House of Lords Journal Volume 62
10 March 1830

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94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 10 March 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 94-104. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16312 Date accessed: 24 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Die Mercurii, 10 Martii 1830.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Ds. Lyndhurst, Cancellarius.
Epus. Landaven.
Epus. Oxon.
Vicecom. Strathallan.
Vicecom. Melville.
Vicecom. Granville.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Vernon.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. Redesdale.
Ds. Clanbrassill.
Ds. Bexley.
Comes Rosslyn, C. P. S.
Dux Norfolk, Marescallus.
Dux Somerset.
March. Lansdowne.
March. Camden.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Fitzwilliam.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Norwich.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Malmesbury.
Comes Mayo.

Prayers.

The Officers of State for Scotland v. the Com r s of Supply for Wigton et al:

Whereas Wednesday the 3d Day of this instant March was appointed for hearing the Cause ex-parte, upon the Petition and Appeal of His Grace George William Duke of Argyll, Keeper of the Great Seal, The Right Honorable Lord Viscount Melville, Lord Privy Seal, The Right Honorable William Dundas, Lord Clerk Register, The Right Honorable Sir William Rae Baronet, Lord Advocate, and The Right Honorable David Boyle, Lord Justice Clerk, all His Majesty's Officers of State for Scotland, and of Adam Rolland, Crown Agent for Scotland; complaining of Two Interlocutors of the Lords of Session in Scotland, of the Second Division, of the 21st of February 1823 and the 5th of June 1827, in so far as they decern against the Officers of State and the Crown Agent for Scotland; and praying, "That the same might be reversed, varied or altered, or that the Appellants might have such Relief in the Premises, as to this House, in their Lordships great Wisdom, should seem meet;" to which Appeal the Commissioners and Collector of Supply for the County of Wigton, the Magistrates of the Burgh of Wigton, and the Ministers, Elders and Kirk Treasurers of the Parishes of Ochiltree, Sorn and St. Quivox, have not put in their Answer, though peremptorily Ordered so to do; Counsel were accordingly heard for the said Appellants; and the Cause appearing to the House to involve an important Question of Law, and to affect Public Rights; it was Ordered, That Counsel be at liberty to argue the Case on the Part of the Respondents without a Printed Case being delivered; and Counsel having been heard on behalf of the Appellants, and also in support of the Interlocutors complained of, pursuant to the said Order; and due Consideration had of what was offered on either Side in this Cause:

Interlocutors Reversed.

It is Ordered and Adjudged, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Interlocutors complained of in the said Appeal be, and the same are hereby Reversed.

Smith v. Mitchell & Logan:

After hearing Counsel for the Appellant this Day upon the amended Petition and Appeal of Miss Jane Smith, some time residing at Moriston, in the Parish of Cambuslang, now in Glasgow, and also as next of Kin, Executrix and Representative of the late Miss Margaret Smith, her Sister; complaining of an Interlocutor of the Lord Ordinary in Scotland, of the 11th of March 1826; and also of Two Interlocutors of the Lords of Session there, of the First Division, of the 23d (signed the 24th) of November and the 9th of December 1826; and praying, That the same might be reversed, varied or altered, or that the Appellant might have such Relief in the Premises, as to this House, in their Lordships great Wisdom, should seem meet;" as also upon the joint and several Answer of Mrs. Margaret Mitchell, Wife of Walter Logan Esquire, late of Cranstonhill and now of Port Dundas, and the said Walter Logan for his Interest, and also as surviving Trustee of the deceased John Maxwell Esquire, of Fingalton, formerly Writer in Glasgow, and of the said Walter Logan, proprio nomine, put in to the said Appeal; and Counsel appearing for the Respondents in the said Appeal; the Counsel were directed to withdraw:

Interlocutors Affirmed.

Ordered and Adjudged, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Petition and Appeal be, and is hereby dismissed this House, and that the Interlocutors therein complained of, be, and the same are hereby Affirmed.

Kirkpatrick v. Innes et al.

After hearing Counsel, in Part, in the Cause wherein John Kirkpatrick Esquire is Appellant, and Mrs. Isobel Innes or Clephane, and others, are Respondents:

It is Ordered, That the further Hearing of the said Cause be put off to Wednesday next.

Dawson et al. v. the Magistrates of Glasgow.

Ordered, That the Cause wherein Messieurs Dawson and Mitchell and Adam Dawson are Appellants, and the Magistrates of Glasgow and their Tacksman are Respondents, be heard ex-parte by Counsel at the Bar on Wednesday next.

Maule et al. v. Ramsay.

Ordered, That the Cause wherein The Honourable William Maule, and others, are Appellants, and Major General The Honorable James Ramsay is Respondent, be heard by Counsel at the Bar on Wednesday next.

Shakerley's Divorce Bill:

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Charles Peter Shakerley Esquire, of the Parish of Egham in the County of Surrey, with Laure Angelique Rosalbe Shakerley his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned;" and for the Lords to be summoned;

Counsel were accordingly called in:

Then Francois Julien Amable Le Vasseur was again called in, and further examined, through the Interpretation of Samuel Albert Muller, as follows:

(By Counsel.) "When did you receive the Letter from The Marquis D'Avaray that you put in upon the last Occasion?"

"In the early Part of May."

"For what Purpose did the Marquis give it you?"

"He gave it me, in order to shew it to Mr. Cosser, the Maitre de Hotel of The King of France."

"For what Purpose?"

"The King passes Six Months at St. Cloud, and I wanted to get into the Household there, and Monsieur D'Avaray gave it me for that Purpose."

"Was M. D'Avaray in the Court of The King of France himself?"

"The Duke D'Avaray was First Chamberlain of the Wardrobe of the King?"

"Do you mean that the Marquis is the First Chamberlain, or the Marquis's Father, the Duke?"

"The Marquis himself."

"The Object of that was, that you should be admitted into the Service of The King of France?"

"Yes, for the Six Months; because during those Six Months there are always Twenty or Thirty more Persons taken into the Household."

"Did you apply directly to The Marquis D'Avaray for that Recommendation, or through Madame Shakerley?"

"I applied to Mrs. Shakerley before I applied to her Father."

"What Answer did Mrs. Shakerley give you?"

"She immediately said that she would speak to her Father upon it."

"In consequence of that did you apply to the Marquis yourself?"

"On the next Day the Marquis told me, "Le Vasseur, I will speak to Mr. Cosser for you;" and then gave me this Note."

