House of Lords Journal Volume 62
3 May 1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 62: 3 May 1830', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 62: 1830, pp. 301-320. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16339 Date accessed: 20 August 2014.


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Contents

Die Lunæ, 3 Maii 1830.
Munro & Rose v. Drummond et al. Sir J. Montgomery et al. v. M. of Queensberry, & Selkrig. Mullins et al. v. Townsend. Bills passed by Commission. Leeds & Selby Railway Bill, Petitions in favor of: (York:) Skipton: Garforth: Yeadon & Guiseley: Hunslett: Holbeck: Wortley & Farnley: Churwell & Morley: Kirkstall, &c: Armley: Idle, &c: Gildersome, &c: Birstall & Gomersall: Calverley & Farsley: Cleckheaton, &c: Batley & Heckmondwike: Bolton: Eccleshill, &c: Bowling, &c: Horbury: Horsforth & Rawden: Thornhill: South Milford, &c: Market Weighton: Beverley: Bradford. Beer Trade, Petitions against opening: (Halifax:) Elland with Greetland: Sheffield. Criminal Laws, Petitions for Revision of: (Chipping Norton:) Haworth: Luton: Boston. Slavery, Petitions from Lee Croft & Howard St. Chapels, Sheffield, for Abolition of. Assizes for West Riding of Yorkshire, Petition from Wakefield for Removal of, to Wakefield. East India, &c. Trade, Petitions for opening, referred to East India Com ee: (Magistrates, &c. of Kinghorn:) Cardiff: Barnard Castle: Stockton upon Tees: Nottingham. British Spirits, Petitions against Encrease of Duty on: (County of Fife:) Farmers, &c. of Fifeshire: Cupar: Com ee of the Norfolk Agricultural Society. Disabilities of the Jews, Petition of Jews in Bath for Removal of. Foleshill Poor Bill. London Bridge Approaches Bill. Weston Zoyland, &c. Inclosure Bill. Othery, &c. Drainage Bill. Tonbridge &c. Roads Bill. Blackburn Road Bill. Dundee & Newtyle Railway Bill. Holyhead Road, Accounts respecting, delivered. 4th Report of Com rs of Metropolis Turnpike Roads delivered. List of Hong Merchants delivered, & referred to East India Com ee. Mr. Gepp to attend. Parish Accounts, Petition of G. Gunning for better Mode of keeping. Labourers Wages, Petition from Lyme Regis respecting. Distress at Bandon, Petition from Bandon respecting. Distress of the Country, Petition from Grimshoe respecting. Climbing Boys in sweeping Chimnies, Petition from Newcastle-under-Lyme against Employment of. Leeds & Selby Railway Bill, Petition against. Foreign Lead, Petitions against Importation of: (Arkengarthdale:) Middleton in Teesdale: Mining District on the Derwent. M'Gavin v. Stewart. Same v. same. Morrison et al. v. Mitchell. Thomson v. Forrester. Hamerton's Divorce Bill. Leicester & Swannington Railway Bill. Whaddon Inclosure Bill. Hockliffe Road Bill. Deddithorpe Inclosure Bill. Rotherham Road Bill. Leeds & Selby Railway Bill read 2 a, & committed: Petitions against & for it, referred to the Com ee: All Lords added to the Com ee: Com ee to appoint a Chairman. Wallis's Divorce Bill: Message to H.C. with it. Sunderland Harbour Bill. Warrington & Newton Railway Bill. Hagley Inclosure Bill. Wendover Road Bill. Wigan Railway Bill. Gordon's Estate Bill. Hall's Estate Bill. Leather Duties Repeal Bill. Maccabe v. Hussey & Maccabe, Petition of a Respondent for Time for her Case, referred to Appeal Com ee. Robley et al. v. Brooke, Respondent's Petition for Time for his Case, referred to Appeal Com ee. Suits in Equity Bill. Slane Peerage, Com ee to meet. Benson's et al. Petition to receive Judges Report: Benson et al. Leave for a Bill: Bill read. Buckle's Estate Bill, Copy of, referred to Judges in Ireland to take Consents. Caxton Inclosure Bill. De Chapeaurouge's Naturalization Bill. Clifton Bridge Bill, Judges Report read. Fever Hospitals (Ireland) Bill. East Retford Election Bill, Witnesses discharged from further Attendance. East Retford Election Bill. "List of Voters paid by J. Thornton jun. Adjourn.

Die Lunæ, 3 Maii 1830.

DOMINI tam Spirituales quam Temporales præsentes fuerunt:

Dux CUMBERLAND.
Archiep. Cantuar.
Epus. Bristol.
Epus. Carliol.
Epus. Roffen.
Epus. Rapoten.
Ds. De Clifford.
Ds. Willoughby de Eresby.
Ds. Dacre.
Ds. Clifton.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Stafford.
Ds. Gower.
Ds. Colville of Culross.
Ds. Hay.
Ds. King.
Ds. Monson.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Vernon.
Ds. Ducie.
Ds. Montagu.
Ds. Dundas.
Ds. Dawnay.
Ds. Calthorpe.
Ds. Rolle.
Ds. Wellesley.
Ds. Bolton.
Ds. Ribblesdale.
Ds. Fitz Gibbon.
Ds. Carbery.
Ds. Dufferin & Claneboye.
Ds. Dunalley.
Ds. Redesdale.
Ds. Ellenborough.
Ds. Arden.
Ds. Mont Eagle.
Ds. Manners.
Ds. Hill.
Ds. Meldrum.
Ds. Melbourne.
Ds. Churchill.
Ds. Prudhoe.
Ds. Forester.
Ds. Bexley.
Ds. Penshurst.
Ds. Somerhill.
Ds. Wharncliffe.
Ds. Clanwilliam.
Ds. Durham.
Ds. Lyndhurst, Cancellarius.
Comes Bathurst, Præses.
Comes Rosslyn, C. P. S.
Dux Norfolk, Marescallus.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux Leeds.
Dux Devonshire.
Dux Rutland.
Dux Wellington.
March. Salisbury.
March. Bute.
March. Camden.
March. Cleveland.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Winchilsea & Nottingham.
Comes Chesterfield.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Albemarle.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Rosebery.
Comes Ferrers.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Cowper.
Comes Stanhope.
Comes Hardwicke.
Comes De Lawarr.
Comes Hillsborough.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Malmesbury.
Comes Chichester.
Comes Limerick.
Comes Charleville.
Comes Grey.
Comes Harrowby.
Comes Harewood.
Comes Beauchamp.
Comes Eldon.
Comes Falmouth.
Comes Howe.
Vicecom. Melville.
Vicecom. Lorton.
Vicecom. Gordon.

PRAYERS.

Munro & Rose v. Drummond et al.

After hearing Counsel, in Part, in the Cause wherein Mrs. Catharine Munro and Hugh Rose her Husband are Appellants, and Andrew Berkeley Drummond Esquire, and others, are Respondents:

It is Ordered, That the further Hearing of the said Cause be put off to Wednesday next.

Sir J. Montgomery et al. v. M. of Queensberry, & Selkrig.

Ordered, That the Hearing of the Cause wherein Sir James Montgomery Baronet, and others, are Appellants, and Charles Marquess of Queensberry and Charles Selkrig are Respondents, which stands appointed for this Day, be put off to Wednesday next.

Mullins et al. v. Townsend.

Ordered, That the Hearing of the Cause wherein The Honorable Edward Mullins, and others, are Appellants, and John Townsend Esquire is Respondent, which stands appointed for this Day, be put off to Wednesday next.

Bills passed by Commission.

The Lord Chancellor acquainted the House, "That His Majesty had been pleased to issue a Commission to several Lords therein named, for declaring His Royal Assent to several Acts agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament."

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Then Three of the Lords Commissioners, being in their Robes, and seated on a Form placed between the Throne and the Woolsack, The Lord Chancellor in the Middle, with The Lord Archbishop of Canterbury on his Right Hand, and The Earl of Shaftesbury on his Left; commanded the Officiating Yeoman Usher of the Black Rod to signify to the Commons, "The Lords Commissioners desire their immediate Attendance in this House, to hear the Commission read."

Who being come, with their Speaker;

The Lord Chancellor said,

"My Lords, and Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

"His Majesty, not thinking fit to be personally present here at this Time, has been pleased to cause a Commission to be issued under the Great Seal, and thereby given His Royal Assent to divers Acts which have been agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament, the Titles whereof are particularly mentioned; and by the said Commission hath commanded us to declare and notify His Royal Assent to the said several Acts, in the Presence of you the Lords and Commons assembled for that Purpose: Which Commission you will now hear read."

Then the said Commission was read by the Clerk, as follows; (viz t.)

"GEORGE R."

"GEORGE the Fourth, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith; To Our right trusty and right well-beloved the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and to Our trusty and well-beloved the Knights, Citizens and Burgesses, and the Commissioners for Shires and Burghs of the House of Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, Greeting: Whereas in Our said Parliament divers and sundry Acts have been agreed and accorded on by you Our loving Subjects, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and the Commons, in this Our present Parliament assembled, and endorsed by you as hath been accustomed, the Titles and Names of which Acts hereafter do particularly ensue; (that is to say,) "An Act for transferring certain Annuities of Four Pounds per Centum per Annum into Annuities of Three Pounds and Ten Shillings or Five Pounds per Centum per Annum:" "An Act for removing the Market at present held for the Sale of Hay and Straw from the Haymarket; and for establishing Markets for the Sale of Hay, Straw and other Articles in York Square, Clarence Gardens and Cumberland Market, in the Parish of Saint Pancras, in the County of Middlesex:" "An Act for relieving, in certain Cases, Vessels entering or sailing from the Port of Berwick-upon-Tweed from the Duties leviable under Two Acts passed in the Fortysixth and Fifty-fourth Years of His late Majesty's Reign, relating to the Northern Lighthouses:" "An Act for incorporating the Dundee Gas Light Company, and for the better lighting the Town of Dundee by Gas:" "An Act for more effectually repairing the Road from Wootton Bassett, in the County of Wilts, to the TwoMile Stone, in the Turnpike Road leading from Swindon to Marlborough, in the said County:" "An Act for maintaining the Road from Haverhill, in the County of Suffolk, to Redcross, in the Parish of Great Shelford, in the County of Cambridge:" "An Act for making a Turnpike Road from the Bridge over the River Bure at Great Yarmouth to Acle, (with certain Branches therefrom,) all in the County of Norfolk:" "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Wistow, in the County of Huntingdon, and for extinguishing the Tithes in the said Parish:" "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Tithings of Arle and Arlestone otherwise Allstone, in the Parish of Cheltenham, in the County of Gloucester, and for discharging from Tithes Lands in the said Tithings:" "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parishes of Stanley Saint Leonard's otherwise Leonard Stanley, and Eastington, or one of them, in the County of Gloucester, and for discharging from Tithes Lands in the said Parish of Stanley Saint Leonard's otherwise Leonard Stanley:" "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Joseph Salisbury Muskett Esquire with Mary Muskett his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes." And albeit the said Acts by you Our said Subjects, the Lords and Commons in this Our present Parliament assembled, are fully agreed and consented unto, yet nevertheless the same are not of Force and Effect in the Law without Our Royal Assent given and put to the said Acts; And for as much as for divers Causes and Considerations We cannot conveniently at this Time be present in Our Royal Person in the Higher House of Our said Parliament, being the accustomed Place for giving Our Royal Assent to such Acts as have been agreed upon by you Our said Subjects, the Lords and Commons, We have therefore caused these Our Letters Patent to be made, and have signed the same, and by the same do give and put Our Royal Assent to the said Acts, and to all Articles, Clauses and Provisions therein contained, and have fully agreed and assented to the said Acts; Willing that the said Acts, and every Article, Clause, Sentence and Provision therein contained, from henceforth shall be of the same Strength, Force and Effect, as if We had been personally present in the said Higher House, and had openly and publicly, in the Presence of you all, assented to the same: And We do by these Presents declare and notify the same Our Royal Assent, as well to you the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons aforesaid, as to all others whom it may concern; Commanding also by these Presents Our well-beloved and faithful Councillor John Singleton Lord Lyndhurst, Our Chancellor of that Part of Our United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland called Great Britain, to seal these Our Letters Patent with Our Great Seal of Our United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland; and also commanding Our most dear Brothers and faithful Councillors William Duke of Clarence, Ernest Duke of Cumberland, Augustus Duke of Sussex, Adolphus Duke of Cambridge; Our most dear Cousin and faithful Councillor William Frederick Duke of Gloucester; The Most Reverend Father in God and Our faithful Councillor William Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate and Metropolitan of all England; Our well-beloved and faithful Councillor John Singleton Lord Lyndhurst, Chancellor of that Part of Our United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland called Great Britain; Our most dear Cousins and Councillors Henry Earl Bathurst, President of Our Council; James Earl of Rosslyn, Keeper of Our Privy Seal; James Duke of Montrose, Chamberlain of Our Household; George William Frederick Duke of Leeds, Master of Our Horse; William Duke of Devonshire, William Henry Duke of Portland, Arthur Duke of Wellington, Henry Marquess Conyngham, Steward of Our Household; Charles Marquess of Winchester, Groom of Our Stole; Henry Marquess of Lansdowne, Richard Marquess Wellesley, John Jeffreys Marquess Camden, Henry William Marquess of Anglesey, John Earl of Westmorland, George Earl of Carlisle, Cropley Ashley Earl of Shaftesbury, George Earl of Aberdeen, One of Our Principal Secretaries of State; William Earl Fitzwilliam, George John Earl Spencer, John Earl of Chatham, John Earl of Eldon, John William Earl of Dudley, Robert Viscount Melville, Henry Viscount Sidmouth, Frederick John Viscount Goderich; Our well-beloved and faithful Councillors Henry Richard Lord Holland, William Wyndham Lord Grenville, Edward Lord Ellenborough, Nicholas Lord Bexley and Charles Lord Tenterden, or any Three or more of them, to declare and notify this Our Royal Assent in Our Absence in the said Higher House, in the Presence of you, the said Lords and Commons of Our Parliament, there to be assembled for that Purpose; and the Clerk of Our Parliaments to endorse the said Acts with such Terms and Words, in Our Name, as is requisite, and hath been accustomed for the same, and also to enrol these Our Letters Patent, and the said Acts, in the Parliament Roll; and these Our Letters Patent shall be to every of them a sufficient Warrant in that Behalf: And We do declare and will, that after this Our Royal Assent given and passed by these Presents, and declared and notified as is aforesaid, then and immediately the said Acts shall be taken, accepted and admitted good, sufficient and perfect Acts of Parliament and Laws, to all Intents, Constructions and Purposes, and to be put in due Execution accordingly, the Continuance or Dissolution of this Our Parliament, or any other Use, Custom, Thing or Things to the contrary thereof notwithstanding: And whereas by Our Letters Patent, bearing Date at Westminster the Third Day of February last past, We did give and grant unto the said Duke of Clarence, Duke of Cumberland, Duke of Sussex, Duke of Cambridge, Duke of Gloucester, Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Lyndhurst, Earl Bathurst, Earl of Rosslyn, Duke of Montrose, Duke of Leeds, Duke of Devonshire, Duke of Portland, Duke of Wellington, Marquess Conyngham, Marquess of Winchester, Marquess of Lansdowne, Marquess Wellesley, Marquess Camden, Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Westmorland, Earl of Carlisle, Earl of Shaftesbury, Earl of Aberdeen, Earl Fitzwilliam, Earl Spencer, Earl of Chatham, Earl of Eldon, Earl of Dudley, Viscount Melville, Viscount Sidmouth, Viscount Goderich, Lord Holland, Lord Grenville, Lord Ellenborough, Lord Bexley and Lord Tenterden, and any Three of them, full Power, in Our Name, to hold Our said Parliament, and to open and declare, and cause to be opened and declared, the Causes of holding the same; and to proceed upon the said Affairs in Our said Parliament, and in all Matters arising therein, and to do every thing which for Us, and by Us, for the good Government of Our said United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of other Our Dominions belonging to Our said United Kingdom, should be therein to be done; and also, if necessary, to continue, adjourn and prorogue Our said Parliament: We do hereby further declare that Our said Letters Patent, and every Clause, Matter and Thing therein contained, shall be and remain in the same Force and Strength as if these Presents had not been had or made, and that nothing herein contained shall be deemed or taken to affect or invalidate the said recited Letters Patent, or any of the Powers or Authorities therein contained, or the Exercise thereof, or of any of them. In Witness whereof We have caused these Our Letters to be made Patent.

