House of Lords Journal Volume 62
24 March 1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 24 March 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 149-158. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16322 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Die Mercurii, 24 Martii 1830.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Ds. Lyndhurst, Cancellarius.
Epus. Londinen.
Epus. Bath. et Well.
Ds. Napier.
Ds. Hay.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. Bayning.
Ds. Arden.
Ds. Wharncliffe.
Ds. Seaford.
Ds. Wynford.
Comes Rosslyn, C. P. S.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Clarendon.
Comes Norwich.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Malmesbury.
Comes Stradbroke.
Vicecom. Arbuthnott.
Vicecom. Doneraile.
Vicecom. Melville.

PRAYERS.

The Lord Wynford sat Speaker by virtue of a former Commission.

The Mayor, &c. of Galway v. The Attorney General of Ireland.

The Answer of His Majesty's Attorney General for Ireland, at the Relation of Valentine Blake and Thomas Blakeney Esquires, to the Petition and Appeal of The Mayor, Sheriffs, Free Burgesses and Commonalty of the Town and County of the Town of Galway in Ireland, was this Day brought in.

Dawson et al. v. the Magistrates of Glasgow.

After hearing Counsel fully in the Cause wherein Dawson and Mitchell and Adam Dawson are Appellants, and the Magistrates of Glasgow and their Tacksman are Respondents:

It is Ordered, That the further Consideration of the said Cause be put off to Wednesday next.

Maule et al. v. Ramsay.

After hearing Counsel, in Part, in the Cause wherein The Honorable William Maule, and others, are Appellants, and Major General The Honorable James Ramsay is Respondent:

It is Ordered, That the further Hearing of the said Cause be put off 'till To-morrow.

Allardice & Boswell v. Robertson.

Ordered, That the Hearing of the Cause wherein Robert Barclay Allardice and John Boswell Esquires are Appellants, and John Robertson is Respondent, which stands appointed for this Day, be put off 'till To-morrow.

Justice v. Callander.

Ordered, That the Cause wherein Miss Maria Campbell Rae Justice is Appellant, and William Burn Callander Esquire is Respondent, be heard by Counsel at the Bar To-morrow.

Hamerton's Divorce Bill:

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of William Medows Hamerton Esquire with Isabella Frances his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes;" and for the Lords to be summoned;

Counsel were accordingly called in:

Then William Murray Esquire was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "I believe you are the Brother of General Murray, who witnessed the Marriage of Major and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"I am."

The Certificate of the Marriage of Major and Mrs. Hamerton was shewn to the Witness.

"Is that your Brother's Handwriting?"

"I believe it to be his Handwriting."

"Is that also the Handwriting of Mrs. Murray, his Wife?"

"Yes, I believe so."

"Mrs. Murray is dead?"

"She died in 1823."

"Is General Murray in a bad State of Health?"

"Most deplorable; One Half of him is dead from Paralysis, and he cannot articulate."

(By a Lord.) "Is he incapable of attending here?"

"I should think it almost impossible, except at a great Risk; and I do not believe he could make himself explicable to your Lordships, if he did attend."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Ann Hatton was again called in, and further examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Do you know whether Mrs. Hamerton was in the habit at any Time of keeping her Trinket-case locked?"

"Yes, she was, during the last Winter she was there."

"Had she been in the habit of keeping it locked before that Winter?"

"She did not use to lock any thing up until the last Six or Eight Months."

"Did you observe in what State of Mind Major Hamerton was when he took those Letters out of the Trinket-case?"

"He was very much agitated; when I first saw him, particularly so; very much distressed."

"Was any thing else found in the Trinket-case besides Letters?"

"There was a Miniature."

"How long did you live with Major and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"I lived Five Years and a Half with Mrs. Hamerton."

"What was the Conduct of Major Hamerton towards his Wife?"

"He was very kind and affectionate in every respect; very much so."

"Do you remember whether Mrs. Hamerton went to Warwick at any Time in 1826?"

"I remember her going to Warwick?"

"How long did she stop at Warwick?"

"She was not a Week from Home. I cannot mention the Days exactly."

"She was away a few Days?"

"Yes."

"Was it in 1826?"

"Yes."

"Are you able to state, from Recollection, whether that (handing a Miniature to the Witness) was the Miniature that was found?"

"Yes, that is the same; I recollect it perfectly."

"Do you know Mr. Bushe by Person?"

"Yes, perfectly well."

"Is that the Miniature of Mr. Bushe?"

"Yes, I consider it as such, as far as my Judgment will go."

"Knowing Mr. Bushe, if you had seen that anywhere, "should you have known that to be a Picture of Mr. Bushe?"

"I should consider it as such."

(By a Lord.) "Do you undertake to swear this is Mr. Bushe's Portrait?"

"I believe it as such."

"You say, upon your Oath, you believe it as such?"

"Yes, upon my Oath, I believe it."

"I understand you to say that Mr. Hamerton shewed you this Case which was opened?"

"It had been opened before I saw the Case."

"He had been in the Room before you got there?"

"He had taken One Letter out, he told me."

"I am not supposing he would do so; but he had an Opportunity of putting those Letters there?"

"He told me he opened the Box and took One Letter out of One Division."

"Then he afterwards came back and found this Picture?"

"Yes, and more Letters."

"How were those Letters covered, so that he could not see them the First Time?"

"The Box was in Two Divisions; the First Letter was laid on the Top Division, he told me."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel informed the House, "That he would now proceed to call another Witness to prove the finding of the Miniature and the Letters."

The Counsel was informed, "That the House doubted whether they ought to attach any Weight to the finding of the Letters and the Miniature, as Major Hamerton had been proved to have been in the Room before the Letters were seen found by the Servants."