"Did you enter into The King of France's Service; or, if you did not, what was the Reason?"

"No; Monsieur Cosser told me that he was very sorry it was not in his Power, but that I had made Application too late."

(By a Lord.) "How long did Mr. Shakerley remain in Paris, when he came there the first Time after you were in his Service?"

"About Seven or Eight Days."

"Did he live at that Time with Madame Shakerley?"

"No; Mrs. Shakerley was in the Country at the Time he arrived."

"How far from Paris was she?"

"About Forty Leagues, at the Chateau D' Avaray."

"Did Mr. Shakerley go to her there?"

"No."

"What did he go to Paris for?"

"I do not know; but I believe he came to take Mrs. Shakerley back to England."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Francois Paix was again called in, and further examined, as follows, through the Interpretation of Samuel Albert Muller:

(By Counsel.) "In the Month of January 1827 were you in the Service of The Marquis D'Herrera?"

"Yes."

"What Countryman is the Marquis?"

"Of the Havannah."

(By a Lord.) "Did you ever live in England?"

"Never 'till on this Occasion."

(By Counsel.) "Do you know whether The Marquis D'Herrera has an Hotel at Madrid, or an Establishment there?"

"No, he has not."

"What Countryman are you?"

"A Spaniard, of Toledo."

"How long did you live in the Service of the Marquis?"

"About Two Years, between the Cousin of the Marquis and himself."

"Did you go into the Service of the Marquis's Cousin after you left the Marquis's Service?"

"In the same Interval."

"You served both Masters together?"

"Yes."

"Did you continue to serve the Marquis's Cousin after the Marquis himself left Paris?"

"No; the Cousin left there."

"Whose Service did you go into after you quitted the Marquis's Service?"

"Of The Count de Billant, a Dutch Nobleman."

"How long did you continue in The Count de Billant's Service?"

"About Eight Months after I left the Service of The Marquis D'Herrera."

"Whose Service did you go into then?"

"Then the Marquis placed me with a Person whose Service I left to come here."

"Who is that?"

"Monsieur Penyalver of the Havannah."

"Then you went into the Service of Monsieur Penyalver at the Recommendation of The Marquis D'Herrera?"

"Yes."

"When you went into the Service of The Marquis D'Herrera, in January 1827, where did the Marquis reside?"

"At No. 51, Rue de Provence.

"While you continued in the Marquis's Service, did you become acquainted with Madame Shakerley?"

"Yes, nearly at the Beginning."

"Where did Madame Shakerley reside at Parish at that Time?"

"At the Hotel D'Avaray, Rue Grenelle, No. 45."

"Do you remember, in the early Period of your Service, taking any Letter from The Marquis D'Herrera to Madame Shakerley?"

"I took a Letter from the Marquis, but I did not deliver it to Mrs. Shakerley; I gave it to the Porter, who was charged with it. The Marquis had told me to give it to the Porter, and to request the Porter to deliver it accurately."

"Speedily after that, do you remember Mrs. Shakerley's coming in a Conveyance to the Marquis's House?"

"She came a few Days after to the Door."

"In what Carriage?"

"In a Remise; a hired Carriage."

"At the Time of Madame Shakerley coming in the Remise, was the Marquis's own Carriage at the Door?"

"Yes."

"What became of Madame Shakerley; where did she go?"

"She went into the Carriage of the Marquis."

"Where was the Marquis; was he at the Door, or where was he when she drove up?"

"He was dressing himself when I announced that she was come."

"Upon her being announced, did he come down Stairs?"

"Immediately."

"And went into his Carriage?"

"Yes."

"Where did they go to?"

"They went to Verey's, at the Palais Royal."

"Did you go with them?"

"Always."

"At what Time of the Day was it?"

"About Six o'Clock."

"How long did they stay at Verey's?"

"Till Eight o'Clock."

(By a Lord.) "What Servants came with the Remise?"

"I think it was Le Vasseur."

(By Counsel.) "Where did they go to then?"

"To the Hotel D'Hamburgh, in the Rue de Bons Enfans."

"The Marquis lived, I understand, in the Rue de Provence?"

"Yes."

"Had he an Apartment in the Hotel D'Hamburgh besides?"

"I heard that he had a Room only."

"Whom did you hear it from?"

"The Marquis frequently sent me to that Hotel, to have his Room prepared."

"To have the Marquis's Room prepared?"

"Yes."

"Did he give you those Orders in the Morning, or in the Evening; or at both Times of the Day?"

"I went the Day beforehand, about Eleven o'Clock, to order them to be ready the next Morning."

"When you went in the Evening, did you go in consequence of Orders given that Day, or at any previous Time?"

"The Orders were always given beforehand."

"Was you ever in the Room yourself at the Hotel D'Hamburgh?"

"I went up to the Room Once."

"Was there any Sofa in it?"

"There was."

"Was there any Bed?"

"I am not aware that there was."

"What sized Sofa was it?"

"A Chaise longue."

"Is the Hotel D'Hamburgh a Restaurateur's; or what Sort of House is it?"

"I think it is a House of Rendezvous."

"Upon the First Day that the Marquis and Madame Shakerley dined together at Verey's, and left it at Eight o'Clock, you have stated that they went to the Hotel D'Hamburgh?"

"Yes."

"Did they get out there?"

"Yes."

"Did they go into the House?"

"Yes; and remained there."

"How long?"

"About Eleven, or Half past Eleven."

"What became of you in the Interval?"

"I was ordered to remain in the Carriage, that nobody might see me in the Street."

"Where did they go after they left the Hotel D'Hamburgh?"

"They then went back to the House of the Marquis, where they found Mrs. Shakerley's Carriage."

"Did Mrs. Shakerley get into her own Carriage?"

"Yes."

"Was any Servant waiting with it?"

"Le Vasseur was always waiting."

"Did you hear the Orders given where the Carriage was to go?"

"To her own House."

(By a Lord.) "Were you ordered to sit inside the Carriage in order that you might not be seen in the Street?"

"Yes."

"What became of the Carriage?"

"It remained at the Door in the Street."

"Had it the Marquis's Arms?"

"It was a Job Carriage."

(By Counsel.) "Was it a plain Carriage; or were there any Arms upon it?"

"No; there was nothing upon it."

"Did you at any Time after this go with the Marquis and Madame Shakerley to the Hotel D'Hamburgh in the Evening?"

"Several Times."

"How often altogether in the Evening?"

