House of Lords Journal Volume 10
13 April 1648

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1767-1830

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'House of Lords Journal Volume 10: 13 April 1648', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 10: 1648-1649 (1767-1830), pp. 187-192. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=32783 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


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DIE Jovis, 13 die Aprilis.

PRAYERS, by Mr. Ash.

Domini præsentes fuerunt:

Comes Manchester, Speaker.

Comes Mulgrave.
Comes Salisbury.
Comes Warwicke.
Ds. Grey.
Ds. Mountagu.
Ds. Wharton.
Ds. Howard.

Answer from the H. C.

Sir Edward Leech and Mr. Page return with this Answer from the House of Commons:

That they agree for the transporting of Four Hundred Men, according to the Desire of the Prince Elector in his Letter; and they agree to the Ordinance for constituting the Three Judges of the Court of Admiralty; and to the Captains and Ships to be added to the Summer's Fleet: (Here enter them.) To all the rest, they will send an Answer by Messengers of their own.

L. Lod. Stewart, a Pass.

Ordered, That the Lord Lodovic Steuart shall have a Pass, to come out of France into England.

Parker, concerning Wrotham Ordinance.

Ordered, That Mr. Parker do shew Cause to this House on Monday Morning next, why the Ordinance concerning Wrotham should not pass.

Hill's Petition, for Money due to him.

Upon reading the Petition of Wm. Hill, of London, Merchant; shewing, "That there is due from the State to him Four Hundred and Thirty Pounds; therefore desires Payment of it:"

It is Ordered, To be recommended to the House of Commons.

Maydwel's Ordinance to be a Filazer.

An Ordinance was presented to the House, for making Mr. Maydwell One of the Filazers; the Place being void by the Death of Mr. Franklyn; which being read, it was respited.

Ordinance for Ministers at Windsor.

An Ordinance was brought in, for appointing Three Preaching Ministers at Windsor; and being read, it was Agreed to.

Message to the H. C. with it, and about Pringle's.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Edw. Leech and Mr. Page:

1. To desire their Concurrence in the Ordinance for settling Three Preaching Ministers in Windsor.

2. To put them in Mind of Mr. Pringle's Ordinance.

L. Wharton, a Pass.

Ordered, That the Lord Wharton shall have a Pass, to transport Four Horses, or Geldings, into France.

Message from the Common Council, with a Narrative of an Insurrection in the City;-desiring the Offenders may be tried, and that a Thanks giving may be kept for their Deliverance:

This Day Alderman Fowlke, with divers other Aldermen and Common Council of the City of London, came with a Message to this House, from the Lord Mayor, and Common Council.

And Mr. Alderman Foulke made a long Narrative of the late great Danger the City was in, by reason of the Insurrection and Mutiny which happened on Sunday last; and how the City was delivered from the Fury and Rage of the said Mutineers: And afterwards presented to this House the Course and Proceedings of the Lord Mayor and Committee for the Militia took for Suppression of the Mutineers: (Here enter them.) And desired their Lordships Approbation thereof, and such further Directions as this House in their Wisdoms shall think to give, for bringing the Offenders to Punishment.

And the Desires of the City was, "That their Lordships would please to give Order to all the Ministers, within the late Lines of Communication, to keep a Day of Thanksgiving for their Deliverance; and that a Commission of Oyer and Terminer may be issued out, for the Trying of the Malefactors."

Answer to them.

The House, taking this into Consideration, returned them this Answer; which was read to them by the Speaker:

" (fn. *) The Lords acknowledge the great and happy Providence of Almighty God, in the preventing of so horrid an Outrage, which might have endangered the Lives of the Chief Magistrates, and also hazarded the Spoil of the whole City of London. In order to making their Acknowledgements to God more public, and in Answer to the Desires of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, they will appoint the Ministers of the several Parishes within the late Lines of Communication, to give Thanks unto God, the next Lord's-day, for this Preservation and Deliverance. They are well satisfied with the general Dislike and Detestation of this dangerous Outrage, expressed by you as the Sense of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of London; and will speedily order, that a Commission of Oyer and Terminer shall issue forth, for the Trial of these Malefactors. They fully approve of the Care, Endeavours, and Orders, of the Lord Mayor and Militia of the City of London, and of the Orders lately made by the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, concerning the same; and return their Thanks unto the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, and the Militia of the City of London; and they do earnestly desire them to continue still to use their Diligence and utmost Endeavours for the preventing Tumults and Outrages for the future, and to be careful for the Preservation of the Safety and Quiet of the City of London, wherein this House will always be ready to give them their best Assistance and Encouragements."