The Counsel stated, "That he meant to prove that the Letters were directed to Mrs. Godolphin, and that Mrs.Hamerton applied at the Post Office for Letters in that Name, and that Mr. Bushe also applied at the Post Office to know whether such Letters had been called for, and that he would then prove that the Letters were in the Handwriting of Mr. Bushe."

The House enquired, "Whether the Counsel had any other Evidence of the Adultery beside that which had been adduced?"

The Counsel stated, "That he had no other Evidence of the Adultery than that which would arise out of the Letters; that the Letters contained Expressions which could lead to no other Inference than that a Criminal Intercourse had taken place."

The Counsel was informed, "That the Letters of the Adulterer had never been received in Evidence to prove the Adultery, in this House; and that Doubts had been entertained whether the Letters of the Wife were Evidence."

The Counsel stated, "That he conceived he was entitled to prove the Fact of Mrs.Hamerton going to the Post Office, and asking for Letters in a feigned Name."

The Counsel was informed, "That if he could trace the Letters into the Hands of Mrs. Hamerton, they would be Evidence in this Case, but that without some such Evidence they could not be received."

The Counsel stated, "That he did not mean to produce the Letters 'till he had called the Postmaster to prove that Letters were left at the Post Office for a Mrs. Godolphin; that Mrs. Hamerton came and asked for them; and that Mr. Bushe also came to the Post Office, to enquire whether those Letters had been called for."

Then Ann Harris was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Did you ever live with Major and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"No."

"Were you ever in the House with them?"

"Not for any length of Time."

"Were you ever in the House?"

"I was in the habit of going backwards and forwards to see Ann Hatton."

"Were you, upon any Occasion when you were visiting Ann Hatton, called upon by Major Hamerton to go up Stairs in his House?"

"Yes."

"Did you go up Stairs?"

"Yes."

"What passed?"

"I saw him open the Trinket-box a Second and Third Time, and take a Miniature out."

"How do you know that; you cannot know it was the Third Time, unless from being told?"

"No."

"You had not been up on any former Occasion?"

"No."

"The only Knowledge you have of his looking into the Trinket-box, and finding any thing, was upon the Occasion you have stated?"

"Yes."

"Were you present when the Miniature was taken out?"

"Yes."

"Any body else?"

"Ann Hatton and Major Hamerton."

The Counsel was informed, "That the Evidence the Witness was now giving could not be received; and that, unless he could shew Mrs. Hamerton had received the Letters, they could not be read."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then James Robertson Woodward was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Have you got a Number of Letters addressed to Mrs. Godolphin?"

"I believe they are so addressed."

"They are annexed to the Libel in the Ecclesiastical Court?"

"Yes, they are."

The Witness produced and delivered in a Number of Letters.

"You produce them from the Office of the Ecclesiastical Court?"

"Yes."

"Were they Exhibits in the Cause of Hamerton v. Hamerton?"

"They were."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then Joseph Fowler was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Are you in the Post Office at Cheltenham?"

"Yes."

"Did you know, at Cheltenham, Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes."

"You knew her by Person?"

"Yes, I did."

"Did you also know Mr. Bushe at Cheltenham?"

"Yes."

"Did Mrs. Hamerton ever come to the Post Office herself to ask after any Letters?"

"She did several Times."

"In what Name did she ask for Letters?"

"Mrs. Godolphin."

"Did you give to her any Letters addressed to Mrs. Godolphin?"

"I did."

"Look at those Letters, at the Backs of them, and see whether, by the Marks upon them, you can pick out any that you gave to Mrs. Hamerton?"

The Witness examined the Letters.

"This is one." (Selecting a particular Letter.)

"Are you able to state that that was a Letter delivered to Mrs. Hamerton?"

"I believe it was."

"Why do you believe it was?"

"From the Handwriting."

"Do you recollect the Handwriting?"

"I do."

"Have you any Mark upon the Back of it that enables you to identify whether it was One of those Letters?"

"The Cheltenham Stamp is on it, which I know to be our Stamp, that we use."

"Did you ever give any Letter, addressed to Mrs. Godolphin, to any other Person than Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Certainly not."

"Was there any Person, from your Knowledge derived in the Post Office, of the Name of Godolphin in Cheltenham?"

"No; I never recollect any one."

"Were all the Letters that were addressed to Mrs. Godolphin delivered to Mrs. Hamerton?"

"All I delivered were delivered to her."

"Had you Access to all the Letters that came to Cheltenham at that Time?"

"Not to deliver them all."

"Were some sent out for Delivery?"

"No."

"I do not mean any with the Name of Godolphin; but some Letters were sent out?"

"Yes."

"Were any Letters in the Name of Godolphin sent from your Office for Delivery, or were they delivered to Mrs. Hamerton?"

"I never took any out,"

"Were all the Letters that came to your Office in the Name of Godolphin delivered personally to Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes." (The Witness proceeded in his Examination of the Letters.) "That is another." (Selecting another Letter.)

"You have the Cheltenham Post Mark upon it?"

"Yes."

"Does that identify the Time? Look at it."

"Not plainly."

"Can you make out in what Year it was; are you able to state from Recollection in what Year it was?"

"1827, I believe."

"Are those the only Letters you have ever delivered for any body, from the Office, directed to Mrs. Godolphin?"

"Those are the only Two I see here."

"Did you ever receive any Letters addressed in the Name of Godolphin, and deliver them, except to Mrs. Hamerton?"

"No."

"Look through the rest."

The Witness examined the rest of the Letters.

"Here is one from Melton Mowbray."

"Is that directed in the same Way?"

"Yes."

"Does that, from the Post Mark, appear to have been left at the Post Office, and delivered about the same Time?"

"This was delivered in March; it has the London Forward Stamp in March. The Melton Mowbray Stamp has no Date to it."

