House of Lords Journal Volume 62
17 March 1830

Sponsor

History of Parliament Trust

Publication

Pages

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 17 March 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 122-128. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16317 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Die Mercurii, 17 Martii 1830.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Ds. Lyndhurst. Cancellarius.
Epus. Landaven.
Vicecom. Melville.
Vicecom. Granville.
Ds. Colville of Culross.
Ds. King.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Auckland.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. Bayning.
Ds. Lilford.
Ds. Fitz Gibbon.
Ds. Somerhill.
Ds. Wharncliffe.
Ds. Wynford.
Comes Bathurst, Præses.
Comes Rosslyn, C. P. S.
March. Lansdowne.
March. Bute.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Malmesbury.
Comes Dudley.

Ld. Wynford sits as Speaker.

The Lord Chancellor not being present, and The Lord Tenterden, Lord Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench, appointed Speaker by His Majesty's Commission, being absent, the Lords called upon The Lord Wynford to take his Place upon the Woolsack as Speaker, and appointed the Mace to be laid thereon, and to be carried before him:

And The Lord Wynford took his Place as Speaker accordingly.

Prayers.

Napier v. Goldie et al.

The joint and several Answer of Alexander Crombie Esquire, of Phesdo, and Miss Xaveria Glendonwyn, to the Petition and Appeal of John Napier Esquire, of Mollance, was this Day brought in.

As was also, The Answer of Alexander Goldie, Writer to the Signet, to the Petition and Appeal of John Napier Esquire, of Mollance.

Kirkpatrick v. Innes et al:

After hearing Counsel this Day upon the Petition and Appeal of John Kirkpatrick Esquire, Advocate, which Appeal upon the Death of Mrs. Isabella Innes or Clephane, one of the Respondents thereto, was, by Order of this House of the 3d Day of this instant March, revived in the Name of John Minto, Surgeon in Edinburgh; Trustee of the said Mrs. Isabella Innes or Clephane, deceased; complaining of Two Interlocutors of the Lord Ordinary in Scotland, of the 28th of January and 9th of February 1826; and also of an Interlocutor of the Lords of Session there, of the Second Division, of the 30th of May 1826; and praying, "That the same might be reversed, varied or altered, or that the Appellant might have such Relief in the Premises, as to this House, in their Lordships great Wisdom, should seem meet;" as also upon the Answer of Mrs. Isobel Innes or Clephane, Isabella Clephane or Minto, and Dr. John Minto her Husband, for himself and his Interest, and John Gavin, put in to the said Appeal; and due Consideration had of what was offered on either Side in this Cause:

Interlocutors Affirmed, with Costs.

It is Ordered and Adjudged, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the said Petition and Appeal be, and is hereby dismissed this House, and that the Interlocutors therein complained of, be, and the same are hereby Affirmed: And it is further Ordered, That the Appellant do pay or cause to be paid to the said Respondents the Sum of Fifty Pounds, for their Costs in respect of the said Appeal.

Dawson et al. v. the Magistrates of Glasgow.

After hearing Counsel, in Part, in the Cause wherein Dawson and Mitchell and Adam Dawson are Appellants, and the Magistrates of Glasgow and their Tacksman are Respondents:

It is Ordered, That the further Hearing of the said Cause be put of 'till To-morrow.

Maule et al. v Ramsay.

Ordered, That the Hearing of the Cause wherein The Honorable William Maule, and others, are Appellants, and Major General The Honorable James Ramsay is Respondent, which stands appointed for this Day, be put off 'till To-morrow.

Justice v. Callander.

Ordered, That the Cause wherein Miss Maria Campbell Rae Justice is Appellant, and William Burn Callander Esquire is Respondent, be heard ex-parte by Counsel at the Bar To-morrow.

Hamerton's Divorce Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of William Medows Hamerton Esquire with Isabella Frances his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes;" and for hearing Counsel for and against the same; and for the Lords to be summoned;

Counsel were accordingly called in:

And Mr. Harrison appearing as Counsel on behalf of the Petitioner; and no Counsel appearing for Mrs. Hamerton;

Mr. Harrison was heard to open the Allegations of the Bill.

