House of Lords Journal Volume 64
6 December 1831

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 64: 6 December 1831', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 64: 1831-1832, pp. 3-7. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=19241 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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JOURNALS OF THE HOUSE OF LORDS.

Anno 2° Gulielmi Quarti.

DIE Martis, 6° Decembris 1831, Annoque Regni Serenissimi Domini Nostri Gulielmi Quarti, Dei Gratiâ, Britanniarum Regis, Fidei Defensoris, Secundo; in quem Diem hæc Secunda Sessio Parliamenti, per seperalia Adjournamenta et per Prorogationem continuata fuerat, in Superiori Domo Parliamenti Britanniarum apud Westmonaster. convenere, Domini tam Spirituales quam Temporales, quorum Nomina subscribuntur, et præsentes fuerunt:

REX.

Dux Cumberland.
Dux Sussex.
Archiep. Cantuar.
Ds. Brougham
& Vaux,
Cancellarius.
Epus. Londinen.
Epus. Lincoln.
Epus. Cicestrien.
Epus. Laonen, &c.
-
Vicecom. Sydney.
Vicecom. Hood.
Vicecom. Sidmouth.
Vicecom. Lake.
Vicecom. Gordon.
Vicecom. Goderich.
Ds. Wellesley, Senescallus.
Ds. Melbourne, Unus PrimariorumSecretariorum.
Ds. Dacre.
Ds. Stourton.
Ds. Saye & Sele.
Ds. Arundell of Wardour.
Ds. Dormer.
Ds. Teynham.
Ds. Stafford.
Ds. Byron.
Ds. Gower.
Ds. Forbes.
Ds. King.
Ds. Monson.
Ds. Montfort.
Ds. Ponsonby.
Ds. Holland.
Ds. Ducie.
Ds. Sundridge & Hamilton.
Ds. Foley.
Ds. Grantley.
Ds. Sherborne.
Ds. Montagu.
Ds. Auckland.
Ds. Lyttelton.
Ds. Mendip.
Ds. Selsey.
Ds. Yarborough.
Ds. Lilford.
Ds. Dunalley.
Ds. Redesdale.
Ds. Ellenborough.
Ds. Lynedoch.
Ds. Hill.
Ds. Ravensworth.
Ds. Bexley.
Ds. Penshurst.
Ds. Somerhill.
Ds. Farnborough.
Ds. Wharncliffe.
Ds. Seaford.
Ds. Lyndhurst.
Ds. Melros.
Ds. Stuart de Rothesay.
Ds. Clanwilliam.
Ds. Skelmersdale.
Ds. Wynford.
Ds. Fingall.
Ds. Sefton.
Ds. Clements.
Ds. Rossie.
Ds. Dover.
Ds. Kenlis.
Ds. Chaworth.
Ds. Oakley.
Ds. Poltimore.
Ds. Segrave.
Ds. Templemore.
Ds. Dinorben.
Ds. Cloncurry.
March. Lansdowne, Præses.
Ds. Durham, C. P. S.
Dux Norfolk, Marescallus.
Dux Devonshire, Camerarius.
Dux Richmond.
Dux Grafton.
Dux Beaufort.
Dux St. Albans.
Dux Leeds.
Dux Bedford.
Dux Buckingham & Chandos.
March. Winchester.
March. Queensberry.
March. Salisbury.
March. Thomond.
March. Camden.
March. Cholmondeley.
March. Westmeath.
March. Cleveland.
March. Ailsa.
Comes Shrewsbury.
Comes Denbigh.
Comes Westmorland.
Comes Winchilsea & Nottingham.
Comes Thanet.
Comes Essex.
Comes Carlisle.
Comes Shaftesbury.
Comes Albemarle.
Comes Coventry.
Comes Jersey.
Comes Oxford & Mortimer.
Comes Tankerville.
Comes Cowper.
Comes Pomfret.
Comes De Lawarr.
Comes Radnor.
Comes Bathurst.
Comes Clarendon.
Comes Digby.
Comes Beverley.
Comes Mansfield.
Comes Carnarvon.
Comes Wicklow.
Comes Rosslyn.
Comes Onslow.
Comes Wilton.
Comes Gosford.
Comes Orford.
Comes Grey.
Comes Harrowby.
Comes Mulgrave.
Comes Verulam.
Comes Eldon.
Comes Amherst.
Comes Cawdor.
Comes Munster.
Comes Burlington.
Comes Camperdown.
Comes Lichfield.