Letter of Thanks to L. Fairfax for this Service.

Ordered, That the General shall have a Letter of Thanks written to him, for his Care in sending Forces to suppress this Outrage.

Ordered, That the Papers delivered by Alderman Foulke, with the Answer to them, shall be printed and published.

Letter from Captain Crowther, about L. Inchiquin's Revolt:

A Letter from Captain Crowther, with a Paper inclosed, signifying the Lord Inchequin's Revolt from the Parliament of England, and joining himself with the Rebels of Ireland, was read. (Here enter it.)

His Son committed to The Tower.

Ordered, That this Letter be sent to the House of Commons.

Ordered, That the Lord Inchequin's Son be sent to The Tower of London, to be kept there in Safe Custody.

Message to the H. C. about it;-for a Thanksgiving for the late Deliverance of the City;-and for the Rioters to be tried.

A Message was sent to the House of Commons, by Sir Edward Leech and Mr. Page:

1. To desire their Concurrence in the Order for Sunday next to be kept a Day of Thanksgiving, for the Deliverance of the City from the late Outrage.

2. To desire Concurrence in the Order for a Commission of Oyer and Terminer, for Trial of the Offenders for the late Mutiny and Outrage in the City.

3. To desire their Concurrence, that the Lord Inchequin's Son may be sent to The Tower of London, there to be kept in safe Custody.

4. To communicate to them the Letter, and Paper inclosed, concerning the Lord Inchequin.

Colonel Payne, a Habeas Corpus.

Ordered, That a Habeas Corpus be issued out, for bringing the Body of Colonel Payne, Corpus cum Causa, before the Lords in Parliament; returnable immediatè;.

Preacher at the Fast.

Ordered, That Mr. Stronge is excused for preaching the next Fast-day before the Lords; and Mr. Joseph Symonds is appointed to preach in his Place.

Ley to be instituted to Monkleigh.

Ordered, That Doctor Bennett give Institution and Induction unto Alexand'r Ley Clerk, Batchelor of Arts, to the Vicarage of Monckeleigh, in Com. Devon, void by Death; salvo Jure cujuscunque: John Hockin Gentleman, Patron.

Ordinance appointing Judges of the Admiralty Court.

"The Lords and Commons assembled in Parliament do order and ordain, and be it Ordered and Ordained, That William Clarke, John Exton, and Isaac Dorislaus, Doctors at Law, and every of them, be, and are hereby, made, appointed, and constituted, Judges of the High Court of Admiralty; to have, hold, exercise, and enjoy, their said Offices, with all the Fees, Privileges, Rights, and Preeminences, thereunto of Right belonging, to them the said Wm. Clarke, John Exton, and Isaac Dorislaus, and every of them, respectively: And it is further Ordered and Ordained, That Oliver St. John Esquire, His Majesty's Solicitor General, do forthwith prepare several Patents, in the Form granted to the former Judge of the said Court, to pass the Great Seal of England, for the constituting of them, and every of them respectively, Judges of the High Court of Admiralty; which Grants, so to be prepared, and every of them, the Commissioners of the Great Seal are hereby authorized and required to pass under the Great Seal of England accordingly: And this Ordinance to continue for Three Months next after the Date hereof, and no longer."

Letter from Captain Crowther, with a Paper concerning the E. of Inchiquin's Revolt from the Parliament, and joining the Irish Rebels.

"To the Right Honourable the Speaker of the Honourable House of Peers of the Parliament of England. Humbly present. Westm'r.

"Aboard Bonaventure, in Kinsayle Harbour, 5 Apr. 1648.