Then James Parsloe, was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Do you know Mrs. Hamerton, the Wife of Major Hamerton?"

"Yes."

"How long have you known her?"

"About Four Years."

"Did you know her while she was living with Major Hamerton as his Wife?"

"Yes."

"Did you occasionally wait at the House?"

"I regularly waited there."

"Was that at Cheltenham?"

"Yes."

"Did you go to France, for the purpose of serving any Proceedings of this House upon Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes."

"Did You see her in France?"

"Yes, I did."

"Where did you see her?"

"In the Rue de Jardrin."

"In Paris?"

"Yes."

"Did you serve her with you Proceedings?"

"Yes."

"What Proceedings did you serve her with; was it with a Copy of the Proceedings in this House?"

"A Copy of the Order of the House of Lords."

"Did you see Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes, personally, herself."

"Did you give that Paper into her own Hand?"

"I did."

"Did you also shew her the original Order of the House?"

"Yes, I did. This (producing a Paper) is the Order I shewed to her."

(By a Lord.) "What did she say when you served her?"

"She asked me if I could call again, and I said I could; but I believe it was meant merely for an Excuse."

"What did she say?"

"She only asked me if I could call again, and offered me back the Parcel I gave into her Hands; and I said I would leave it with her."

"Did you tell her what it was?"

"Yes; and gave her this Copy to read, and held it in my Hands while she read it."

(By Counsel.) "She offered it you back again, and you would not take it?"

"Yes."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Rogers was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "What are you?"

"Clerk in The Bishop of London's Registry."

"Are Certificates of Marriages solemnized in France regularly sent over to this Country?"

"Yes, they are."

"Are they now sent over in Books?"

"Yes, they are."

"Were they formerly sent over as separate Certificates, like that which you have got in your Hand?"

"Yes, they were."

"Do you produce that Certificate from the Office in which you are a Clerk?"

"Yes."

"From the Office of The Bishop of London?"

"The Bishop of London's Registry."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

"Certificate of Marriage."

"I hereby certify, That William Meadows Hamerton of Hamerton in the County of Tripperary, in the Kingdom of Ireland, and Isabella Frances Romer of London, both now residing at Versailles in the Kingdom of France, were married in the House of His Britannic Majesty's Ambassador at Paris, according to the Form of the Church of England and Ireland, this Twentyfourth Day of December in the Year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and eighteen, by me,

"Edward Forster, A. M.

"Chaplain to the British Embassy, and Minister to the English Protestant Congregation at the Church of the Oratoire in Paris."

"This Marriage was solemnized between us, W. M. Hamerton.
I. F. Romer.
In the Presence of J. Murray,
Isabella Murray."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel informed the House, "That he would now proceed to call Witnesses to prove the Handwriting of Major and Mrs. Hamerton."

Then Ann Hatton was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Did you live with Mrs. Hamerton as Lady's Maid?"

"Yes."

"How long did you live with Mrs. Hamerton as her Maid?"

"Five Years and a Half."

"Are you acquainted with her Handwriting?"

"Yes, fully acquainted with it."

The Certificate of Marriage was shewn to the Witness.

"Is that the Handwriting of Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes, I believe it to be the Handwriting of Mrs. Hamerton."

"What was her Name before her Marriage?"

"Isabella Frances Romer."

"Do you know the Handwriting of Major Hamerton?"

"I am perfectly well acquainted with it."

"Is that the Handwriting of Major Hamerton?"

"Yes, I believe it to be the Handwriting of Major Hamerton."

(By a Lord.) "Have you seen them both write?"

"Yes, frequently."

"And you believe it to be the Handwriting of both?"

"I do."

(By Counsel.) "Do you remember them coming Home after their Marriage?"

"I did not live with them 'till the little Girl was Sixteen Months old."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Captain Richard Hackett was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Do you know Major Hamerton and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Perfectly well."

"Were you intimately acquainted with Major Hamerton?"

"Intimately."

"Do you know Mrs. Isabella Murray, whose Name is signed as a Witness to the Certificate of Marriage?"