"About Five or Six Times in the Evening; Mrs. Shakerley went in the Morning likewise."

"How long did they remain together in the Hotel D'Hamburgh, speaking generally, upon those Occasions?"

"Generally 'till Half past Eleven or Twelve at Night."

"At what Time did they go for the most Part?"

"Always at about Eight o'Clock."

"What became of you; did you always get into the Carriage according to your Orders?"

"Always."

"Did you upon each of those Occasions take any Orders from the Marquis to have the Chamber prepared?"

"Always."

"Who did you give the Orders to?"

"To the Porter of the House."

"You have said that Madame Shakerley went there in the Morning?"

"The Marquis told me to order the Chamber by the Morning; sometimes saying that Madame would come."

"Did the Marquis name any particular Hour at which the Chamber was to be ready in the Morning?"

"At Seven o'Clock."

"At what Time of the Year was this?"

"In the Course of February."

"How long did those Visits to the Hotel D'Hamburgh continue; were they confined to the Month of February, or did they extend to March or April, or how long?"

"They were during the Course of March likewise."

"How often do you think the Marquis ordered the Chamber to be prepared in the Morning at the Hotel D'Hamburgh?"

"About Ten Times."

"Do you recollect whether the Marquis visited at the Hotel D'Avaray?"

"Some Days after my Arrival he went there."

"Upon any Occasion did you ever take any Clothes of the Marquis's to the Hotel D'Avaray?"

"I once took a Parcel in the Carriage."

(By a Lord.) "Was the Marquis in the Carriage?"

"Yes, he went with it."

(By Counsel.) "When they got to the Hotel D'Avaray, what became of that Parcel?"

"I was ordered to deliver it to Le Vasseur, Mrs. Shakerley's Valet."

"Did you do so?"

"Yes."

"What did it contain?"

"I did not make up the Packet."

"Do you recollect at what Time of the Year it was?"

"That was in the Course of February."

"Do you remember Madame Shakerley leaving Paris, and going into the Country?"

"I think it was in the Spring, in the Month of May."

"Do you know where she went to?"

"I understood that she went to her Father's Residence."

"Do you know where the Chateau D'Avaray is situated?"

"Yes."

"Is it near the Town of Mers?"

"About a League from the Town of Mers."

"Is that in the Road to Tours or Blois?"

"On the Road to Blois."

"Is it near the Banks of the Loire?"

"The Castle is quite near to it."

"Is the Castle surrounded by Wood?"

"There is a great deal of Wood."

"Do you remember The Marquis D'Herrera going to Mers at any Time?"

"Yes, I remember it."

"Did you go with him?"

"Yes, always."

"Where did you put up?"

"At an Hotel called The Quavert, in the Town of Mers."

"Under what Name did The Marquis D'Herrera go when he went to Mers?"

"He forbid my telling his Name."

"What Name did he desire you to call him?"

"In case I was asked, I was to say his Name was Arriosa."

"What Name were you to bear?"

"I had always the Name of Paix."

"Do you know whether the Marquis had any Passport on that Occasion?"

"He had his own Passport, but he was not accustomed to shew it."

"Have you got that Passport?"

"I have not got what I mean by our Passport, but I have got the false one."

"What do you mean by the Name Arriosa; is that the Marquis's real Name?"

"No; his Name is Joseph Herrera."

"What Name did the Marquis assume and go by when he went upon a Visit to Mers to the Quavert?"

"He did not give it; they did not ask for it."

"What Name did the Marquis tell you to call him, if you should have Occasion to address him by his Name?"

"In case I was asked, I was to say his Name was Arriosa."

"Have you got any Passport which the Marquis had upon that Occasion?"

The Witness produced a Paper.

(By a Lord.) "Is that the Passport which the Marquis had at the Time you referred to?"

"Yes."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

282

Vu à la Police Gale du Royaume, Paris le 23 7bre 1827.

"No. 100

Le Chef de Bau des Passeports, Barecu.

Don Santiago de Usoz y Mozi,

Filiacion. Edad. Estatura. Ojos. Pelo. Cejas. Nariz. Frente. Colov. Boca. Barba.

Caballero de Nùmero de la real y distinguida Orden Española de Carlos III. Maestrante del Real cuerpo de Maestranza Caballeria de Ronda, del Consejo de S.M. y su Secretario con ejercieio Decretos, Oficial Mayor 2° de la primera Secretaria de Estado y del Despacho y Encargado de Negocios de S. M. Catolica en la Corte de Francia, &c. &c.

Concedo libre y seguro pasa Porte à Francisco Arriosa criado nat1 de Toledo, para pasar à Tours.

Firma del Portador.

Por tanto pido y encargo à los Capitanes Generales de Mar y Tierra, Comandantes, Gobernadores, Capitanes de Buques de Guerra y Mercantes, Justicias, Mayores, y demas Oficiales de Mar y Tierra de S. M. à quienes pudiera pertenecer y à las demas Potencias sus amigas aliadas ò neutrales no le pongan impedimento alguno en su viage, antes bien le faciliten los auxilios necesarios; a cuyo efecto doy el presente firmado por mi mano sellado con el escudo de mis armas.

Dado en Paris, hon dia Veinte y dos de Set° 1827.

Sant° Usoz y Mozi.

Tours.

3 D. N° 96.

Vu. Pour Tours.

Paris, le 22 Septembre 1827.

P. le Prefét de Police.

Le S. Chef de Bureau,

PORTER.

No. 1. No. 125.

Visto en la Embajada de S.M.C. en Francia para pasar À Tours.

Paris, 28 de Dbre de 1827.

El Secretario de la Embajada,

ANORES VILLALBA.

Tours.

3 D. No. 9.

Vu. Pour Tours.

Paris, le 28 December 1827.

P. le Prefé de Police.

Le S. Chef de Bureau,

Gratis.

PORTER."

(By Counsel.) "Where did you get that Passport; from the Marquis himself?"

"The Marquis went to the Ambassador's to ask it."

"Did the Marquis give it to you?"

"Yes; the Marquis gave it to me in case I was asked."

"After the Arrival at the Quavert do you recollect receiving any Letter from The Marquis D'Herrera to be sent to the Chateau D'Avaray?"

"Yes; he gave me a Letter, which I gave to a Boy at the Hotel."

"For what Purpose did you give it to the Boy?"

"Because the Marquis told me to have it sent by a Boy."

"Where to?"

"To the Chateau D'Avaray."

