to the Constables and other Officers within their Jurisdiction, take special Order that no empty Hackney Coaches be suffered to make any Stay between Whitehall and the End of Abingdon Street, in Westminster, from Twelve of the Clock at Noon until Five of the Clock in the Afternoon of the same Day, during the Sitting of this Parliament; and that no Carriages, Drays, or Carts be permitted to stop in the Streets and Passages between the End of Pall Mall and the End of Abingdon Street, between the Hours aforesaid, or to pass through the Old Palace Yard from One of the Clock in the Afternoon until One Hour after the rising of this House, during the Sitting of this Parliament; and that all Carriages, Drays, or Carts hereby permitted to pass through the said Streets and Passages, be obliged to go one after another in the Manner following; (that is to say) all Carriages, Drays, or Carts going towards Westminster, to keep on the Side of the Street or Passage next to Saint James's Park, and all those going the contrary Way to keep on the other Side of the Street, and upon no Account whatsoever to presume to go Two or more abreast during the Sitting of this Parliament; and herein special Care is to be taken by the said Deputy Steward, Justices of the Peace, Constables, and all other Officers herein concerned, as the contrary will be answered to this House: And it is further Ordered, That the High Bailiff of the City of Westminster, and the Justices of the Peace for the City and Liberty thereof, or some of them, residing in Westminster, be served with the Order of this House made this Day for the Purposes aforesaid.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Lunæ, octavum diem instantis Februarii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.