"Right Honourable,

"The Honourable Committee of the Admiralty sending me a Commission, in October last, to be Commander in Chief of the Irish Squadron on this Coast for this Winter's Expedition now past, which I have endeavoured with all Faithfulness to perform, and have from Time to Time given that Honourable Committee Account of all Proceedings:

"But, at present, such is the sad Condition of this Kingdom's unhappy, unexpected, distracted Affairs, which seem to alter the very Surface of the Parliament of England's Interest here, that I could not but send you these Lines, to present unto your Lordship the present Negotiations which this inclosed will fully impart; that my Trust may be discharged, in giving such timely Notice as may advise what Course to be taken in a Matter of this Concernment.

"And I humbly conceive, so far I find by some Officers, that were but that Course taken as was used for the taking-in of Dublin, the Soldiery might gained easily; and so consequently the whole Province reduced to the Parliament's Obedience without further Charge or shedding of Blood, which otherwise must needs be both exhausted.

"I have already sent Ships to lie in all their Harbours, to prevent any Supplies coming in, reported to be daily expected from France and Holland, with whom comes the Marquis of Ormond.

"I assure you, there shall not be any Care wanting in me, during my Command, for their Surprizal; but, without a farther Supply of Shipping, I shall not be able to defend this Coast as I would, and as it ought to be at this Time.

"That the Parliament's Friends in these Parts might not totally suffer, I have declared Entertainment and Protection to all that shall fly for Refuge.

"I shall therefore humbly desire your Honour to speed me a Word or Two, for my present Direction during my Command; which, God (fn. *) willing, shall with all Faithfulness be performed by,

"My Lord,
"Your Honour's
Most faithful and obedient Servant,
"John Crouther.

"By this Conveyance, comes the Gentlemen themselves which attested this Relation, with divers others who can inform farther."

"In Obedience and Discharge of our Trust to the Parliament of England now sitting at Westminster, we give this Information under our Hands, to be presented to them; which we shall be ready to make good in our Persons, upon Oath, to that Honourable House; (videlicet),

"That the Lord Baron of Inchiquin, Lord President of Munster, having been abroad with some Part of his Army, whereof we are Members, did, upon the Third Day of this present Month, upon his returning Home, being at Mayallo, send for us who have hereunder subscribed, to appear presently before him at his Quarters: Which being performed, and all of us assembled together in his Presence Chamber, his Lordship declared this unto us, "That, in order to the National Covenant, and to that particular Branch thereof which concerns the reinvesting His Majesty in His Throne, he had, with the Advice of his Officers, taken a Resolution to oppose this present pretended Parliament in England, who were forced by an Independent Faction (they having broken all their Oaths and Covenants, which they had made both to God and Man); and to that Purpose was now putting himself in a Posture of Defence; and that, for the managing of this Design, he had Correspondence with the King, the Scotts, and generally all the Presbyterian Party, who were agreed with the King, and were resolved to endeavour to their utmost their reinthroning the King, and restoring a Free Parliament, which he fully declared this not to be; and, for his better effecting and carrying on this Design, he was resolved to join with the Lord Taffe and the whole Irish of the Province of Munster, who had assured him of their Assistance, both with their Persons and Estates; and that he had now sent for us, who were the only suspected Party in the Army, to impart this unto us; and to require of us our Resolution, whether we would comply with him or no in this.

"To which we answered, "We stood for King and Parliament, as we had ever done."

"Upon which, he required us, "not to juggle with him, but to declare whether it was this present Parliament which we meant; for, he said, the Truth of it was, that they did not acknowledge this to be a Parliament."

"To which we answered his Lordship, "We could not comply with him;" he still using many Aggravations to make good what he had said against them.

"And further said, "He hoped to see this pretended Parliament flat on their Backs ere Michaelmas Day; and that this was no rash Resolution, but a premeditated Action; he being confident that, let it come to the worst that could be, yet, in spight of all, he would be able to procure good Terms both for himself and those that adhere to him: And that which chiefly induced him to put it in Practice at present was, that he was now assured he was before-hand with the Independent Party, which he was never before. Yet he had thought for some Time longer to have forborn his declaring; but that some Suspicions the Vice Admiral, Captain John Crouther, had of him could not permit him to carry it private any longer, in regard the said Captain Crouther had protested against him, and blocked up his Harbours."

"And his Lordship did further declare, "That all who would not join with him in this Design, he required them to depart, and go for England; for that he would not permit any near him, nor in his Army, who would not faithfully comply with him in this Intention."