"Witness Ourself at Westminster, the Third Day of May, in the Eleventh Year of Our Reign.

"By the King Himself, signed with His own Hand.

"BATHURST."

Then The Lord Chancellor said,

"In obedience to His Majesty's Commands, and by virtue of the Commission which has been now read, We do declare and notify to you, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in Parliament assembled, That His Majesty hath given His Royal Assent to the several Acts in the Commission mentioned; and the Clerks are required to pass the same in the usual Form and Words."

Then the Deputy Clerk of the Crown, at the Table, read the Titles of the Bills to be passed, severally, as follow; (viz t.)

1. "An Act for transferring certain Annuities of Four Pounds per Centum per Annum into Annuities of Three Pounds and Ten Shillings or Five Pounds per Centum per Annum."

2. "An Act removing the Market at present held for the Sale of Hay and Straw from the Haymarket; and for establishing Markets for the Sale of Hay, Straw and other Articles in York Square, Clarence Gardens and Cumberland Market, in the Parish of Saint Pancras, in the County of Middlesex."

3. "An Act for relieving, in certain Cases, Vessels entering or sailing from the Port of Berwick-uponTweed from the Duties leviable under Two Acts passed in the Forty-sixth and Fifty-fourth Years of His late Majesty's Reign, relating to the Northern Lighthouses."

4. "An Act for incorporating the Dundee Gas Light Company, and for the better lighting the Town of Dundee by Gas."

5. "An Act for more effectually repairing the Road from Wootton Bassett, in the County of Wilts, to the Two-Mile Stone in the Turnpike Road leading from Swindon to Marlborough, in the said County."

6. "An Act for maintaining the Road from Haverhill, in the County of Suffolk, to Redcross, in the Parish of Great Shelford, in the County of Cambridge."

7. "An Act for making a Turnpike Road from the Bridge over the River Bure at Great Yarmouth to Acle, (with certain Branches therefrom,) all in the County of Norfolk."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant, in these Words; (viz t.)

"Le Roy le veult."

8. "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parish of Wistow, in the County of Huntingdon, and for extinguishing the Tithes in the said Parish."

9. "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Tithings of Arle and Arlestone otherwise Allstone, in the Parish of Cheltenham, in the County of Gloucester, and for discharging from Tithes Lands in the said Tithings."

10. "An Act for inclosing Lands in the Parishes of Stanley Saint Leonard's otherwise Leonard Stanley, and Eastington, or one of them, in the County of Gloucester, and for discharging from Tithes Lands in the said Parish of Stanley Saint Leonard's otherwise Leonard Stanley."

11. "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Joseph Salisbury Muskett Esquire with Mary Muskett his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes."

To these Bills the Royal Assent was pronounced, severally, by the Clerk Assistant, in these Words; (viz t.)

"Soit fait comme il est desiré."

Then the Commons withdrew.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Leeds & Selby Railway Bill, Petitions in favor of: (York:) Skipton:

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Traders and other Inhabitants of the City of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Skipton, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Garforth:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Owners and Occupiers of Land, Farmers and other Inhabitants of the Parish of Garforth, in the Line of the proposed Railway from Leeds to Selby, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Yeadon & Guiseley:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Yeadon and Guiseley, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Hunslett:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the Township of Hunslett, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Holbeck:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the Township of Holbeck, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Wortley & Farnley:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Wortley and Farnley, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Churwell & Morley:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Churwell and Morley, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Kirkstall, &c:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Kirkstall, Woodhouse and Chapel Allerton, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Armley:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the Township of Armley, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Idle, &c:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Idle, Baildon and Heaton, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Gildersome, &c:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Gildersome, Drighlington and Tong, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Birstall & Gomersall:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Birstall and Gomersall, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Calverley & Farsley:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Calverley and Farsley, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Cleckheaton, &c:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Cleckheaton, Wike, Hunsworth and North Bierley, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Batley & Heckmondwike:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Batley and Heckmondwike, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Bolton:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the Township of Bolton, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Eccleshill, &c:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Eccleshill, Windhill and Shipley, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Bowling, &c:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Bowling, Bradford and East Bierley, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Horbury:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the Township of Horbury, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Horsforth & Rawden:

Also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the District of Horsforth and Rawden, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

Thornhill:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Woollen and Worsted Manufacturers, and others interested therein, residing in the Parish of Thornhill, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for making a Railway from the Town of Leeds to the River Ouse, within the Parish of Selby, in the West Riding of the County of York;" and severally praying their Lordships, "That the same may pass into a Law:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

South Milford, &c:

Upon reading the Petition of the Owners of Land, Farmers and other Inhabitants of South Milford, Sherburn, Newthorpe and Micklefield, contiguous to the proposed Railway from Leeds to Selby, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of the last-mentioned Bill, and praying their Lordships, "That the same may pass into a Law in such Manner and under such Modifications as to them shall seem meet; and that the Petitioners may be heard by themselves, their Counsel or Agents, in support of the said Bill:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Market Weighton:

Upon reading the Petition of the several Persons, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, being the Gentry, Merchants, Traders and other Inhabitants of the Town of Market Weighton, in the East Riding of the County of York:

Beverley:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the several Persons, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, being the Gentry, Merchants, Bankers, Traders and other Inhabitants of the Town and Liberties of Beverley, in the East Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of the last-mentioned Bill, and severally praying their Lordships, "That the same may pass into a Law in such Manner, by such Ways and Means, and under and subject to such Regulations and Restrictions as to their Lordships shall seem meet:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Bradford.

Upon reading the Petition of the Bankers, Merchants, Manufacturers and others interested in the Town and Trade of Bradford, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of the last-mentioned Bill, and praying, "That their Lordships will support the same, under such Restrictions and Regulations as to their Lordships shall seem meet, and will allow the Petitioners to be heard by their Counsel or Agents, in support of such Bill, at the Bar of this House:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Beer Trade, Petitions against opening:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Halifax, in the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

(Halifax:) Elland with Greetland:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Elland with Greetland, in the Parish of Halifax, in the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; severally praying their Lordships "not to sanction any Measure for throwing open the Trade of Beer, and for repealing those Laws relating thereto which past Experience and present Opinion equally approve to have been wise and salutary:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Sheffield.

Upon reading the Petition of the Licensed Victuallers of the Town and Neighbourhood of Sheffield, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "not to sanction the proposed Measure for throwing open the Trade in Beer, which must, if carried into a Law, be attended with most ruinous Consequences to the Petitioners, and would inflict on them, for no Fault of theirs, a Loss amounting to many Thousand Pounds, besides throwing many out of their accustomed Habits, and forcing them to other Employments, after having invested their Capital in a restricted Trade, established under a long-existing Series of Laws:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Criminal Laws, Petitions for Revision of: (Chipping Norton:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Chipping Norton, Oxon, and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That the Penalty of Death in Cases of Forgery may be commuted in such Manner as may appear to their Wisdom best calculated to promote the Ends of Public Justice, on an enlightened Policy, tempered by the Benevolence of Christian Principles:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Haworth:

Upon reading the Petition of the Churchmen, Baptists, Methodists and all other Christian Denominations in Haworth, near Bradford, Yorkshire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will take into their most serious Consideration the Necessity of a speedy and thorough Revision of all those Laws that affect the Person and Life of His Majesty's Subjects:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Luton:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town and Parish of Luton, in the County of Bedford, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will take into Consideration, not only the Penal Statutes relating to Forgery, but also the Expediency of commuting the Penalty of Death in respect to all Offences connected with Property, in such Manner as to their Lordships shall seem best adapted to effect this important Purpose:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Boston.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Borough of Boston and its Neighbourhood, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to abolish the Punishment of Death for Forgery and Cattle Stealing, and also in Cases of Housebreaking and Highway Robbery unaccompanied by Acts of Violence or Cruelty; and to substitute such other Punishment as may further the Ends of Justice, without encroaching on the Laws of Humanity:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Slavery, Petitions from Lee Croft & Howard St. Chapels, Sheffield, for Abolition of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Minister and Members of the Congregation of Protestant Dissenters of the Independent Denomination at Lee Croft Chapel, and other Friends uniting with them, in the Town of Sheffield, Yorkshire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Protestant Dissenters of the Independent Denomination assembling in Howard Street Chapel, Sheffield, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; severally praying their Lordships for the immediate and total Extinction of Slavery in all Parts of His Majesty's Dominions, and for the Introduction of a much-injured Race to the Enjoyment of Constitutional Freedom:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Assizes for West Riding of Yorkshire, Petition from Wakefield for Removal of, to Wakefield.

Upon reading the Petition of the Clergy, Gentry, Freeholders and others, Inhabitants of the Town and Parish of Wakefield, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships to take into their serious Consideration the Recommendation contained in the First Report of the Law Commissioners, that the Assizes for the West Riding of the County of York be removed from York to Wakefield, with a view to devise Means for putting it into Effect, and for affording to the Petitioners such further Relief as to their Lordships may seem most expedient:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

East India, &c. Trade, Petitions for opening, referred to East India Com ee: (Magistrates, &c. of Kinghorn:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Magistrates, Town Council, Heritors and Burgesses of the Royal Burgh of Kinghorn, in Head Court assembled, under their Common Seal; praying their Lordships "to alter the Laws connected with our Trade to Countries to the East of the Cape of Good Hope, so as to secure to all His Majesty's Subjects in the United Kingdom an entire and free Enjoyment of such Trade, and such Right to resort to and reside in all Parts of India as may be consistent with the Safety and Tranquillity of our Eastern Empire:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Select Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

Cardiff:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Cardiff and its Neighbourhood, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That they will agree to no Proposals for continuing the Restrictions on the Right of the Petitioners and their Fellow Subjects to trade with all Countries in Peace with the British Crown, and to reside in any of the Colonies and Dependencies of the British Empire:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the lastmentioned Committee.

Barnard Castle:

Upon reading the Petition of the Gentry, Merchants, Manufacturers and others of the Town of Barnard Castle, in the County of Durham, and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships to adopt such Measures as in their Wisdom may seem best adapted to secure to the Petitioners and this Empire the incalculable Benefits resulting from free and unrestricted Commerce to all Parties throughout our European and Asiatic Dominions:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the lastmentioned Committee.

Stockton upon Tees:

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Bankers, Ship Owners, Manufacturers and other Inhabitants of the Town and Port of Stockton upon Tees, in the County Palatine of Durham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to give that great National Question of opening the Trade to India and China the most attentive and impartial Consideration; and to adopt such Measures on or previous to the Expiration of The East India Company's Charter as will secure to the British Merchant and Ship Owner the Right of freely embarking in this important Trade:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the lastmentioned Committee.

Nottingham.

Upon reading the Petition of the Merchants, Manufacturers and other Inhabitants of Nottingham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That at the earliest Period allowed by Law such Measures may be adopted as shall secure to all His Majesty's Subjects in the United Kingdom a Free Trade to all the Countries situated to the Eastward of the Cape of Good Hope, and the Liberty of proceeding to and residing in those Countries; also the Privilege of holding and possessing Land, and trading within the British Possessions in India, under such Regulations as to their Lordships may seem proper and consistent with their Government, Tranquillity and Safety:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the lastmentioned Committee.

British Spirits, Petitions against Encrease of Duty on: (County of Fife:) Farmers, &c. of Fifeshire:

Upon reading the Petition of the Noblemen, Freeholders, Justices of Peace and Commissioners of Supply of the County of Fife, whose Names are thereunto subscribed:

And also, Upon reading the Petition of the Farmers and Occupiers of Land in the Western District of Fifeshire, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; severally praying their Lordships "to afford them the Protection that they have hitherto had in the Duties on Spirits; and if it is necessary to lay additional Duty on the Spirits consumed in England, that the same Scale of Duties which has been hitherto observed between Colonial and Home-made Spirits shall be continued:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petitions do lie on the Table.

Cupar:

Upon reading the Petition of the Farmers of the District of Cupar, in the County of Fife, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take into Consideration the Measure lately proposed for raising the Duties on British-made Spirits, without making a corresponding Encrease on the Duty of Rum; and to afford such Protection to the Agricultural Interest as to their Lordships may seem proper:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Com ee of the Norfolk Agricultural Society.