"At what Time of the Day did you send it?"

"Early in the Morning."

"In the course of the same Day did you see Madame Shakerley at the Quavert?"

"She came at One o'Clock that Day."

"What Apartments had the Marquis in that Inn?"

"A Bed-room."

"Was there a Bed in it?"

"Yes."

"Had he no other Room than a Bed-room?"

"No; he had no other Room."

"Where did Madame Shakerley go when she came to the Quavert?"

"She went into the Marquis's Apartments."

"Did she come on Foot or in the Carriage?"

"On Foot."

"Any body with her?"

"Nobody."

"Did you receive any Orders about her from the Marquis before she arrived?"

"To be at the Door in order to conduct her to his Room."

"Did you conduct her to the Marquis's Room?"

"Yes."

"Having arrived at One o'Clock, how long did Madame Shakerley remain with the Marquis?"

"'Till Four o'Clock."

"Were they alone, or was any body with them?"

"They were alone."

"Did she go away by herself, or how?"

"Alone."

"On Foot?"

"On Foot."

"Did she ever repeat her Visits to the Marquis at the Quavert?"

"Yes."

"How often?"

"During the Ten Days that we remained."

"At what Time of the Year was this?"

"I think at the End of July."

"Did Madame Shakerley always walk away from this Inn, or did she at any Time go in the Carriage?"

"She always went on Foot; except one Day that it rained, and then I conveyed her in the Cabriolet."

"Did you go with her in any Cabriolet?"

"Yes; I drove her to the Avenue."

"To what Avenue?"

"To the Avenue of the Chateau D'Avaray."

"When you got to the Avenue of the Chateau D'Avaray, what did Madame Shakerley do?"

"She got out on the Road, and went away on Foot."

"What Direction did she go in?"

"She went directly to the Chateau."

"Upon each of those Occasions did Madame Shakerley go into the Marquis's Bed-room at the Quavert?"

"Yes; she had no other."

"How long did she stay, generally speaking, upon those Visits?"

"Always 'till about Four or Half past Four."

"When she went away, did the Marquis go out at that Time, shortly after?"

"He generally went out about Half past Eight in the Cabriolet with me."

"Had you ever Occasion, shortly after Madame Shakerley left the Marquis's Apartment, to go into it?"

"I have gone in there on different Occasions."

"Had you ever made any Observation upon the State of the Bed, as if any body had been lying upon it?"

"I remember that, sometimes."

"What did you observe?"

"Derangement."

"Had the Bed been made before Madame Shakerley came there?"

"It was always made in the Morning."

"That was after she went away you found it deranged?"

"Yes."

"Did you find it oftener than Once?"

"Several Times."

"Do you remember at any Time the Marquis desiring you to get a Cloth Cloak for him?"

"Yes; I bought it myself; the Marquis told me to buy a Blue Cloak."

"Do the Peasantry wear Blue Cloaks in that Country?"

"Yes; it is the Custom of the Country."

"What did the Marquis do with it?"

"He disguised himself in it, to go out in the Evening."

"What sort of Hat did he wear?"

"A Cloth Cap."

"Was that the Dress of the Peasantry too?"

"Yes."

"When the Marquis had dressed himself in this Manner, where did he go?"

"He took me to the Avenue of the Chateau."

"Did you go with him?"

"Always."

"In the Cabriolet?"

"I drove the Cabriolet."

"When you got to the Avenue of the Chateau, what became of the Marquis?"

"He got out, and left me on the Road."

"Which Way did the Marquis go?"

"He always went in the Wood near the Castle."

"How long did he remain before he returned to you?"

"'Till Twelve at Night, or Half past Twelve, or One."

"At what Time did he go?"

"About Eight or Half past Eight."

"How often did you drive the Marquis in his Blue Cloak to the Avenue of the Chateau?"

"I remember about Five Times; at least Five Times."

(By a Lord.) "You said that it was Forty Leagues from Paris; in what Road?"

"On the Road of Orleans."

"How far is Tours from Paris?"

"It is about Thirty Leagues from Orleans to Paris, and about Twenty afterwards."

"In what Month was it that you went to Mers?"

"About the End of July."

"In what Year?"

"1827."

"In what Month was it that these Occurrences took place?"

"I think it was in July or August."

"Upon the Occasion to which you referred, namely, in July 1827, had the Marquis the Passport to which you have referred?"

"The First Journey to Mers he went without a Passport."

"Was it upon the First Journey that you were directed to make use of that false Name?"

"Yes; I was always told during that First Journey not to name him except by that Name."

"Had you any Passport for the First Journey at all?"

"I had my own, but he never shewed his."

(By Counsel.) "Where did the Marquis and you go to after you left Mers in the Month of July or August?"

"He made a Journey on the Loire."

"What Month was that in?"

"I think the Passport was dated the 22d July."

"Where did he go the Second Time?"

"To Orleans."

"Where did the Marquis and you go after you left Mers in the Month of July, after you left the Quavert?"

"To Paris."

"How long did you stay at Paris?"

"I think a short Time."

"What do you call a short Time?"

"I think there was not a Month Interval."

"Where did they go to from Paris, after staying there about a Month?"

"To Orleans."

(By a Lord.) "At what Time was it when he left Paris to go to Orleans?"

"In the Course of August, or after August."

(By Counsel.) "Did the Marquis hire any Boat, or did you do so by the Marquis's Order, when you were at Orleans?"

"Yes."

"What Sort of Vessel was it?"

"A Boat for carrying Merchandize."

"Was it one of the Boats that carry Merchandize or Goods upon the Loire?"

"Yes."

"One of the common Navigation Boats?"

"Yes, an ordinary Boat used in the Navigation of the River."

"Was there a Cabin in it?"

"There was the Captain's Chamber in it."

"Did the Marquis direct you to put in a Bed there?"

"I hired a Bed at Orleans."

"Did you lay any Provision in?"

"Yes; I engaged Provisions for about Fifteen Days."

"Do you remember, while you were at Orleans, receiving any Letter yourself?"

"Yes."

"How did it reach you?"

"Poste restant at Orleans."

"Did you apply for it at the Post Office?"

"Yes."

"Do you mean a Letter for yourself?"

"Always in my Name."

"What did you do with that Letter?"

"I gave it to the Marquis."

"Did not you open it?"

"No; the Marquis told me there would be a Letter addressed to me, but which was for him."

"How soon after you delivered that Letter did you and the Marquis leave Orleans?"

