The London lay subsidy of 1332
Appendices and Notes

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

George Unwin (editor)

Year published

1918

Supporting documents

Pages

57-60

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'The London lay subsidy of 1332: Appendices and Notes', Finance and trade under Edward III: The London lay subsidy of 1332 (1918), pp. 57-60. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33006 Date accessed: 23 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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ANALYSIS OF THE PAYMENTS IN THE WARDS

Amount paid Nos in Nos £1 & 10/- paying & 5/ Between & 5/-& Between 16d &
Ward £ s d ward + + + 16d under
Aldgate 5 9 21 2 - 3 15 1
Aldersgate 5 17 11¾ 43 - - 4 22 17
Bassieshaw 4 14 11¼ 18 1 2 2 4 9
Billingsgate 24 10 49 8 6 14 11 10
Bishopsgate 22 6 47 5 2 2 13 25
Bread St 23 16 77 6 9 13 25 24
Bridge 47 12 10½ 72 19 8 6 18 21
Broad St 33 7 74 10 6 8 25 25
Candlewick 13 15 45 4 2 6 27 6
Castle Baynard 8 3 10 46 - 1 12 20 13
Cheap 67 3 127 20 23 16 35 33
Coleman St 16 18 59 4 6 8 16 25
Cordwainer 62 13 73 18 13 19 16 7
Cornhill 12 0 43 - 8 13 13 9
Cripplegate Within 36 10 74 13 9 11 15 21
(5 amounts missing )
Cripplegate Without 7 9 43 1 2 7 12 21
Dowgate 30 18 85 14 3 14 24 30
Farringdon Within 48 8 4 130 16 7 14 50 43
Farringdon Without 31 19 98 7 6 21 19 41
(4 amounts missing )
Langbourn 18 17 8 77 5 4 9 14 45
Limestreet 2 6 18 1 - - 4 13
Portsoken 5 7 23 1 1 5 4 12
Queenhithe 20 19 74 4 4 14 17 35
Tower 34 6 4 73 9 5 7 34 18
Vintry 37 10 0 40 7 4 8 14 7
Walbrook 47 2 4 107 13 10 17 35 32
£670 7 1,636 188 141 253 502 543

THE CRAFTS IN THE DIFFERENT CLASSES

(The scanty information given in the roll has been supplemented by search in the London records )

Amount for
which
assessed £4 & over
4 pepperers, 1 vintner, 1 butcher
2 mercers, 2 woolmongers, 1 draper
Between £1 £4 20 fishmongers, 7 pepperers, 3 butchers, 3 vintners
6 mercers, 4 woolmongers, 12 drapers, 2 tailors, 1 haber
dasher, 2 burlers, 1 dyer
7 skinners, 1 tanner, 3 cordwainers, 1 saddler, 1 whit
tawyer, 2 girdlers, 1 bookbinder
7 goldsmiths, 6 bladers, 1 woodmonger, 1 chandler, 1
painter
Between 10/- & £1 9 fishmongers, 1 pepperer, 6 vintners, 3 butchers, 2
cheesemongers, 1 salter, 1 cook, 1 baker, 2 apothecaries
1 chaucer, 5 mercers, 2 woolmongers, 2 drapers, 2 tailors,
1 burler, 1 dyer, 1 fripperer
5 skinners, 1 tanner, 4 cordwainers, 1 glover, 1 girdler
2 bladers, 1 woodmonger, 3 ironmongers, 1 plumber,
1 armourer, 1 spurrier, 1 mason, 1 tiler, 1 shipwright,
1 corder
1 barber, 1 clerk
Between 5/- & 10/ 15 fishmongers, 1 pepperer, 2 spicers, 11 butchers,
4 vintners, 1 brewer, 1 cook, 1 salter
3 woolmongers, 1 draper, 2 tailors, 1 weaver, 1 tapicer,
1 fripperer
8 skinners, 3 tanners, 2 curriers, 4 cordwainers, 1 purser,
1 cofferer
4 goldsmiths, 3 carpenters, 3 ironmongers, 1 plumber,
1 tiler, 1 armourer, 1 potter, 2 chandlers
1 clerk, 1 horsedealer
Between5/- & 16d 11 fishmongers, 2 grocers, 14 butchers, 1 pork butcher,
4 vintners, 7 brewers, 1 taverner, 1 hostler, 4 drawers,
2 cornmongers, 1 fruiterer
3 woolmongers, 2 drapers, 4 tailors, 2 haberdashers,
5 burlers, 1 fuller, 1 tapicer, 4 hatters, 1 hosier, 2 fripperers
12 skinners, 6 tanners, 8 saddlers, 1 fuster, 4 cordwainers,
1 bracer, 3 girdlers
10 goldsmiths, 4 bladers, 3 ironmongers, 1 armourer,
1 bowyer, 1 spurrier, 1 cutler, 1 brassour, 1 joiner,
2 potters, 2 corders, 2 chandlers, 2 cirgers, 3 image-makers
Between 16d & 8d 6 fishmongers, 10 butchers, 2 vintners, 6 brewers, 1 taverner,
1 cook, 2 bakers, 1 fruiterer, 1 poulterer
1 woolbroker, 1 draper, 1 mercer, 4 tailors, 6 weavers,
1 shearman, 1 burler, 1 dyer, 4 tapicers, 2 hatters, 2 hosiers
9 skinners, 2 tanners, 1 currier, 1 leather merchant,
5 cordwainers, 1 saddler, 1 fuster, 2 girdlers
5 goldsmiths, 3 armourers, 1 spurrier, 3 cutlers, 2 carpen
ters, 1 plumber, 1 coppersmith, 1 smith, 1 ironmonger,
1 pavier, 3 chandlers, 1 cirger
1 barber

