House of Commons Journal Volume 7
25 December 1652

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History of Parliament Trust

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 7: 25 December 1652', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 7: 1651-1660 (1802), pp. 235-236. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=24130 Date accessed: 22 September 2014.


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Saturday, the 25th of December, 1652.

Prayers.

Articles of War.

THE House this Day resumed the Debate upon the Articles and Ordinances of War.

The Three-and-thirtieth Article was read; and, upon the Question, agreed unto.

The Four-and-thirtieth Article was read; and, upon the Question, agreed unto.

The Five-and-thirtieth Article was read; and, upon the Question, agreed unto.

The Six-and-thirtieth Article was read.

And the Question being put, That these Words; viz. "wilful Killing," do stand in this Article;

It passed with the Affirmative.

And the said Article, being put to the Question, was agreed unto.

The Seven-and-thirtieth Article was read; and, upon the Question, agreed unto.

The Eight-and-thirtieth Article was read.

Resolved, That these Words, "without Delay," be added in this Article, next the Word "Charge."

Resolved, That these Words, "as the Court of Admiralty shall judge," be inserted in this Article.

Resolved, That these Words be added to the Close of this Article.

Resolved, That these Words be added to the Close of this Article; viz. "and that no Captain, Master, or other Officer of any Ship belonging to the State, or in their Service, shall demand, receive, or take from any Merchant, or other, whose Ship or Goods he is appointed to convoy, any Fee, Gratuity, or Reward, in respect thereof, upon Pain that such Captain, Master, or Officer, shall, for such Offence, be cashiered."

And the said Article, so amended, was, upon the Question, agreed unto.

The Nine-and-thirtieth Article was read; and, upon the Question, agreed unto.

The Fortieth Article was read; and, upon the Question, agreed unto.

The One-and-fortieth Article was read; and, upon the Question, agreed unto.

The Two-and-fortieth Article was read; and, upon the Question, agreed unto.

Ordered, That these Articles be printed, and that it be referred to the Commissioners of the Admiralty, to direct how the same shall be published; and that it be done at such Time as they shall think fit, and direct.

Aiscue's Losses.

Mr. Strickland reports The Matter of Fact touching the Damage sustained by Sir George Aiscue, by making the River of Wye, in the County of Surrey, navigable.

IN pursuance of an Order of Parliament, of the 3d of August 1652, whereby it is referred unto this Committee, to consider of the Damage Sir George Aiscue hath suffered by the making of the River Wye navigable; and to state the Matter of Fact; and to report the same unto the Parliament; This Committee, upon Examination, do find, that on the 13th of November 1649, Sir George Aiscue did agree with the Contractors at Gurney House, for the Purchase of the Manor of Ham-Haw, alias Ham-Court, in the County of Surrey; and for . . . Manor-House, or Capital Messuage, called Ham-Haw, alias Ham-Court, lying in Chertsey, in the County aforesaid; and all and every the Demesns of the said Manor, being about One hundred Thirty-nine Acres, mentioned, in the Particular thereof, to have been therewith heretofore demised by the late Dean and Canons of the Free Chapel of St. George in New Windsore, unto Sir George Aiscue Knight, at the Rate of Twelve Years Purchase, for the present yearly Rent thereof, being Eighteen Pounds in Possession, and at the Rate of Five Years Purchase, for the improved yearly Value thereof, being One hundred Seventy-nine Pounds Sixteen Shillings and Eight-pence, in Reversion; and for Timber and Wood upon the Premises, at the Gross Sum of Eighty Pounds, the whole Purchase-Money being Eleven hundred Ninety-five Pounds Three Shillings and Fourpence, to be paid in ready Monies, or doubled Monies.

That by the Examination of John Staseley, aged Seventy Years, taken by the said Committee, it also appears, that the Wharf, Parcel of the Premises above-mentioned, containing about Three Acres, called Ham-Haw, was, in the Year 1642, let by Mr. Wm. Aiscue, Father of the said Sir George, to one Mr. Warner, for about One hundred Forty Pounds per Annum; and afterwards by Sir George to one Rockley, for One hundred Forty Pounds, or One hundred Fifty Pounds per Annum; and that the said Wharf of late is so considerably improved by the said Sir George, that it is worth, one Year with another, Two hundred Pounds per Annum: All which Benefit, he verily believes, will be lost by the Cutting of the River of Wye.

And, by the Examination of Robert Dawson, Wharfinger, it appears, that for these Two Years last past, there hath been made by the Profits of the said Wharf, all Charges deducted, Two hundred Pounds per Annum: All which, he believes will be lost, in case the River of Wye be made navigable; for that there is a Wharf intended to be made Two Miles above the said Ham-Haw.

Ordered, That Sir George Aiscue have Five hundred Pounds in Money, out of the Prize-Ship lately come from the Barbadoes; and that it be referred to the Committee of the Navy, to see the same forthwith paid to the said Sir George Aiscue, or his Assigns: And the Acquittance or Acquittances of the said Sir George Aiscue, or his Assigns, shall be a sufficient Discharge to such Person and Persons as by Warrant from the Committee of the Navy shall pay the same.

Ordered, That Lands of Inheritance of the clear yearly Value of Three hundred Pounds, of the Lands forfeited to the Commonwealth in Ireland, as the same was valued in the Year 1640, be settled upon Sir George Aiscue, and his Heirs, as a Mark of the Parliament's Favour to the said Sir George Aiscue, for his faithful Services; and that the Commissioners of the Parliament in Ireland, be authorized and required to set out Lands of the said Value, accordingly; and put the said Sir George Aiscue, or his Assigns, into the Possession thereof, to be enjoyed accordingly: And that Mr. Speaker do write a Letter unto the said Commissioners for that Purpose.

Security of Trade.

Ordered, That it be referred to the Council of State, to consider of some Rules for the more secure Managing of Trade, by the Assistance of those who are convoyed to the Men of War that convoy them; and report it to the House.

The House, according to former Order, adjourned itself to Tuesday Morning next, Eight of Clock.