"As soon as they had got Provisions; Two Days afterwards."

(By a Lord.) "At what Time of the Year was it, as nearly as you can tell?"

"I think in the Course of August or September."

"Do you mean in the Course of August, or early in September?"

"I think it was in September."

"Was it early or late in September?"

"I think about the Middle; I do not remember precisely."

"How long was it after he had left Paris?"

"In the same Month."

"How long was it after you had left Paris when you received that Letter?"

"I cannot recollect exactly; it may be Three or Four Days."

(By Counsel.) "Where did the Marquis and you go to when you left Orleans upon this Occasion?"

"We went on board the Boat we had hired."

"Where did you cast Anchor?"

"Not far from Orleans, near the Chateau D'Avaray."

"How many Miles from Orleans?"

"About Five or Six Leagues, on the Banks of the Loire."

"Was it near the Chateau D'Avaray that the Vessel stopped?"

"Yes, near the Wood of the Chateau."

"Did the Wood come down to the Bank, or was there a little Space between, so that you could see who was walking there?"

"There is a little Interval between the Wood and the Banks of the River."

"Do you remember, after the Vessel came to an Anchor, seeing Madame Shakerley on the Banks of the Loire?"

"Every Day."

"How long did the Vessel lie off the Banks of the Loire?"

"About Ten or Twelve Days."

"Did Madame Shakerley come down every Day?"

"Every Morning and Afternoon."

"Where did she go?"

"Into the Marquis's Cabin."

"How did she get aboard; was the Vessel close to the Shore?"

"They went very near, and put a large Plank to the Shore."

"Was there any body on board besides the Marquis and the People belonging to the Boat?"

"The People belonging to the Boat were below, where they had Orders to place themselves."

"Was there any body besides the Crew; had the Marquis any other Companion?"

"Nobody."

"Did any body come down to the Banks with Madame Shakerley, or was she alone?"

"Alone."

"How long used she to stay on board in the Cabin?"

"She came at Seven o'Clock, and remained 'till Half past Eight or Nine."

"Was the Bed you have mentioned put up in the Cabin?"

"It was placed in lieu of the Captain's Bed."

"When Madame Shakerley left the Boat, did she go away alone, or the Marquis go with her?"

"Alone."

"Upon any of those Occasions did you go into the Cabin after Madame Shakerley had left it?"

"I always went; because I was alone with the Marquis."

"Did you make any Observations upon the State of the Bed in the Cabin?"

"It was always deranged, for it was a bad Bed."

"Could you form any Opinion, from what you saw, whether any Persons had been lying on that Bed, or not?"

"They had no Chairs; they either sat or laid upon the Bed."

"When did you quit the Marquis's Service?"

"In 1829."

"At what Time of the Year?"

"In the Month of August."

"When did you first see Mr. Shakerley?"

"At Paris, Eight Months ago."

"How did that happen?"

"Because I was taken into the House to speak to him."

"Who was with Mr. Shakerley upon that Occasion?"

"There was a Gentleman; I believe a Mr. Roscoe."

"Were any Questions asked you then as to what you knew of The Marquis D'Herrera's Acquaintance and Connection with Madame Shakerley?"

"Yes."

"Did you tell Mr. Shakerley or Mr. Roscoe then the Story you have told their Lordships now?"

"Yes; I told them the Truth."

"Did you tell them the same Story?"

"Exactly the same."

(By a Lord.) "How long did you remain in this Boat on the Loire?"

"About Ten Days."

"Where did you go to afterwards?"

"To Blois, to the Hotel D'Angleterre."

"At what Time was that?"

"Always in the same Month."

"Where did they go to afterwards?"

"We went back in the Diligence to Paris."

"How long were you in going?"

"Three or Four Days Journey."

"Did the Marquis remain in Paris?"

"He remained some short Time."

"How long?"

"About Two Months, I think."

"Have you and the Marquis had any Quarrel?"

"No."

"Had you ever seen Mr. Shakerley and Mr. Roscoe before you saw them upon the Occasion you have mentioned?"

"No; I did not know him."

"Were you told who they were?"

"Yes; Le Vasseur told me."

"Did you at once tell them all you have been disclosing now?"

"Yes; those Gentlemen asked me various Questions as to what I knew."

"Do you mean to say that you, knowing it was Mr. Shakerley you were speaking to, told this Story about your Master, with whom you had not at all quarrelled?"

"I forfeited my Word, because I was told that I must say what was the Fact."

"What do you mean by having forfeited your Word?"

"I mean by that, because I declared what I knew."

"What induced you to declare what you knew to the Prejudice of your own Master to a perfect Stranger?"

"Because Le Vasseur came to me and told me he had an excellent Place for me to go to England, and I was to go to the Hotel de Restardt."

"Did you go on the Expectation of getting an excellent Place?"

"Yes."

"Did you tell this Story to get this excellent Place?"

"Yes; he said it was an excellent Place; that I was to go to London."

"In consequence of being told that, you disclosed this Story?"

"Yes."

"After you returned to Paris, after you had staid in Paris Two Months, where did your Master then go?"

"He made a Journey."

"Where to?"

"To Orleans."

"To Orleans again?"

"Yes."

"Did you go the Chateau again?"

"Yes, I went there."

"Where were you living at the Time Mr. Shakerley found you out?"

"In Paris."

"In whose Service?"

"In the Service of Mr. Penyalver."

"How long had you been in that Gentleman's Service?"

"A very short Time; not a Month."

"In what Capacity?"

"Valet de Chambre."

"Had you good Wages?"

"The ordinary Wages of Paris."

"Have you got the good Place you expected?"

"Not yet."

"Have you got any Money yet?"

"No."

"Do you mean to swear you have received no Money from Mr. Shakerley or Mr. Shakerley's Agents?"

"I have received Money for my Subsistence, I believe, from Mr. Roscoe."

"For how long a Period has that been?"

"Ever since I quitted Paris; about Eight Months."

"How much a Week, or a Month; is it paid by the Week or the Month?"

"It is paid by the Month; £10 a Month."

"How much more are you to receive afterwards?"

"A good Place."

"You have received £10 a Month; what Wages did you receive while in the Service of the Gentleman you have mentioned?"

"One hundred and twenty Francs per Month."

"What is the ordinary Pay that a Lacquey de Place has in England?"

"I do not know."

"Do you know what a Courier gets when he is resident in England?"

"No, I do not know."