Upon reading the Petition of the Committee of the Norfolk Agricultural Society, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "That if an additional Duty be imposed on British Spirits, an equivalent Encrease of Duty may at the same Time be imposed on all other Spirits, especially on Rum:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Disabilities of the Jews, Petition of Jews in Bath for Removal of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Jews residing in the City of Bath, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will take their Case into Consideration, and afford them that Relief from the Disabilities and Restrictions still existing against them which their Lordships, in their Wisdom, may deem necessary and just to grant:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Foleshill Poor Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Heathcote and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for better assessing and collecting the Poor and other Rates in the Parish of Foleshill, in the County of the City of Coventry;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

London Bridge Approaches Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Alderman Wood and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to make further Provision for defraying the Expences of making the Approaches to London Bridge and the Removal of Fleet Market;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Weston Zoyland, &c. Inclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Alderman Wood and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing and allotting Lands within the Parishes of Weston Zoyland and Middlezoy, in the County of Somerset;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Othery, &c. Drainage Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Alderman Wood and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for draining, flooding and improving certain Low Lands and Grounds within the several Parishes of Othery, Middlezoy and Weston Zoyland, in the County of Somerset;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Tonbridge &c. Roads Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for amending and improving the Road from Tonbridge to Ightham, and other Roads communicating therewith, in the County of Kent;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Blackburn Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing the Road from Blackburn to Walton Cop, within Walton in le Dale, in the County of Lancaster;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Dundee & Newtyle Railway Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Alexander Grant and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act to amend an Act for making a Railway from Dundee to Newtyle;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Seven Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Holyhead Road, Accounts respecting, delivered.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Robertson, from the Office of His Majesty's Woods, Forests and Land Revenue, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to an Order of the 25th Day of March last,

"An Account of all Sums of Money granted by Parliament, and all other Sums expended by the Parliamentary Commissioners, from the Institution of the Commission for the Improvement of the Road from London to Holyhead to the present Period, distinguishing the Amounts applied to the several Portions of Road within the following Trusts; (vizt)

"The Highgate Trust.

"Highgate Archway Road.

"Whetstone Trust.

"St. Alban's Trust.

"Dunstable Trust.

"Puddle Hill Trust.

"Hockcliffe and Stratford Trust.

"Stoney Stratford Trust.

"Statford and Dunchurch Trust.

"Dunchurch and Stone Bridge Trust.

"Stone Bridge and Birmingham Trust.

"Wednesbury Trust.

"Bilston Trust.

"Wolverhampton Trust.

"Shiffnall District.

"Wellington District.

"Road from Shrewsbury to Bangor."

And also, "An Account of all Salaries, Gratuities, Travelling Charges and other Allowances paid under the Direction of the Holyhead Road Commissioners; stating the Names of the Persons to whom the said Salaries have been paid, and their Offices."

And then he withdrew.

And the Titles thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Accounts do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Accounts be printed.

4th Report of Com rs of Metropolis Turnpike Roads delivered.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Richard Robertson, from the Commissioners of the Metropolis Turnpike Roads, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to the Directions of an Act of Parliament,

"The Fourth Report of the Commissioners of the Metropolis Turnpike Roads, North of the Thames."

And then he withdrew.

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Report do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Report be printed.

List of Hong Merchants delivered, & referred to East India Com ee.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Preston, from the Court of Directors of The East India Company, attended;"

He was called in; and delivered at the Bar, pursuant to an Order of the 25th Day of March last,

"A List of Hong Merchants, stating the particular Privileges and Powers with which they are invested in respect to the Canton Trade."

And then he withdrew.

And the Title thereof being read by the Clerk;

Ordered, That the said Paper do lie on the Table.

Ordered, That the said Paper be printed.

Ordered, That the said Paper be referred to the Select Committee appointed to enquire into the present State of the Affairs of The East India Company, and into the Trade between Great Britain, the East Indies and China.

Mr. Gepp to attend.

The House being informed, "That Mr. Gepp, Acting Treasurer of the Western Division of the County of Essex, had not made a Return of all Monies levied for the County Rate of the said County, from the 5th of April 1815 to the 5th of April 1829, inclusive, distinguishing each Year, and the Items of Expenditure, pursuant to the Order of this House of Monday the 15th of June last:"

Ordered, That the said Mr. Gepp do attend this House on Monday next at Four o'Clock.

Parish Accounts, Petition of

Upon reading the Petition of George Gunning of Frindsbury, Kent, a Lieutenant on the Half Pay of His Majesty's

G. Gunning for better Mode of keeping.

First Regiment of Dragoon Guards; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to pass a Law to oblige all Overseers of the Poor to keep their Accounts in one fixed Form; and that their Lordships will give the Forms of Returns for such Purpose in the said Petition set forth their most gracious Consideration:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Labourers Wages, Petition from Lyme Regis respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Clothiers carrying on the Manufacture of Woollen Cloths at Lyme Regis, in the County of Dorset, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships, "to adopt the most effectual Measures their Wisdom can devise to put down the Practice of paying Wages in Goods instead of Money, which, as it appears to the Petitioners, is from its Nature fraught with the most fearful Consequences to every Class of Society, and even to the State itself:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Distress at Bandon, Petition from Bandon respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Town of Bandon and its Vicinity, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take the distressed State of the Operatives of the Town of Bandon into Consideration, with a view to render them Relief by affording them productive Employment, or by affording them Facilities of Emigration, or by whatever other Means their Lordships, in their Wisdom, may devise:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Distress of the Country, Petition from Grimshoe respecting.

Upon reading the Petition of the Owners and Occupiers of Land and other Inhabitants of the Hundred of Grimshoe, in the County of Norfolk, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to take into their earliest and most serious Consideration the present distressed State of all Classes of His Majesty's Subjects, and take Steps to afford Relief, by applying to their utmost practicable Limits Economy and Retrenchment in every Department of the State; by a material Reduction of all Taxes pressing directly or indirectly on the Necessaries of Life, particularly on Beer, the wholesome Beverage of the Poor; and for the Total Repeal of the Malt Tax:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Climbing Boys in sweeping Chimnies, Petition from Newcastle-under-Lyme against Employment of.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Newcastle-under-Lyme, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to pass such an Act for prohibiting the Use of Children in climbing Chimnies for the Purpose of cleansing them, as their Lordships in their Wisdom may deem fit:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Leeds & Selby Railway Bill, Petition against.

Upon reading the Petition of Isabella Ann Dowager Marchioness of Hertford, and of the Owners of Lands on the Line of the Railway from Leeds to Selby, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; taking notice of a Bill depending in this House, intituled, "An Act for making a Railway from the Town of Leeds to the River Ouse, within the Parish of Selby, in the West Riding of the County of York;" and praying their Lordships, "That they may be heard by themselves, their Counsel, Agents and Witnesses, against the Preamble, and so much and such Parts of the said Bill as may affect their Rights and Interests; and that the said Bill may not pass into a Law as it now stands:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Foreign Lead, Petitions against Importation of: (Arkengarthdale:)

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of Arkengarthdale, in the North Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying their Lordships "to take the distressed Situation of this Parish into their most serious Consideration, and grant them such Relief, either by imposing a sufficient protecting Duty upon Foreign Lead and Lead Ore, or by such other Means as their Lordships, in their Wisdom, may think proper:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Middleton in Teesdale:

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Parish of Middleton in Teesdale, in the County of Durham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That their Lordships will be pleased to adopt some Measures for giving to the British Lead Miners an effectual Preference to Foreigners both in our Home Market and that of our Colonies:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

Mining District on the Derwent.

Upon reading the Petition of the Inhabitants of the Mining District on the Derwent, in the Counties of Durham, and Northumberland, whose Names are thereunto subscribed; praying, "That such Relief as seems good to their Lordships may be granted, as will enable the Proprietors of Lead Mines to compete with Foreigners; and thus, by encouraging the Productions of our own Country, afford Employment, and rescue the Petitioners from the present overwhelming Distress:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition do lie on the Table.

M'Gavin v. Stewart.

Ordered, That the Order made on Thursday the 29th of April last, "That the further Hearing of the Cause wherein James M'Gavin is Appellant, and James Stewart is Respondent, be put off to Tuesday next," be discharged.

Same v. same.

Ordered, That the Order made on Thursday the 29th of April last, "That the Hearing of the Second Cause wherein the said James M'Gavin is Appellant, and the said James Stewart is Respondent, which stands appointed for this Day, be put off to Tuesday next," be discharged.

Morrison et al. v. Mitchell.

Ordered, That the Order made on Thursday the 29th of April last, "That the Hearing of the Cause wherein John Morrison, and others, are Appellants, and James Mitchell is Respondent, which stands appointed for this Day, be put off to Tuesday next," be discharged.

Thomson v. Forrester.

Ordered, That the Order made on Thursday the 29th of April last, "That the Cause wherein James Thomson is Appellant, and Thomas Forrester is Respondent, be heard by Counsel at the Bar on Tuesday next," be discharged.

Hamerton's Divorce Bill.

It was moved, "That the Order made on Thursday the 29th of April last, "That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of William Medows Hamerton Esquire with Isabella Frances his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes," be put off to Tuesday the 4th of May next; and that the Lords be summoned;" be now read."

The same was accordingly read by the Clerk.

Ordered, That the said Order be discharged.

Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off to Thursday next, and that the Lords be summoned; and that Mrs. Mary Matthews, who was Ordered to attend, do then attend.

Leicester & Swannington Railway Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Legh Keck and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining a Railway or Tram road from the River Soar, near the West Bridge, in or near the Borough of Leicester, to Swannington, in the County of Leicester, and Four Branches therefrom;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Whaddon Inclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Fremantle and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing and exonerating from Tithes Lands in the Parish of Whaddon, including the Hamlet of Nash, in the County of Buckingham;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Hockliffe Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir Thomas Fremantle and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and maintaining the Road between Hockliffe, in the County of Bedford, and Stony Stratford, in the County of Buckingham;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Deddithorpe Inclosure Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Sir William Ingleby and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for dividing, allotting and inclosing, and for exonerating from Tithes, Lands within the Township or Hamlet of Deddithorpe otherwise Derrythorpe, in the Parish of Althorpe, in the Isle of Axholme, in the County of Lincoln;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Rotherham Road Bill.

A Message was brought from the House of Commons, by Mr. Charles Wood and others;

With a Bill, intituled, "An Act for altering, improving, diverting and maintaining the Road from Rotherham to the Four Lane Ends, near Wortley, in the West Riding of the County of York;" to which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

The said Five Bills were, severally, read the First Time.

Leeds & Selby Railway Bill read 2 a, & committed:

It was moved, "That the Bill, intituled, "An Act for making a Railway from the Town of Leeds to the River Ouse, within the Parish of Selby, in the West Riding of the County of York," be now read a Second Time."

Which being objected to;

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Then the said Bill was read a Second Time.

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords following:

L. Bp. Bristol.
L. Bp. Carlisle.
L. Bp. Rochester.
L. Bp. Raphoe.
L. De Clifford.
L. Willoughby de Eresby.
L. Dacre.
L. Clifton.
L. Teynham.
L. Stafford.
L. Gower.
L. Colville of Culross.
L. Hay.
L. King.
L. Monson.
L. Holland.
L. Vernon.
L. Ducie.
L. Montagu.
L. Dundas.
L. Dawnay.
L. Calthorpe.
L. Rolle.
L. Wellesley.
L. Bolton.
L. Ribblesdale.
L. Fitz Gibbon.
L. Carbery.
L. Dufferin & Claneboye.
L. Dunalley.
L. Redesdale.
L. Ellenborough.
L. Arden.
L. Mont Eagle.
L. Manners.
L. Hill.
L. Meldrum.
L. Melbourne.
L. Churchill.
L. Prudhoe.
L. Forester.
L. Bexley.
L. Penshurst.
L. Somerhill.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Clanwilliam.
L. Durham.
D. CUMBERLAND.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Norfolk.
D. Richmond.
D. Beaufort.
D. Leeds.
D. Devonshire.
D. Rutland.
D. Wellington.
M. Salisbury.
M. Bute.
M. Camden.
M. Cleveland.
E. Westmorland.
E. Winchilsea & Nottingham.
E. Chesterfield.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Albemarle.
E. Jersey.
E. Rosebery.
E. Ferrers.
E. Tankerville.
E. Cowper.
E. Stanhope.
E. Hardwicke.
E. De Lawarr.
E. Hillsborough.
E. Carnarvon.
E. Malmesbury.
E. Chichester.
E. Limerick.
E. Charleville.
E. Grey.
E. Harrowby.
E. Harewood.
E. Beauchamp.
E. Eldon.
E. Falmouth.
E. Howe.
V. Melville.
V. Lorton.
V. Gordon.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at One o'Clock in the Afternoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Petitions against & for it, referred to the Com ee:

Ordered, That the Petition of Isabella Ann Dowager Marchioness of Hertford, and of the Owners of Lands on the Line of the Railway from Leeds to Selby, in the West Riding of the County of York, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, presented to the House this Day; taking notice of the last-mentioned Bill, and praying their Lordships, "That they may be heard by themselves, their Counsel, Agents and Witnesses, against the same," be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed, and that the Petitioners be at liberty to be heard by themselves, their Counsel, Agents and Witnesses, against the same, as desired; and that Counsel be heard for the Bill at the same Time, if they think fit.

Ordered, That the several Petitions presented to the House, praying, That the last-mentioned Bill may pass into a Law, be referred to the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed.

All Lords added to the Com ee:

Ordered, That all the Lords who have been or shall be present this Session, and are not named of the Committee to whom the last-mentioned Bill stands committed, be added thereto.

Com ee to appoint a Chairman.

Ordered, That the Committee to whom the said Bill stands committed do appoint their own Chairman.

Wallis's Divorce Bill:

Hodie 3a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to dissolve the Marriage of Thomas Wallis Esquire with Charlotte Augusta Amelia his now Wife, and to enable him to marry again; and for other Purposes."

The Question was put, "Whether this Bill shall pass?"

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Message to H.C. with it.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Mr. Farrer and Mr. Wingfield;

To carry down the said Bill, and desire their Concurrence thereto.

