Folios cxxxi - cxl

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1902

Pages

263-276

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'Folios cxxxi - cxl', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: D: 1309-1314 (1902), pp. 263-276. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33086 Date accessed: 25 November 2014.


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Folio cxxxi.

De Johanne le Lorymer.

Prisona.

John le Lorymer attached, for that he is indicted in the Ward of Bradestrete as a misdoer and common bruiser (comunis pugnator), wandering about by night to attack freemen and strangers, contrary to the peace of the lord the King. Also because he is indicted in the Ward of Bassieshawe as a bad character and a disturber of the King's peace and as a doer of many evil things, contrary to the peace, &c. He appeared, and being asked how he would acquit himself thereof, he says that he is no way guilty, and puts himself upon the country, &c. And the jury, by Adam Trugge and others, come and say on their oath that the said John le Lorymer is guilty of the trespasses aforesaid. Therefore he is committed to prison, &c.

Rog's fr' Joh'is le Lorimer.

Prisona.

Roger, brother of the above John le Lorymer, attached because indicted in the Ward of Bassieshawe for similar practices. He puts himself on the country. The jury, by Adam Trugge and others, find him guilty, and he is committed to prison, &c.

Manucapcio.

Afterwards, viz., on Thursday before Easter [11 April], 4 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], he is mainprised by Master Edmund de London, Richard le Clerk, Dyonisius de Cauntebrige, William le Chaundeler, Simon de Wylcestre, Adam de Hallyngbery, John le Haneper, Richard Roolf, and Richard de Berkynge, and set free, &c.

Oliver' de "Moltone."

Prisona.

Oliver de "Multone" attached because indicted in the Wards of Chepe, Tower, and Creplegate for similar practices, as well as for enticing men to taverns for gambling purposes. Found guilty and committed to prison. (fn. 1)

Thom' de Brackele.

Q.

Thomas de Brackele attached because indicted in the Wards of Creplegate and Bassieshawe as a disturber of the peace, a night-walker, and frequenter of taverns with harlots, &c. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country, &c. The jury, by Adam Trugge and others, find him not guilty, therefore let him be thereof quit. Nevertheless, it is considered by the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Aldermen of the City that he should find sufficient mainprise for good behaviour in the future.

Folio cxxxi b.

Rogerus Wyndewawe tapicer.

Prisona.

Roger Wyndewawe attached because indicted in the Wards of Tower, Langgebourne, Billinggesgate, and Bridge as a nightwalker and disturber of the King's peace Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. The jury, by Adam Trugge and others, find him guilty. Therefore he is committed to prison, &c.

Thom' de Boloygne.

Prisona.

Thomas, son of Thomas de "Boloyngne," attached because indicted in the Wards of Tower, Langburne, Billinggesgate, Bridge, Bassieshaw, and elsewhere for various offences against the peace and for beating the watch in the Ward of Billinggesgate, by procuration of Stephen the Clerk of St. Mary "atte helle." Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. The jury, by the above Adam and others, find him guilty of having assaulted the watch in the Ward of Billinggesgate in Christmas week, anno 4 Edward II., but acquit him of other charges. Therefore he is committed to prison for his attack on the watch, &c., and is quit as to the other articles, &c.

Joh'es Vincent et Rog'us fr' eius.

Q'.

John Vincent and Roger his brother attached because indicted in the Ward of Bassieshawe and divers other Wards for being disturbers of the peace. They plead not guilty and put themselves on the country. The jury, by Adam Trugge and others, find them not guilty. Therefore let them be thereof quit.

Folio cxxxii.

Johannes de Rokesle.

Prisona.

John de Rokeslee attached because indicted in the Wards of Vintry, Crepelgate, and elsewhere as frequenting taverns with harlots, and as having no business whereby to maintain himself nor private means, as they (the accusers) understand, (fn. 2) and yet is well clothed, &c. He pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. Is found guilty and committed, &c.

Rogerus de Rudham.

Q'.

Roger de Rudham attached because indicted in the Ward of Tower and elsewhere as a disturber of the peace, &c. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. The jury find him not guilty. Therefore let him be thereof quit, &c.

Petrus atte Sole.

Prisona.

Peter atte Sole attached because indicted in Tower Ward and elsewhere as night-walker and assaulter of men, &c. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. Found guilty and is committed, &c.

Petrus le Taverner.

Prisona.

Peter le Taverner, called "Holer," attached because indicted in the Wards of Vintry, Douegate, and elsewhere as a bad character. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. Found guilty and committed, &c.

Thom' fil' Sarre.

Q'.

Thomas, son of Sarah la Bredmongestere, (fn. 3) of Douegate Ward, John Sterre, wyndrawer, and John le Spicer attached because indicted in the Ward of Vintry and elsewhere as nightwalkers and disturbers of the peace. Plead not guilty and put themselves on the country. Found not guilty. Therefore let them all be thereof quit, &c.

Folio cxxxii b.

Joh'es ae "Boloyne."

Prisona.

John "Blome" attached because indicted as a common "wagabund" by night and for committing batteries, &c., in the Ward of Aldresgate and elsewhere. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. Found guilty and is committed.

manucapcio.

Afterwards, on Thursday before Easter [11 April], 4 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], he is released by mainprise of William de Suningham, Robert Burel, Gilbert Ladde, John Coterel, cordwainer, Hamo Cook, junior, and John le Haneper.