"I knew her intimately."

"Is she living or dead?"

"Dead."

"Do you know General Murray, who has signed it also?"

"Yes, intimately."

"Do you know him now, so as to know his State of Health?"

"I have understood-"

(By a Lord.) "Have you seen him?"

"Not since his Illness."

(By Counsel.) "You say you were acquainted with Major Hamerton and his Wife Miss Romer?"

"Yes."

"Did you know them prior to their Marriage in "Paris?"

"Yes."

"You knew her as Miss Romer, and him as Major Hamerton?"

"Yes."

"Did you know them after their Marriage?"

"Yes."

"Did you associate with them as a Friend?"

"Yes."

"What was the Conduct of Major Hamerton to his Wife?"

"Most affectionate."

"Were you in the habit of frequently seeing them?"

"Yes, while they were in that Part of France where I was; they were a considerable Time at Boulgone; but when they were last in Paris I spent some Days with them, which was in 1824 or 1825; that was the last Time they were in Paris."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Thomas Griffiths was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Are you a Solicitor at Cheltenham?"

"Yes, I am."

"Were you Solicitor to Major Hamerton?"

"I was."

"Did Major Hamerton send to you in Cheltenham, to make any Communication to you professionally as to the Conduct of his Wife?"

"Yes, on the 26th of March 1827."

"Did he communicate to you the Intelligence he had received as to his Wife?"

"Yes."

"Did he desire you to take any Steps?"

"He desired me to commence an Action at Law against John Bushe for Criminal Conversation with his Wife."

"And also Steps as to a Divorce?"

"Yes."

"Did you take any Steps?"

"I sent for a Latitat by that Day's Post; that would arrive by the 28th. I made every Exertion to find out Mr. Bushe; but I found he had left on the 26th, in the Evening; and he has never been there since."

"Have you made Enquiries repeatedly to ascertain whether he has returned to England?"

"Yes, I have; and I have Reason to believe he went immediately to France. I sent a Writ to Dover, but it did not arrive in Time."

"The Information you received was, that he left Cheltenham on the 26th?"

"Yes."

"Did you go on to Outlawry upon that Writ?"

"No; that would be upon a Special Original. I issued a Special Original, under the Advice of Counsel, and proceeded to Outlawry."

(By a Lord.) "You know nothing of the Parties?"

"I know Major Hamerton and Mr. Bushe."

(By Counsel.) "Was Mr. Bushe at that Time living in Cheltenham with his Wife?"

"Yes; I know Lady Louisa Bushe was living at No. 2, Oxford Parade, where I caused Enquiries to be made for him."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel informed the House, "That he would now proceed to prove the Situation of General Murray."

Then William Hubert Gyde was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Did you go down to Brighton in this last Week to procure the Attendance of General Murray at the Bar of their Lordships House?"

"I did."

"Did you see General Murray?"

"I did."

"In what Condition did you find him as to his Health?"

"In as bad a Condition as a Man could be."

"As far as Appearance enabled you to judge, what was the Nature of his Complaint?"

"I have some Difficulty in giving an Answer to that Question. The Surgeon informed me, and I believe him-"

(By a Lord.) "Are you a Medical Man?"

"No."

(By Counsel.) "What Steps did you take in consequence?"

"I served him with a Copy of the Order of the House which I took down."

"Did you take any other Steps to ascertain whether his Attendance was practical or possible?"

"He referred me to his Surgeon, to whom I went, and he told me the Nature of his Disorder was Paralysis."

"What was his Appearance?"

"He appeared in an extremely weak and delicated State; and from what I saw he did not appear able to rise from his Chair."

(By a Lord.) "Can you state upon your Oath he is not able to come here?"

"Yes, I can, safely."

"Do you know that that is the General Murray who is wanted here?"

"I believe it to be the General Murray."

"Do you know General Murray's Handwriting?"

"No, I do not."

"What Means have you of knowing that the Gentleman you saw at Brighton was the Person whose Attendance was required here?"