The King present:

His Majesty being seated on the Throne, adorned with His Crown and Regal Ornaments, and attended by His Officers of State, (the Lords being in their Robes,) commanded the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, through the Deputy Lord Great Chamberlain, to let the Commons know, "It is His Majesty's Pleasure they attend Him immediately in this House."

Who being come, with their Speaker;

His Majesty was pleased to speak as follows:

His Majesty's Speech.

"My Lords, and Gentlemen,

"I have called you together, that you may resume, without further Delay, the important Duties, to which the Circumstances of the Times require your immediate Attention; and I sincerely regret the Inconvenience, which, I am well aware, you must experience, from so early a Renewal of your Labours, after the short Interval allowed you for Repose from the Fatigues of the last Session.

"I feel it to be My Duty, in the first place, to recommend, to your most careful Consideration, the Measures, which will be proposed to you, for a Reform in the Commons House of Parliament; a speedy and satisfactory Settlement of this Question, becomes daily of more pressing Importance, to the Security of the State, and to the Contentment and Welfare of My People.

"I deeply lament the Distress, which still prevails, in many Parts of My Dominions; and for which the Preservation of Peace, both at Home and Abroad, will, under the Blessing of Divine Providence, afford the best and most effectual Remedy. I feel assured of your Disposition to adopt any practicable Measures, which you will always find Me ready, and anxious, to assist, both for removing the Causes, and mitigating the Effects, of the Want of Employment, which the Embarrassments of Commerce, and the consequent Interruption of the Pursuits of Industry, have occasioned.

"It is with great Regret that I have observed the Existence of a Disease at Sunderland, similar in its Appearance and Character, to that which has existed in many Parts of Europe.

"Whether it is indigenous, or has been imported from Abroad, is a Question involved in much Uncertainty; but its Progress has neither been so extensive, nor so fatal, as on the Continent. It is not, however, the less necessary to use every Precaution against the further Extension of this Malady; and the Measures, recommended by those who have had the best Opportunities of observing it, as most effectual for this Purpose, have been adopted.

"In Parts of Ireland, a systematic Opposition has been made to the Payment of Tithes, attended, in some Instances, with afflicting Results; and it will be one of your first Duties to inquire, whether it may not be possible to effect Improvements in the Laws respecting this Subject, which may afford the necessary Protection to the Established Church, and, at the same Time, remove the present Causes of Complaint.

"But in this, and in every other Question affecting Ireland, it is, above all Things, necessary to look to the best Means of securing internal Peace and Order; which alone seem wanting to raise a Country, blessed by Providence with so many natural Advantages, to a State of the greatest Prosperity.

"The Conduct of the Portuguese Government, and the repeated Injuries to which My Subjects have been exposed, have prevented a Renewal of My Diplomatic Relations with that Kingdom. The State of a Country, so long united with this, by the Ties of the most intimate Alliance, must necessarily be to Me an Object of the deepest Interest. The Return to Europe of the elder Branch of the illustrious House of Braganza, and the Dangers of a disputed Succession, will require My most vigilant Attention to Events, by which not only the Safety of Portugal, but the general Interests of Europe, may be affected.

"The Arrangement, which I announced to you at the Close of the last Session, for the Separation of the States of Holland and Belgium, has been followed by a Treaty between the Five Powers and The King of the Belgians, which I have directed to be laid before you, as soon as the Ratifications shall have been exchanged.