"Did it come through London?"

"Yes. The 10th of March is the London Stamp; that is the Day after it was put in at Melton Mowbray."

(By a Lord.) "Do you undertake to swear that those Letters were delivered by your Hand into the Hand of Mrs. Hamerton?"

"No; I could not swear that."

"You are not the only Person who delivers out Letters at Cheltenham?"

"No; there is another Clerk."

"You judge those Letters past through the Post Office, because they have the Post Office Mark; but they may have been delivered by another Person, every one of them?"

"They may. There was another Clerk at the Office."

"How many Clerks are there?"

"There is One Clerk, and me, the Assistant."

"You are a Deputy?"

"Yes."

"Is the other Clerk here?"

"No."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel informed the House, "That the Reason for not calling the other Clerk was, because he did not know the Person of Mrs. Hamerton; and that he would now proceed to prove the Handwriting of Mr. Bushe."

The Counsel was informed, "That the Letters could not be read without a great deal more Evidence being first produced."

Then William Pitt was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Look at those Letters?"

The Witness examined the Letters which had been produced.

"In whose Handwriting are those Letters?"

"In Mr. Bushe's Handwriting."

"Are you familiar with his Handwriting?"

"Perfectly."

"Are you quite certain they are all in his Handwriting?"

"I have not the slightest Doubt about it."

"Were you at Cheltenham in the Year 1827?"

"Yes."

"And the latter Part of 1826?"

"Yes."

"Was Mr. Bushe there at the same Time?"

"Yes."

"Do you know where Mr. Bushe resided?"

"No. 2, Oxford Parade."

"Was his Family with him at that Time?"

"Lady Louisa Bushe was living with him."

"Do you know the House called the Pavilion?"

"Yes, I do."

"Where is it situated?"

"Close to the High Street."

"Is it a retired House; a House a little out of the Way?"

"Very much so."

"Is it a House to which any body could have Access without being seen by the Servants, or without being let in?"

"Yes."

"Do you happen to know whether Mr. Bushe ever had that House?"

"No, I do not."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel informed the House, "That he would now proceed to call another Servant of Mrs. Matthews, to confirm the Testimony of the other Witnesses with respect to Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton meeting at the House of Mrs. Matthews."

Then Sarah Bright was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Did you live with Mrs. Matthews at Cheltenham in the Years 1826 and 1827?"

"Yes."

"How long were you with Mrs. Matthews?"

"A little more than Twelve Months."

"Do you recollect Mrs. Hamerton coming to Mrs. Matthews' House?"

"Yes."

"Did she come frequently to the House?"

"Yes."

"Did you know Mr. Bushe by Person?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Bushe also come to the House?"

"Yes."

"Did you ever receive any Orders from Mrs. Matthews upon the Subject of letting in Visitors?"

"Yes."

"What were those Orders?"

The Counsel was informed, "That what Mrs. Matthews said to the Witness was not Evidence."

(By Counsel.) "When Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton were at Mrs. Matthews' House, were any other Persons let in?"

"No."

"At what Time did they usually come to Mrs. Matthews'; did they frequently come together?"

"Yes."

"In what Room were they when they were at Mrs. Matthews'?"

"In the Dining-room."

"When they were at Mrs. Matthews' together, do I understand you to say that no other Visitors were let in?"

"No."

"Did you receive any Direction from any body, not to let in other Persons?"

"Yes."

(By a Lord.) "Did you receive Directions from Mrs. Hamerton or Mr. Bushe?"

"From Mrs. Matthews."

(By Counsel.) "Do you remember Mrs. Hamerton, on any Occasion, dining with Mrs. Matthews?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Bushe come to the House while Mrs. Hamerton and Mrs. Matthews were at Dinner?"

"Yes."

"Was it soon after they had began Dinner; or at what Period?"

"Soon after."

"Into what Room of the House did Mr. Bushe go upon that Occasion?"

"The Drawing-room."

"Did any body go to him in the Drawing-room?"

"Yes."

"Who went up to him?"

"Mrs. Hamerton."

"Did Mrs. Hamerton go to Mr. Bushe immediately he came, or did she stay to finish her Dinner?"

"She staid a very short Time; she did not wait many Minutes; she had almost done Dinner."

"Did she go up to the Drawing-room to Mr. Bushe?"

"Yes."

"Did she wait there with him?"

"Yes."

"Did Mrs. Matthews go up too?"

"Yes; about an Hour after."

"Were Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton in the Drawingroom alone during that Interval?"

"Yes."

"Did you see Mrs. Hamerton when she came out of the Room?"

"Yes."

"What was her Appearance; was there any thing in her Appearance that you observed?"

"She was very much flushed in the Face."

"You say they were nearly One Hour together before Mrs. Matthews went up to them?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton come frequently to the House?"

"Yes."

"When they were in the Parlour below, were the Blinds of the Parlour drawn up or down?"

"Down."

"Were the Blinds in the Parlour usually down when other Persons were there?"

"Not all the Way down; Part of the Way."

"Do you remember Mr. Bushe coming to Mrs. Matthews', on the Evening on which he left Cheltenham?"

"Yes."

"Was Mrs. Hamerton there then?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Bushe give you any Money at any Time?"

"Yes."

"What Sum did he give you?"

"Ten Shillings, Eight Shillings, Five Shillings and Four Shillings."

"Did any other Gentleman who came to the House give you Money too?"

"No."

"Was he the only Gentleman who came as a Visitor that gave you Money?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember, upon any Occasion, Major Hamerton coming to the House when Mr. Bushe was there?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Bushe remain in the Room in which he was when Major Hamerton was coming up to the House?"

"No."

"What did Mr. Bushe do?"

"Run up Stairs."

"How long did Mr. Hamerton stay in the House?"