"From Information received from Mr. Hamerton's Solicitor, I understood that General Murray was residing there."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Captain Richard Hackett was again called in, and further examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Are you acquainted with the Handwriting of General Murray?"

"No, I am not. I could not swear to it."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel informed the House, "That he would on a future Occasion be able to prove the Handwriting of General Murray, though it could not be done at the present Moment."

Then Charlotte Hargraves was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

"Did you know Mrs. Hamerton and Major Hamerton?"

"Yes."

"Did you also know Mr. Bushe?"

"Yes."

"Where did you know him; was it at Cheltenham?"

"Yes."

"With whom did you live at Cheltenham?"

"With Mrs. Colonel Matthews."

"Where did she reside at that Time in Cheltenham?"

"In Belle Vue Place, No.1."

"Were you in the habit of seeing Mrs. Hamerton at the House of Mrs. Matthews?"

"Frequently."

"Did you also see Mr. Bushe there?"

"Frequently."

"Did Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton come to Mrs. Matthews' House at the same Time, or at different Times?"

"They came very shortly one after the other, and most in general they met."

"About what Time did you first see Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton at Mrs. Matthews' House; about what Year?"

"I do not exactly know what Year; it was about Fifteen Months before I left Mrs. Matthews."

"When did you leave Mrs. Matthews?"

"I have left her about going on Three Years."

"Did you ever see Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton together? You have stated that they came to the House repeatedly?"

"I never saw them together, no more than knowing that they were together in a private Room; but I never saw them together in a private Room."

"Did you ever see them together out of a Room?"

"No, never. Yes; I saw them together out of a Room, at the Front Door, once."

"Did you hear any Conversation pass between them at that Time?"

"She answered the Door to Mr. Bushe."

"Do you mean that Mrs. Hamerton answered the Door to Mr. Bushe?"

"Yes. He came with a Double Rap. I was going to answer the Door, and she answered it before me."

"Do I understand you, that you saw Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton together upon that Occasion?"

"Yes."

"Did any Conversation pass between them?"

"There was something passed between them when they met that I could not hear; and then she said she was going to Town; and they whispered something in an under Breath again; and then, as she turned away from him, he pushed the Door to, and asked her if he should see her before she went, Three Times, before she answered him; and she turned round with a Blush to him, and said "Yes;" and then she turned away and smiled, and went into the Dining-room to Mrs. Matthews, and he went away."

"You said that Mrs. Hamerton and Mr. Bushe were frequently in the habit of coming to the House of Mrs. Matthews?"

"Yes."

"At what Time of the Day did they come?"

"Sometimes in the Afternoon, and sometimes in the Evening; sometimes they would meet earlier: Twelve or One o'Clock."

"Into what Room were they shewn?"

"Generally in the Parlour, on the First Floor."

"Did you ever know them to be alone in that Room?"

"Several Times."

"Did you ever know of their being in any other Room in the House?"

"In the Drawing-room, alone."

"Do you recollect any particular Occasion on which they were in the Drawing-room, alone?"

"One particular Time they were there longer than another."

"What Time was that?"

"I do not know what Time in the Year; it was in the Summer-time."

"What Time of the Day was it?"

"About Four o'Clock in the Afternoon."

"Did you open the Door to Mr. Bushe on that Occasion?"

"No; the Housemaid."

"What is the Name of the Housemaid?"

"Sarah Bright."

"Where was Mrs. Hamerton when Mr. Bushe came into the House?"

"In the Dining-room, with Mistress, at Dinner."

"Had they long begun their Dinner?"

"They had very shortly begun their Dinner; from Five to Ten Minutes, I suppose; but she had quite done when Mr. Bushe-"

"Where did Mr. Bushe go; did he go up into the Drawing-room?"

"He was to be shewn up into the Drawing-room. Mistress told us he was coming."

"Who went to him in the Drawing-room?"

"Sarah Bright shewed him up, and then came back, and told Mrs. Matthews that he was there."

"Did any body follow him?"

"Mrs. Matthews asked Mrs. Hamerton if she would go and sit with her Friend 'till she had done Dinner; and Mrs. Hamerton was shewn up, and she remained there Three Quarters of an Hour. They were private together."

