House of Commons Journal Volume 9
14 May 1679

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History of Parliament Trust

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 9: 14 May 1679', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 9: 1667-1687 (1802), pp. 621-622. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=27776 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Mercurii, 14 die Maii, 1679.

Prayers.

Lost Records of Fines.

MR. Serjeant Seys reports from the Committee to whom the Bill for Re-ingrossment of the Fines lost or burnt by the late Fire in the Temple, was committed, several Amendments made to the Bill: Which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered the same in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were twice read; and, upon the Question, severally agreed.

Resolved, &c. That the Bill, with the Amendments agreed to, be ingrossed.

Exporting Leather.

Sir Robert Markham reports from the Committee to whom the Bill for Exporting of Leather, was committed, several Amendments made to the Bill: Which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered the same in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same were twice read; and, upon the Question, severally agreed to.

Resolved, &c. That the Bill, with the Amendments agreed to, be ingrossed.

Address for Defence of the King.

Sir Robert Markham reports from the Committee to whom it was referred to draw up an Address to his Majesty, pursuant to the Vote of this House of the Eleventh Instant; whereby it was resolved, That, in Defence of his Majesty's Person and the Protestant Religion, this House doth declare, That they will stand by his Majesty with their Lives and Fortunes; and that, if his Majesty shall come to any violent Death (which God forbid!), they will revenge it to the utmost upon the Papists; an Address agreed upon by the Committee: Which he read in his Place, and afterwards delivered the same in at the Clerk's Table: Where the same was twice read; and, with some Amendments made at the Table, upon the Question, agreed; and is as followeth; viz.

Most Dread Sovereign,

WE Your Majesty's most Dutiful and Loyal Subjects the Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, do with all humble Gratitude acknowledge Your most gracious Assurances Your Majesty hath been pleased to give us, of Your constant Care to do every Thing that may preserve the Protestant Religion; of Your firm Resolution to defend the same to the utmost: and Your Royal Endeavours, that the Security of that Blessing may be transmitted to Posterity: And we do humbly represent to your Majesty, That, being deeply sensible, that the greatest Hopes of Success against our Religion, in the Enemies thereof, the Papists, are founded in the execrable Designs which they have laid against Your Sacred Person and Life of Your Majesty (which, it is not only our Duty but our Interest, with the greatest Hazards to preserve and defend); we have applied our Counsels to the making such Provision by Law as may defeat these Popish Adversaries, their Abettors and Adherents, of their Hopes of gaining an Advantage by any violent Attempts against Your Majesty; and may utterly frustrate their Expectation of subverting the Protestant Religion thereby in time to come: And, further to obviate, by the best Means we can, all wicked Practices against Your Majesty, while any such Laws are in Preparation and bringing to Perfection; it is our Resolution, and we do declare, That, in Defence of Your Majesty's Person, and the Protestant Religion, we will stand by Your Majesty with our Lives and Fortunes; and shall be ready to revenge, upon the Papists, any Violence offered by them to Your Sacred Person: In which, we hope, Your Majesty will graciously please to be the more assured, as we ourselves are the more encouraged, in that the Hearts of all Your Majesty's Protestant Subjects, with the most sincere Affection and Zeal, join with us herein.

Message respecting the Fleet.

Mr. Powle delivers a Message from his Majesty, as followeth:

Charles R

Though his Majesty hath already, at the First Meeting in Parliament, and since, by a Word or Two, mentioned the Necessity of having a Fleet at Sea this Summer; yet the Season for preparing it being far advanced, and our Neighbours before us in their Preparations, He cannot hold Himself discharged towards his People, if He do not now, with more Earnestness, again recommend the same to your present Care and Consideration; and the rather, from the daily Expectation of the Return of the Fleet from the Streights; to which a great Arrear is due: And He must acquit Himself of the ill Consequences, which the Want of a Fleet in such a Juncture may produce: And he hath not done this without considering, That the entring on this Work presently can be no Hindrance to the other great Affairs upon your Hands; but rather a Security in the Dispatch thereof.

A Debate arising thereupon;

Resolved, &c. That the further Consideration of the said Message be adjourned till Monday next come Sevennight.

Leave of Absence.

Ordered, That Sir Richard Cust have Leave to go into the Country for some few Days.

King to appoint being attended.

Ordered, That such Members of this House as are of his Majesty's Privy Council, be desired to know his Majesty's Pleasure, when this House may attend his Majesty with the Address this Day agreed to.

Leave of Absence.

Ordered, That Mr. Arthington have Leave to go into the Country.

And then the House adjourned till To-morrow Morning, Seven of the Clock.