House of Commons Journal Volume 9
22 March 1678

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 9: 22 March 1678', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 9: 1667-1687 (1802), pp. 460-461. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=27604 Date accessed: 26 October 2014.


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Veneris, 22 die Martii, 1677.

Williams' Jointure.

A BILL to enable Trevor Williams Esquire, to settle a Jointure upon a Wife, was read the Second time.

Resolved, &c. That the Bill be committed to Sir Ch. Harbord, Mr. Eyres, Sir Anth. Irby, Sir John Holland, Mr. Wright, Sir Lan. Lake, Sir Rich. How, Mr. Browne, Mr. Mallet, Mr. May, Sir Tho. Stringer, Serjeant Seis, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer, Mr. Mainard, Sir John Hanmer, Sir John Hotham, Mr. Gray, Lord Fitzharding, Sir Geo. Downing, Sir Courtney Poole, Mr. Tregonwell, Mr. Crouch, Sir Wm. Lowther, Sir John Mallet, Sir John Cotton, Sir John Barnaby, Colonel Birch, Sir John Knight, Mr. Morris, Mr. Westphaling, Lord Gorge, Sir Gilbert Talbot, Sir Tho. Meeres, Sir Gilbert Gerrard, Sir Rich. Graham, and all the Members that serve for the Counties of Monmouth and Hereford: And they are to meet To-morrow at Two of the Clock in the Afternoon, in the Speaker's Chamber.

St. Asaph's Cathedral.

An ingrossed Bill, sent from the Lords, intituled, An Act for appropriating the Rectories of Llanrhayader in Mochnant, in the Counties of Denbigh and Mountgomery, and of Skeiviog in the County of Flint, for the Repairs of the Cathedral Church of St. Asaph, and for the better Maintenance of the Choir there; and also for the Uniting several Rectories sine Cura, and the Vicarages of the same Parishes within the Diocese of St. Asaph aforesaid; was read the Second time.

Resolved, &c. That the Bill be committed to Mr. Crouch, Sir John Knight, Sir John Mallet, Col. Robinson, Sir John Trevor, Sir Edm. Windham, Sir Gilbert Talbot, Sir Anth. Irby, Mr. Harrison, Mr. Fleetwood, Mr. Mallet, Mr. Westphaling, Mr. Daniell, Mr. Weld, Sir Robert Thomas, Serjeant Seis, Sir Ch. Harbord, Sir Trevor Williams, Mr. Eyres, Sir Ric. Franklyn, Lord O Brien, Colonel Whitley, Sir Court. Poole, Sir Robert Carr, Mr. Browne, Sir Hen. Ford, Mr. Wright, Lord Gorge, Sir John Hanmer, Sir John Norton, Mr. Buscawen, Mr. Newport, Sir Tho. Lee, Colonel Birch, Sir Herbert Perrot, Sir Hen. Capell, Mr. Marvile, Sir Tho. Stringer, Sir Tho. Littleton, Sir Tho. Clergis, Sir Wm. Lowther, Mr. Mansell, Mr. May, Colonel Price, and all the Members that serve for Wales: And they are to meet on Monday next, at Two of the Clock in the Afternoon, in the Speaker's Chamber.

Interment of Charles I.

The House then resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House, to proceed in the Consideration of the Bill for the more decent and solemn Interment of his late Sacred Majesty King Charles the First, and for erecting a Monument to his Memory.

Mr. Speaker left the Chair.

Sir Phil. Warwick took the Chair of the Committee.

Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair.

Conference on Lords Amendments to Address- War with France.

The Time being come for the Conference with the Lords upon the Amendments by them made to the Address sent up from this House;

The Members appointed did attend, and managed the same; and delivered their Reasons; which are as followeth; viz.

1. That his Majesty having declared to us, since this Meeting, That he had made a League offensive and defensive with Holland against the Growth and Power of the French King, and for the Preservation of the Spanish Netherlands; we cannot but suppose, that his Majesty hath disposed of his Affairs already in order thereunto; and is therefore now so far engaged, that an immediate Declaration of War against the French King cannot be either prejudicial or dangerous to his Majesty's Affairs.

