Staines
Charities

Sponsor

Victoria County History

Publication

Author

Susan Reynolds (Editor)

Year published

1962

Supporting documents

Page

33

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'Staines: Charities', A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 3: Shepperton, Staines, Stanwell, Sunbury, Teddington, Heston and Isleworth, Twickenham, Cowley, Cranford, West Drayton, Greenford, Hanwell, Harefield and Harlington (1962), pp. 33. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=22237 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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CHARITIES.

Nathaniel Loane, Thomas Heames, and Anthony Wills (by wills dated 1625, 1705, 1836 respectively), and William Patten (by will and codicil proved 1876) each left endowments to provide bread to be distributed to the poor. John Arwood, William Steere, Richard Button, John Berryman, and Martha Towse (by wills dated 1681, 1701, 1797, 1806, 1842 respectively) left charities for yearly doles. The five earlier of these charities were endowed with rent-charges, all of which had been redeemed for stock by 1950, and the six later ones consisted of stock from the start. The total income of the charities existing in 1822 was £9 9s. 2d. In 1950 some £42 of the dividends were spent on bread, and 52 dole tickets of 5s. each were given away. (fn. 10) George Fournier (will dated 1837) (fn. 11) and George Pearce (will dated 1849) each left £2,000 in trust for distribution to twelve poor people to be chosen by ballot respectively of the vestry and of the inhabitant householders. Mary Ann Pearce (will proved 1863) left £200 stock in trust for a yearly distribution to three young women servants who had worked for the same employer for at least two years. (fn. 12)

The five almshouses for widows in Goodman Place were established in 1853 by Mary Ann Pearce, who also left £1,500 (will proved 1863) for their support. The income of the charity was for many years barely sufficient to pay for repairs and adequate stipends, but it was increased by several legacies and the temporary letting of one house, so that for some years after 1915 the charity was able to assist a few out-pensioners. Its income in 1950 was £86. (fn. 13)

Footnotes

10 9th Rep. Com. Char. H.C. 258, pp. 306-8 (1823), ix; Char. Com. files.
11 Char. Com. files.
12 Ibid.; Par. Rec., Pearce Charities Acct. Bk. 1877- 1914.
13 Char. Com. files.