"A similar Treaty has not yet been agreed to by The King of the Netherlands; but, I trust, the Period is not distant, when that Sovereign will see the Necessity of acceding to an Arrangement, in which the Plenipotentiaries of the Five Powers have unanimously concurred, and which has been framed with the most careful and impartial Attention to all the Interests concerned.

"I have the Satisfaction to inform you, that I have concluded with The King of the French a Convention, which I have directed to be laid before you, the Object of which is the effectual Suppression of the African Slave Trade.

"This Convention, having for its Basis the Concession of reciprocal Rights, to be mutually exercised in specified Latitudes, and Places, will, I trust, enable the Naval Forces of the Two Countries, by their combined Efforts, to accomplish an Object, which is felt by both to be so important to the Interests of Humanity.

"Regarding the State of Europe generally, the friendly Assurances which I receive from Foreign Powers, and the Union which subsists between Me and My Allies, inspire Me with a confident Hope that Peace will not be interrupted.

"Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

"I have directed the Estimates for the ensuing Year to be prepared, and they will, in due Time, be laid before you. I will take care that they shall be formed with the strictest Regard to Economy, and I trust to your Wisdom and Patriotism, to make such Provision, as may be required, for the Public Service.

"My Lords, and Gentlemen,

"The Scenes of Violence and Outrage, which have occurred in the City of Bristol, and in some other Places, have caused Me the deepest Affliction.

"The Authority of the Laws must be vindicated by the Punishment of Offences, which have produced so extensive a Destruction of Property, and so melancholy a Loss of Life; but I think it right to direct your Attention to the best Means of improving the Municipal Police of the Kingdom, for the more effectual Protection of the Public Peace, against the Recurrence of similar Commotions.

"Sincerely attached to our free Constitution, I never can sanction any Interference with the legitimate Exercise of those Rights, which secure to My People the Privilege of discussing, and making known their Grievances; but, in respecting these Rights, it is also My Duty to prevent Combinations, under whatever Pretext, which in their Form and Character are incompatible with all regular Government, and are equally opposed to the Spirit and to the Provisions of the Law; and I know that I shall not appeal in vain to My faithful Subjects, to second My determined Resolution, to repress all illegal Proceedings, by which the Peace and Security of My Dominions may be endangered."

Then His Majesty was pleased to retire;

And the Commons withdrew.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure, to unrobe.

The House was resumed.

PRAYERS.

Bp. Killaloe takes the Oaths.

This Day Edmond Lord Bishop of Killaloe and Kilfenora took the Oaths, and also took and subscribed the Oath of Abjuration, pursuant to the Statutes.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure.

The House was resumed.

Bill pro formâ read.

Hodie 1a vice lecta est Billa, intituled, "An Act for the better regulating Select Vestries."

His Majesty's Speech reported:

The Lord Chancellor reported His Majesty's Speech:

And the same being read by the Clerk;

Order for Address thereon:

Ordered, Nemine Dissentiente, That an humble Address be presented to His Majesty, to return to His Majesty our humble Thanks for His Majesty's most gracious Speech.

To assure His Majesty, that we feel the Necessity which the Circumstances of the Times have imposed upon His Majesty of calling us together, and that we submit, without Regret, to the Inconvenience which we may individually experience from so early a Renewal of our Duties.

To assure His Majesty, that we receive with all Humility and Respect His Majesty's gracious Recommendation, that we should enter upon the careful Consideration of the Measures, which will be proposed to us, for a Reform in the Commons House of Parliament; and that we feel convinced that a speedy and satisfactory Settlement of this Question becomes daily of more pressing Importance to the Security of the State, and to the Contentment and Welfare of the People.

To express to His Majesty our Concern at the Distress which still prevails in many Parts of His Majesty's Dominions, and for which we feel that the Preservation of Peace, both at Home and Abroad, will, under the Blessing of Divine Providence, afford the best and most effectual Remedy; and to express to His Majesty our Readiness to adopt any practicable Measures, in which we are confident His Majesty will always be anxious to assist, for removing the Causes, and mitigating the Effects, of the Want of Employment, which the Embarrassments of Commerce, and the consequent Interruption of the Pursuits of Industry, have occasioned.

