House of Commons Journal Volume 9
18 February 1673

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History of Parliament Trust

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 9: 18 February 1673', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 9: 1667-1687 (1802), pp. 253-254. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=27350 Date accessed: 21 September 2014.


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Martis, 18 die Februarii, 1672.

Prayers.

Mr. Speaker resigns.

THE House being met; and Mr. Speaker's Indisposition growing still more upon him, that he was not able to attend the Service of the House; and having sent a Letter to his Majesty, to desire his Leave to move the House, to permit him to retire into the Country; and to give them Leave to choose another Speaker: Which Letter, being communicated to the House, by Mr. Secretary Coventry; who acquainted the House, that his Majesty had yielded to what was therein desired: And Mr. Speaker having also sent another Letter to the House, desiring to be excused from the Place of Speaker; and to retire into the Country: Both which Letters being read;

Mr. Secretary Coventry proposed, That, according to the Leave given them by his Majesty, they would proceed to the Electing of another Speaker: And did nominate and recommend to them Edward Seymour Esquire, eldest Son of Sir Edward Seymour Baronet, as a fit Person, both in respect of his Ability and Experience, as also of his Constitution and Health of Body, for the Speaker:

Mr. Seymour, chosen Speaker.

Who being called upon; stood up in his Place, and did endeavour to excuse himself:

But That being not admitted; he was conducted to the Chair, by Sir Robert Carr, his Majesty's Chancellor of the Duchy, and Mr. Secretary Coventry.

Where, after he had again desired Leave of the House, to desire his Majesty to excuse him, being set in the Chair;

A Message was sent from his Majesty, by Sir Edward Carteret, Usher of the Black Rod; viz.

The King commands this honourable House to attend Him, immediately, in His House of Lords.

And accordingly Mr. Speaker elect, and the House, went up to attend his Majesty.-

Sir J. Charlton's Letters of Resignation.

Sir Job Charlton's Letters to his Majesty, and the House of Commons, are as followeth; viz.

May it please Your Most Excellent Majesty,

WHEN I first had Notice of Your gracious Intentions, to approve me, if elected by the House of Commons for their Speaker, I did endeavour my Excuse by all dutiful and decent Ways I could; being really doubtful, lest my Indisposition of Health, through long Sittings, might arise to that Height of Distemper, that might prove prejudicial to the public Affairs.

Sir, My then Fears have unfortunately befallen me; and I was, on Saturday Morning last, instead of going on with the publick Business of the House, by their great Favour, permitted to adjourn till Tuesday following; hoping by that Time my Distemper might have abated: But now finding the contrary, I humbly beseech your Majesty's Leave, that I may move your most dutiful and loyal House of Commons to permit me to retire into the Country; and to give them Leave to choose another Speaker: And no Day, that God shall be pleased to add to my Life, shall pass without a grateful Acknowledgment, in the warmest Devotion of,

Great Sir,

17 Feb. in the Evening.

Your Majesty's most obedient, and loyal Subject and Servant,

J. Charlton.

Directed: To the King's Most Excellent Majesty.

Honourable Gentlemen,

I GIVE you most humble Thanks for the great Kindness you were pleased to shew me on Saturday last, in adjourning to this Day. I was indeed in Hopes, by this Time, to have been able to have attended your Service: But, finding myself to be still oppressed by the same Indisposition, and not foreseeing when 'tis probable I may be restored to a Health competent for your Service; lest the great Affairs before you suffer by further Delay, I am in Duty forced to move you, that you would, with his Majesty's Leave, 'proceed to the Choice of another Speaker, and permit me to retire into the Country; where, while I live, I shall have a grateful Remembrance of all Favours to

18 Feb.-72.

Your most faithful and humble Servant,

J. Charlton.

Mr. Speaker approved of.

The House having presented Mr. Speaker; who being approved of by his Majesty;

Mr. Speaker returning, with the Mace carried before him; and having taken the Chair;

The King appoints to be attended.

Mr. Secretary Coventry acquaints the House, That he, with other Members of the Privy Council, had attended his Majesty, and acquainted Him with the Desires of the House, to present their humble Petition and Address to his Majesty; and to appoint a Time and Place when he would please to be attended therewith: And that his Majesty had been pleased to declare, That he would expect the Attendance of the House, To-morrow at Three of the Clock in the Afternoon, in the Banquetting House at Whitehall.

Chiping Wicombe Election.

A Petition of Sir William Egerton, Knight of the Bath, was read; complaining of an undue Practice, in one Mr. Lucas; who, pretending himself to be Mayor of the Borough of Chiping Wicombe, in the County of Bucks, had caused a Disturbance and Interruption to be made, in the Election of a Burgess to serve for that Place; and by that Means caused a double Return to be made, in Prejudice of the Petitioner, who was duly elected for that Place, by the proper Mayor.

Ordered, That it be referred to the Committee of Elections and Privileges, to take the Petition into Consideration; and to report the Matter, with their Opinions therein, to the House.

Ditto.

Another Petition of Sir John Borlace was read; alledging, That he was duly elected Burgess, to serve for Chipping Wicombe; and was, by Indenture executed, duly returned by the proper Mayor: And that one Thomas Gibbons was set up, in opposition to the rightful Mayor, to disturb the Election.

Ordered, That this Petition be referred to the Committee of Elections and Privileges, to take the Petition into Consideration; and to report the Matter, with their Opinions therein, to the House.

Dartmouth Election.

A Petition of Nathaniel Hearne was read; complaining of an undue Election of one Josias Child, Merchant, to serve for the Borough of Clifton Dartmouth Hardnes, in the County of Devon, in the room of William Gould Esquire, deceased; whereas the Petitioner was duly elected to serve for that Place.

Ordered, That this Petition be referred to the Committee of Elections and Privileges; and to take the Petition into Consideration; and report the Matter, with their Opinions therein, to the House.

Supply Bill.

The Bill for his Majesty's Supply was read a Second time.

Resolved, &c. That the said Bill be committed to a Committee of the whole House.

Resolved, &c. That the Case of the City of London, in respect to their Losses, be recommended to the said Committee, for Ease in their Proportion.

Protestant Dissenters.

Resolved, &c. That the House resolve into a Committee of the whole House To-morrow Morning at Ten of the Clock, to consider of the Subject Matter for a Bill of Ease to his Majesty's Protestant Subjects, Dissenters, in Matters of Religion, from the Church of England.

Supply Bill.

Resolved, &c. That the House resolve into a Committee of the whole House, on Friday Morning next, to proceed upon the Bill for his Majesty's Supply.

Committee of Privileges.

Ordered, That Lord Ogle, Sir John Dawney, Captain Jones, Sir Robert Worsley, Sir John Worden, Lord Buckhurst, Mr. John Buller, Sir Charles Sidley, Sir Nicholas Pelham, Mr. Richard Harrison, Sir Francis Anderson, Mr. Roger James, Sir Nich. Steward, Mr. Lee, Lord Vaughan, Mr. Stockdale, Mr. Burlase, Colonel Nevill, be added to the Committee of Elections and Privileges.

And then the House adjourned till To-morrow Morning, Eight of the Clock.