"Where was Mrs. Matthews upon that Occasion?"

"She staid down in the Dining-room, and from there she went up into the Bed-room to clean herself, to prepare herself to go out in the Phaeton with Mrs. Hamerton, to meet her Mother."

"When Mr. Bushe came to Mrs. Matthews, and was in the Parlour with Mrs. Hamerton, did you observe whether the Blinds were down or up?"

"In the Dining-room?"

"Yes. When Mr. Bushe was shewn into the Room below, were the Blinds put down, to prevent People seeing in, or were they up?"

"The Blinds were generally pulled down; almost always."

"Were the Blinds pulled down upon other Occasions, when Mrs. Hamerton and Mr. Bushe were not there, as well as when they were there?"

"Never; without any Time when Mistress was writing; it was very seldom she had them pulled down unless she was tired of writing, but never whenever any other Gentlefolks were there except Mrs. Hamerton and Mr. Bushe."

"Did you receive any Directions as to whether any body was to be admitted when Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton were at the House of your Mistress?"

"Not One Time in Ten she would be at Home to any body when they were there."

"Did she give any Directions as to whether she was to be at Home or not?"

"She would always say, Not at Home to any body but Mr. Bushe. If he was in first, she would say, Not at Home to any body but Mrs. Hamerton. When they were both in, then she would be at Home to nobody."

"Do you ever recollect Major Hamerton coming to the House when Mr. Bushe was there?"

"Yes; he came twice while Mr. Bushe was there. He came one Time and catched Mrs. Hamerton and Mr. Bushe sitting together in the Dining-room, and Mrs. Matthews."

"You say he came twice; do you recollect what passed when he came the other Time?"

"The next Time they saw, I believe, Major Hamerton coming, for Mr. Bushe ran up Stairs very fast."

"Did Mr. Bushe come down Stairs while Major Hamerton was there?"

"No."

"Did he come down Stairs after Major Hamerton was gone?"

"Yes. Mrs. Matthews asked Leave of Major Hamerton to let Mrs. Hamerton stop to dine."

"Did she stop and dine?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Bushe come down while Major Hamerton was there?"

"No. Mrs. Matthews walked to the Front Door with Major Hamerton, and shut it, and bolted it; and then Mr. Bushe came down."

"Did Mr. Bushe then come down to the Room where Mrs. Hamerton was?"

"Yes."

"How long did Mr. Bushe stay?"

"'Till Seven o'Clock in the Evening, before the Dinner was taken up."

"Was the Dinner kept waiting upon that Occasion 'till Mr. Bushe went?"

"Yes; Two Hours."

"Where did he stop with Mrs. Hamerton?"

"In the Dining-room."

"Did Mr. Bushe, upon any Occasions upon which he came to Mrs. Matthews' House, give any Money to you or any of the other Servants?"

"Yes."

"What did he give to the Servants?"

"The most he ever gave us was Half a Sovereign apiece."

"Did he give you any other Sum at another Time?"

"Eight Shillings, another Time."

"Any Money at any other Time?"

"Five Shillings another, and Four Shillings another."

"Did any other Gentleman who came to the House give you Money too?"

"No."

"Was Mr. Bushe the only Gentleman who visited who gave you and the other Servants Money?"

"Yes."

(By a Lord.) "Were you the Servant of Major Hamerton?"

"No."

"In whose Service were you?"

"In Mrs. Colonel Matthews'."

"That is the Person at whose House they were staying?"

"Yes. Major Hamerton was staying at Fancy Hall."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Ann Hatton was again called in, and further examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Did you live Servant Maid with Major Hamerton and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes."

"You have said already, for Five Years?"

"Yes; Five Years, and upwards."

"Where did they live, at Cheltenham?"

"They first lived at No. 4, Kentson Bank."

"Did you know where Mrs. Matthews lived?"

"At Belle Vue Place."

"Did Major Hamerton and Mrs. Hamerton live at the Place you have mentioned the whole of the Time you staid at Cheltenham?"