To express our Participation in the Concern which His Majesty has felt in observing the Existence of a Disease at Sunderland, similar in its Appearance and Character to that which has prevailed in many Parts of Europe. That it affords some Consolation to observe, that its Ravages have neither been so extensive, nor so fatal, as on the Continent; but that it is not the less necessary to use every Precaution against the further Extension of this Malady; and we learn with Satisfaction that the Measures recommended by those who have had the best Opportunity of observing it, as most effectual for this Purpose, have been adopted.

To express to His Majesty our deep Regret that a systematic Opposition has been made in Parts of Ireland to the Payment of Tithes, attended, in some Instances, with afflicting Results; and to assure His Majesty that it will be one of our first Duties to inquire, whether it may not be possible to effect Improvements in the Laws respecting this Subject, which may afford the necessary Protection to the Established Church, and, at the same Time, remove the present Causes of Complaint; but we feel that in this, and in every other Question affecting Ireland, it is, above all Things, necessary to look at the best Means of securing internal Peace and Order; which alone seem wanting to raise a Country, blessed by Providence with so many natural Advantages, to a State of the greatest Prosperity.

To express to His Majesty our Regret that the Conduct of the Portuguese Government, and the repeated Injuries to which His Majesty's Subjects have been exposed, have prevented a Renewal of His Majesty's Diplomatic Relations with that Kingdom; and we beg to express the deep Interest which, with His Majesty, we feel in the State of a Country, so long united with this by the Ties of the most intimate Alliance.

To assure His Majesty that we rely with Confidence on His Majesty's vigilant Attention to all Events by which not only the Safety of Portugal, but the general Interests of Europe, may be affected.

To express to His Majesty our Satisfaction that the Arrangement for the Separation of the States of Holland and Belgium has been followed by a Treaty between the Five Powers and The King of the Belgians; and to thank His Majesty for having directed a Copy of this Treaty to be laid before us, as soon as the Ratifications shall have been exchanged.

To express our Hope that though a similar Treaty has not yet been agreed to by The King of the Netherlands, that the Period is not distant, when that Sovereign will see the Necessity of acceding to an Arrangement, in which the Plenipotentiaries of the Five Powers have unanimously concurred, and which has been framed with the most careful and impartial Attention to all the Interests concerned.

To express to His Majesty the sincere Pleasure with which we have received His Majesty's gracious Communication, that a Convention has been concluded with The King of the French, having for its Object the effectual Suppression of the African Slave Trade; and to thank His Majesty for having directed a Copy of it to be laid before us.

To express to His Majesty our confident Hope that this Convention, having for its Basis the Concession of reciprocal Rights, to be mutually exercised in specified Latitudes and Places, will enable the Naval Forces of the Two Countries to accomplish, by their combined Efforts, an Object which is felt by both to be so important to the Interests of Humanity.

To express to His Majesty our Satisfaction that the friendly Assurances which His Majesty receives from Foreign Powers, and the Union which subsists between His Majesty and His Allies, inspire His Majesty with a confident Hope that the Peace of Europe will not be interrupted.

To assure His Majesty that it is to us, as it is to His Majesty, a Cause of the deepest Affliction, that Scenes of Violence and Outrage have occurred in Bristol, and in some other Places: The Authority of the Laws must be vindicated by the Punishment of Offences, which have produced so extensive a Destruction of Property, and so melancholy a Loss of Life; that we will, in Obedience to His Majesty's Recommendation, direct our Attention to the best Means of improving the Municipal Police of the Kingdom, for the more effectual Protection of the Public Peace, against the Recurrence of similar Commotions.

To express our firm Reliance on His Majesty's sincere Attachment to our free Constitution; our Confidence that His Majesty never can sanction any Interference with the legitimate Exercise of those Rights, which secure to the People the Privilege of discussing, and making known their Grievances; and that, in respecting those Rights, His Majesty will prevent Combinations, under whatever Pretext, which in their Form and Character are incompatible with all regular Government, and are equally opposed to the Spirit and to the Provisions of the Law; and to assure His Majesty that He will never appeal in vain to His faithful Subjects, to second His determined Resolution, to repress all illegal Proceedings, by which the Peace and Security of His Majesty's Dominions may be endangered.