"A few Minutes."

"Did Mr. Bushe come down Stairs while Major Hamerton was in the House?"

"No."

"Did he come down Stairs after Major Hamerton was gone?"

"Yes."

"Was Mrs. Hamerton in the House then?"

"Yes."

"In what Room?"

"In the Parlour."

"Did Major Hamerton go into the Room in which his Wife was?"

"Yes."

"And then went away in a few Minutes?"

"Yes."

"Did Mr. Bushe come down again to the Room where Mrs. Hamerton was?"

"Yes."

"Were they together a considerable Time upon that Occasion?"

"Yes."

"Do you remember whether Dinner was kept waiting that Day?"

"A very long Time."

"How long was Dinner kept waiting?"

"Nearly Two Hours."

"Was that an usual Thing, or an unusual Thing, at Mrs. Matthews' House?"

"An unusual Thing."

(By a Lord.) "Is Mrs. Matthews here?"

"No."

"Where is she?"

"I do not know."

"What sort of a House does Mrs. Matthews keep; what is her Situation in Life?"

"I do not know now; when I lived with her, she lived at Cheltenham."

"What sort of a House was it?"

"It was No. 1, Belle Vue Place."

"Is she a Married Woman?"

"She had been; she was a Widow."

"And she permitted those Meetings to be held at her House?"

"Yes."

"You are sure of that?"

"Yes."

"Whose Widow was she?"

"Colonel Matthews'."

"Do you mean to say that a Person in that Situation of Life, the Widow of an Officer of Rank in the Army, permitted these Things to be going on?"

"Yes; these Two Calls; I do not know of any thing more."

"That she permitted a Gentleman to be alone in her House with a Lady for Two or Three Hours?"

"Yes."

"Did she know the Blinds were down when they were there?"

"Yes."

"You swear that?"

"Yes."

"How many Times did this happen?"

"I cannot say."

"How many do you think; Ten Times?"

"Yes; quite as many as that."

"You thought this was very improper?"

"Yes."

"Did you never mention to your Mistress it was not creditable to her?"

"No."

"The Ten Shillings, the Eight Shillings, the Five Shillings and the Four Shillings stopped your Conscience?"

"I did not think it my Duty to speak to my Mistress about it."

"But you thought it very wrong?"

"Yes."

"Is Mrs. Matthews now at Cheltenham?"

"She is not at that House. I do not know where she is. I left her at that Time."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then William Maine was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "What are you?"

"A Waiter."

"Do you remember waiting at the House of Colonel Crowther, at Cheltenham, when an Evening Party was given?"

"Yes."

"Was Mr. Bushe at that Party?"

"Yes, he was."

"Was Mrs. Hamerton at that Party too?"

"Yes."

"Did you know the Persons of Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Both very well."

"Were you in the habit of waiting at Places where they visited?"

"Frequently."

"Do you remember Mrs. Hamerton going away from Colonel Crowther's that Night?"

"After Tea and the Refreshments Mrs. Hamerton's Glass Coach came for her. I announced the Carriage was at the Door. Mr. Bushe rose from his Seat (he had not left her long; he was walking her about the Room all the former Part of the Evening;) and went to her. They had a great deal of Conversation, and left the Room. I followed them out on to the Top of the Stairs. I had some Things outside I had taken down to the Floor below, and I waited. There was a great deal of Conversation outside of the Door, and some Kisses up Stairs. He took her Arm, or she took him by the Arm, and he walked her down Stairs. The Lad that was with the Glass Coach opened the Door, and then left the Door, and went to his Horses. There was a good deal of Conversation; I will not swear to the Words, but it was for she to meet him, and he to meet her, at some future Time. They shook Hands, and gave one another a Kiss; and the last Words she spoke was, she says "You be sure to be there." "Yes, my dear," he says; and the Carriage Door was shut, and she went Home, I suppose."

"When you talk of Conversation and Kisses, are you alluding to the Conversation between Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes."

"Are you positive, upon your Oath, that Mr. Bushe did kiss Mrs. Hamerton?"

"Yes; and Mrs. Hamerton Mr. Bushe."

"Did that take place more than once?"

"Only once; then they shook Hands, and the Carriage Door was shut, and the Boy drove her Home."

"Was it after she got into the Carriage?"

"Yes; before the Steps were put up."

"Where were you standing at the Time?"

"At the front Door, about Three Yards from the Carriage, on the Pavement."

"Did I understand you to say, they had been together a great deal in the Course of the Afternoon?"

"Yes, in the Evening; they were together the greatest Part of the Evening, talking, in the Drawing-room."

"Was there a large Party?"

"Mr. Bushe was at the Dinner Party; Mrs. Hamerton was not; she came to the Evening Party."

(By a Lord.) "Was there a Light near where the Carriage was?"

"Yes; there was a Lamp at the Corner, about Ten Yards off."

"It was quite light?"

"Yes."

"What Part of Cheltenham was it in?"

"Portland Street, Warwick House; very near the new Church."

"There was a great deal of Light?"

"Yes, there was."

"They must have seen you?"

"Yes; I stood Three Yards behind Mr. Bushe's Back."

"You were standing close behind, and a Gas Light close by you, and you saw this Gentleman and Lady kissing each other?"

"Yes."

"He kissed her, and she him?"

"Yes."

"In your Presence?"

"Yes."

"She must have seen you?"

"Yes, she must; but he could not."

"Her Face was towards you?"

"She was sat down, leaning towards him, in the Carriage, as he stood on the Pavement; and I was standing ready to shut the Door when Mr. Bushe returned."

"Where do you live now?"

"At Guilford."

"You have left Cheltenham?"

"Yes."

"In what Situation are you now?"

"Waiter at the White Hart."

"How was it known that you saw them; who did you tell of it?"

