House of Commons Journal Volume 10
17 August 1689

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History of Parliament Trust

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 10: 17 August 1689', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 10: 1688-1693 (1802), pp. 267-268. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=28907 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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Sabbati, 17 die Augusti; 1° Gulielmi et Mariæ.

Prayers.

A MESSAGE from the Lords, by Sir John Franklyn and Mr. Kecke;

Clandestine Marriages.

Mr. Speaker, We are commanded by the Lords to acquaint this House, That they have passed a Bill, intituled, An Act to disable Minors to marry without the Consent of their Fathers, or Guardians; and against their untimely marrying after the Decease of their Fathers; and for the preventing all clandestine Marriages for the Future: To which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Woollen Manufactures.

The Lords likewise have agreed to the Bill for the better preventing the Exportation of Wool, and encouraging the Woolen Manufactures of this Kingdom, with some Amendments: to which Amendments they desire the Concurrence of this House.

Tanned Leather.

We are commanded also to acquaint this House, That they have agreed to the Amendments proposed by this House to the Bill, intituled, An Act for Explaining Part of an Act made in the First Year of King James the First, concerning tanned Leather.

And then the Messengers withdrew.

Clandestine Marriages.

An ingrossed Bill, sent down from the Lords, intituled, An Act to disable Minors to marry without the Consent of their Fathers or Guardians; and against their untimely marrying after the Decease of their Fathers; and for the preventing all clandestine Marriages for the future; was read the First time.

Resolved, That the Bill be read a Second time.

Woollen Manufactures.

Then the Amendments proposed by the Lords to be made to the Bill for the better preventing the Exportation of Wool, and encouraging the Woolen Manufactures of this Kingdom, were read the First time throughout; and are as followeth;

Press 8, Line 15, 16, leave out "nor the Privileges thereof;" and insert "to the Eastland Company, to the Russia Company, to the African Company, or to the Privileges granted to them, or any of them."

At the End of the Bill, add Clause (A):

"Provided also, and it is hereby enacted, by the Authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful to transport, from the Port of Southampton only, for the only Use or Behoof of the Inhabitants of the Islands of Guernsey, Jersey, Alderney, and Sarke, and of the Woolen Manufactures there made, One thousand Todds of uncombed Wool for the Island of Guernsey, Two thousand Todd of uncombed Wool for the Island of Jersey, Two hundred Todd of uncombed Wool for the Island of Alderney, and One hundred Todd of uncombed Wool for the Island of Sarke, more than by the said Act made in the Twelfth Year of the Reign of King Charles the Second, is directed and provided for the same; to be done according to the same Rules, Orders, and Directions, and under the like Penalties and Forfeitures, as in the said Act is directed, ordained, appointed, and inflicted; and, on the further Penalty of Twenty Pounds for every Todd of Wool, and Forfeiture of the Wool itself (One half thereof to his Majesty, One Quarter Part thereof to the Informer, and the other Quarter Part thereof to the Poor of the said Islands), in case any Person shall again transport, or attempt to transport any of the said Wool from the said Islands, for every Offence therein; and also, that every Person so offending shall, from and after the First Offence, be incapable of having or enjoying any Grant of any Wool from the said Port of Southampton; nor shall ever hereafter have any Warrant given or granted him for that Purpose; the said Penalties to be recovered by such Person as shall sue for the same, by any Action of Debt, Bill, Plaint, or Information; wherein no Essoign, Protection, Privilege, Wager of Law, Injunction, or Order of Restraint, is to be allowed, or any more than one Imparlance."

A Petition of the East India Company was offered; setting forth, That there be a Clause added to the Bill for preventing the Exportation of Wool, giving Liberty to all Persons to export the Woolen Manufactures into any Parts beyond the Seas: That, forasmuch as the said Clause may be construed to give Liberties to others, besides the Petitioners, to trade into the East Indies, which may be of very dangerous Consequence, and cause the Losing of the East India Trade, not only to the Petitioners, but to the whole Kingdom for ever: And praying, that, before the said Bill do pass, they may be heard to it; or that there may be a Saving of their Privileges, as there are of the Privileges of several other Companies of Merchants:

And the Question being put, That the Petition be read;

It passed in the Negative.

The First of the said Amendments being read a Second time;

Resolved, That this House doth agree with the Lords in the said Amendment.

The Clause being twice more read;

Resolved, That the said Clause be made Part of the Bill.

Ordered, That Sir John Knatchbull do carry the Bill to the Lords; and acquaint them with the Concurrence of this House to the said Amendments.

Securing Persons concerned in Tumult.

Resolved, That it be recommended to his Majesty's most honourable Privy Council, to secure Robert Diggs, who was lately committed by Colonel Sackvile, touching the Tumult on Wednesday last, that he may not be released by Bail.

Exactions at Hull Port.

The House being informed, that Colonel Copley, and the Petitioners against him, according to the Order of Yesterday, attended at the Door;

They were called in.

And, after the Petition was read, several Witnesses were examined touching the Time of setting-up the Chain at Hull; and also, the said Colonel Copley's taking a Farthing per Ton (as he was Lieutenant Governor) from Masters and Mariners of Ships, in respect thereof.

And also Lieutenant Governor Copley was heard: Who acquainted the House, That he did not set up the Chain, but only kept it up, as a Thing of great Use and Service to the Place: And that he was desired by the Customhouse Officers so to do: And produced a Certificate of those Officers for that Purpose: And also informed the House, That the former Lieutenants had received the like Duty; particularly in Colonel Gilbye's and Lord Langdale's Time.

And then the Petitioners and Witnesses, and Colonel Copley withdrew.

The said Certificate was read.

Resolved, That the levying a Farthing per Ton, or any other Sum of Money, upon Ships that come into the Port of Hull, upon Pretence of maintaining a Chain there, is an illegal Exaction upon the People.

And afterwards Colonel Copley was called in; and acquainted with the said Resolution, that he might not levy the pretended Duty any more:

And then withdrew.

Ordered, That the Informations, delivered into the House Yesterday by Colonel Copley, be delivered back to him.

And then the House adjourned till Monday Morning, Nine a Clock.