"They were for a short Time in another House."

"Did they ever live in the same House with Mrs. Matthews?"

"No, never."

"Did you know where Mr. Bushe lived?"

"He lived in the Oxford Parade at the Time I knew him."

"Was Lady Louisa Bushe living in the Oxford Parade at that Time?"

"I believe she was."

"Was your Mistress in the habit of getting up early in the Morning?"

"She got up early in the Morning 'till we were at Boulogne in France."

"Was she indisposed at Boulogne?"

"Yes, at the Time she first took to breakfasting in Bed."

"Was her usual habit after that to breakfast in Bed?"

"Yes, generally."

"At any Period after you lived with Mrs. Hamerton at Cheltenham did she get up in the Morning earlier than her usual habit?"

"She has done it some Mornings in 1826 and the Beginning of 1827."

"Upon what Mornings did she get up early?"

"It was when Major Hamerton was gone out a-hunting, to meet the Hounds."

"It was when Major Hamerton in the habit of frequently going out with the Hounds?"

"Two or Three Times a Week."

"Did Mrs. Hamerton ascertain before she got up whether Major Hamerton was gone or not?"

"She would always ascertain it from me before she got up."

"At what Time did she get up upon the Occasions on which she arose earlier than usual?"

"Probably about Ten or Eleven."

"Did she, upon any of those Occasions, go out into Cheltenham, into the Town?"

"She would say sometimes to me, she was going to Mrs. Matthews."

"Did she then quit her House?"

"Yes."

"How long did she upon those Occasions stay out?"

"She has returned Home by Twelve or One o'Clock, and sometimes not 'till Three in the Afternoon."

"Did she, upon those Occasions, generally take her Daughter with her?"

"She never took her Daughter with her upon those Occasions."

"Was Mrs. Hamerton very fond of her Daughter?"

"When I first lived there, she was particularly fond of her."

"Did you observe any Change in the Conduct of Mrs. Hamerton towards her Daughter at any Time?"

"I had observed a Change for Twelve Months before she left Mr. Hamerton; she neglected the Child very much."

"Did the Child ever ask to go out with her walking in Cheltenham?"

"I have heard her frequently ask her Mamma to take her, and her Mamma would not take her."

"Was Mrs. Hamerton in the habit of taking the Child out with her before the Period you are mentioning?"

"She would take her out more frequently."

"Was the Child after that left much more to your Care?"

"Entirely to me."

"Do you recollect Major Hamerton calling you up Stairs to observe your Mistress's Dressing-case?"

"He took me up with him."

"Do you remember when it was; at what Time?"

"The 25th of March 1827."

"Did you go up to Mrs. Hamerton's Bed-room?"

"I went up Stairs to Mrs. Hamerton's Bed-room."

"What passed there?"

"Major Hamerton opened the Dressing-case, and took out Letters; the Trinket-case, I should say."

"Did he then empty the Trinket-case, or go to the Trinket-case and take out any other Things at any other Period?"

"He went a Second Time."

"When did he go the Second Time?"

"Almost immediately after the Letters were found."

"Do you mean immediately after the First Letters were found which you have before stated; was it the same Day?"

"Yes."

"Did he make a further Search in the Trinket-case?"

"Yes; he made a further Search, and he found a Miniature that was concealed in a great deal of Wool or Wadding."

"Where was Mrs. Hamerton at this Time?"

"Major Hamerton and Mrs. Hamerton had left the House, and he returned again to the House."

"Do you mean, that Major Hamerton had left the House before he made the First Search, or the Second Search?"

"I was not at Home when he made the First Search at all."

"You were only present at the Second?"

"At the Second and Third."

"You were present when the Trinket-box was searched twice, but not the First Time?"

"No."

"When it was opened the last Time, Major and Mrs. Hamerton had left the House?"

"Yes; he took her out; they went in a Fly together from Fancy Hall."

"Did Major Hamerton come back alone?"

"Yes."

"Was Mrs. Hamerton ever in the House of Major Hamerton after that Time?"

"No; she was never in the House again."