"When it first arose it was in Conversation. I spoke to one of the Witnesses, Mr. Parsloe, and he told Mr. Griffiths, and he examined me."

"Where were you examined first?"

"At Mr. Griffiths' Office."

"How long ago?"

"Nearly Three Years."

"You are quite sure she saw you?"

"She must have seen me; I was standing ready to shut the Door."

"It is a Thing that does not often occur at Cheltenham?"

"I took the more Notice of it, knowing both the Parties; and I said to the Servants at Supper, after the Company was gone, there was something incorrect."

"You did not tell Major Hamerton?"

"No."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Then William Hubert Gyde was again called in, and further examined as follows:

(By Counsel.) "Were you in Paris in April 1828?"

"I was."

"Did you endeavour to ascertain the Residence of Mr. Bushe?"

"I did."

"Did you also endeavour to find out where Mrs. Hamerton lived?"

"Yes."

"Did you ascertain, while at Paris, the Residence of both of them?"

"Yes."

"Did you take any Steps to endeavour to see whether they were in the habit of seeing each other?"

"I did."

"State to their Lordships whether you saw them together, and when?"

"I think it was on the 5th of April. I was going down the Rue de la Michaudiere, at No. 3, in which Street Mr. Bushe resided, and in passing I saw a Carriage drive up to the Door, or within a few Yards of the Door; it could not drive quite close up, in consequence of another Carriage standing in front of the Door. When the Carriage stopped, a Lady got out, and I immediately recognized her as Mrs. Hamerton. She went into the House where Mr. Bushe resided. I waited at the Door Three or Four Hours, and then Mrs. Hamerton came out of the House, and walked back to her own Residence. The Residences of the Two Parties were about Three hundred Yards from each other. In about Four or Five Minutes Mr. Bushe came out, dressed as a Man who had not been out before; his Boots were clean, and his Hat neatly brushed, and so forth. About Four or Five Days afterwards, I was going down the Rue Neuve, St. Augustin, in Paris, and I saw Mr. Bushe drive down that Street in a Carriage, and stop at No. 51, which was Mrs. Hamerton's Residence; and, after waiting in the Carriage a few Moments, Mrs. Hamerton came out, and got into the Carriage, and they drove away immediately. On the 3d of March last I was in Paris, to serve Mrs. Hamerton with the Process; and by Accident I was at one of the Theatres, and Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton were in the next Box; and I saw Mrs. Hamerton repeatedly, in the Course of the Evening, put her Arm to his Back; and any one would have supposed they were Man and Wife from the Manner of the Parties."

"Those were the only Times at which you were able to trace them together?"

"Yes."

"When they were at the Theatre, were they with a Party, or did they appear to be by themselves?"

"They were alone. It was the Avant Scene Box; and there was no other Person in the Box, except during a short Period of the Evening."

"Do I understand you to state, there was some Degree of Familiarity in the Manner in which Mrs. Hamerton behaved to Mr. Bushe?"

"It was with as much Familiarity as a Lady would treat a Gentleman in a Public Theatre. I observed frequently, in the Course of the Evening, that her Legs were pressed against him; and I saw her Arm leaning against his Back and Shoulders. I might probably, during the First Two Times I was in Paris, have seen them more together; but that was not my Duty; I was there merely to obtain other Evidence."

(By a Lord.) "You are the Attorney that conducts this Case?"

"I am an Articled Clerk to the Attorney."

(By Counsel.) "You were not there at first to enquire after Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton, but for another Object?"

"Yes; for the Purpose of obtaining Evidence; not to watch the Proceedings of the Parties personally."

"(By a Lord.) "How do you know that these Places were the Residences of Mr. Bushe and Mrs. Hamerton?"

"By enquiring at the House, of the Porters, and seeing the Parties going in and out several Times."

"They were not living together in the same House?"

"No."

"Was Mr. Bushe's Lady living there at the same Time?"

"I believe not. She was residing in Cheltenham, I believe."

(By Counsel.) "Was the Time you have spoken of the same Day you served Mrs. Hamerton with a Copy of the Bill?"

"I did not serve her personally with it; but the Person I took with me for that Purpose did serve her."

"Did you see him serve her?"

"No, I did not."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel was informed, "That it would be satisfactory to the House that Mrs. Matthews should be examined; that the Evidence in support of the Bill would be very meagre unless she was called."

The Counsel was directed to withdraw.

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off sine Die.

Evidence to be printed.

Ordered, That the Evidence taken upon the Second Reading of the said Bill be printed.

V. Doneraile takes the Oaths.

This Day Hayes Viscount Doneraile took the Oaths, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

Rothschild v. Brookman.

The House being moved, "That a Day may be appointed for hearing the Cause wherein Nathan Mayer Rothschild is Appellant, and James Brookman is Respondent:"

It is Ordered, That this House will hear the said Cause, by Counsel at the Bar, on the first vacant Day for Causes after those already appointed.