Sunderland Harbour Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to amend and enlarge the Powers and Provisions of several Acts relating to the Improvement and Preservation of the River Wear, and the Port and Haven of Sunderland, in the County Palatine of Durham."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Warrington & Newton Railway Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to enable the Company of Proprietors of the Warrington and Newton Railway to extend the Line of the said Railway; and for repealing, explaining, altering, amending and enlarging some of the Powers and Provisions of the Act relating thereto."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Hagley Inclosure Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for inclosing certain Lands in the Parish of Hagley, in the County of Worcester."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Wendover Road Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for more effectually repairing and improving the Road from Wendover to the Town of Buckingham, in the County of Buckingham."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Wigan Railway Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for making and maintaining a Railway from the Borough of Wigan to the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, in the Borough of Newton, in the County Palatine of Lancaster, and Collateral Branches to communicate therewith."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Gordon's Estate Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for vesting Part of the Estates devised by and settled to the Uses of the Wills of James Gordon Esquire, and of his Son James Gordon Esquire, both deceased, situate in the Counties of Hertford and Somerset, and in the Island of Antigua, in the West Indies, in Trustees to be sold, and for laying out the Monies thence arising in the Purchase of other Estates; and for other Purposes."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on Monday the 24th of this instant May, at the usual Time and Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Hall's Estate Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to authorize the granting of Building and Mining Leases of certain Parts of the Estates now subject to the Trusts of the Will of Benjamin Hall Esquire, deceased, and of other Estates which may be hereafter conveyed or settled upon the same Trusts, and also the Appropriation and Grant of other Part of the said Estates for the Erection of a Church."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to the Consideration of the Lords Committees aforenamed:

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet on the same Day, at the same Place; and to adjourn as they please.

Leather Duties Repeal Bill.

Hodie 2a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act to repeal the Duties of Excise and Drawbacks on Leather, and the Laws relating thereto."

Ordered, That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the Whole House.

Ordered, That the House be put into a Committee upon the said Bill To-morrow.

Maccabe v. Hussey & Maccabe, Petition of a Respondent for Time for her Case, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of Catherine Hussey, one of the Respondents in a Cause depending in this House, to which Jennings Patrick Maccabe Esquire is Appellant; praying their Lordships, "That she may have Six Weeks further Time to lay her Case on the Table of this House:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Robley et al. v. Brooke, Respondent's Petition for Time for his Case, referred to Appeal Com ee.

Upon reading the Petition of Charles Brooke, Respondent in a Cause depending in this House, to which Caroline Robley, and others, are Appellants; praying, "That their Lordships will grant unto the Petitioner Six Weeks further Time for laying a Print of his Case upon the Table of this House; and that such Time may be computed from the Expiration of the Time allowed by the Orders of this House:"

It is Ordered, That the said Petition be referred to the Committee appointed to consider of the Causes in which Prints of the Appellants and Respondents Cases, now depending in this House in Matters of Appeals and Writs of Error, have not been delivered, pursuant to the Standing Orders of this House.

Suits in Equity Bill.

It was moved, "That the Order made on Wednesday the 28th of April last, "That the Bill, intituled, "An Act for further facilitating the Administration of Justice in Suits and other Proceedings in Equity," be read the Third Time on Tuesday next; and that the Lords be summoned," be now read."

The same was accordingly read by the Clerk.

Ordered, That the said Order be discharged.

Ordered, That the said Bill be read the Third Time on Tuesday the 11th of this instant May; and that the Lords be summoned.

Slane Peerage, Com ee to meet.

Ordered, That the Committee for Privileges, to whom the Petition of George Bryan of Jenkinstown, in the County of Kilkenny, Esquire, to His Majesty, praying, "That his Claim to the Barony of Slane may be referred to The House of Peers, to report whether the said Title be or be not a Barony in Fee by Writ of Summons, descendible to Heirs General, and whether the same is or is not now in Abeyance between Edward Lord Dunsany and the Petitioner;" together with His Majesty's Reference thereof to this House, and the Report of the Attorney General thereunto annexed; and also the Petition of Henry Fleming of the City of Dublin, praying, "That their Lordships will not adjudge the Barony of Slane to the Claimant, Mr. Bryan, until he has fully and clearly proved that, according to the Usage and Law of Ireland, he is entitled to it; and that Time may be allowed until James Fleming, his eldest Brother, who is at present in France, and altogether ignorant of the Steps that have been taken by the said George Bryan, shall return, and have an Opportunity of proving, at the Bar of this House, the Truth of the Allegations contained in the said Petition," stand referred, do meet to consider of the said Claim on Wednesday the 19th of this instant May; and that Notice thereof be given to His Majesty's Attorney General for England, and also to His Majesty's Attorney or Solicitor General for Ireland.

Benson's et al. Petition to receive Judges Report:

Upon reading the Petition of Ralph Benson Esquire, and others, praying their Lordships, "That, in Consideration of the particular Circumstances of the Case, the Judges Report on their Petition for a Private Bill may be now received:"

It is Ordered, That the said Report be now received.

Benson et al. Leave for a Bill:

Accordingly, After reading and considering the Report of the Judges, to whom was referred the Petition of Ralph Benson Esquire, and others; praying Leave to bring in a Private Bill, for the Purposes therein mentioned:

It is Ordered, That Leave be given to bring in a Bill, pursuant to the said Petition and Report.

Bill read.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for vesting an Estate at Liverpool, in the County of Lancaster, devised and settled by the Will of Moses Benson Esquire, deceased, in Trustees to be sold, and for laying out the Monies arising from such Sale in the Purchase of Estates to be settled to the same Uses."

Buckle's Estate Bill, Copy of, referred to Judges in Ireland to take Consents.

Ordered, That a printed Copy of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to enable John Buckle Esquire, or other Committee of the Estate of William Buckle, a Lunatic, for and in the Name and on behalf of the said William Buckle, to consent to the Exercise of a Power of Sale over Estates settled on the said William Buckle for his Life, and which Power is exerciseable with the Consent of the said William Buckle," attested by the Clerk of the Parliaments, be, and the same is hereby referred to Mr. Justice Jebb, in Ireland, and Mr. Justice Johnson, in Ireland, who are forthwith to summon George Whitley Esquire and Louisa his Wife, James Scargill Esquire and Gertrude his Wife, Hamilton Lockwood Esquire and Richard Butler Esquire, now in Ireland, and to take their Consent to the said Bill; and thereafter to report to the House, under their Hands, whether the said Persons have appeared before them the said Mr. Justice Jebb and Mr. Justice Johnson, and consented to the same; and that the said Mr. Justice Jebb and Mr. Justice Johnson do sign the said printed Copy of the said Bill.

Caxton Inclosure Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for inclosing and exonerating from Tithes Lands in the Parish of Caxton, in the County of Cambridge," was committed; That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; that the Parties concerned had given their Consents to Satisfaction of the Committee; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

De Chapeaurouge's Naturalization Bill.

The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Lords Committees, to whom the Bill, intituled, "An Act for naturalizing Philip Augustus De Chapeaurouge," was committed; "That they had considered the said Bill, and examined the Allegations thereof, which were found to be true; and that the Committee had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

Ordered, That the said Bill be ingrossed.

Clifton Bridge Bill, Judges Report read.

The Report of the Judges, to whom the Consideration of the Bill, intituled, "An Act for building a Bridge over the River Avon, from Clifton, in the County of Gloucester, to the opposite Side of the River, in the County of Somerset, and for making convenient Roads and Approaches to communicate therewith," was referred, was read.

Fever Hospitals (Ireland) Bill.

The House (according to Order) was adjourned during Pleasure, and put in a Committee upon the Bill, intituled, "An Act to extend the Powers of Grand Juries in the Execution of an Act of the Fifty-eighth Year of His late Majesty's Reign, for establishing Fever Hospitals in Ireland."

After some Time, the House was resumed:

And The Earl of Shaftesbury reported from the Committee, "That they had gone through the Bill, and directed him to report the same to the House, without any Amendment."

East Retford Election Bill, Witnesses discharged from further Attendance.

Ordered, That Richard Hannam, William Elmsall Carter, Henry Pickup, Stephen Hemsworth, John Goodlad, Edward Golland, Jonathan Banks and John Fell, be discharged from further Attendance on this House on the Bill, intituled, "An Act to prevent Bribery and Corruption in the Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of East Retford."

East Retford Election Bill.

The Order of the Day being read for the further Consideration and Second Reading of the Bill, intituled, "An Act to prevent Bribery and Corruption in the Election of Burgesses to serve in Parliament for the Borough of East Retford," and for the Lords to be summoned; and for permitting Counsel to examine Witnesses in support of the Bill; and for hearing Counsel on the Petition of the Burgesses of the Borough of East Retford, in the County of Nottingham, whose Names are thereunto subscribed, praying their Lordships, "That the said Bill may not pass into a Law;"

Counsel were accordingly called in.

Then William Evans Esquire was called in; and having been sworn, was examined as follows:

(Mr. Law.) "Is your Name William Evans?"

"Yes."

"Were you a Candidate to represent the Borough of East Retford in the Year 1818?"

"I was."

"Were you also a Candidate for that Borough in the Year 1820?"

"I was."

"Did you, after the Elections in those Years, sit as a Member for that Borough?"

"I did."

"Had you a Connection with the Borough of Retford previous to the Year 1818?"

"No."

"Do you know Mr. Mee?"

"Yes."

"Was he at that Time the Town Clerk of Retford?"

"I believe he was."

"Were you introduced to him?"

"Yes, I was."

"In consequence of being introduced to that Gentleman, were you also introduced to Mr. George Kippax?"

"I do not know. Mr. George Kippax became known to me. I do not remember, at this Period of Time, who introduced me to Mr. Kippax."

"Had you been acquainted with Mr. Kippax before 1818?"

"No."

"Did you deposit any Sum of Money with Mr. George Kippax?"

"I believe I did."

"At whose Desire or Suggestion did you deposit Money with him?"

"I do not recollect."

"What Sum of Money did you deposite with Mr. George Kippax?"

"Three thousand Pounds, I believe, was the Sum. I have not my Letter, or his Answer, I think."

"To the best of your Recollection, was that the Sum you deposited?"

"Yes, I believe it was."

"As nearly as you can recollect, when did you so deposite that Sum of Money?"

"I do not really recollect."

"Was it in the Year 1818?"

"Yes, it was in the Year 1818."

"Was it in the early Part of that Year?"

"I do not now recollect."

"Was it before the Election?"

"Oh yes; long before the Election; a considerable Time before the Election; I do not know exactly how long."

"For what Purpose was the Sum of £3,000 deposited by you with Mr. Kippax?"

"I believe the Object, in depositing that Sum with Mr. Kippax, was, that it might be known that I had Money at my Disposal."

"Did you become acquainted, in the Year 1818, with a Person of the Name of John Thornton; Mr. John Thornton?"

"Yes, I did."

"How did you become acquainted with that Individual?"

"I believe-indeed I recollect, that Mr. Mee introduced me to Mr. Thornton, and he recommended Mr. Thornton to me, as an honest Person whom I might safely employ."

"For what Purpose did Mr. Mee so recommend him; in what Capacity?"

"As a Man to be employed as an Agent at the ensuing Election."

"Being so introduced to Mr. Thornton, what Communication did Thornton make to you as to the Mode in which the Election was to be conducted?"

"I dare say he made a great many Communications to me of that Nature. I do not quite understand the Question."

"Was any Representation made to you by Mr. Thornton respecting the Voters?"

"I dare say there was; I do not doubt there was."

Mr. Alderson submitted, "That the Answer could not be received unless the Witness could from his Recollection speak to the Fact."

The Witness was requested to attend particularly to the Question, and see whether he could answer it more precisely.

(Mr. Law.) "What Representation did Mr. Thornton make to you with regard to the Conduct to be pursued by you towards the Voters?"

"I really do not very well understand the Question. A Person may make a very great Number of Observations about the Mode in which an Election should be conducted. I do not know what Answer I ought to give to that Question. I do not know exactly what it is that it is wished to elicit."

"Did Mr. Thornton make any Representation to you as to the Expectations of the Voters; what they would expect you to do?"

"Yes, he did."

"What was that Representation?"

"He represented that the Voters would expect to be paid."

"What did he represent to you they would expect to be paid?"

"He stated that for many Elections the Voters had received Twenty Guineas each."

"What did he represent with regard to your own Election?"

"That they would expect to receive the same."

"Did Mr. Thornton distinguish between Plumpers and single Votes?"

Mr. Adam objected to the Question.

The Counsel were informed, "That the Question did not appear to be open to Objection;" and the Question was put.

"He did."

"What Distinction did he make?"

"He said that a Person who gave a Plumper received Double the Sum that the Person who gave a single Vote received."

(By a Lord.) "Was the Twenty Guineas which you spoke to, for a single Vote, or a Plumper?"

"For a single Vote."

(Mr. Law.) "And Double for a Plumper?"

"Yes."

"In consequence of the Communication made to you by Mr. Thornton, did you appoint him your Agent?"

"I did."

"Was he at that Time resident at Retford?"

"He was."

"Were you in constant Correspondence with him upon the Subject of your Election?"

"I had many Letters from him."

Mr. Alderson objected to the Question, as a leading Question.

The Counsel were informed, "That the Question, merely specifying the Subject of the Correspondence, and not the Particulars, was not open to Objection."

(Mr. Law.) "Be so good as to state what Sum of Money you expended in your Election in the Year 1818?"

"I believe I expended about £4,400; I think a little more."

"Was there any Third Candidate?"

"There was no Third Candidate."

"Who was the other Candidate besides yourself?"

"Mr. Crompton."

"You have been requested to produce certain Papers, and the first Paper I wish you to produce begins, "Brought forward, Total Votes;" will you have the goodness to produce that?"

"I believe I have that Paper; but, my Lords, may I be allowed to plead that that Paper is a Paper containing, not a general List, but the Names of many Individuals. I come here at your Lordships Summons. I feel no Hesitation whatever in answering any Questions which relate only to myself, or any general Questions; but I think that your Lordships must feel, that it is the most painful and unpleasant Situation in which any Man could be placed, after having represented a Borough in Two Parliaments, and after having had the Confidence of the Burgesses; that if there is any Offence in those Burgesses he should be the last possible Person to accuse them of that. I cannot but imagine your Lordships will think it is a particularly painful Situation in which you place me, if you require me to be the Accuser of those who treated me always with perfect Confidence, and who, whatever may be said against them in other respects, were true and faithful to me, and of whom I am the last Person who ought to be their Accuser. On that Account I shall certainly take the Liberty of appealing to your Lordships against producing any List of Names."

The Witness was informed, "That he was not standing in the Situation of an Accuser; that he was brought forward as a Witness in support of an Accusation."