2. That, by declaring a War immediately, his Majesty may begin the War against France at this time, upon equal Terms: Whereas, if Things continue in this doubtful State, the French King may begin upon us, when he sees his best Advantage; and surprise his Majesty's Subjects, while they go on securely in their Trades, in Confidence of a seeming Peace. And, if we should agree to the Amendments your Lordships propose, the Provocation to the French King will be equal to an immediate Declaration of a War; and will equally justify him in such a Manner of Proceeding, and yet at the same time leave ourselves, and the Confederates, in great Uncertainty.

3. That the Arms of the French King have been of late so prosperous and successful, that, it may be doubted, that, if his Majesty does not immediately declare War, the Confederates, or some of the Principal of them, may be constrained to make a Peace upon such Terms as the French King will grant: whereby we may be left to defend ourselves alone, or upon much greater Disadvantages than we may do at present.

4. That, by the Words your Lordships have put in, the Time will be left indefinite; and so must be subject to the Exposition of those, who have prevailed with his Majesty to defer the Entering into this War too long already.

5. That, by declaring a War immediately, the Forces his Majesty hath raised must presently be sent abroad, and employed beyond Sea; whereas, otherwise, they may be kept up in this Kingdom: Than which nothing can be more dangerous to his Majesty, and more destructive to the Laws, Liberties, and Properties of the Subjects of this Kingdom; the Fear of which hath already possessed their Minds.

6. That, by such a Declaration, his Majesty's Subjects, now in the French Service will be recalled, and brought thence; and, by That means, the Arms of France will be deprived of their Assistance, and his Majesty and the Confederates strengthened by the Addition of so many Forces, who may otherwise suddenly be employed in fighting against those whom we desire to support.

7. That the Charge of maintaining the Land Forces will be very great; and we can no way satisfy those we represent chearfully to bear such Taxes as are necessary, unless the immediate Employment of them abroad be plain and visible.

8. That, if his Majesty make himself a Party in the War, it will be inconsistent with the Continuance of a Mediation.

9. That the Continuance of the English Ambassadors at Nemigen, as Mediators, may raise a Doubt in the Confederates, that his Majesty had not quite laid aside all Endeavours of Peace by way of Mediation, and would therefore prosecute the War with less Vigour; and may also cause Apprehensions, that the Forces sent to Flanders are rather intended to enforce a Peace, than for the Defence of those Countries against the French.

10. That, in the powerful Condition the French King is at this present, it cannot reasonably be expected he will condescend to any Peace, whereby his Majesty's Kingdom may be sufficiently secure.

11. That the Continuance of a French Ambassador here, after declaring the War, may be very prejudicial, in respect of Intelligence, and private Correspondencies; And, as to the English Ambassador in France, we conceive it better for his Majesty to recall his own Ambassador from thence, than to have him sent away.

Petition against a Member.

A Petition being tendered, complaining against Sir Robert Holt, a Member of this House; and it being the Order of the House, That no Petition ought to be tendered, the Member being absent;

Ordered, That the Petition be tendered on Tuesday Morning next: And that Sir Robert Holt have Notice then to attend.

Interment of Charles I.

Resolved, &c. That the House do now again resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to proceed in the Consideration of the Bill for be more decent and solemn Interrment of his late Sa\?\ed Majesty King Charles the First, and erecting a Monument to his Memory.

Mr. Speaker left the Chair.

Sir Phil. Warwick took the Chair of the Committee.

Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair.

Sir Phillip Warwick reports from the said Committee, That they had made a considerable Progress in the Bill: And humbly moved, from the said Committee, That they may have Leave to sit again on Thursday Morning next, at Ten of the Clock.

Resolved, &c. That this House will, on Thursday Morning next, at Ten of the Clock, resolve into a Committee of the whole House, to proceed further in the Consideration of the Bill for the more decent and solemn Interrment of his late Sacred Majesty King Charles the First, and erecting a Monument to his Memory.

And then the House adjourned till To-morrow Morning, Eight of the Clock.