Emeris's et al. Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of The Reverend John Emeris of Louth, in the County of Lincoln, Clerk; The Reverend Marmaduke Alington of Swinhop House, in the County of Lincoln, Clerk, as well on his own behalf as for and on behalf of his Son Richard Pye Alington, an Infant under the Age of Twenty-one Years; George Marmaduke Alington of the same Place, Esquire, eldest Son of the said Marmaduke Alington, as well on his own behalf as for and on behalf of his (the said George Marmaduke Alington's) Two Sons George Hugh Alington and Charles Argentine Alington, Infants under the Age of Twenty-one Years; Mary Alington, the Wife of the said George Marmaduke Alington; Henry Pye of Louth, in the said County of Lincoln, Gentleman, lately called Henry Alington, the Second Son of the said Marmaduke Alington; The Reverend John Alington of Swinhop aforesaid, Clerk, the Third Son of the said Marmaduke Alington; Hildebrand William Alington of Boston, in the said County of Lincoln, Gentleman, the Fourth Son of the said Marmaduke Alington; and Samuel Rowe of Malpas, in the County of Chester, Esquire; praying Leave to bring in a Bill for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be, and is hereby referred to Mr. Baron Garrow and Mr. Justice Gaselee, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon, under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also, that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Evelyn's & Boscawen's Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of Mary Jane Evelyn and of The Honorable and Reverend John Evelyn Boscawen, on behalf of William John Evelyn, George Pallmer Evelyn, Charles Francis Evelyn, Frederick Massy Evelyn, James Evelyn and Edmund Boscawen Evelyn, Infants; praying Leave to bring in a Bill for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be, and is hereby referred to The Lord Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas and Mr. Justice Littledale, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon, under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also, that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Gordon's et al. Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of James Adam Gordon of Hill Street, Berkeley Square, in the County of Middlesex, Esquire; Sir William Abdy of the same Place, Baronet; Sir Thomas Fellowes Knight, a Captain in His Majesty's Royal Navy; The Reverend George Caldwell of Cheltenham, in the County of Gloucester, Clerk, and Harriot his Wife; Charles Andrew Caldwell of Saville Row, in the said County of Middlesex, Esquire; and William Abdy Fellowes, Thomas Abdy Fellowes and Katharine Harriot Fellowes, Infants, by the said Sir Thomas Fellowes their Father and Guardian; praying Leave to bring in a Bill for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be, and is hereby referred to The Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer and Mr. Justice Bosanquet, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon, under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also, that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Buckle's Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of John Buckle Esquire, as the Committee of the Estate of his Brother William Buckle Esquire, a Lunatic; praying Leave to bring in a Bill for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be, and is hereby referred to Mr. Justice Bayley and Mr. Baron Bolland, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon, under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also, that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Hall's Petition referred to Judges.

Upon reading the Petition of Benjamin Hall of Llanover, in the County of Monmouth, Esquire; praying Leave to bring in a Bill for the Purposes in the said Petition mentioned:

It is Ordered, That the Consideration of the said Petition be, and is hereby referred to Mr. Justice Park and Mr. Justice James Parke, who are forthwith to summon all Parties concerned in the Bill, and, after hearing them, are to report to the House the State of the Case, with their Opinion thereupon, under their Hands, and whether all Parties, who may be concerned in the Consequences of the Bill, have signed the Petition; and also, that the Judges, having perused the Bill, do sign the same.

Robley et al. v. Brooke.

Upon reading the Petition and Appeal of Caroline Robley, William Blake and James Cunningham; complaining of a Decree of the Court of Chancery, of the 4th Day of June 1829, which Decree was signed and enrolled on the 17th March 1830, made in Two certain Causes; in the first of which, Caroline Robley Widow, William Blake and James Cunningham were Plaintiffs, and Charles Brooke Defendant; and in the second, the said William Blake and James Cunningham and William Groom, and the said Caroline Robley, Henry Robley, Fanny Ann Robley, Adelaide Robley, John Horatio Robley, George Robley and Christopher Irvine, out of the Jurisdiction of the Court, were Defendants; and praying, "That the same may be reversed or varied, or that the Appellants may have such Relief in the Premises, as to this House, in their Lordships great Wisdom, should seem meet; and that the said Charles Brooke may be required to answer the said Appeal:"

It is Ordered, That the said Charles Brooke may have a Copy of the said Appeal, and do put in his Answer thereunto, in Writing, on or before Wednesday the 7th Day of April next.

Lindsay v. Jaffray & Mercer.

Upon reading the Petition and Appeal of William Lindsay, Victualler in Cowcaddens, of Glasgow; complaining of Two Interlocutors of the Lords of Session in Scotland, of the Second Division, of the 19th Day of February and 10th of March 1830; and praying, "That the same may be reversed, varied or altered, and that the Interlocutor of the Lord Ordinary of the 22d of May 1829 may be affirmed, or that the Appellant may have such Relief in the Premises, as to this House, in their Lordships great Wisdom, should seem meet; and that William Jaffray junior, Accountant in Glasgow, and William Mercer, Writer to the Signet, may be required to answer the said Appeal:"

It is Ordered, That the said William Jaffray and William Mercer may have a Copy of the said Appeal, and do put in their Answer or respective Answers thereunto, in Writing, on or before Wednesday the 21st Day of April next; and Service of this Order upon the said Respondents, or upon any one of their known Agents in the Court of Session in Scotland, shall be deemed good Service.

Justice v. Callander.

It was moved, "That the Order made on Friday the 19th of this instant March, That the Petition of Miss Maria Campbell Rae Justice, (now the Wife of Dr. Alexander Stewart, a Surgeon on the Staff of His Majesty's Forces,) Appellant in a Cause depending in this House, to which William Burn Callander Esquire is Respondent, praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to make an Order, permitting Dr. Alexander Stewart her Husband to prosecute the aforesaid Appeal jointly with the Petitioner, and for that Purpose to print and lodge a Supplemental Case," be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House, be now read."

The same was accordingly read by the Clerk.

Ordered, That the said Order be discharged.

Ordered, That the said Dr. Alexander Stewart be permitted to prosecute the said Appeal jointly with the Petitioner; and that he be at liberty to print and lodge a Supplemental Case, as desired.

2d Report of Comrs on the Common Law delivered.

The Earl of Shaftesbury laid before the House, pursuant to an Address to His Majesty of the 9th Day of this instant March,

"Second Report made to His Majesty by the Commissioners appointed to enquire into the Practice and Proceedings of the Superior Courts of Common Law."

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Report do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Report be printed.