Com ee to prepare the Address:

Then the Lords following were appointed a Committee to prepare an Address pursuant thereto:

V. Sydney.
V. Goderich.
L. Steward.
L. Stafford.
L. Holland.
L. Auckland.
L. Lyttelton.
L. Clanwilliam.
L. Sefton.
L. Dover.
L. Segrave.
L. Cloncurry.
L. Abp. Canterbury.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Norfolk.
L. Chamberlain.
D. Richmond.
M. Salisbury.
M. Cholmondeley.
M. Westmeath.
M. Ailsa.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Wilton.
E. Grey.
E. Burlington.
E. Camperdown.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet immediately, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

The House was adjourned during Pleasure; and the Committee withdrew, to prepare the Address.

After some Time, the House was resumed.

Address reported & agreed to.

And The Earl of Camperdown reported from the Committee an Address drawn by them as follows; (vizt.)

"Most Gracious Sovereign,

"We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, in Parliament assembled, beg leave to approach Your Majesty with our humble Thanks for Your Majesty's most gracious Speech.

"We assure Your Majesty that we feel the Necessity which the Circumstances of the Times have imposed upon Your Majesty of calling us together, and we submit, without Regret, to the Inconvenience which we may individually experience from so early a Renewal of our Duties.

"We receive with all Humility and Respect Your Majesty's gracious Recommendation, that we should enter upon the careful Consideration of the Measures, which will be proposed to us, for a Reform in the Commons House of Parliament; and we feel convinced that a speedy and satisfactory Settlement of this Question, becomes daily of more pressing Importance to the Security of the State, and to the Contentment and Welfare of the People.

"Permit us to express to Your Majesty our Concern at the Distress which still prevails in many Parts of Your Majesty's Dominions, and for which we feel that the Preservation of Peace, both at Home and Abroad, will, under the Blessing of Divine Providence, afford the best and most effectual Remedy; and to express to Your Majesty our Readiness to adopt any practicable Measures, in which we are confident Your Majesty will always be anxious to assist, for removing the Causes, and mitigating the Effects, of the Want of Employment, which the Embarrassments of Commerce, and the consequent Interruption of the Pursuits of Industry, have occasioned.

"We beg to express our Participation in the Concern which Your Majesty has felt in observing the Existence of a Disease at Sunderland, similar in its Appearance and Character to that which has prevailed in many Parts of Europe; that it affords some Consolation to observe, that its Ravages have neither been so extensive, nor so fatal, as on the Continent; but that it is not the less necessary to use every Precaution against the further Extension of this Malady; and we learn with Satisfaction that the Measures recommended by those who have had the best Opportunity of observing it, as most effectual for this Purpose, have been adopted.

"We feel deep Regret that a systematic Opposition has been made in Parts of Ireland to the Payment of Tithes, attended, in some Instances, with afflicting Results; and we assure Your Majesty that it will be one of our first Duties to inquire, whether it may not be possible to effect Improvements in the Laws respecting this Subject, which may afford the necessary Protection to the Established Church, and, at the same Time, remove the present Causes of Complaint; but we feel that in this, and in every other Question affecting Ireland, it is, above all Things, necessary to look at the best Means of securing internal Peace and Order; which alone seem wanting to raise a Country, blessed by Providence with so many natural Advantages, to a State of the greatest Prosperity.

"We regret that the Conduct of the Portuguese Government, and the repeated Injuries to which Your Majesty's Subjects have been exposed, have prevented a Renewal of Your Majesty's Diplomatic Relations with that Kingdom; and we beg to express the deep Interest which, with Your Majesty, we feel in the State of a Country, so long united with this by the Ties of the most intimate Alliance.

