November 1689

Commons Journal

Lords Journal

Roger Whitley's Diary

History and Proceedings

Grey's Debates

CSPD William and Mary

CSP, Colonial

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Treasury Papers

House of Commons Journal Volume 10
14 November 1689

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History of Parliament Trust

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1802

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'House of Commons Journal Volume 10: 14 November 1689', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 10: 1688-1693 (1802), pp. 285-286. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=28930 Date accessed: 25 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Jovis, 14 die Novembris; 1° Gulielmi et Mariæ.

Prayers.

Silk Manufactures.

A PETITION of the Bailiffs, Wardens and Assistants of the Company of Weavers of London, was read; setting forth, That whereas Abraham Loveny and George Nicholson, have lately presented a Petition to this House, in the Name of the Silkthrowsters, Weavers, and Dyers of London; praying amongst other Things, that their Subsistence may be provided for by the late Bill for the enjoining the Wear of Woollen Manufactures; and the same being subscribed with Hundreds of Names; the Weavers, whose Names . . . thereunto put, have declared That they never subscribed the same: And, for that the restraining the Silk Wear will ruin the Manufacture; and praying to be heard, before any Proceedings be had upon the said Petition.

A Petition of the Master, Wardens, and Assistants, of the Corporation of the Silkthrowsters of London, in Behalf of themselves and the whole Corporation, was read; setting forth, That, whereas there is a Petition before this House, which is styled, A Petition of the Silkthrowsters, Weavers, and Dyers, in and about London; the Petitioners do declare, That neither they, nor any of their Members, knew any thing thereof; but utterly disown the same; the Bill hinted at therein, being utterly destructive to their Trade of Silkthrowsting, which employs above Two hundred thousand poor Persons in and about the said City of London: And praying that this House would be pleased to hear the Petitioners on the Behalf of themselves and the great Number of Dependents upon their Trade, before any thing be done upon the said Petition.

A Petition of Abraham Lovenne, * Nicholson, and * Rape, and others was also read.

And several of the Parties were called in to the Bar; and owned the said Petitions.

But it appeared, that all the Names set to the said Petition, presented by the said Lovenne, Nicholson, and Rape, were of one Writing, and was by them owned to be written by a Scrivener, by the Direction of the said Lovenne, Nicholson, and Rape; who said, They had Order from the Persons whose Names are set, to put their Names down.

And the said Persons being withdrawn.

And a Debate arising, touching the Manner how Petitions ought to be signed;

Petitions to be properly signed.

Resolved, That all Petitions, presented to the House, ought to be signed by the Petitioners with their own Hands, by their Names or Marks.

Then the House was informed, That several of the Persons whose Names are set to the Petition in Parchment, presented by the said Lovenne, Nicholson, and Rape, the Sixth Instant, were at the Door; and denied their Hands thereto were of their Setting, or set by their Order or Consent:

And thereupon several of those Persons were called in to the Bar; and said, They set their Hands to a Paper, but not a Petition; being told, It was for the Good of their Trade, and for the Prohibition of Foreign Silks.

And then those Persons withdrew.

Ordered, That the Petitions of the Weavers and Silkthrowsters be referred to the Committee to whom it was referred to consider of the best Way how the Silk and Woolen Manufactures of this Kingdom may be improved; to examine the Matter; and make their Report thereof to the House.

And the said Lovenne, Nicholson, and Rape, were called in again to the Bar; and acquainted, That their Petition this Day presented, did not come regularly signed.

And the same was delivered back again to them, to be signed by the Petitioners themselves.

Sir Thomas Pilkington's Complaint.

A Petition of Sir Tho. Pilkington, Lord Mayor of London, and several other Citizens of London, was presented to the House.

Resolved, That the said Petition be read To-morrow Morning.

Punishing Mutiny and Desertion.

A Message from the Lords, by Sir Miles Cooke and * *;

Mr. Speaker, The Lords have passed a Bill, intituled, An Act for punishing Officers or Soldiers, who shall mutiny, or desert their Majesties Service; and for punishing false Musters: To which they desire the Concurrence of this House.

And then the Messengers withdrew.

Answer to Address.

Sir John Guise acquaints the House, That he had attended his Majesty with the Address of this House, for sending Persons into Ireland, to take an Account of the Number of the Army there, and of the State and Condition of the same: And that his Majesty was pleased to give this Answer, That he would send some Persons forthwith into Ireland, according to the Desires of this House.

Punishing Mutiny and Desertion.

Resolved, That the aforesaid Bill, come down from the Lords, be now read the First time.

The Bill was read the First time.

Resolved, That the Bill be read a Second Time Tomorrow Morning.

State of the Nation.

Then the House resolved into a Committee of the whole House, to take into Consideration the State of the Nation.

Mr. Speaker left the Chair.

Mr. Grey took the Chair of the Committee.

Mr. Speaker resumed the Chair.

Mr. Grey reports from the Committee of the whole House, That they had agreed upon a Resolution: Which he read in his Place; and afterwards delivered the same in at the Table; Where the same was read; and is as followeth;

Resolved, That it is the Opinion of this Committee, That the Want of a Guard, or Convoys, for the Merchants, for the last Year, hath been an Obstruction of Trade, and an Occasion of great Losses to the Nation.

The said Resolve being read a Second time;

Resolved, That the House doth agree with the Committee, That the Want of a Guard, or Convoys, for the Merchants, for the last Year, hath been an Obstruction of Trade, and an Occasion of great Losses to the Nation.

Committees.

Ordered, That all Committees be adjourned.

And then the House adjourned till To-morrow Morning, Nine a Clock.