(The Witness in continuation.)-"The Effect of the Evidence I am called upon to give is exactly the same as if I was bringing forward an Accusation. I may have used an erroneous Term."

The Witness was informed, "That he must answer the Questions which were put to him, unless they were shewn to be open to Objection."

Mr. Law stated, "That he was instructed that the Witness had not volunteered the Information, but had merely attended in obedience to their Lordships Summons."

Mr. Adam submitted, "That the Paper in the Handwriting of the Witness was not made Evidence, and could not be produced."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

Mr. Law was heard in support of the Production of the Paper.

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

The Counsel were again called in.

Mr. Adam stated, "That he could make no Objection to the Witness refreshing his Recollection by a Paper he had written at the Time, but he submitted that the Paper was not itself Evidence."

The Witness was again called in.

(Mr. Law.) "Have you with you the Paper to which I have referred, by the Description I have already given of it?"

"I have no Paper beginning with the Words used by you."

"Have you a Paper which commences with the Words, Promises, 161?"

"Yes, I have."

"Will you be good enough to state whether that Paper is in your own Handwriting, looking at it for the Purpose of informing yourself of that Fact?"

"Before I answer that Question, I would wish to ask, whether the Answer I give to that Question decides whether this Paper is to remain in the Custody of the House of Lords or my own Custody?"

The Witness was informed, "That he must not put Questions to the Counsel to decide whether he should answer the Question or not."

"I apprehend I have no Choice about answering any Question which your Lordships peremptorily desire me to answer; but if I may be allowed to say another Syllable about the Production of any Paper, I would submit whether this is the Time at which I ought to give it."

(By a Lord.) "Is that Paper in your own Handwriting?"

"It is."

(Mr. Law.) "Does that Paper which you so produce in your own Handwriting contain Memoranda made by yourself with reference to the Election?"

Mr. Adam objected to the Question; stating, "That the Paper must speak for itself, if it should be made Evidence; but that it was not yet made Evidence."

Mr. Law was heard in support of the Question.

Mr. Adam was heard in reply.

(By a Lord.) "Does that Paper relate to the Election?"

"It does."

"Is it in your own Handwriting?"

"It is."

(Mr. Law.) As it relates to the Election, and is in your own Handwriting, will you have the goodness to look at that Paper, and I will put some Questions to you?"

Mr. Adam submitted, "That the only Use which could be made of this Paper was, that the Witness might look at it, if he chose, for the Purpose of refreshing his Memory."

Mr. Law submitted, "That if it contained a Declaration by the Party of his Conduct in reference to the Election it was admissible in Evidence, and that therefore he was entitled to put Questions to the Witness, calling upon him to refresh his Memory by Reference to the Paper."

Mr. Adam submitted, "That the Paper was not Evidence; and that the Witness was at liberty to refer to it, or to refrain from referring to it, in giving his Evidence."

Mr. Alderson was heard in support of the Objection.

Mr. Law was heard against the Objection; and submitted, "That this must be treated as a written Declaration by a Co-conspirator."

Mr. Adam was heard in reply.

The Counsel and Witness were directed to withdraw.

The Counsel and Witness were again called in.

(By a Lord.) "Did this Paper you have been called upon to take out of your Pocket ever pass into any other Hands than your own?"

"I am afraid that I must answer that Question at greater Length than I should wish to do. I received an Order from your Lordships House to produce every Paper, Book, Memorandum, Note-I do not recollect all the Expressions-which I possessed respecting this Election. I confess, when this Enquiry-I do not mean the present Enquiry, but when first the Enquiry was notified through the Newspapers in the other House of Parliament, I did feel it would have been a Comfort to me if I had burnt every Paper relating to that Affair which I had; but after it was made public there was to be an Enquiry, after a little Reflection, I came to the Opinion that I ought not, knowing an Enquiry before a competent Tribunal was to take place, and not knowing whether I should be called or not, to destroy my Papers; and I have not destroyed any. I have not read them; but I left them as they were; I did not destroy any of them. I dare say there are many Persons will think I acted extremely improperly, and will think that I may in some Way have compromised them: I may have done so. I gave the Subject the best Consideration that I could give to it, as to what I thought both honorable and right, pending such an Enquiry; and I had thought, if I should be asked by your Lordships House, or the other House, whether I had ever had any Papers, and should say that I had had them, if I was asked what had become of them, and that I should say I heard there was an Enquiry in the House of Lords, and I burnt the Papers, that would not be a proper Act, or a creditable Line of Conduct for me to pursue. With respect to these Papers having been out of my Hands: -I came up here in very difficult Circumstances; there were a considerable Number of private Letters of Persons not resident at Retford, and Persons not Voters at Retford, and Persons not writing at all about the Election, who, I believe, had some of them not probably ever been at that Place; those were amongst my Papers, but they related to the Election in such a Way that, by the Terms of your Lordships Order, I apprehended I must produce them, and bring them up here. I could not tell what would be the Effect of your Lordships Order. I had no Idea of making a Defence before your Lordships, but I wished to explain why those Papers had been out of my Hands. This Paper has been out of my Hands; with such a Set of Papers I could not tell that I could not be compelled to produce them all. There were private Papers which I think would not have implicated the Character of those Individuals, but which might be all wanted upon your Lordships Journals, and which might be unpleasant to them. I threw myself completely into the Hands of the Promoters of the Bill, in the first place, so far as to say that I trusted they would not require me, or ask me, to produce any Papers not necessary to their Case. I could expect no Confidence from them as to Papers being necessary for their Case, unless I told them what those Papers were. I did see the Agent for the Bill. It was impossible to read the Papers while we remained together; therefore I left the Papers in his Hands, because I thought in that Way I should not be required to produce these private Letters, in case I might be required to produce some. For that Reason I answer your Lordship's Question in the Affirmative, that these Papers have been out of my Hands."

"In what Light do you consider this Paper that you are now called upon to produce?"

"That Paper is a Memorandum of my own, I believe. The Object of it was to ascertain in some degree the Correctness of some Part of the Accounts of my Agent."

"Was it written during the Election, or after the whole Proceedings were entirely over?"

"I know it must have been a considerable Time after the Election was over; I cannot tell how long, but a considerable Time after the Election was over."

"Do you consider it, or not, as a private Memorandum?"

"I conceive it to be a private Memorandum."

The Counsel and Witness were directed to withdraw.

The Counsel were again called in; and informed, "That in the Opinion of their Lordships the Paper was not Evidence, but that the Witness might refer to it to enable him to answer the Questions correctly."

The Witness was again called in.

(Mr. Law.) "Have the goodness to refer to the Paper in your Handwriting, and state how many Promises you had in the Year 1818?"

Mr. Adam objected to the Question.

Mr. Law waived the Question.

(Mr. Law.) "How many Promises had you in the Year 1818?"

"I can only answer that Question by a Reference to some Paper; I cannot answer it without that Reference, with perfect Certainty and Correctness."

"State to the best of your Belief how many Promises you had in the Year 1818."

(Mr. Adam.) "What Paper are you now looking at?"

"I was looking at that Memorandum."

The Witness was informed, "That having stated that the Paper in his Hand was written long after the Election, he must not look at it for the Purpose of refreshing his Memory as to any Transaction which passed at the Time of the Election, but that he must rely upon his Memory, speaking with as much Precision as was in his Power."

(Mr. Law) "What Sum of Money did you issue to Mr. Thornton in reference to the Election of 1818?"

Mr. Adam submitted, "That the Witness should be asked whether the Paper he was referring to was written at the Time of the Transaction to which it referred."

The Witness was informed, "That if he had any Memorandum made at the Time when he advanced Money to Thornton on account of the Election, he might refresh his Memory by referring to it, but not otherwise."

"I believe I have a Memorandum copied from some of Mr. Thornton's own Letters, as Receipts for Money."

Mr. Adam objected to the Production of Copies of Letters.

(By a Lord.) "Have you any Memorandum made by yourself of the Advances you made?"

"I have."

(Mr. Law.) "State to the best of your Belief the Amount of your Advances to Mr. Thornton in reference to the Election of 1818?"

Mr. Adam requested, "That the Witness might be asked whether the Paper to which he was now referring was written at the Time of the Transaction."

(By a Lord.) "Was that Memorandum made at the Time you advanced Money to Mr. Thornton?"

"I do not know whether your Lordships will think I properly comply with the Orders of this House, if I answer that Question; but I have, in a private Book of my own, and not a Book containing an Account of the Retford Election merely, certain Sums put which had been charged to my Account at a Bank at which I do my own Business. I could not take those Leaves out; it was a Book containing private Accounts of my own Income and Expenditure and Money paid, entered in that Book; the only Thing it contained relating to Retford was an Entry from my Banker's Passage Book, which shewed the Sums that I had remitted to a Person there, and I entered that Amount that I might know what the Expences were; it was written in a very few Lines. I did not bring up that Book, because it had never passed out of my own Hands; I had never entered in it any other Account of Things relating to Retford but the Amount of this Sum; it had never gone into the Hands of another Person. I therefore submit, that I ought not to be called upon to produce that Book. That which I hold in my Hand is a Copy from that Book."

The Witness was informed, "That the Copy in his Hand was not Evidence, and that the Original alone could be referred to."

(Mr. Law.) "Without reference to any Papers or Documents, speaking to the best of your Recollection, what Sums did you advance to Mr. Thornton in reference to that Election?"

"I should think, to the best of my Recollection, about £2,700, but I cannot profess to speak very accurately."

"Were those Advances made previous to or subsequent to the Writing of the Paper that has caused the Discussion here To-day; had you paid the Money to Mr. Thornton, or was it in contemplation to pay him the Money when that Minute you have last referred to was made?"

"I believe the Money I have mentioned was sent to Mr. Thornton before that Memorandum was made."

"Can you ascertain that Fact by reference to the Paper to which you first referred, whether the Minutes made on that Paper were made in contemplation of sending a Sum of Money, or after such Sum of Money was sent?"

"I think I have understood from your Lordships House that I am not allowed to look at that Paper."

The Witness was informed, "That he was allowed to look at the Paper in question."

The Witness referred to the same; and answered, "I believe there can be no Doubt that this Memorandum was made after the Sums had been so sent to Mr. Thornton."

(Mr. Law.) "How soon after the Sums were sent to Mr. Thornton do you believe that that was made?"

"I do not know."

Mr. Adam submitted this was a leading Question.

(Mr. Law.) "Will you specify to their Lordships the Purposes to which Mr. Thornton was to apply the Money you so advanced?"

Mr.Adam submitted, the Witness should be asked whether that was communicated in Writing.

The Counsel were informed the Question might be put.

"I have no doubt the principal Object of remitting the Money was to pay the Voters."

(Mr. Law.) "Will you state how many Voters it was your Object to pay?"

"My Object was to pay all the Voters who had promised me, and who chose to accept the Money."

"To the best of your Recollection and Belief, how many Voters had so promised you?"

I believe about 163; I think a little more than 160; but I am not sure."

"Were any of those Promises Plumpers?"

"One or Two, I think; One certainly."

"In transmitting Money to Mr. Thornton for the Payment of Voters, was it your Intention to distinguish in the Manner you have described between single Votes and Plumpers?"

"Not in transmitting the Money."

"With regard to the Application of Money, was it your Intention that he should make a Distinction in the Payment of Plumpers and single Votes?"

"Certainly."

"What Difference was he to make?"

"He was to pay Forty Guineas to Plumpers, and Twenty to single Votes."

(By a Lord.) "Was the Sum you transmitted calculated for the Promises?"

"It was."

"Did you employ any Person except Mr. Thornton to pay Money to the Voters?"

"Yes, I did."

"After the Election of 1818?"

"Yes, I did."

"Do you know Mr. Ward?"

"I do."

"Did you employ that Gentleman?"

"I believe I requested him to pay some Persons; some Voters."

"Were they London Voters?"

"They were London Voters."

"How many were there in point of Number of the London Voters?"

"I cannot answer that Question without Reference to some Paper."

"Was this Paper drawn up by you with reference to the Number of Voters that were to be paid, at the Time, in contemplation of Payment; was it drawn up to assist you in apportioning the Sums to be paid?"

"Certainly."

"Was this Paper drawn up by you to assist you in apportioning the Sums to be paid to the several Voters?"

"I really do not know. I thought it was not."

"Reconsider that Question, looking at that Paper in your own Handwriting?"

(By a Lord.) "In order that you may give a safe and secure Answer, having given Answers, as it appears, conflicting with each other, you had better look at the Paper."

"I have no Doubt I have made Memorandums for the Purpose asked me by the Counsel."

"The Question put to you is with reference to that particular Paper which has been described; was that Paper drawn up for the Purpose of regulating the Payment you were to make to the Voters?"

"I am really not clear about that. There is a Date put upon it, which may have been put for a considerable Time; it is a Date that refers to another Paper, which may have been put upon it there a considerable Time after the Paper was written; and I am not clear about it."

"Cannot you tell from your Recollection of the Election itself, and recal it to your Mind by looking at the Paper, whether it was made for the particular Purpose of guiding you in the Sums you were to transmit to the Voters?"

"I am not at all clear about that; it might have been made for that Purpose; it might have been made afterwards, for the Purpose of ascertaining whether some further Sum was not necessary to be remitted after the great Bulk of the Payments were made."

"It might have been made for the Purpose of regulating the Payments you were to make generally, or for the Purpose of regulating some further Sum?"

"For the Purpose of ascertaining whether I had not some further Sum to send to Mr. Thornton for this Purpose."

(Mr. Law.) "Did you make any Memorandum in Writing of the Names of the London Voters, for the Purpose of paying them?"

"I wrote a Number of Names, who were London Voters."

"Was that for the Purpose of paying them?"

"It must have been either for the Purpose of paying them, or to ascertain whether they had been all paid; whether the Payments were correct; it must have been for one of those Purposes."

"Do you believe that the List of such Persons, at the Time you made it, was correct?"

"I should suppose it was."

"What Proportion of Voters were to be paid by Mr. Thornton; how many in Number?"

(Mr. Adam.) "To what Paper are you now looking?"

"I am looking at the first Memorandum."

Mr. Adam submitted, "That the Witness was not at liberty to refer to the Memorandum in question."

(Mr. Law.) "Whether the Paper you have produced was written before or after the Money issued for the Payment of Voters, was that Paper written when the Circumstances minuted down were fresh in your Memory?"

Mr. Adam objected to the Question.

Mr. Law was heard in support of the Question.