"And, as a Motive to induce us to join with him, he informed us, "That he was certainly assured that Colonel Joanes had, by Order from the Parliament of England, made a Cessation with Owen Roe Oneale and that Faction, who chose rather to enter into League with the Parliament than the King; and that in respect he would now join with the Lord Taffe and Munster Forces in Opposition to the other."

"For the Truth of all these Premises, we have hereunto subscribed our Names, this 7 April. 1648, aboard The Bonadventure, in Kinsale Harbour.

"Christopher Elsinge.
"J. Grey.
"Tho. Chandler.
"Alex. Barrington.
"Tho. Davis.
"Copia vera,
"John Crouther."

Langley to be instituted to Swettenham.

Ordered, That Doctor Aylett give Institution and Induction unto Sam. Langley Clerk, Master of Arts, to the Rectory of Swettenham, in Com. Cheshire, void by Resignation of Sam. Catherall Clerk, late Incumbent; salvo Jure, &c.: Elizabeth Davenport, Patroness.

Browning versus Stanbury, in Error.

Ordered, That the Cause between Tymothy Browning Plaintiff, against William Stanbury Defendant, upon a Writ of Error depending in this House, shall be argued, at this Bar, at Ten, on the 18th Instant; and the Parties to attend by Counsel.

Captain Wilkins to transport 400 Men, for Prince Philip, to Vonice.

"Whereas, in October last, upon the Desire of the Prince Elector, the Lords and Commons in Parliament assembled did grant Leave for the levying and transporting of Four Hundred Men, to Two Captains having Commission from Prince Philip, Brother to the Prince Elector, to be employed in the Service of the State of Venice; and it being now represented to the Houses, by Letters from the Prince Elector, of 4 April. 1648, That, those Captains not being able to perform those Conditions upon which they had engaged, there hath as yet been nothing at all done upon that Business: The Lords and Commons, in Pursuance of their former Order and favourable Intentions to the Prince, and upon Desire of the Prince Elector, do order, and it is hereby Ordered, That Captain Wilkens, who hath undertaken the same Employment, shall have free Leave, according to the said former Order, to levy and transport Four Hundred Men, for Prince Philip, to be employed in the Service of the State of Venice; the said Captain Wilkens giving good Assurance, that it shall not be to the Prejudice of the Affairs of this Kingdom."

Narrative of a great Tumult and Riot in the City.

(fn. *) "A full Narration of the late riotous Tumult within the City of London, and Proceedings of the Lord Mayor, Committee of Militia, and the Common Council of the said City, concerning the same; presented to the House of Peers upon Thursday the 13 of April, 1648; with their Lordships Answer thereunto.

Commune Concilium tent. in Camera Guildhall Civitatis London, Undecimo Die Aprilis, 1648, Annoque Regni Domini nostri Caroli, nunc Regis Angliæ, &c. Vicesimo Quarto, coram Johanne Warner, Majore Civit. London. &c.

"At this Common Council, Master Alderman Fowke and Master Alderman Gibbs, by the Direction of the Committee of the Militia of London, did make a large Relation of the great Tumult, Insurrection, and Mutiny, which happened in this City on the last Lord'sday and Monday last, by many evil-disposed Persons, who first began on the Lord's-day in the Afternoon in the County of Middlesex, where they seized the Colours of One of the Trained Bands of the said County, who were there employed for the suppressing of such Persons as did prophane the Lord's-day; and, being dispersed by some of the General's Forces, did gather together within the City of London and Liberties thereof, and, in a riotous Manner, did break open divers Houses, and Magazines of Arms and Ammunition, and took away Arms, Plate, Money, and other Things, and did seize upon the Drums of the Trained Bands of this City, which were beating to raise their Companies, and armed themselves, and beat up Drums, and put themselves in a Warlike Posture, and seized upon the Gates, Chains, and Watches of this City; and then marched to the Lord Mayor's House, and there assaulted the Lord Mayor, Sheriffs, Committee of the Militia of London, and other Magistrates of the same; and did shoot into the Lord Mayor's House, beat back his Guards, killed One of them, wounded divers others, and seized and took away a Piece of Ordnance from thence, with which they did afterwards slay and wound divers Persons; and committed many other Outrages: All which Matters being largely debated, and many Particulars insisted upon, both for the Discovery and Punishment of the said Misdemeanors and Outrages, and also for the preventing of the like for Time to come, it was at the last concluded and agreed, by this Common Council, as followeth:

"First, This Common Council do generally conceive, that this City was in great Danger, by reason of the said Outrages and Misdemeanors; and that, if the same had not so timely been prevented and stayed, the whole City would have been exposed to the Fury and Rage of the said Malefactors: And this Common Council doth declare, That the same Misdemeanor and Outrage was a horrid and detestable Act, tending to the Destruction of the City; and that they do disavow the same, and with an utter Detestation do declare their Dislike thereof: And this Common Council do appoint the Committee of the Militia of London to make the same known to the Honourable Houses of Parliament; and also to make an humble Request unto them, That an Order may be issued forth from them, to the several Ministers of this City, and the Places adjacent, that they may be directed to give Public Thanks to Almighty God, the Author of this great and wonderful Deliverance from that imminent Danger wherein this City and Parts adjacent were involved: And further, the said Committee are appointed by this Court to apply themselves to the Honourable Houses of Parliament, for the obtaining of a special Commission of Oyer and Terminer, for the trying and punishing of all the Malefactors that had a Hand in this detestable Action, according to the known Laws of this Land. And this Court with thankful Hearts do acknowledge the Instruments, under God, by which they obtained this Deliverance, to be by the Forces raised and continued by the Parliament, under the Command of his Excellency the Lord General Fairfax; and, to manifest the same, this Common Council do also order, That the said Committee of the Militia, in the Name of this City, as a Thing upon by a unanimous Consent, shall return their hearty Thanks to his Excellency, for his speedy and seasonable Aid afforded unto the City, in this their great Straight and Danger: And this Court, with a general Consent, do well approve of the Endeavours of the said Committee of the Militia for London, for the raising of the Forces of this City, and in their procuring of the said Aid and Help from his Excellency in this Extremity, and what else they have done for the appeasing and suppressing of the said Tumults: And this Court doth give Thanks to the said Committee of the Militia, for their Care and Pains by them taken upon this sad Occasion; and they do appoint Master Alderman Fowke to declare the same their Thanks to such of the said Committee as are not of this Court. And this Court doth also with all Thankfulness acknowledge the Pains and Care of the Right Honourable the Lord Mayor, and the Right Worshipful the Sheriffs of this City therein. And this Court do generally declare, That it is the Duty of every Citizen of this City, by himself and all that do belong unto him, or is under his Command, to be ready, upon all Occasions, to be aiding and assisting unto the Lord Mayor and the rest of the Magistrates of this City, for the suppressing of all Tumults and Disorders within the same; and the several Persons now present at this Common Council (by the holding up of their Hands) have promised, that for the Time to come they will use their utmost Endeavours, and be ready upon all Occasions, to do the same.

"Michell."

Orders of the London Militia Committee, and Lord Mayor, &c. for suppresing it.

"At the Committee of the Militia of London, the Tenth of April, 1648.

"Ordered, That my Lord Mayor be hereby desired to call a Common Council To-morrow Morning, at Ten of the Clock; and that last Night's Tumult be reported to the Court, by Alderman Fowke and Alderman Gibbs; and what this Committee then did for the Safety of this City, and what Application they were forced to make to the General for his Assistance.

"Adam Banckes, Clerk to the said Committee."

"Whereas, by virtue of an Ordinance of Parliament, dated the Second of September, 1647, it was Ordained and Declared, That we, the Persons intrusted with the Ordering of the Militia within the City of London and the Liberties thereof, should have full Power and Authority to cause all and singular His Majesty's Subjects, inhabiting within the said City and Liberties, that are meet and fit for the Wars, from Time to Time to be assembled and called together, and to be listed, well and sufficiently arrayed, weaponed, trained, and exercised, and put in Readiness, in Places most fit for that Purpose; and, for the better Execution of the said Ordinance, to make Colonels, Captains, and other Officers; and to lead, conduct, and employ the said Forces, arrayed and weaponed, for the safeguarding of the said City and Liberties, and for the Suppression of all Rebellions, Insurrections, and Invasions, that may happen within the same, and to give Battle and fight with them and their Adherents, and all others that shall approach with any such Force towards or against the Parliament or the City of London and Liberties thereof, or cause any Insurrection within the same, and them to invade, resist, repress, subdue, pursue, kill, and slay, and by all Means to destroy, as Enemles of the Kingdom: We do therefore pray and require you, to observe all Particulars abovementioned unto you belonging, and to proceed therein according to the Duty of your Place.