"As far as you know, did Major Hamerton after that Time ever see Mrs. Hamerton?"

"I believe not, to the best of my Knowledge."

"She never came back to the House?"

"No."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel was directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off to Wednesday next, and that the Lords be summoned; and that Counsel be called in at Three o'Clock."

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed by The Lord Chancellor.

New Chappel & Brighton Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Burrell and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and maintaining the Road from New Chappel, in the County of Surrey, to Ditcheling Bost Hills, in the County of Sussex, and from thence to the Town of Brighthelmston, in the same County; and also for making and maintaining a Branch of Road from the Town of Ditcheling to Clayton, in the County of Sussex;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Brunswick Square, &c. (Brighton) Improvement Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Burrell and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for paving, lighting, watching, cleansing and otherwise improving Brunswick Square and Brunswick Terrace, and certain Streets and other Public Places upon certain Grounds late Part of a Farm called the Wick Farm, in the Parish of Hove, in the County of Sussex;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Congleton Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Egerton and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for repairing, amending and maintaining the Road from Congleton, in the County of Chester, to a Branch of the Leek Turnpike Road at Thatchmarsh Bottom, in the Parish of Hartington, in the County of Derby, and from the Lowe to the Havannah Mills, in the said County of Chester;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Ardglass Harbour Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Corbett and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable the Commissioners of the Harbour of Ardglass, in the County of Down, to make Contracts for Works, and to borrow Money for the Improvement of the said Harbour;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Four Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

East India Co. Accounts respecting, delivered, & referred to East India Com ee.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Danvers, from the Court of Directors of The East India Company, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to Orders of the 25th Day of February last,

"An Account of the Per-centage at which the several Heads of Revenue in India were collected for the Years included in the Papers presented on the 9th of February 1830:"

Also, "An Account of the Arrears of Land Revenue left outstanding annually at the Close of the Official Year, at each of the Presidencies in India, from 1809-10 to 1827-28 inclusive:"

Also, "Statement of the Revenues and Charges of the Presidency of Bengal (exclusive of the Commercial Charges) in the Years 1809-10, 1817-18 and 1827-28:"

Also, "A Statement of the several Heads of Revenue and Charge of the Presidency of Madras for the Years 1809-10, 1817-18 and 1827-28:"

Also, "Statement of the Revenues and Charges of Bombay (exclusive of the Commercial Charges) in the Years 1809-10, 1817-18 and 1827-28:"

Also, "Statement of the Revenues and Charges of Prince of Wales Island and Malacca, in the Year 1809-10 and 1817-18, and of Prince of Wales Island, Singapore and Malacca, in the Year 1827-28:"

And also, "Statement of the Revenues and Charges of St. Helena for the Years 1809-10, 1817-18 and 1827-28."

And then he withdrew.

And the Titles thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Papers do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Papers be printed.

Ordered, That the said Papers be referred to the Select Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

Labourers Wages, Petition from Newcastleunder-Lyme respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Parish of Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take such Steps as will most effectually check or totally abolish that most injurious System of paying Wages in Goods instead of the Current Coin of the Realm, a great and crying Injustice to all the Middle and Lower Classes, as tending to, and, in fact, as absolutely producing a Demoralization of Character appalling to every well regulated Mind, and as going very far towards breaking up the social Compact:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Tythe Laws, Petition from Llanthewy Skirrid, & c. for Revision of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Freeholders and Landholders of the several Parishes of Llanthewy Skirrid, Llanthewy Rytherch, Llanvapley, Llanvetherine, Llantilliopertholey, Llanvihangel Crucorney, Llangattocklingold, Llanarth, Goitrey, Bringwyn, Tregare, Penrose, Llanellen and Llanover, in the County of Monmouth, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will, at as early a Period in this Session of Parliament as the Business of the Nation will allow, take into their most serious Consideration the present State of the Tythe Laws, and the Effects now resulting from them, and after a strict and mature Investigation of the Question in all its relative Bearings, their Lordships will be pleased to adopt such Measures and make such Arrangements as shall appear to them to be consistent with Justice to the Payers and Receivers of Tythes, and most beneficial to the general Interest of Religion, and those of the Community at large:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Foreign & Colonial Corn & Flour, Account of Duty on, Ordered.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, "An Account shewing the Rate and Amount of Duty paid on each Sort of Foreign and Colonial Corn, Flour and Meal entered for Home Consumption, from July 5th, 1828, to January 5th, 1830."