Proceedings on East India Judicature Act.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees appointed to examine the Lists laid upon the Table on Monday last, pursuant to the Directions of an Act made in the 26th Year of His late Majesty's Reign, for the further Regulation of the Trial of Persons accused of certain Offences committed in the East Indies; and for other Purposes therein mentioned; and to report to the House the Titles of such Lords as shall appear upon Ten such Lists; "That the Committee had met, and examined the said Lists; and that the Titles of the following Lords are the only Titles that appear upon Ten Lists:

"Duke of Somerset.

"Duke of Rutland.

"Marquess of Bute.

"Marquess of Cleveland.

"Earl of Denbigh.

"Earl of Essex.

"Earl of Abingdon.

"Earl of Plymouth.

"Earl Talbot.

"Earl of Carnarvon.

"Earl of Wilton.

"Earl Strange.

"Earl Brownlow.

"Earl of Morley.

"Viscount Hood.

"Viscount Duncan.

"Bishop of London.

"Bishop of Landaff.

"Baron Dacre.

"Baron Grantham.

"Baron Holland.

"Baron Bayning.

"Baron Ribblesdale.

"Baron Ailsa.

"Baron Wharncliffe.

"Baron Seaford."

Then it was moved, "That the Clause in the said Act, directing that the Names of such Persons who shall appear to hold or to have held any of the Offices or Employments therein specified, shall be struck out of the said Report, be now read."

The same was accordingly read by the Clerk.

Ordered, That the said Titles be referred to the same Committee, to report the Names of those who shall appear to hold or to have held any of the Offices or Employments specified in the said Act.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Dorchester Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repairing the Road from Wool Bridge to the Borough of Dorchester, in the County of Dorset."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

L. Bp. London.
L. Bp. Bath & Wells.
L. Napier.
L. Hay.
L. Holland.
L. Calthorpe.
L. Bayning.
L. Arden.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Seaford.
L. Wynford.
L. Privy Seal.
E. Carlisle.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Stanhope.
E. Hardwicke.
E. Radnor.
E. Clarendon.
E. Norwich.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Malmesbury.
E. Stradbroke.
V. Arbuthnott.
V. Doneraile.
V. Melville.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Congleton Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for repairing, amending and maintaining the Road from Congleton, in the County of Chester, to a Branch of the Leek Turnpike Road at Thatchmarsh Bottom, in the Parish of Hartington, in the County of Derby, and from the Lowe to the Havannah Mills, in the said County of Chester."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Gainsburgh & East Retford Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Road from the West End of Gainsburgh Bridge to East Retford and to Gringley-on-the-Hill, in the County of Nottingham."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Ardglass Harbour Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable the Commissioners of the Harbour of Ardglass, in the County of Down, to make Contracts for Works, and to borrow Money for the Improvement of the said Harbour."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. that the Lords have agreed to it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Cross and Mr. Trower;

To acquaint them, That the Lords have agreed to the said Bill, without any Amendment.

New Chappel Road Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and maintaining the Road from New Chappel, in the County of Surrey, to Ditcheling Bost Hills, in the County of Sussex, and from thence to the Town of Brighthelmston, in the same County; and also for making and maintaining a Branch of Road from the Town of Ditcheling to Clayton, in the County of Sussex," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Malmesbury Roads Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Roads from the Town of Malmesbury to Copped Hall Turnpike, Sutton Benger Church and Dauntsey Gate, in the County of Wilts," was committed.

Pickford Brook Road Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury also made the like Report from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, An Act for making and maintaining a Turnpike Road from Pickford Brook, in the Parish of Allesley, in the County of Warwick, to Canwell Gate, in the County of Stafford," was committed.

Trade & Navigation Accounts delivered.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Irving, Inspector General of the Imports and Exports of Great Britain, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to the Directions of an Act of Parliament,

"An Account of the Value of the Imports into and of the Exports from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland during each of the Three Years ending the 5th January 1830, calculated at the Official Rates of Valuation, and distinguishing the Amount of the Produce and Manufactures of the United Kingdom exported from the Value of Foreign and Colonial Merchandize exported; also stating the Amount of the Produce and Manufactures of the United Kingdom exported therefrom, according to the Real or Declared Value thereof:"

Also, "An Account of the Value of the Imports into and of the Exports from Great Britain during each of the Three Years ending the 5th January 1830, calculated at the Official Rates of Valuation, and stated exclusive of the Trade with Ireland, distinguishing the Amount of the Produce and Manufactures of the United Kingdom exported from the Value of Foreign and Colonial Merchandize exported; also stating the Amount of the Produce and Manufactures of the United Kingdom exported from Great Britain, according to the Real or Declared Value thereof:"

Also, "An Account of the Value of all Imports into and of all Exports from Ireland during each of the Three Years ending 5th January 1830, calculated at the Official Rates of Valuation, and stated exclusively of the Trade with Great Britain, distinguishing the Amount of the Produce and Manufactures of the United Kingdom exported from the Value of Foreign and Colonial Merchandize exported; also stating the Amount of the Produce and Manufactures of the United Kingdom exported from Ireland, according to the Real or Declared Value thereof:"

Also, "An Account of the Number of Vessels, with the Amount of their Tonnage, that were built and registered in the several Ports of the British Empire, in the Years ending 5th January 1828, 1829 and 1830 respectively:"

Also, "An Account of the Number of Vessels, with the Amount of their Tonnage, and the Number of Men and Boys usually employed in navigating the same, that belonged to the several Ports of the British Empire, on the 31st December 1827, 1828 and 1829 respectively:"

Also, "An Account of the Number of Vessels, with the Amount of their Tonnage, and the Number of Men and Boys employed in navigating the same, (including their repeated Voyages,) that entered Inwards and cleared Outwards at the several Ports of the United Kingdom, from and to Foreign Parts, during each of the Three Years ending 5th January 1830:"