"We rely with Confidence on Your Majesty's vigilant Attention to all Events by which not only the Safety of Portugal, but the general Interests of Europe, may be affected.

"We desire to express our Thanks to Your Majesty for the Information that a Treaty has been concluded between the Five Powers and The King of the Belgians, for the Arrangement of the Separation of the States of Holland and Belgium; and that Your Majesty has been graciously pleased to give Directions that a Copy of this Treaty shall be laid before us, as soon as the Ratifications shall have been exchanged: And we humbly thank Your Majesty for communicating to us the Hopes which Your Majesty entertains, that though a similar Treaty has not yet been agreed to by The King of the Netherlands, that the Period is not distant, when that Sovereign will see the Necessity of acceding to an Arrangement, in which the Plenipotentiaries of the Five Powers have unanimously concurred, and which, we are assured by Your Majesty, has been framed with the most careful and impartial Attention to all the Interests concerned.

"We have received with sincere Pleasure Your Majesty's gracious Communication, that a Convention has been concluded with The King of the French, having for its Object the effectual Suppression of the African Slave Trade; and we humbly thank Your Majesty for having directed a Copy of it to be laid before us.

"We entertain a confident Hope that this Convention, having for its Basis the Concession of reciprocal Rights, to be mutually exercised in specified Latitudes and Places, will enable the Naval Forces of the Two Countries to accomplish, by their combined Efforts, an Object which is felt by both to be so important to the Interests of Humanity.

"We learn with great Satisfaction that the friendly Assurances which Your Majesty receives from Foreign Powers, and the Union which subsists between Your Majesty and Your Allies, inspire Your Majesty with a confident Hope that the Peace of Europe will not be interrupted.

"We assure Your Majesty that it is to us, as it is to Your Majesty, a Cause of the deepest Affliction, that Scenes of Violence and Outrage have occured in Bristol, and in some other Places; and we feel the Necessity of vindicating the Authority of the Laws by the Punishment of Offences, which have produced so extensive a Destruction of Property, and so melancholy a Loss of Life; and we will, in Obedience to Your Majesty's Recommendation, direct our Attention to the best Means of improving the Municipal Police of the Kingdom, for the more effectual Protection of the Public Peace, against the Recurrence of similar Commotions.

"We entertain a firm Reliance on Your Majesty's sincere Attachment to our free Constitution, and the fullest Confidence that Your Majesty never can sanction any Interference with the legitimate Exercise of those Rights, which secure to the People the Privilege of discussing, and making known their Grievances; and that, in respecting those Rights, Your Majesty will prevent Combinations, under whatever Pretext, which in their Form and Character are incompatible with all regular Government, and are equally opposed to the Spirit and to the Provisions of the Law; and we assure Your Majesty that Your Majesty will never appeal in vain to Your faithful Subjects, to second Your Majesty's determined Resolution, to repress all illegal Proceedings, by which the Peace and Security of Your Majesty's Dominions may be endangered."

Which Address, being read by the Clerk, was agreed to by the House.

Ordered, That the said Address be presented to His Majesty by the Whole House.

Ordered, That the Lords with White Staves do wait on His Majesty, humbly to know what Time His Majesty will please to appoint to be attended with the said Address.

E. of Shaftesbury to take the Chair in all Com ees.

It was moved, "That the several Resolutions of the 23d of July 1800, touching the Nomination of a Lord to take the Chair of Committees of this House at the Commencement of every Session, be now read."

The same were accordingly read by the Clerk.

Resolved, Nemine Dissentiente, That The Earl of Shaftesbury be appointed to take the Chair in all Committees of this House, for this Session.

Resolved, Nemine Dissentiente, That The Earl of Shaftesbury do take the Chair in all Committees of the Whole House, unless where it shall have been otherwise directed by this House.

Resolved, Nemine Dissentiente, That The Earl of Shaftesbury do also take the Chair in all Committees upon Private Bills, and other Matters, unless where it shall have been otherwise directed by this House.

Com ee for Privileges.