(By a Lord.) "Was that Paper taken from any thing else, or a Paper which you made as to the Sums you paid; an original Paper?"

"I should think it must have been made from something else."

Mr. Law suggested, "That the Paper might be handed in to their Lordships, as Papers were frequently handed to the Judge, in order to enable them to determine whether it was receivable in Evidence."

Mr. Adam submitted, "That the Paper could not be handed to their Lordships."

The Counsel were informed, "That the Counsel in support of the Bill being in Possession of a Copy of this, it did not appear to be necessary that it should be handed in."

(Mr. Law.) "Be good enough to state, to the best of your Belief, how many Promises there were, both in London and Retford?"

"I think I have stated there were somewhat more than 160."

"Of that 160 or more, how many do you believe were London Voters, according to the best of your Recollection?"

"I believe about Twenty-six."

"Who was directed to pay Voters who were not London Voters?"

"Mr. Thornton was directed to pay most of them."

"Was Mr. Thornton employed to pay the Retford Voters, those resident there, only, or those who might be also in the Neighbourhood of Retford?"

"I believe he was employed to pay those in the Neighbourhood also."

"Did they amount to the Difference between Twentysix and One hundred and sixty-four, or thereabouts; were they all the remaining Votes?"

"I believe not."

"How many Voters was Thornton to pay?"

(Mr. Adam.) "To what Paper are you now referring?"

"The Paper I was first asked to."

(Mr. Law.) "How many Voters were resident at Retford?"

"My Impression is, that there were about 100 resident at Retford."

"Twenty-six resident in London?"

"Yes."

"How many beyond those that live at Retford was Mr. Thornton to pay?"

"I do not suppose he was to pay all the Hundred at Retford; but that he had to pay about Forty, or thereabout, who did not reside at Retford."

"How many did reside at Retford?"

"The Exceptions were not very numerous, I apprehend. I do not know the exact Number put forward."

"Did you know Mr. Foljambe at Retford?"

"I did not know Mr. Foljambe when I first went to Retford."

"Did you transmit any Money to his Bank?"

"I believe I did."

"To what Amount?"

"I think the first Sum I remitted to his Bank was £500."

"Will you refer to a Paper you were directed to produce, intituled, "May 1819. List by Mr. Mee;" then a Line, and then a "List of Voters paid by Thornton jun." will you produce that Document?"

(By a Lord.) "Is Thornton junior the Thornton employed as your Agent?"

"Yes; his Father was then living."

(Mr. Law.) "Have you a Paper in his Handwriting; the Paper referred to by the Questions?"

"I have such a Paper. If your Lordships positively require me to produce it, I cannot resist it. I certainly entertain some Hopes your Lordships will not require me to produce it."

(By a Lord.) "Was not Mr. Thornton, your Agent, a Voter and Freeman?"

"Yes."

"Have you, in his Handwriting, a List of the Number of Voters paid by him?"

"Yes; I have no Doubt it is his Handwriting."

"It was transmitted by him to you?"

"Yes."

(Mr. Law.) "Will you produce that Paper?"

(Mr. Adam) "Are you sure it is Thornton's Handwriting?"

"I have no doubt it is Thornton's Handwriting. I do not know, at this Distance of Time, that I ever saw Thornton write, but I perhaps did."

(Mr. Law.) "Did you constantly correspond with him as your Agent?"

"I have had a good many Letters from him."

"Did you act upon those Letters?"

"Yes."

"Did you pay him Money upon them?"

"I did."

(By a Lord.) "Do you believe that Paper to be his Handwriting?"

"I do."

The Witness was directed to produce the Paper in question.

The Witness produced the Paper, and it was read as follows:

"List of Voters paid by J. Thornton jun.

1. Appleby, Robert.
2. Appleby, Thomas.
3. Butler, Thos, Mansfield.
4. Batty, Thos.
5. Bailey, Geo.
6. Booth, Tom.
7. Buxton, Thos.
8. Bailey, Geo. senr.
9. Baker, John, junr, Mansfield.
10. Bingham, Geo.
11. Butler, John.
12. Baker, Wm. Mansfield.
13. Bailey, James. junr.
14. Brown, Geo. Nottingham.
15. Banks, John.
16. Brown, Wm. junr.
17. Ball, Thos Bottomsell, a Plumper.
18. Banks, John. junr.
19. Burton, Wm.
20. Buxton, Saml.
21. Brummitt, Dowager.
22. Burton, Jno. junr.
23. Bower, John.
24. Birch, Richd, Nottingham.
25. Bailey, Wm, Mitton.
26. Bailey, Jas, Askham.
27. Baker, John.
28. Bayley, Jas, West Retford.
29. Butler, Thos.
30. Burton, John. senr.
31. Brown, Saml.
32. Bayley, Josph.
33. Banks, Josh.
34. Baker, Valn.
35. Brown, Edwd.
36. Banks, John, senr.
37. Charlton, Robt.
38. Crookes, Wm.
39. Cutler, Thos.
40. Crookes, Charles.
41. Clarke, Thos.
42. Cotton, Jas N.
43. Cartwright, Wm.
44. Cocking, Wm.
45. Cocking, Geo.
46. Cutliff, Robt, Southwell.
47. Cuckson, Wm.
48. Clarke, Jas.
49. Clarke, John.
50. Dawber, John.
51. Drake, John.
52. Drake, Fras.
53. Denman, John, Twyford.
54. Dernie, Jas.
55. Deane, Isaac.
56. Elvidge, Wm.
57. Furley, Wm, Nottingham.
58. Fell, Revd Jno, Nottingham.
59. Grant, Wm.
60. Ginevar, Wm.
61. Hurst, Stepn, Stayley.
62. Hindley, Richd, Holme.
63. Hartshorne, Widow.
64. Hindley, Saml.
65. Hallis, Wm.
66. Hudson, Robt.
67. Hemsworth, Stepn.
68. Hemsworth, Wm.
69. Hoult, Henry.
70. Hudson, Thos.
71. Hodson, Wm. junr.
72. Hudson, Geo.
73. Hudson, John.
74. Haydock, Geo.
75. Hurst, Richd, Nottingham.
76. Hempsall, Thos.
77. Hodson, Wm.
78. Hoult, John.
79. Holliday, Thos.
80. Johnson, John.
81. Jubb, Uriah, Nottingham.
82. Jackson, Wm.
83. Kirkby, John, Nottingham.
84. Kirkby, Wm, Nottingham.
85. Leadbeater, Wm.
86. Lawrence, Stepn.
87. Lawrence, Thos.
88. Leak, Thos, Nottingham.
89. Leadbeater, Westby.
90. Leadbeater. George.
91. Marshall, Josph.
92. Mawer, Richd.
93. Ogle, Edwd, Nottingham.
94. Palmer, Wm.
95. Pashley, Robt.
96. Pierpoint, Wm, Lincoln.
97. Richardson, Jas. jun.
98. Rushby, Robt.
99. Richards, Jno, Widow.
100. Rayner, Josh, Nottingham.
101. Richardson, John.
102. Savage, John, jun.
103. Scott, Josh.
104. Scott, Benjn.
105. Savage, John.
106. Scott, Richd, Nottingham.
107. Scott, John.
108. Slaney, Thos.
109. Slaney, Broxn.
110. Stevenson, Wm, Nottingham.
111. Shaw, John.
112. Tenny, John, Methwold, Norfolk.
113. Trueman, Wm, Clumber.
114. Tayler, Wm. junr, Mansfield.
115. Uttley, John.
116. Windle, John.
117. Watmough, Robt. jun.
118. Wright, Wm.
119. White, John, Hayton.
120. Worstley, Geo.
121. Wass, Mattw.
122. Willey, Thos.
123. White, John, Nottingham.
124. Wake, Wm.
125. Walker, John.
126. Mason, Mr. John.
127. Clarke, Mr. William, Plumper.
128. Cottam, William.

"This List includes the last Two Voters, Hurst of Staley and Hindley of Holme, that I had to settle with."

(Mr. Law.) "Are those Words, "This List includes the last Two Voters, Hurst of Staley and Hindley of Holme, that I had to settle with," in Thornton's Handwriting?"

"Yes."

"There is a Memorandum at the Bottom, in these Words: "See my own List, which is as below, 123 single Votes, Two Plumpers; Total, 125. Add one William Ginevar, ditto one R. Hindley, ditto one Stephen Hurst, not included in my List. Total, 128." In whose Handwriting are those Words?"

"Those Words are in my Writing."

"Do you produce a Paper, headed, "This Account brought by Mr. Mee, May 1819"? and state to their Lordships, whether that is not also in the Handwriting of Mr. Thornton, your Agent."

"I have a Paper, dated May 1819, indorsed, "Thornton's Statement of his Account, sent by Mr. Mee."

"Look inside, and see whether that is Thornton's Account, in his Handwriting?"

"Yes, it is Thornton's Handwriting. I state from Recollection: the Period has long elapsed. I imagine this Paper was brought to me by Mr. Mee while I was in London; that he was the Bearer of it, in a sealed Packet. I cannot state that positively."

"I find this Item in it: "128 Voters paid, including Two Plumpers, as per List sent, £2,730?"

"Yes, I have that Entry."

"Did you allow that Sum of Money to Mr. Thornton; Money advanced upon the Footing therein expressed, of 128 Voters paid, including Two Plumpers, as per List sent?"

"I believe I did."

"Have you any Doubt in your own Mind upon that?"

"No, I do not feel any Doubt that I did. I am not certain whether there may have been any subsequent Correction; but substantially that Sum was allowed, I do not doubt."

"You observe in that Account the Words used, "as per List sent;" is the other Paper to which your Attention has been already called, which has been handed in to their Lordships, that List so sent?"

"I suppose it is."

"Will you refer to a Paper headed "1819," a written List of Voters paid by Thornton, and state in whose Handwriting that Paper is? There is a List. There are these Words: "Omitted in the Copy sent Thornton, 19th of April 1819, inclosing him £50, and desired he would pay Stephen Hurst of Staley, and R. Hindley of Holme." Did you make that Memorandum at the Time, desiring he would pay those Persons?"

"I do not recollect that I have such a Paper. I did not read these Papers. When I came to Town I brought all the Papers I could find."

"Will you look at the List of Promises of 1820, and state in whose Handwriting that is?"

"I have a Paper, endorsed, "List of Promises, 1820."

"Is that in Thornton's Handwriting?"

"Yes; I believe that is in Thornton's Handwriting."

"Was he at the Time your Agent for the Election of 1820?"

"Yes. I do not know whether this List was sent up; but he was my Agent for the Election of 1820."

"Is that a List furnished by him to you in his Handwriting?"

"Yes."

"Do you find these Words in the List now produced:

"The following are a List of the independent Voters that have promised you, and not included in the other List?"

"Yes."

"Referring to them, do they amount to only Twelve; the independent Votes?"

"They amount to Twelve Votes under that Head here."

"Do the others, not mentioned as the independent Voters, amount to 169?"

"I have not ascertained the Number; there are Figures put 159 here."

"I find in the List the Words that follow: "Brummitt, Dowager, Nottingham; he offered a Plumper, but you did not know if you should accept of a Vote from him; you would consider it." Have the goodness to explain what is meant by your not accepting a Vote?"

Mr. Adam submitted, "That the Witness could not explain what was meant by Thornton."

(Mr. Law.) "Is the Fact stated there correct, that Dowager Brummitt offered you a Plumper, and you did not know you should accept a Vote from him, but you must consider of it?"

"I do not know at this Time."

"Did you know of Brummitt offering you a Vote?"

"If you were to ask me without this Paper, whether Brummitt offered me a Vote, I should say I recollect nothing at all about it."

(By a Lord.) "Did any thing pass between you and Thornton, either before or after that Entry was made, that led you to affix a particular Meaning to it?"

"I apprehend the Meaning is as clear as Noon-day."

"That is not an Answer to the Question."

"I do not recollect."

(Mr. Law.) "What did you understand to be the Consequence of your not accepting a Vote to the Voter; should you have to pay him any thing, unless you accepted his Promise?"

"I believe not, certainly."

The List was delivered in, and read as follows:

"LIST of PROMISES, 1820.

1. Appleby, Josph, Liverpool.

2. Appleby, Thos, Retford.

3. Appleby, Robt.

Burton, Thos.

10. Baker, Thos, Worksop.

Batty, Thos, Retford.

Booth, Tom, Markham.

Buxton, Thos, Retford.

5. Bailey, George, Stone Hill.

Baker, Jno, jnr, Mansfield.

Barker, Jas. Manchester; says he is a Plumper.

Bingham, Geo. Clayworth.

Butler, John, Retford.

Baker, Wm, Mansfield (now Retford).

Bolton, Danl, London.

9. Bailey, Jas Jno, Retford.

Brown, Geo. Nottingham; at the Time a Pauper.

Banks, Jonn, Retford.

Banks, Josph; says he resides at Nottingham, but is now at Retford.

Banks, Jno, jnr, Retford.

Banks, Jno, snr.

Brown, Thos, Sheffield.

Brown, Wm, Retford.

Ball, Thos, Bottomsell; a Plumper.

Burton, Wm, Retford.

Buxton, Saml.

Benton, Jno, Mansfield.

Brummitt, Dowr, Nottingham; he offered a Plumper, but you did not know if you should accept of a Vote from him; you would consider it.

Brown, Robt, Manchester.

Burton, Jno, jnr, Retford.

Brown, Geo. Manchester.

Brown, Wm, London.

Brown, Jno, Retford.

Birch, Richd, Nottingham.

6. Bailey, Wm, Milton.

8. Bailey, Jas, Askam.

Baker, Jno, Retford.

7. Bailey, Jas, sr, West Retford.

Butler, Thos, Retford.

Burton, Jno, sr.

Brown, Saml.

4. Bailey, Josh.

Baker, Vale.

Brown, E. C.

Crookes, Jno, Wheatley.

Charlton, Robt, Stockport.

Crookes, Wm, Askam.

Cutler, Thos, Retford.

Crookes, Chas, Askam.

Clarke, Thos, Clarbro'.

Colton, Jas, N. Retford.

Cottam, Wm, Retford.

Cocking, Geo.

Cocking, Wm.

Cutliff, Robt, Southwell.

Cookson, Wm, Retford.

Clarke, Jas, Retford.

Clarke, Jno, Clarbro'.

Dawber, Jno, Retford.

Dixon, Thos, Glasgow.

Drake, Jno, Sound.

Drake, Fras, Do.