"You say you have received this for about Eight Months; what Part of the Eight Months have you been in England?"

"The whole of the Time."

"Do you mean to say, upon your Oath, that that is all you have received?"

"Nothing more."

"The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then James Roscoe was again called in, and further examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Did you accompany Mr. Shakerley to Paris in the Month of June 1827?"

"I did."

"For what Purpose did you go to Paris in the Month of June 1827?"

"For the Purpose of seeking of Madame Shakerley an Explanation of Circumstances and Reports which had come to the Ears of Mr. Shakerley."

"Were those Circumstances and Reports with reference to Matters which had occurred in England?"

"Yes, they were."

"Were you at the Time the Attorney and Agent of Mr. Shakerley?"

"I was."

"Had you at that Time any Reason to suspect improper Conduct of Mrs. Shakerley in Paris?"

"No."

"Did you make any Attempt to collect Evidence to affect Mrs. Shakerley with respect to her Conduct in Paris at that Time?"

"Certainly not."

"Why not?"

"Because we thought it was possible she might explain her Conduct to the Satisfaction of Mr. Shakerley."

"Had you any Suspicion of improper Conduct at Paris at that Time?"

"No."

"Did you go to Paris at any subsequent Time with Mr. Shakerley, or by his Directions?"

"In July 1829."

"By whose Orders?"

"I went by Orders of Mr. Shakerley, and with him."

"For what Purpose did you go then?"

"For the Purpose of obtaining Evidence, if such existed, of the Criminality of Madame Shakerley."

"The Criminality of Madame Shakerley supposed to have been committed, where?"

"Supposed to have been committed in France with The Marquis D'Herrera."

"When did any Information first come to your Knowledge of imputed Criminality between The Marquis D'Herrera and Madame Shakerley, committed in Paris?"

"Not until June last."

"Was that the earliest Time that you first heard of Imputations upon Madame Shakerley in Paris?"

"It was."

"And you went there for the Purpose of ascertaining the Truth of those Reports?"

"I did."

"To whom did you apply to furnish you with Information respecting Madame Shakerley's Conduct in Paris?"

"To the Witness Le Vasseur."

"Where did you first see him?"

"At the Hotel Restardt."

"Did Mr. Shakerley reside at the Hotel Restardt at that Time?"

"He did."

"How did Le Vasseur come to you; was he sent for?"

"He was sent for."

"What passed between you and Mr. Shakerley and Le Vasseur when he first came?"

"He was asked Questions what he knew of her Conduct, and he related it."

"Did you put Questions to Le Vasseur, or did he volunteer Information to you?"

"Questions were asked of him by me."

"Did he offer you any Information of his own accord, until you put the Questions to him?"

"No."

"Did you offer him any Money?"

"No."

"Did you offer him any Inducement to make the Statement that he did?"

"None at all."

"Any Promise of any Sort or Kind?"

"None."

"Upon that Occasion did you see the other Witness, Paix?"

"I did."

"Who informed you that Paix could furnish you with any Information?"

"Le Vasseur."

"In consequence of Le Vasseur telling you that, was Paix sent for?"

"He was."

(By a Lord.) "Who went for him, Le Vasseur?"

"I am not perfectly clear."

(By Counsel.) "Le Vasseur told you Paix could give you Information, and he was sent for?"

"Yes."

"You do not know who went for him?"

"I do not."

"When Paix came, who was in the Room besides you and Mr. Shakerley?"

"A Mr. Mills, a Professional Gentleman in Paris; and I think Le Vasseur was there."

"Did he say any thing of his own Accord, or were Questions put to him in the first Instance?"

"Questions were put to him."

"Who put the Questions?"

"Myself or Mr. Mills. I suggested them."

"Did Paix communicate the Information at once, or did he shew any Reluctance to tell?"

"He shewed considerable Reluctance."

"In what Way did he shew considerable Reluctance?"

"He spoke of his being under Obligations to The Marquis D'Herrera, and expressed his Unwillingness to tell this."

"What Arguments did you use to induce him to tell?"

"Nothing, but that we told him it was his Duty to tell the Truth."

"Did he, in consequence of that, give the Information which he did?"

"It was."

"Did you make him any Promise?"

"Never."

"Was any made in your Presence?"

"Never; not in my Presence."

"Or by any body?"

"No."

"To your Knowledge, was any Promise ever made to Paix of any Sort or Kind?"

"Not to my Knowledge."

"What have you paid Paix?"

"I paid his travelling Expences from Paris, and have paid him since that £10 a Month."

"Why have you paid him that £10 a Month?"

"It was thought as little as a Foreigner could live for in this Country, he not knowing the cheapest Way of going about Things."

"Has he found every Thing out of that; his Clothes and so on?"

"Yes; and when he crossed with me he was destitute of Clothes."

(By a Lord.) "Did you find him in Service in Paris?"

"He was in the Service of a Gentleman of the Name of Penyalvere."

"Was he destitute of Clothes?"

"He came with me in very great Haste, and did not bring with him all his Wardrobe he had in Paris, I imagine."

(Mr. Adam.) "Do you happen to know the ordinary Rate of Board Wages, as we should call them, to a Courier?"

"I do not."

"How early did Paix and Le Vasseur come to this Country?"

"In the Month of July."

"Have they been here ever since?"

"They have."

"Why did you bring them so soon?"

"Because I was not sure of having Access to them afterwards, if I did not."

"When were the Proceedings commenced in the Ecclesiastical Court?"

"Immediately on my Return; I think the Month of August."

"Were Paix and Le Vasseur Witnesses in the Ecclesiastical Court?"

"Yes."

"What was the Date of the Sentence?"

"I do not recollect."

"Was it necessary to retain them here 'till the Close of the Proceedings Mr. Shakerley thought it necessary to institute?"

"Yes."

"Were they retained for any other Reason?"

"I do not know any other Reason whatever."

(By a Lord.) "You examined the last Witness in Paris?"

"Yes."

"Did you conclude that Examination at One Meeting; or were there several Meetings?"

"There were several Meetings. I saw him first in the Evening, and I then got no Information from him."

"I saw him again the next Morning."

"Who had seen him in the mean time?"

"I cannot tell."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Francois Julien Amable Le Vasseur was again called in, and further examined as follows, through the Interpretation of Samuel Albert Muller:

(By a Lord.) "Did you find out Paix for the Purpose of bringing him to Mr. Roscoe?"

"Yes."

