House of Commons Journal Volume 4
8 January 1645

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History of Parliament Trust

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 4: 8 January 1645', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 4: 1644-1646 (1802), pp. 13-14. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=23290 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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Die Mercurii, Januarii 8, 1644.

Prayers.

The humble Petition of the Colonels, and other Chief Officers of his Excellency's Infantry, was this Day read: And

It is Ordered, That, whereas there are some Expressions in the Petition, whereby the Petitioners seem to apprehend that something has been informed, that may reflect upon their Honour, That this House doth declare, That they have received no Information that reflects any thing upon the Honour of the Petitioners; and that this House will be ever tender and careful to preserve the Honour of such Gentlemen as faithfully serve the Publick, as the Petitioners have done.

Ordered, That it be referred to the Committee, where Mr. Scawen has the Chair, to consider of a Way for taking the Accounts, and allowing the Debentures, of the Officers and Soldiers before the Establishment: And are to meet this Afternoon, at Three of Clock, in the Exchequer-Chamber.

Ordered, That Sir Gilb. Gerard, Treasurer at Wars, do take the Accounts of the Officers and Soldiers since the Establishment, and do give them Debentures; and to give to the House Account of such Monies as have been paid to the Army, and of the Arrears due, that all may appear; to the end Course may be taken for satisfying the Arrears.

Ordered, That on this Day Sevennight the Committee to whom it was referred, do make Report of the Business concerning Auditor Broad and Auditor Wilcox.

Ordered, That some Course be taken, that it may be certainly known, what Damages the Counties have sustained by Billet and Free-Quarter; to the end they may be satisfied, by Deductions out of the Soldiers Pay, in a just and fitting Way.

Ordered, That the Officers be required forthwith to repair to their several and respective Charges.

The Desire of the Petitioners concerning Ministers will be settled, when the new Model shall be brought in and settled.

The Petitioners were called in: And Mr. Speaker acquainted them with the Resolutions of the House upon the Particulars of their Petition; ... required them, by the Command of the House, to repair to their Charges; and returned them the Thanks of this House for their Service already performed.

The House being informed, that divers Divines of the Assembly were at the Door;

They were called in; and did prefer a Petition concerning their Salary: The which was read: And

It is Ordered, That it be taken into Consideration on Tuesday next: And that Mr. White be acquainted herewith.

A Message from the Lords, by Doctor Aylett and Doctor Heath;

The Lords have received a Petition from the Archbishop of Canterbury: To which they agree; and desire your Concurrence: And they likewise desire to put you in mind, That Yesterday, at the Conference, they delivered something to you concerning the Execution of the Archbishop of Canterbury, "That it might be done by taking off his Head only."

His Petition to the Lords, and likewise his Petition to this House, were both read.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth concurr with the Lords, That the Head of the Archbishop of Canterbury shall be taken off only: And that his Head and his Body shall be buried by the Care of his Servants.

Sir Tho. Widdrington, Mr. Selden, Mr. Prideaux, Mr. Recorder, are appointed forthwith to withdraw, and to draw up an Ordinance to this Purpose.

Answer returned by the same Messengers; That this House has considered their Lordships Message; and do concurr, that Execution shall be done upon the Archbishop of Canterbury, by taking off his Head only; and that the Head and Body shall be interred by the Care of his Servants.

Accordingly to an Order Yesterday made, the Reasons delivered by the Lords, at the Conference concerning the Ordinance That no Member of either House shall bear Office, were read.

Resolved, &c. That the Lords sending down of Reasons concerning this Ordinance, without sending down the Ordinance itself, and the particular Amendments; not expressing wherein they do agree or disagree; is a Breach of Privilege, and contrary to the Course of Parliament.

Mr. Sollicitor, Mr. Peirpoint, Mr. Ellis, Mr. Lisle, Mr. Selden, Mr. Recorder, Mr. Prideaux, Mr. Crue, Sir Henry Vane, Sir Jo. Evelyn, Mr. Whitelock;

This Committee has Power to prepare Reasons, to satisfy the Lords, Why they cannot take into Consideration the Reasons concerning the Ordinance That no Member of either House shall bear Office, &c.; and to acquaint them, That the sending down the Reasons without the Ordinance, and the particular Amendments, nor expressing wherein they do agree or disagree, is a Breach of Privilege of Parliament, and contrary to the Course of Parliament; and to offer them Reasons for the speedy Passing of the said Ordinance: And are to meet at Three of Clock, in the Queen's-Court, this Afternoon.

Ordered, That Mr. Knightly, Sir John Evelyn, Sir Henry Mildmay, and Sir Gilb. Pickering, do repair to my Lord General, and the Earl of Manchester; and, from this House, require of them an Account, Why the Orders made by the Committee of both Kingdoms, touching the Keeping of the Line for the Quarters of Horse and Foot, have not been observed; and by whose Default it has been done; and to give an Account what has been done upon their Orders, and where the Horse and Foot are now quartered: And are to give an Account hereof to the House To-morrow.

Ordered, That the Committee, to whom it was referred to consider of the coming back of the Party sent into the West, do meet this Afternoon: And that Sir Walter Erle and Mr. Long do give an Account of this Business To-morrow.

Ordered, That To-morrow Mr. Pierpoint do make Report, from the Committee of both Kingdoms, of the Model of the Armies; and of the Business concerning Ireland.

Sir Henry Mildway went up to the Lords, to desire them to sit awhile: And

Brings Answer, The Lords were risen.

Ordered, That Sir Thomas Pelham, Sir Thomas Parker, Mr. Middleton, Mr. Alford, and Mr. Shelly, be forthwith injoined to go down into the County of Sussex, to take care of the Preservation of that County.

Resolved, &c. That Colonel Norton shall have a Fortnight's Pay for his Regiment: And it is referred to Sir Walter Erle and Mr. Lisle to consider how a Fortnight's Pay may be raised.

Resolved, &c. That Colonel Norton, and all other Commanders that are now in Town, be required forthwith to repair to their several Charges.

Whereas Wm. Archbishop of Canterbury stands adjudged attainted of High Treason by Ordinance of both Houses of Parliament; and is thereby to suffer the Pains of Death, as a Person attainted of High Treason should or ought to do; It is now Ordained, by the Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament, That, as touching his corporal Punishment, the Head only of the said Archbishop shall be cut off at the Tower Hill, at the accustomed Place there used for such Purpose: And that afterwards, his Head and Body shall be delivered unto his Servants, or some of them, to be by their Care buried. And it is hereby further Ordained, That the Lieutenant of the Tower of London shall, upon Friday the Tenth of January 1644, deliver the Body of the said Archbishop to the Sheriffs of London at Tower-Hill, in the accustomed Place: And that the said Sheriffs of London shall the same Day receive and execute the said Archbishop at the accustomed Place at Tower-Hill aforesaid, in such Sort, Manner, and Form only, as by this Ordinance is appointed and declared. And this present Ordinance shall be a sufficient Warrant to discharge the said Lieutenant of the Tower, and Sheriffs of London, and every of them in that Behalf; any thing in the said former Ordinance, or any other Ordinance or Order of both or either Houses of Parliament, or any other Matter or Thing whatsoever to the contrary notwithstanding.

Sir Thomas Widdrington is to carry it up.