Denman, Jno, Taxford.

Dernie, Jas, Retford.

Deane, Jas, Do.

Dean, Js, jr.

Elvidge, Wm, Retford.

Evans, Thos, Sheffield.

Farley, Wm, Nottingham.

Freeman, Wm, Ranskill, now Misterton.

Golland, Edwd, London.

Golland, Wm, - Do. now at Retford, ill.

Grant, Wm, London.

Green, Robt, Birmingham.

Goodlad, Isaac, London.

Goodlad, Jno, - Do.

Giniver, Wm, Retford.

Hartshorn, Geo. London.

Hindley, Saml, Retford.

Hollis, Wm, Sheffield.

Hemsworth, Step. Retford.

Hemsworth, Wm, Taxford.

Hoult, Hy, Retford.

Hindley, Richard, Holme near Newark.

Hutchinson, Jno, Gringby Hill.

Hudson, Thos, Retford.

Hudson, Thos, R. H's Son, Do.; dead since the Election.

Hurst, Step. Staveley.

Hodson, Wm, Retford.

Hudson, Geo.

Hudson, Jno, Claworth.

Hindley, Rd, Manchester.

Haydock, Geo. Retford.

Hurst, Richd, Nottingham.

Hempsall, Thos, Little Markham.

Hoult, Jno, Retford.

Holiday, Thos.

Anty Hartshorne, London; a Plumper.

Johnson, Jno, Retford.

Jubb, Wt, Nottingham.

Jackson, Wm, Betford.

Kirkby, Jno, London.

Kirkby, Wm, Nottingham.

Leach, Wm, London.

Leadbeater, Wm, Retford.

Larance, Step.

Larance, Thos.

Leak, Edwd, London.

Leak, Thos, Nottingham.

Linigar, Jno, nr Sheffield.

Leadbeater, Westy, Retford.

Leadbeater, Geo. Norton, near Gainsbro'.

Marshall, Josh, Tuxford.

Mawer, Richd, Retford.

Markham, Edwd, Tick Hill.

Mellors, Wm, London.

Ogle, Edwd, Nottingham.

Palmer, Wm, Retford.

Pashley, Robt.

Peerpoint, Wm, Lincoln.

Pinder, Jno, Sheffield.

Richardson, Jno, jr, Retford.

Rushby, Robt, Norbriggs Toll Bar.

Raynor, Josh, Nottingham.

Richardson, Jno, Retford.

Slaney, Geo.

Savage, Jno. jnr.

Scott, Jno.

Scott, Benjn.

Slaney, Thos.

Slaney, Broxm.

Savage, Jno. snr.

Scott, Richd, Basford.

Scott, Jos. Retford.

Strawson, Wm, Liverpool.

Straw, Jno, Retford.

Taylor, Jno, London.

Tenney, Jno, Methwold, nr Brandon, Norfolk.

Trueman, Wm, Clumber.

Taylor, Wm, Mansfield.

Taylor, Wm, London.

Utley, Jno, Retford.

Windle, Jno.

Watmough, Robt.

Wright, Wm, Mattersey.

White, Jno, Hayton.

Worstley, Geo. Retford.

Wass, Matthw, Riston.

Willy, Thos, Retford.

Wakefield, Wm, Manchester.

Wake, Wm, Mansfield.

Watmough, Christr, London.

Walker, Jno, Mansfield.

Willy, Jno, Retford.

Whittam, Geo.

Cartwright, Wm, Retford.

Mason, John, Aldn.

Clarke, W. Do.

Fell, Revd Jno, Huntington.

"The following is a List of the independent Voters that have promised you, and not included in the other List:

Brownlow, Wm, London.

Booth, Revd Mr, Retford.

Haworth, W. R. London.

Wyldefield, Jers, Do.

Cottam, Aldn, Retford.

Benley, Do.

Thornton junr, Retford.

Marshall, - Do.

Ginever - Do.

Parker, Dr, - Do.

Thornton senr Do.

Meekly, - Do.

"Richard Scott is marked a Plumper in my Book.

"Is Strawson's Name Wm or Josh Jeffery?

"This List examined, and contains all the Names marked P. in my Book."

"Have the goodness to state the Christian Name of Mr. Ward, whom you have stated to be employed to pay the London Voters?"

"I think his Name was Henry Ward; but he had another Name that began with an N, and I do not recollect what it is."

"Do you know where he resides at present?"

"No."

"Where did you last see him?"

"I have not seen him for many Years."

"Have you corresponded with him?"

"No."

"Do you know where he is to be found?"

"No."

"Did you issue any and what Sum of Money to him for the Payment of the London Voters?"

"I certainly sent him some Money to pay London Voters with; I think Six or Seven hundred Pounds."

"Did you employ any other Person besides your Agent Thornton and Mr. Ward, for the Payment of Voters?"

"Yes."

"Have the goodness to state the Names of the Parties you so employed?"

"I believe I requested my Brother to take Means to pay some Voters who resided at a Distance from Retford?"

"What is your Brother's Christian Name?"

"Samuel."

"Where does that Gentleman reside?"

"At Derby."

"Is he there now, to the best of your Belief?"

"I believe so."

"How many Voters did you authorize him to pay?"

"I do not recollect; a very few."

"Will you be good enough to produce a Letter received by you, dated the 6th of February 1819, from Mr. Thornton, another of the 7th, another of the 17th, and another of the 27th of the same Month, in the same Year; is that of the 6th of February in Mr. Thornton's Handwriting?"

"Yes, it is."

"Was that received by you in due Course of Post after the Time it bears Date?"

"Yes."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

"Retford, 6th Feb. 1819.

"Dear Sir, "I have this Day received Four Covers containing Halves of Bank Notes to the Amount of £2,000. Shall pay due Respect to your Cautions in paying the Money. Mr. Crompton has just paid all the Freemen in and near Retford, according as they promised; for a single Vote has given 20 Guineas, and for a Plumper he has paid 40 Guineas.

"There is no Freeman in the List herewith sent but what is entitled to vote, except Mr. I. Fell, the Father of The Rev. Mr. Fell. The late Mr. Hartshorne's Name is not in the List; but I am informed that Mr. C. has sent his Widow 20 Guineas. There is dead, since the Election, Wm. Brown senr, of London, and Jno Richards of this Town. It is customary to pay the Widows the same as if their Husbands were now living, and Mr. C. has paid Richards' Widow 20 Guineas.

"The List inclosed contains the whole that promised you, both in Retford and all other Places; and I have marked against those whom I should suppose would not accept of any thing; and by which List appears 147 Voters to pay, amongst which are Four Plumpers. I think you will find my List correct.

"I remain, dear Sir,

"With the greatest Respect,

"Your faithful obedient humble Servant,

"Jno Thornton jun."

"What is the List referred to in that Letter; is that one of those already produced?"

"I believe it is one which has been produced."

"Is the Letter of the 7th February in Mr. Thornton's Handwriting?"

"I believe it is."

"The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

Retford, 7th February 1819.

"Dear Sir, I had not Time Yesterday to consider what you said respecting the Out-Voters; but, upon Consideration, don't you think it would not be better for you to remit me for the whole of the Voters, (except those in London, or any particular ones you would wish to get paid yourself;) and will thank you to send me a List of the Names of such as you wish to get paid yourself.

"Most of the Freemen at a Distance from Retford have Friends here, who they generally authorize to receive it; and I have had some Applications to that Effect since Mr. C. has paid.

"I have no Doubt but I can get the Money paid without their knowing from whom it came. You will see by the List I Yesterday sent, that £2,000 will not be sufficient to pay the Voters in Retford and the adjoining Towns, with Nottingham and Mansfield. As soon as it is known that any Part had got the Money, I should almost be pulled to Pieces by those who had not received any. On the opposite Side is a List of the Freemen residing in London at this Time that will expect the Money. Mr. C. has this Day sent a Person over to Nottingham, Mansfield, and other distant Places, to pay the Voters.

"I am, dear Sir,

"With the greatest Respect,

"Your very faithful and obedient humble Servant,

John Thornton jun.

John Taylor, No. 22, St Swithin's Lane, Lombard Street.
Geo. Slaney,

Wr Leach, No. 44, Gray's Inn Lane, Wilson Place. Danl Bolton, White Cross Street.

Edwd Golland, No. 32. York Street, Blackfriars Road.
Wm Golland,
Wm Brown senr, Widow, No 42, James Street, Oxford Street.
Wm Brown junr.

Wm Mellors, No. 38, Norfolk Street, Strand.

Wm Taylor, Patriot Street; works at the India House.

Crisr Watmough, Mulberry Court.

Anthy Hartshorne, a Plumper, Plumber Row, Whitechapel.

Edwd Leah, in the Foot Guards; was at the Time of canvassing at No. 2, Dolop Court, Broadway.

"If any of the above Addresses is not correct, any one of the rest will give Information."

"Have the goodness to produce the Letter of the 17th February 1819. Is that Mr. Thornton's Handwriting?"

"Yes, I believe it is."

"And the Inclosure?"

"Yes."

The Letter and Inclosure were delivered in, and read as follow:

Retford, 17th February 1819.

"Dear Sir,

"In my last I informed you that you had misunderstood me respecting the joint Bills betwixt you and Mr. C. The Amount of each that I sent you was for the Whole; you had only to pay Half of the Sums named. You will see by the inclosed Statement, that I shall have a Balance of £210 10s. 8d., instead of £134 2s. 4d., as stated in your Letter of the 8th Instant.

"I have not yet paid Clark any thing, as you should refer it to Mr. Mee. Josph Marshall - I only sent him for One Vote he promised you. When he was at work upon the Road, he afterwards wished to be a Plumper. I always avoided giving him a direct Answer, except that you did not wish to have any more than One Vote. I recollect mentioning the Circumstance to you at the Election.

"The Money has been paid to all the Freemen that I have had to pay in such a Way as it is not possible that any Proof can ever be made of its coming from you.

Mr. Fox has been with me respecting the Bill at the White Hart, the House where Mr. C. was at; and likewise a Bill of Jackson's, that lived in a Village about Two Miles off. I told him we had nothing to do with either of them. He said he should write to you upon the Subject. As for the Bill at the White Hart, I think Mr. C. would never suppose that you would have any thing to do with any Expence that he might incur at the House he was at. He never could think that you would expect him to pay any Part of any Expence that might be incurred at the House you was at. I have paid the whole of Mr. Dawber's Bill. The Reverend Mr. Fell, I did not know what to say respecting him, whether you could make him the Present; therefore I included him as one. Miss Cocking has spoke to me about her Bill. She says she has lost the Account of the Particulars that the Chair was dressed with; she leaves it with you to pay her what you think proper, as she says she cannot think of making out another Bill. £15, or even £12, would be quite sufficient; her Bill was charged £20 6s. Grant, I have no doubt, will in a little Time be ready to accede to any Sum you would wish to pay him. You omitted Mr. Dawber and Miss Cockings in your Statement of the 8th Instant, which says, I should have a Balance of £134; 2s. 4d. when all the Bills are paid except Grant's. The Receipts for the Bills I have paid I will send at any Time you require them.

"I have just received a Letter from Benton of Mansfield, saying he had received Mr. C's Money; and adds, that a Person was at Mansfield, Monday last, and paid the Freemen, as he supposes, for you, but the Person forgot to call upon him. He says he promised you both; and that you sent him a Basket of Game on the 14th of November. He says, had not you thought him a Friend, you would not have sent it. He says there must be some Mistake, and begs me to inquire into it.

"I am, dear Sir,

"With the greatest respect,

"Your ever faithful obedient humble Servant,

"John Thornton jun."

Dr. J. Thornton in Account with W.Evans, Esq. Cr.

1819. £ s. d. 1819. £ s. d.
Jan. 30. To Balance in Hand 128 1 4 Feb. 5. The whole Bill of Mr.Dawber's 45 11 2
Feb. 5. Bank Notes 2,000 0 0 16. ½ of Mr. Cuckson's Bill 0 10 3
12. - Cash from Folj.Bank 800 0 0 ½ Mrs. Cotton's Bill 61 19 3
½ Mrs. Ogle's Bill 43 0 0
To 121 Voters, including Mrs. Hartshorne for One Vote, and Thomas Ball a Plumper 2,562 0 0
Sundry Expences paying the Freemen in Retford, Nottingham, Mansfield, and other Places; and Postages of Letters, &c. 4 10 0
Balance in Hand 210 10 8
£ 2,928 1 4 £ 2,928 1 4

"I have the above Balance in my Hands, with the Exception of Ten Pounds that I lent to Grant on a Note which has not yet been brought into the Accounts. There is only Grant's Bill and Miss Cockings to pay."

"Did you allow to Mr. Thornton, in Account, that Sum of £2,562 for the 121 Voters, including Mrs. Hartshorne for One Vote, and Thomas Ball a Plumper?"

"I believe I did."

"Have you a Letter of the 27th February, in the same Year, beginning, "In the List of 147 Voters?"

"I have such a Letter, but it is not of that Day."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

"Dear Sir, "Retford, February 24th, 1819.

"Dear Sir,

"In the List of 147 Voters that I sent you, including Four Plumpers, I did not include Mrs. Hartshorne, which would make 148 and the Four Plumpers, and it would make 152 to pay. You deducted for The Rev. Mr. Fell, and One Vote from Josph Marshall; then there remained 150 to pay. Deduct Twenty-six Votes you intend getting paid yourself, and there remained for me to 124 Votes, which is the Number I have paid, amounting in the whole to £2,604 Os. 0d. You say you had included Mrs. Hartshorne. I think, if you will refer to your List, and compare it with mine, you will find Mrs. H. is omitted.

"I hope you have arranged about the Out-Voters that you intend paying yourself, as I have Applications from one or other of them every Day. Brown of Manchester is this Day come over here to apply for his.

"The Money has been paid in so secret a Manner, that I cannot give a direct Answer to their Applications. I have now a Balance in my Hands of £168 10s. 8d. Take off Grant's £10 that I lent him (which I shall take care to stop when his Bill is paid), and the Balance in my Hands is £158 10s. 8d. I paid Mr. Clark, for his Two Votes, this Day, (which is included in the above List,) according to Mr. Mee's Advice.

"I am, dear Sir,

"With the greatest Respect,

"Your obedient humble Servant,

"John Thornton jun."

"Have you a Letter of the 21st of April 1819?"

"I have."

"Is it in Mr. Thornton's Handwriting?"