"Did you tell him, that if he would tell the Facts relating to this Transaction he should have a good Place?"

"I began to tell him, that if he went over to England he would have a good Place."

"Did you tell him what he was to come to England for?"

"No; I told him nothing 'till he promised that he would come over to England."

"You began by telling him, if he would come over to England he should have a good Place here?"

"Yes."

"It was after that Promise of the Place you asked him about these Circumstances, was it?"

"He had told me he would certainly come over; and then I told him that he must go and speak to Mr. Shakerley."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Francois Paix was again called in, and further examined as follows, through the Interpretation of Samuel Albert Muller:

(By a Lord.) "You stated that you had the Promise of a good Place in England if you would come over and give your Evidence; who made you that Promise?"

"Those Gentlemen in the Hotel."

"Whom do you mean by those Gentlemen?"

"The Gentlemen at the Hotel Restardt."

"Give the Names of those Gentlemen?"

"Mr. Roscoe and Mr. Shakerley."

"Did Mr. Roscoe and Mr. Shakerley tell you you should have a good Place if you would come over to England?"

"Mr. Roscoe told me I need not fear any thing, for I should at all events have a good Place."

"Did Mr. Roscoe tell you that you should have a good Place in England, or that you should be provided for while you staid in England?"

"As I expressed my Fear what might happen to me about the Loss of my Place in Paris, that I should have a good Place when it was all over."

"Which of the Gentlemen was it; did Mr. Roscoe say so, or Mr. Shakerley?"

"It was in general; those Gentlemen spoke together, both of them."

"You know Mr. Roscoe and you know Mr. Shakerley?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then James Roscoe was again called in, and further examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Have the goodness to state precisely what passed?"

"I could not speak French, so that I could not possibly speak to him; but I told him, through Mr. Mills of Paris, when he expressed an Unwillingness to come to London, that he had not any thing to fear for his Provision, for he should be very well taken care of when he was here."

"When he was here, or while he was here?"

"While he was here."

"Can you take upon yourself to swear that Mr. Shakerley did not say that he should have a good Place?"

"He did not, to my Knowledge; but I am not so conversant with the French Language as to be able to speak precisely to Expressions."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then John Cole was again called in, and further examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "You served Madame Shakerley with the Order of this House, and an examined Copy of this Bill?"

"I did."

"Where did you serve her?"

"At the Hotel D'Avaray."

"In what Part of the Hotel did you serve Madame Shakerley?"

"I served her in the principal Building."

"Up what Staircase were you introduced into the Hotel?"

"A Side Staircase, just after passing the Porter's Lodge."

"On the Left?"

"Yes."

"To what Room were you first introduced?"

"The Room I think would be over the Gateway; a small Room over the Gateway."

"Whom did you see there?"

"A Maid Servant."

"Whose Maid was she?"

"She appeared to me to be Mrs. Shakerley's. Mr. Mills was with me; I was not sufficiently acquainted with the French."

"Who is Mr. Mills?"

"He is a Solicitor; I believe, Solicitor to the Embassy at Paris."

"An Englishman?"

"Yes; but particularly conversant with French. Mr. Mills had previously served the Lady with other Documents."

(By a Lord.) "Is Mr. Mills here?"

"No, he is not."

(By Counsel.) "Can you state to their Lordships in what Part of the Hotel Madame Shakerley's Apartments were?"

"No, I cannot, certainly. I was introduced by the Porter up Stairs; and Mr. Mills had previously given the Porter his Card to give to Madame Shakerley; it was given to the Servant."

"Do you know whether the Part of the Hotel that you were first introduced to were Madame Shakerley's Apartments, or not?"

"No, I do not know that; the Servant appeared to be Madame Shakerley's Servant."

(By a Lord.) "Why?"

"Mr. Mills spoke to her about Madame Shakerley; she took the Card to Madame Shakerley; and then we were requested to follow her through the Corridor into the House; and then I was introduced."

"How does it follow from that that it was Madame Shakerley's personal Servant; she was living in her Father's House?"

"Yes; only we gave the Card to her."

"The Female Servant who took the Card conducted you along the Corridor into the other Part of the House?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Alfred Dyson was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Do you hold a Situation in the Alien Office?"

"Yes."

"Does your Situation enable you to state whether in the Year 1827 The Marquis D'Herrera was in England?"

"He was."

"Do you know when he left England?"

"The 29th of August 1827."

"Do you know whether he has since returned to England?"

"Not according to the Books in our Office."

"If he had returned to England in the only Way Foreign Noblemen would do, should you have official Knowledge of that Fact?"

"Yes."

"According to the Practice and Usage of the Alien Office, do Foreign Noblemen enter their Names in the Books there?"

"Yes."

"Has The Marquis D'Herrera entered his Name in the Books of that Office since August 1827?"

"No."

(By a Lord.) "You have searched the Books for the Purpose of ascertaining the Fact, have you?"

"Yes, I have."

"And you do not find any Entry of his Name?"

"No."

"What was the Day he left England?"

"The 29th of August. He left the 27th of January 1827; he returned the 7th of August 1827, and left the 29th of August in the same Year."

"Did he leave with any Servant with him?"

"I will not be quite sure, but I rather think he had a Servant with him."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Francois Paix was again called in, and further examined as follows, through the Interpretation of Samuel Albert Muller:

(By a Lord.) "When did you go into the Marquis's Service first?"

"The 29th of January 1827."

"Where?"

"Rue Provence, No. 51."

"Did you come to England with him?"

"Never."

"How long did you continue in the Marquis's Service after you first entered?"

"I was about Two Years between the Two."

"Between the Marquis and his Cousin?"

"Yes."

"You entered the Service in January 1827, in Paris?"

"Yes."

"How long did the Marquis remain at Paris with you?"

"He has always remained at Paris, and I believe he is still there."

"Do you mean to say, that from January 1827, as long as you continued in his Service, the Marquis remained at Paris?"

"Yes."

"Are you quite certain you entered the Marquis's Service in January 1827?"

"Yes; the 29th of January."

"Did you continue all February, and all March, and all April, and all May, and all June, and all July in that Year, in Paris, with the Marquis?"

"Yes; I remained always with him, either in Paris or on Journies."

"Journies in France?"

"Yes."

"When was the first Voyage began; was that the one taken to Tours?"

"To Mer."

"That was in the Month of August or September, you have stated?"

"In September, I think."