"Dated at Guildhall, London, the 30 of October, 1647.

"Jo. Warner, Mayor.
Owen Rowe.
Thomas Noel.
Marke Hildsley.
Stephen Estwick.
Jo. Wollaston.
Tho. Andrewes.
Will. Berkeley.
Tho. Player."

"Colonel Underwood,

"You are hereby required to raise your Regiment, and to draw them to the Place of Rendezvouz, compleatly armed, and furnished with Powder, Match, and Bullet; and to suppress all Tumults and Insurrections that may be to the Prejudice of the Peace of the City, by sending out Parties and Companies, or otherwise as you shall see Cause: And for so doing, this shall be your Warrant.

"Dated at the Lord Mayor's Place, the Ninth of April, 1648.

"The Warrant above was issued to

Colonel Underwood,
Colonel Rowe,
Colonel Hayes,
Lieutenant Colonel Camfield,
Colonel Harrison,

"Adam Bankes, Clerk to the Committee of the Militia, London."

"Whereas Tumults do much increase in the City, and the Drums of the Trained Bands are taken from them: It is thought fit, and so Ordered, by the Committee of the Militia, London, That the Chains of the several Wards be forthwith let down; and the Deputies and Common Council-men and Constables are required to take Notice hereof accordingly:

"Dated the Ninth of April, 1648."

"To the Alderman of the Ward of Farringdon Within.

"By the Mayor.

"These are to will and require you, in Pursuance of an Order of the Committee of the Militia for London, That, for the Safety of this City, you take Care and see that the Hooks and Staples, which fasten the Chains to the Posts within your Ward, be forthwith this Night pulled out; and that they and the Chains be by you taken and disposed of in some safe and secure Place, where your Deputy and Common Council shall think most convenient, until further Order be given in this Behalf: And hereof fail you not, as you will answer the contrary at your Peril.

"Dated the Tenth of April, 1648.

"Michell."

Answer to the Message from the Common Council about it.

(fn. *) "Their Lordships Answer.

"The Lords acknowledge the great and happy Providence of Almighty God, in the preventing of so horrid an Outrage, which might have endangered the Lives of the Chief Magistrates, and also hazarded the Spoil of the whole City of London. In order to making their Acknowledgements to God more public, and in Answer to the Desires of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, they will appoint the Ministers of the several Parishes within the late Lines of Communication to give Thanks unto God, the next Lord's-day, for this Preservation and Deliverance. They are well satisfied with the general Dislike and Detestation of this dangerous Outrage, expressed by you as the Sense of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of London; and will speedily order that a Commission of Oyer and Terminer shall issue forth, for the Trial of these Malefactors. They fully approve of the Care, Endeavours, and Orders, of the Lord Mayor, and Militia of the City of London, and of the Orders lately made by the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, concerning the same; and return their Thanks unto the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, and the Militia of the City of London; and they do earnestly desire them to continue still to use their Diligence and utmost Endeavours for the preventing Tumults and Outrages for the future, and to be careful for the Preservation of the Safety and Quiet of the City of London, wherein this House will always be ready to give them their best Assistance and Encouragements.

"Joh. Browne, Cler. Parliamentorum.

"Die Jovis, 13 April. 1648.

"Ordered, by the Lords assembled in Parliament, That this Narration be forthwith printed and published.

"Joh. Brown,

Cler. Parliamentorum."

Adjourn.

House adjourned till 10a cras.

Footnotes

* This Answer occurs again at the End of the Day in Print, and bound up with other Papers concerning this Transaction.
* Origin. Willingly.
* This Narration, and other Papers to the End of this Day, is printed, and bound in with the Original.
* This Answer is entered verbatim in MS. at the Beginning of this Day.