"I believe it is."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

Dear Sir, "Retford, 21st April 1819.

"Dear Sir,

"In looking over the List of Voters that you inclosed me, I find you have omitted Wm Ginever, a Relation of Mr. Alderman Ginever's, who I have paid, which will make the Number of 126 Voters that I had paid, including Two Plumpers, which will make the Sum of £2,688 0s. 0d. You state the Balance in my Hands to be £70 1s. 8d. Take off £21 for Wm Ginever, omitted in your List, and Ten Pounds that I have lent to Grant, and the Balance in my Hands would be £39 1s. 8d.; which agrees with my Accounts. Taylor of Mansfield has been paid. I received the inclosed Fifty Pound Bank Note; and have this Day settled with Hurst of Stayley, and shall settle with Hindley of Holme as soon as possible. Mr. Mee I expect will be in Town on or about the 3d of May. I will send a regular Account of what I have paid, &c. by him; and any Explanation that may be required he will be able to give you.

"I am, dear Sir,

"With the greatest Respect,

"Your faithful obedient humble Servant,

"John Thornton junr.

"Mr. G. Kippax is in Town, and I expect he will call upon you."

(Addressed) "Wm. Evans Esq. M. P.

"181, Piccadilly,

"London."

"Have you a Letter of the 17th May 1819?"

"I have."

"Is that in Mr. Thornton's Handwriting?"

"I believe it is."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

"Retford, 17th May 1819.

"Dear Sir,

"I am glad that you found all the Accounts correct; it has always been my Study to keep them so. As to what you would give me for my Trouble, I am at a Loss to state what would remunerate me for it. For the Anxiety I had before the Election is more than you possibly could conceive; and the Time taken up both before and since was a great deal more than I expected. I am afraid I shall likewise lose a good deal of Money by trusting a many of the Burgesses in expectation of having it in my Power to stop when they were settled with; on account of their being paid in a secret Manner I had not the Opportunity of doing it. Mr. Mee was the Person who first spoke to me to undertake the Management for you. I refer myself to him to say what would be a fair Remuneration for the Trouble, &c. that I have been at. I shall always feel anxious to render you any Service that lays in my Power. Grant I have no doubt will be glad to accept the Money offered him. The Custom of £2 2s. to each of the Jurys you would, I suppose, wish me to pay as usual.

"I am, dear Sir,

"With the greatest Respect,

"Your ever faithful obedient humble Servant,

"John Thornton jun."

(Addressed) "William Evans Esq. M.P.

"No. 181, Piccadilly,

"London."

"Have you a Letter of the 1st of February 1818?"

"I have."

"Is that Thornton's Handwriting?"

"Yes; I believe it to be so."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

"Sir,

"I wrote you an Account that Mr. Fox gave a Dinner to Mr. Crompton's Friends on Thursday last. I thought it adviseable for me to go, as I had an Invitation, to prevent them from raising any Jealousy amongst the Burgesses, which I thought they would if I had not gone. There was nothing of any Consequence transpired when I closed my Letter; but after, Mr. Fox gave the Health of The Duke of Newcastle, and spoke so much in his Praise, that the Freemen began to be jealous that Mr. Crompton had come in the Duke's Interest; and I can assure you I never saw such Confusion in my Life. They had a great deal to do to explain themselves to the Satisfaction of the Freemen. Many said they felt themselves at liberty; and asked me if Mr. Evans would accept of Plumpers. I answered you only wanted Support for yourself; but if they offered you Plumpers I did not think you would refuse them. As for the Dinner on Monday, you saw all the Quarrelling there was; all was conducted in a peaceable and quiet Manner. The House was cleared before Eleven o'Clock; and all went away perfectly satisfied, except a little Grumbling about Mr. Kirke. I have not seen Mr. Kirke since I received yours, but I shall take care to deliver your Message. I gave your Respects to Mr. Kippax, and told him you would write to him soon.

"The Duke's Steward has been at Retford, to those who wished to be assured of his Grace's Wishes, and they are satisfied. Mr. Ginever and Mr. Marshall, I understand, either has or intends writing to you. You may now rely upon the whole of the Duke's Friends giving you their Support. Mr. Aldn Bailey told me this Morning he was satisfied, and should give you his Support. I have also got the Promise of Mr. Jon n Banks of Retford (his Father and Two Brothers promised you upon your Canvass), George Bailey of Askham, and also by their Father, Brocksholm Slaney, for his Two Sons in London, John Taylor and George Slaney. Raynor and Birch of Nottingham also promised before they left Retford Yesterday. It is the Sun Paper which you are to send, as per my last Letter; Mr. Crompton sends the Times Paper. Mr. Crompton has subscribed Five Guineas to the National School; he has also subscribed to the Sick Clubs in the Town. That you may consider of, as it is not immediately required.

"I remain, Sir,

"With the greatest Respect,

"Your obedient humble Servant,

"Retford "John Thornton jun.

"Retford,

"7th Feb. 1818.

"If any thing of consequence transpires, I shall take care to inform you."

(Addressed) "William Evans Esq.

"Darley, near Derby."

"Have you a Letter dated the 1st of March 1820?"

"I have."

"Is that Mr. Thornton's Handwriting?"

"Yes."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

"Retford, 1st March 1820.

"Dear Sir,

"Parliament being now dissolved; and if the Writs left London this Day, I don't think it possible that the Election can take place before Tuesday next. The Mail from London does not reach Nottingham until after Two o'Clock the next Day; therefore the Precept will hardly get here in Time for the Election to be proclaimed the same Day; if it does, the Election may be on Monday. I think it would be advisable for you not to reach here before Sunday Evening, and that rather late. Mr. Crompton, I believe, intends doing the same. I have had some Conversation with Mr. Fox, respecting treating, if it cannot be avoided, upon the same Plan as you proposed; but he seems quite averse to it. I understood from him that Mr. Foljambe will write to you respecting the Election Dinner, &c.

"I think you had better take a split Vote from Brummitt; and you cannot well refuse any of the other Nottingham Voters that have promised."

"I am, dear Sir,

"Your obedient humble Servant,

"J. Thornton junr.

"I did not tell Mr. Fox any thing respecting your Brother sending a Person over."

(Addressed) "William Evans Esq.

"Post Office,

"Stamford."

"Have you a Letter dated the 10th of May 1820?"

"I have."

"Is that Mr. Thornton's Handwriting?"

"Yes, it is."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

"Retford, 10th May 1820.

"Dear Sir,

"I have this Day received by the Mail a Box containing 150 Halves of Bank Notes for £20 each.

"You may rely upon the greatest Secrecy being observed. I suppose you mean to do the same as the last Time. If you settle with those in London, Manchester or any other Places, be so good as to let me have a List of them.

"I am, dear Sir,

"With the greatest Respect,

"Your obedient humble Servant,

"J. Thornton jun."

(Addressed) "William Evans Esq. M.P.

"No. 24, Charles Street,

"St. James's Square,

"London."

"12th May. Answered; and sent List of all London Voters, and of Three Manchester, and Green of Birmingham."

"Is that at the Bottom a Memorandum you made on the Letter yourself at the Time?"

"Yes."

"Looking at that, can you say whether you did send a List in the Terms stated?"

"Yes; I have no doubt I sent a Letter corresponding with that Memorandum."

"Have you a Letter dated the 16th of May 1820?"

"I have."

"Is that in Mr. Thornton's Handwriting?"

"It is."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

"Retford, May 16, 1820.

"Dear Sir,

"All in Retford have been settled with in a Way that they do not know from whom they received it. The late Thomas Hudson, R. H's Son, in the List, I did not think proper to pay any thing, until I have your Sanction. He has a Father, Mother, and Brothers and Sisters. His Father is a Man of some Property. He has some other Sons that will be Freemen. What would you have me do respecting it?

"William Golland of London is still at Retford, very ill, and not likely to recover.

"I do not intend settling any thing with Matthew Wass of Kirton, for Reasons you know.

"Thomas Ball of Bottomsell is down in the List a Plumper. I suppose you mean him to be as such, as he promised it. If you recollect, I told you I advised him to give One to Mr. C., which he would not accept.

"I should certainly not take Dowr Brummitt of Nottingham as a Plumper, but I think it would be advisable to take him as a single One.

"George Brown of Nottingham (I believe you said you had let him have something) promised, but at the same Time was a Pauper, and is down in the List as such. He called upon me this Day, to say he had left Nottingham. Is any thing to be done respecting him, as he is not entitled to any thing?

"John Dixon, residing in this Town, Brother to Thomas Dixon of Glasgow, spoke to me (I gave no direct Answer), saying he had Authority from his Brother to receive any thing that his Brother might be entitled to. You perhaps will recollect him saying something to you on this Subject before the Election. What would you have me do respecting him?

"Address to Robert Green, Scale Beam Maker, No. 19, Balsall Street, Birmingham, I believe will be correct.

"I shall be obliged by your Answer as soon as possible, as Mr. C. has had a Person here giving Notes, signed, from a Yorkshire Friend, and is now gone to the distant Towns. I expect my Friend here again, for the same Purpose, in a Day or two.

"The Reverend Mr. Fell I suppose is to be the same as the last Time.

"I received the inclosed Note from Mrs. Grant, but do not intend answering it unless you wish it.

"I remain, dear Sir,

"With the greatest Respect,

"Your obedient humble Servant,

"J. Thornton jun."

(Addressed) "William Evans Esq. M. P.

"Bank,

"Derby."

"Have you a Letter of the 27th of May 1820?"

"I have."

"Is that also in Thornton's Handwriting?"

"It is."

The same was delivered in, and read as follows:

"Retford, May 27, 1820.

"Dear Sir,

"I received yours, inclosing Lord Sidmouth's Answer to the Petition you presented respecting Storrs. The Petitioners are much obliged to you for the Trouble you have taken respecting it.

"I have settled with all except Three, that is at a Distance. I have just got their Address, and shall settle with them immediately, by Post. Thomas Hudson, R. H's Son, died since the Election, and I understand his Father has received from the Yorkshire Friend. I suppose he must be done the same; but shall wait your Answer. I only returned Home Yesterday with the Friend I got to settle with those in the Villages, Nottingham, Mansfield, Sheffield, &c. I saw them all settled with, without them seeing me. I will write the Particulars in a few Days; and I remain,

"Dear Sir,

"Your obedient humble Servant,

"J. Thornton jun."

(Addressed) "William Evans Esq. M. P.

"No. 24, Charles Street,

"St. James's Square,

"London."

"Can you state where Mr. Ward resided at the Time you employed him to pay the London Voters?"

"You say I employed him. He resided, I believe, in a Street going out of Cheapside; a small Street."

"What was he by Profession?"

"He was a Merchant."

"Can you state the Street, or whether he had any Partner?"

"I think he had no Partner."

"What was the Nature of his Commercial Transactions?"

"I think he was a Wholesale Druggist, and also had Foreign Business-a Commission Business, and that he used to have Goods on Commission."

(By a Lord.) "What was the Name of the Street?"

"I ought to know, but it does not occur to me at this Moment."

"How far was it from St. Paul's; on which Side of the Way?"

"It was on the Right Hand Side."

"Was that Gentleman a Stranger to you?"

"No; he was not a Stranger to me."

"Was that the only Occasion on which you engaged his Assistance and Service?"

"The only Occasion on which I engaged his Assistance and Service in any thing relating to Retford. I believe I asked him to canvass the Retford Voters, before that; I asked him to see some of them, when first I went to Retford."

"Did you employ him on both Elections, or only one?"

"One."

"Whom did you employ to pay the London Voters on the other Election?"

"I believe I employed a Friend of mine, whose Name is Ewbank."

"What is his Christian Name?"

"Henry."

"Where does he reside?"

"He has an Office in Mincing Lane; he resides in Surrey."

"Which Election was that; in 1818 or 1820?"

"I think in 1820."

"What Sum of Money did you issue to Mr. Ewbank for the Payment of Voters?"

"I do not know."

"How many Voters, to the best of your Recollection, did you engage him to pay; were there as many as Ten or a Dozen?"

"I really do not know. I should think probably about the same Number as the previous Election."

"What Sum did you direct him to pay each Voter?"

"The same Sum, I have no doubt."

"Does that mean the Twenty Guineas?"

"Yes."

"Can you mention any other Gentleman, besides Mr. Ewbank and Mr. Ward, whose Services you engaged for the Payment of Voters in London or elsewhere?"

(Mr. Adam.) "What Paper is that in your Hand; was it made at the Time of the Election?"

"No."

(Mr. Law.) "Was there no other Person whom you employed to pay Voters, in London or elsewhere, besides Thornton, Ewbank and Ward?"

"I think there was a Gentleman who resided near Sheffield, who is now dead."

"What was his Name?"

"Shore."

"You do not remember any others?"

"No."

"Were you a Candidate for Retford after the Election of 1820?"

"No."

"At the Elections of 1818 and 1820, there was no Opposition from any Third Candidate?"

"No."

"Have the goodness to state your Reason for not again presenting yourself at Retford?"

"My Reason for not again standing for Retford was, that I had some Doubts of this Practice."

"Will you explain what you mean by your having some Doubts of the Practice?"

"It will be very difficult perhaps entirely to defend the Practice; but it was notorious, and very well known, that no Person would be elected, or had been elected for many Parliaments, on other Principles."

"Mr. Adam submitted this was no Answer to the Question.

"Then my Answer was, that after a Consideration of that Case, which I had not made before, and a Consultation with a particular Friend of mine, whether it was allowable, whether I could rightly do such a Thing or not, I decided that I should not do it; and therefore I did not stand for that Place."

"(By a Lord.) "Was it necessary to consult with a Friend for the Purpose of coming to such a Conclusion?"

"Perhaps your Lordship will not insist upon an Answer to that Question."

"Was then your Reason your Dislike to the Practice, and the Impression that you could not obtain an Election in any other Manner, that which made you give it up?"

"I had no other Reason; for I did not apprehend I could obtain a Seat at less Expence; nor did I expect that I should have any Opposition if I stood for Retford. "I did not communicate my Intention to the People at Retford; and I never gave them any Reason, because I apprehended I could not, with any Propriety, give them that Reason; and I did not choose to give them any Reason that was not the real one."

The Witness was directed to withdraw.

The Counsel were directed to withdraw.

"Ordered, That the further Consideration and Second Reading of the said Bill be put off to Monday next; and that the Lords be summoned.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Martis, quartum diem instantis Maii, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.