Foreign Lead, Petition from Swaledale against Importation of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Swaledale, in the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of the further Decrease of the Value of Lead, and praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to take into their Consideration the distressed State of the Nation, and of the Mining Districts in particular, and afford Relief by such Measures as to their Lordships shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Salford Improvement Bill, The King's Consent signified:

The Earl of Shaftesbury acquainted the House, "That His Majesty having been informed of the Contents of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for better cleansing, lighting, watching, regulating and improving the Town of Salford, in the County Palatine of Lancaster," was pleased to consent (as far as His Majesty's Interest is concerned) that their Lordships may proceed therein as they shall think fit."

Bill reported.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees to whom the last-mentioned Bill was committed, "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Kirkby & Pinxton Road Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for repairing and improving the Road from the Nottingham and Mansfield Turnpike Road, through Kirkby and Pinxton, to Carter Lane, and to the Colliery near Pinxton Green, in the Counties of Nottingham and Derby," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Watling Street Road Bill Specially reported.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed to consider of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually improving and maintaining the Wellington District of the Watling Street Road, in the County of Salop;" "That the Committee had met, and considered the said Bill, and, in the first place, proceeded to enquire how far the Standing Orders of the House relative to Road Bills had been complied with, and found that all the said Orders had been complied with, except in the following Particular; viz t. That no Map or Plan, together with a Book of Reference containing a List of the Names of the Owners and Occupiers of the Lands, and an Estimate of the Expence of the Work proposed to be done, and of the probable Time within which the same may be completed, had been deposited with the Clerk of the Parliaments previously to the Bill being brought to this House from the Commons, as it was stated to the Committee, by the Agent for the Bill, that the same had been omitted to be done through Inadvertence; but that the said Map or Plan and Papers had since been deposited with the Clerk of the Parliaments, and had been produced to the Committee, and duly proved; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to their Lordships, without any Amendment."

Which Report being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Report do lie on the Table.

Rawlings's Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of Edward Rawlings of Dartford, in the County of Kent, Esquire, praying Leave to bring in a Bill for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be, and is hereby referred to The Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer and Mr. Justice Bosanquet, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon, under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also, that the Judges, having persued the Bill, do sign the same.

Horsham & Guildford Roads Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Road from Horsham to the Road leading to Guildford at Aldford Cross Ways, with Two Branches therefrom, and for making and maintaining a new Branch of Road to communicate therewith, all in the Counties of Sussex and Surrey."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Cox and Mr. Stephen;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

Ld. Ellenborough's Divorce Bill:

The Order of the Day being read for the Third Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of The Right Honorable Edward Baron Ellenborough with The Right Honorable Jane Elizabeth Baroness Ellenborough his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes therein mentioned;"

It was moved, "That the said Bill be now read the Third Time."

Which being objected to; After Debate,

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Then the said Bill was read the Third Time.

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by the former Messengers;

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

Report of Mr. Telford on the Road from Ketley Iron Works to Chirke, Ordered.

Ordered, That there be laid before this House, "A Copy of the Report of Mr. Telford respecting the Road from Ketley Iron Works, in the County of Salop, to Chirke, in North Wales."

Mutiny Bill.

Hodie 2 a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for punishing Mutiny and Desertion; and for the better Payment of the Army and their Quarters."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Marine Mutiny Bill.

Hodie 2 avice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the Regulation of His Majesty's Royal Marine Forces while on Shore."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Pensions, &c. Duties Bill.

Hodie 2 avice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for continuing to His Majesty, for One Year, certain Duties on Personal Estates, Offices and Pensions in England, for the Service of the Year One thousand eight hundred and thirty."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, decimum octavum diem instantis Martii, horâ decimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.