"Do you state that you have never quitted the Marquis's Person?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Alfred Dyson was again called in, and further examined as follows:

(By a Lord.) "Have the goodness to state when the Marquis first came to England in 1827?"

"On the 7th of August."

"Had he been in England before in that Year?"

"He left England on the 27th of January 1827."

"He came back on the 7th of August?"

"Yes."

"When did he return?"

"On the 29th of August."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Francois Paix was again called in, and further examined as follows, through the Interpretation of Samuel Albert Muller:

(By a Lord.) "You have stated that you remained with your Master in Paris in the Month of July; did you remain with your Master in Paris during the whole of the Month of August until he set out for Tours?"

"Yes; during the whole of the Month."

"Was the Marquis in Paris during the whole of the Month of August?"

"Yes."

"Up to the 27th?"

"Yes; I think up to the 27th."

"Are you quite positive the Marquis was in Paris during the whole of that Month?"

"It is not possible that he was there all the Month."

"What do you mean by that Answer?"

"That I am not quite certain; I do not perfectly recollect."

"Was he there the greater Part of the Month?"

"Yes, I am sure."

"Up to the Time when he left for the Purpose of going to Tours?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Mr. Adam stated, "That he had closed the Case for the Petitioner."

The Counsel was directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off sine Die.

Evidence to be printed.

Ordered, That the Evidence taken on the Second Reading of the said Bill be printed.

Ld. Ellenborough's Divorce Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put into a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of The Right Honorable Edward Baron Ellenborough with The Right Honorable Jane Elizabeth Baroness Ellenborough his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and made One Amendment thereto, which he was ready to report, when the House will please to receive the same."

Ordered, That the said Report be received To-morrow.

Transfer of Aids Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for appropriating certain Sums to the Service of the Year One thousand eight hundred and thirty;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Exchequer Bills (£12,000,000) Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for raising the Sum of Twelve Millions by Exchequer Bills, for the Service of the Year One thousand eight hundred and thirty;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Horsham & Guildford Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Burrell and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Road from Horsham to the Road leading to Guildford at Aldford Cross Ways, with Two Branches therefrom, and for making and maintaining a new Branch of Road to communicate therewith, all in the Counties of Sussex and Surrey;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Bridport Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Jones and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for better repairing the Second District of Turnpike Roads leading to and from the Town of Bridport, in the County of Dorset, and for making and maintaining several Branch Roads to communicate with the same;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Four Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Maule et al. v. Ramsay, Appellants Petition for Cause to stand over, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of The Honorable William Maule, and others, Appellants in a Cause depending in this House, to which Major General The Honorable James Ramsay is Respondent; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to order that this Cause may stand over to be heard on the Second Cause Day after Easter:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Willis et Ux. v. Sir G. A. Robinson et al. Petition of a Respondent for an early Day, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of George Thomas Lyon Bowes commonly called Lord Glammis, One of the Respondents in a Cause depending in this House, wherein John Walpole Willis Esquire, and Lady Mary Isabelle his Wife, are Appellants, and Sir George Abercrombie Robinson Baronet, and others, are Respondents; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to order that the said Appeal may be set down and heard at an early Day in the present Session of Parliament:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Mullins et al. v. Townsend, Appellants Petition to put off the Hearing, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of The Honorable Edward Mullins, and others, Appellants in a Cause depending in this House, to which John Townsend Esquire is Respondent; praying their Lordships "to put off the Hearing of this Appeal until Monday the 3d Day of May next, or such other Day as to their Lordships shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

National Vaccine Establishment, Report of, delivered.

The Earl of Shaftesbury laid before the House, pursuant to an Address to His Majesty of Thursday last,

"A Copy of the last Report from the National Vaccine Establishment."

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Report do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Report be printed.

East India, &c. Trade, Petitions for throwing open, referred to East India Com ee: Chambers of Commerce of Edinburgh;

Upon reading the Petition of The Chamber of Commerce and Manufactures of the City of Edinburgh, under their Common Seal; praying their Lordships "for the entire Removal of all Restrictions on the Trade to India and to the Countries East of the Cape of Good Hope, from all the Ports of Great Britain and Ireland, which would most effectually promote the Trade and give Vent to the Manufactures of these Kingdoms:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

of Greenock;

Upon reading the Petition of The Chamber of Commerce of Greenock incorporated by Royal Charter, under their Common Seal; praying their Lordships, "That at the Expiry of the existing Charter of The East India Company the Restrictions on the Trade with India may be removed, the Colonization of that Country by British Subjects freely permitted, and the Monopoly of the Trade with China entirely and for ever abolished:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the lastmentioned Committee.

and of Glasgow.

Upon reading the Petition of the Directors of The Chamber of Commerce and Manufactures established by Royal Charter in the City of Glasgow, under their Common Seal; praying their Lordships, "That at the earliest Period allowed by Law such Measures may be adopted by their Lordships as shall secure to all His Majesty's Subjects in the United Kingdom a free Trade to all the Countries situated to the Eastward of the Cape of Good Hope, and the Liberty of proceeding to and residing in these Countries, under such Regulations as to their Lordships may seem proper, and consistent with the good Government, Tranquillity and Safety of the British Possessions in India:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the lastmentioned Committee.

Corn Laws, Petition from Manchester against, & for Reduction of the Taxes.

Upon reading the Petition of the Retail Dealers in No. 6. or the Exchange District in Manchester, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will entirely remove the Duties on the Importation of Foreign Corn, and make a great and immediate Reduction of the Taxes:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Leather Duty, Petition from Linlithgow for Repeal of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Tanners and Curriers in Linlithgow, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to repeal the Act of the Third Year of His present Majesty's Reign, imposing a Duty of Three Half-pence per Pound on Leather, as well as the accompanying Restrictions and Penalties:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Disabilities of the Jews, Petition from Jews of Liverpool for Removal of.

Upon reading the Petition of the natural-born Subjects of His Majesty professing the Jewish Religion resident in Liverpool, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take into favorable Consideration the peculiar Grievances of the Petitioners, and to adopt such Legislative Measures for the Removal thereof, as to their Lordships, in their Wisdom, shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Anatomy, Petition from Sheffield respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Physicians and Surgeons residing in Sheffield, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Disadvantages under which the Science of Anatomy is now placed, and the Difficulties under which the Petitioners and the Professors of Physic and Surgery labour, may be taken into early Consideration; and that their Lordships will consider of the best Means which, to their Wisdom, may appear meet for removing the same:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, undecimum diem instantis Martii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.