Also, "An Account of the Number of Vessels, with the Amount of their Tonnage, that were built and registered in the several Ports of the British Empire (except Ireland) in the Years ending 5th January 1828, 1829 and 1830 respectively:"

Also, "An Account of the Number of Vessels, with the Amount of their Tonnage, and the Number of Men and Boys usually employed in navigating the same, that belonged to the several Ports of the British Empire (except Ireland) on the 31st December 1827, 1828 and 1829 respectively:"

Also, "An Account of the Number of Vessels, with the Amount of their Tonnage, and the Number of Men and Boys employed in navigating the same, (including their repeated Voyages,) that entered Inwards and cleared Outwards at the several Ports of Great Britain, from and to all Parts of the World, during each of the Three Years ending 5th January 1830; also shewing the Number and Tonnage of Shipping entered Inwards and cleared Outwards during the same Period (exclusive of the Intercourse with Ireland:)"

Also, "An Account of the Number of Vessels, with the Amount of their Tonnage, that were built and registered in the several Ports of Ireland, in the Years ending 5th January 1828, 1829 and 1830 respectively:"

Also, "An Account of the Number of Vessels, with the Amount of their Tonnage, and the Number of Men and Boys usually employed in navigating the same, that belonged to the several Ports of Ireland on the 31st December 1827, 1828 and 1829 respectively:"

And also, "An Account of the Number of Vessels, with the Amount of their Tonnage, and the Number of Men and Boys employed in navigating the same, (including their repeated Voyages,) that entered Inwards and cleared Outwards at the several Ports of Ireland, from and to all Parts of the World, during each of the Three Years ending 5th January 1830; also shewing the Number and Tonnage of Shipping entered Inwards and cleared Outwards during the same Period (exclusive of the Intercourse with Great Britain.)"

And then he withdrew.

And the Titles thereof being read by the Clerk; Ordered, That the said Accounts do lie on the Table.

Letters from The East India Co. to The Governors in India delivered, & referred to East India Com ee.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Danvers, from the Court of Directors of The East India Company, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to Orders of Monday last,

"Copy of a Letter from the Court of Directors of The East India Company to The Governor General in Council at Fort William in Bengal, in the Territorial Finance Department, dated 10th March 1830:"

Also, "Copy of a Letter from the Court of Directors of The East India Company to The Governor in Council at Bombay, in the Territorial Finance Department, dated 10th March 1830:"

And also, "Copy of a Letter from the Court of Directors of The East India Company to The Governor in Council at Fort St. George, in the Territorial Finance Department, dated 10th March 1830."

And then he withdrew.

And the Titles thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Papers do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Papers be printed.

Ordered, That the said Papers be referred to the Select Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

Beer, Petitions from Bury & Manchester complaining of Grievances in retailing.

Upon reading the Petition of the Retail Brewers of the Towns of Bury and Rochdale, in the County of Lancaster, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; complaining of certain Grievances affecting them, and praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to grant to the Petitioners a further Extension of Time for selling their Beer beyond what is allowed to them in the Evening, vizt. Eleven o'Clock every Evening (except Sunday;) the Working Classes, who do not principally receive their Wages until late on a Saturday Evening, and are not able to reach Home from Market after purchasing their Provisions before the Petitioners are compelled by Law to close, not being able to pay the enormous Price charged by the Publicans for that nutritious Beverage, Beer, and thereby to a considerable Degree hurting the Revenue; and that their Lordships will be pleased to give these Matters their early Consideration, and devise such Means (by reducing the Penalties for selling their Beer after Ten o'Clock in the Evening, or for allowing Purchasers to taste it on the Premises, or otherwise,) for the bettering the Condition of the Petitioners and the Trade generally, as, in the Opinion of their Lordships, shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Upon reading the Petition of the Retail Brewers of Manchester and Salford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; complaining of certain Grievances affecting them in the Retail of Beer, and praying their Lordships, "That such Remedies may be applied as the Wisdom of their Lordships may devise:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

East India, &c. Trade, Petitions for throwing open, from Perth, referred to East India Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Manufacturers and other Inhabitants of the City of Perth, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That at the earliest Period allowed by Law such Measures may be adopted as shall secure to all His Majesty's Subjects in the United Kingdom a Free Trade to all the Countries situated to the Eastward of the Cape of Good Hope, and the Liberty of proceeding to and residing in these Countries, under such Regulations as to their Lordships may seem proper and consistent with the good Government, Tranquillity and Safety of the British Possessions in the East Indies:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Lords Committees appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

Upon reading the Petition of The Lord Provost, Magistrates and Town Council of the City and Royal Burgh of Perth, under their Common Seal; praying their Lordships "to remove the Restrictions with which the Commerce of this Country to India is at present fettered, and to throw open the Trade to China, under such Regulations as to their Lordships may seem proper:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the lastmentioned Committee.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed by The Lord Chancellor.

Agricultural Distress, Petition from Mendlesham respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Mendlesham, in the County of Suffolk, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take such Steps as shall seem most meet to ascertain the actual Degree of Distress that prevails amongst the Agriculturists of the Kingdom, and then to apply such prompt and efficient Remedies as the Wisdom of their Lordships shall deem best:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Mr. Telford's Report on the Road from Ketley Iron Works to Chirk, delivered.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Robertson, from the Office of His Majesty's Woods, Forests and Land Revenue, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to an Order of the 17th Day of this instant March,

"Report of Mr. Telford on the Road from Ketley Iron Works, in the County of Salop, to Chirk in North Wales."

And then he withdrew.

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Report do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Report be printed.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Jovis, vicesimum quintum diem instantis Martii, horâ decimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.