Ordered, That all the Lords present this Day be appointed a Committee to consider of the Orders and Customs of this House, and Privileges of Parliament, and of the Peers of Great Britain and Ireland, and Lords of Parliament:

Their Lordships, or any Seven of them, to meet on Monday next, at Ten o'Clock in the Forenoon, in the House of Peers, and every Monday after; and to adjourn as they please.

Com ee for the Journals.

Ordered, That all the Lords present this Day be appointed a Sub-Committee to consider of the Orders and Customs of this House, and Privileges of the Peers of Great Britain and Ireland, and Lords of Parliament; and to peruse and perfect the Journals of this and former Sessions of Parliament:

Their Lordships, or any Three of them, to meet when, where, and as often as they please.

Stoppages in the Streets, Order to prevent.

The House taking notice, "That there is such an Interruption, by Hackney Coaches, Carts and Drays, in the Streets and Passages leading to this House, that the Lords and others are frequently hindered from coming thereto:"

It is thereupon Ordered, by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal in Parliament assembled, That the High Steward of the City of Westminster, or his Deputy, together with the Justices of the Peace of the said City shall, by their strict Care and Directions to the Constables and other Officers within their Jurisdiction, take special Order that no empty Hackney Coaches be suffered to make any Stay between Whitehall and the End of Abingdon Street, in Westminster, from Twelve of the Clock at Noon until Five of the Clock in the Afternoon of the same Day, during the Sitting of this Parliament; and that no Carriages, Drays or Carts be permitted to stop in the Streets and Passages between the End of Pall Mall and the End of Abingdon Street, between the Hours aforesaid, or to pass through the Old Palace Yard, from One of the Clock in the Afternoon until One Hour after the rising of this House, during the Sitting of this Parliament; and that all Carriages, Drays or Carts, hereby permitted to pass through the said Streets and Passages, be obliged to go one after another in the Manner following; (that is to say,) all Carriages, Drays or Carts, going towards Westminster, to keep on the Side of the Street or Passage next to Saint James's Park, and all those going the contrary Way to keep on the other Side of the Street, and upon no Account whatsoever to presume to go Two or more abreast during the Sitting of this Parliament; and herein special Care is to be taken by the said Deputy Steward, Justices of the Peace, Constables, and all other Officers herein concerned, as the contrary will be answered to this House: And it is further Ordered, That the High Bailiff of the City of Westminster, and the Justices of the Peace for the City and Liberty thereof, or some of them, residing in Westminster, be served with the Order of this House made this Day for the Purposes aforesaid.

Select Com ee on the Library of the House appointed:

It was moved, "That a Select Committee be appointed to consider of some Additions to be made to the Library of this House, and of other Matters relating thereto; and to report to the House."

The Question was put thereupon?

It was resolved in the Affirmative.

Ordered, That the Lords following be appointed a Select Committee to consider of some Additions to be made to the Library of this House, and of other Matters relating thereto; and to report to the House:

V. Sidmouth.
V. Gordon.
L. Bp. London.
L. Dacre.
L. Auckland.
L. Carbery.
L. Redesdale.
L. Wharncliffe.
L. Lyndhurst.
L. Plunket.
L. Melros.
L. Skelmersdale.
L. Dover.
D. Cumberland.
L. President.
L. Privy Seal.
D. Richmond.
M. Salisbury.
M. Cholmondeley.
E. Essex.
E. Shaftesbury.
E. Radnor.
E. Rosslyn.
E. Mulgrave.
E. Amherst.

Their Lordships, or any Five of them, to meet Tomorrow, at Four o'Clock in the Afternoon, in the Prince's Lodgings, near the House of Peers; and to adjourn as they please.

Instruction to the Com ee.

Ordered, That it be an Instruction to the said Committee, to consider of some Mode for more effectually ventilating the House.

Adjourn.

Dominus Cancellarius declaravit præsens Parliamentum continuandum esse usque ad et in diem Mercurii, septimum diem instantis Decembris, horâ undecimâ Auroræ, Dominis sic decernentibus.