NOTE I WOMEN IN THE CRAFT GILDS

Dr Cunningham in a passage on the position of women in the craft gilds (fn. 1) says that in the case of the London weavers, the weaver's rights descended to his widow, but that this seems to have been exceptional

But in the case of five men in the roll, of four different trades, they expected their wives to carry on their business, as they left to them the remaining term of an apprentice Thomas de Worstede, mercer, left also to his wife, six chests in a seld, (fn. 2) and another mercer, Henry le Chener, left to his wife, his shop in the great seld of London, and also the remaining term of two apprentices (fn. 3) , John Trapp, a skinner (fn. 4) , Simon de Turnham, a fishmonger, (fn. 5) and John de Somersham, draper, (fn. 6) each assigned one apprentice to his wife

It might be contended that though this was done, the custom had no sanction from the craft or city authorities, but it is stated in the will of Simon de Turnham that his wife or his executors shall present the apprentice, "at the end of his term in the Gildhall, as a good and faithful apprentice, as is the custom, and make him free and lawful, according to the custom of the city for apprentices" There is evidently no doubt of the wife's power to do this, or the duty would have been left to the executors alone

So the widow's rights seem to have been of the fullest kind, extending even to those which belonged to to the members of the craft gilds as burgesses

NOTE II THE TRANSLATION OF ALDERMEN

The translation of aldermen from one ward to another was frequent in the fourteenth as in later centuries Mr Beaven makes some comments about it, but he gives no reason for the translations (fn. 1)

The roll, by indicating the man's residence, makes it possible to suggest an explanation

In the cases where an alderman was not translated he was generally living in the ward that he was elected by in the first instance This is true of John de la Rokele (Dowgate), William de Briklesworth (Tower), Ralph de Upton (Coleman Street), and John de Cotoun (Walbrook)

But it would frequently happen that there was no vacancy in the ward of residence of the man who wished to become an alderman In such cases, he would represent another ward, and might in time be elected to the ward he lived in This appears to have been the case with Andrew Aubrey and John de Grantham, who were translated from Bread Street and Cornhill respectively, to the aldermancy of Cordwainer Richard Constantin was probably translated from Aldersgate to Cripplegate, (fn. 2) and Bartholomew Deumars was translated from Bishopsgate to Dowgate, and Henry Combemartyn from Aldgate to Tower

In all these cases the aldermen served first for poor wards which would always be dependent on the richer wards for their aldermen But translation was as frequent from the rich wards as from the poor (fn. 3)

NOTE III THE MYSTERY OF BLADERS

On page 233 of Letter Book E there is evidently a misreading or a misprint of "beader" for "blader" The wardens here mentioned are elsewhere called blader-e g Hamo le Barber in Bk F, p 220, Cal Wills, I, 533, and John Ate Loke, Cal Wills, I, 544

Footnotes

1 Growth of English Industry and Commerce, I, 352
2 Cal Wills, I, 489
3 Ib, I, 462
4 Ib, I 475
5 Ib, I, 495
6 Ib, I, 441
1 Aldermen of London, 240-1
2 Ib, 385
3 Ib, 241