Joh'es le "Seour."

Prisona.

John le "Seuwour" attached because indicted in the Ward of Tower and other Wards as a bruiser and night-walker. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. Found guilty and committed, &c.

manuc'.

Afterwards, viz., on Thursday before Easter [11 April], 4 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], he failed to find mainprise, and the Mayor of his favour allowed him to make oath that he would behave himself in future. Let him therefore be released, &c.

Ricardus Heryng.

Q'.

Richard Heryng, chaplain, attached because indicted in the Ward of Farndone and elsewhere as a bruiser and nightwalker, &c. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. Found not guilty, therefore let him go quit.

Joh'nes le "Tapicer."

Prisona.

John le "Tapiter," brother of Elena la "Tapetere," attached because indicted in Vintry Ward and elsewhere as a nightwalker and disturber of the peace. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. Found guilty and committed.

John de Kysselyn attached because indicted in the Ward of Douegate as a night-walker and assaulter of men, &c. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. Found not guilty. Let him therefore go quit.

Folio cxxxiii.

Thom' de Bery, Nich's de Brigge.

Thom' de Bery commiss' est prisone et Nich's de Brigge-Q'.

Thomas de Bery [and] Nicholas de Brigge attached because indicted in the Ward of Creplegate as night-walkers and frequenters of taverns, &c., and because they are well clothed and use no business whereby they can be maintained and have no rents, as they [the accusers] understand (prout intendunt), &c. Plead not guilty and put themselves on the country. The jury find the aforesaid Thomas guilty, and Nicholas not guilty. Therefore it is adjudged that the said Thomas shall go to prison and Nicholas go quit.

Magister Rog'us le Shyrmysour.

Prisona.

Master Roger le Skirmisour attached because indicted for holding a school for fencing (de skirmeria) and drawing young men together, sons of respectable parents, to the wasting of their property and injury of their own characters. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. Found guilty and committed to prison.

Walt'us Brond et Rob's de Gunneby.

Walter Brond and Robert de Gunneby attached because indicted in the Ward of Creplegate and elsewhere for receiving unknown night-walkers and disturbers of the peace. Plead not guilty and put themselves on the country. Found not guilty, therefore let them be thereof quit.

Rob's Delle, chaundeler, Hub'tus le Batour et Henr' Davy.

Robert Delle, "chaundeler," attached because indicted in Creplegate Ward as a bad character; Walter de Gloucestre attached because indicted in the same Ward as a night-walker; and Hubert le Batour and Henry Davy attached because indicted in the same Ward as bruisers, &c. Plead not guilty and put themselves on the country. Found not guilty, therefore let them be thereof quit.

Ad' fr' Mich'is le Pottere.

Adam, brother of Michael le Pottere, attached because indicted in the Ward of Creplegate as a misdoer, and Jordan de Balesham likewise. Plead not guilty and put themselves on the country. Found not guilty, therefore let them be thereof quit.

Folio cxxxiii b.

Johannes Baron.

Q'.

John Baroun attached because indicted in the Ward of Bassieshawe for keeping open house at night and receiving nightwalkers and dice-players; and John Vautort attached because indicted in the same Ward as being of ill fame. Plead not guilty and put themselves on the country. Found not guilty, therefore let them be thereof quit.

Henr' de Kirkeby.

Q'.

Henry de Kirkeby attached because indicted in the Ward of Bisshoppesgate as a receiver of strangers who wound men and afterwards return home. Pleads not guilty and puts himself on the country. Found not guilty, therefore let him be quit.

Edm' de Pel ham et Ric'us de Pelham.

Prisona.

Edmund de Pelham and Richard de Pelham attached because indicted in the Ward of Walebroke as night-walkers and "Rorers" defrauding strangers. Plead not guilty and put themselves on the country. The jury find Edmund not guilty, but Richard his son guilty.

Simon Braban.

Prisona.

Q'.

Simon Braban, companion of Oliver de Multone, attached because indicted in the Ward of Walebroke as a night-walker and "Rorer" defrauding strangers, &c.; Richard, son of Gregory le Pastemakere, likewise because indicted in the Ward of Bisshopesgate as a night-walker; Thomas de Bery, son of William le Mariner, likewise because indicted in the Ward of Langebourne as making a living out of gains of "Rorers," &c.; Stephen, son of Roger le Brayeler, likewise because indicted in the same Ward as a misdoer, &c.; John Burelman likewise because indicted in the Ward of Billinggesgate as a bruiser, &c.; and Thomas le Messager likewise because indicted in the same Ward for assaulting the guardians of the peace. Plead not guilty and put themselves on the country. The jury, by Adam Truge and others, find Simon Braban, Richard son of Gregory, Thomas de Bery, and John Burelman guilty, and Stephen le Brayeler and Thomas le Messager not guilty.

[Folio cxxxiv blank.]

Folio cxxxiv b.

Common Memoranda, anno 5 Edward II., temp. Richer de Refham, Mayor.

Ordinacio Cantar' pro anima d' ni Will'i de Carletone.

Ordinance to the effect that the Mayor and Aldermen, together with four of the leading parishioners of the parish of St. Mary de Aldermanbery, cause to be elected yearly at Michaelmas a chantry priest in the said parish church to pray for the soul of William de Carletone and others, the said William having by his will, proved and enrolled on Monday the morrow of St. James, Ap. [25 July], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], (fn. 4) devised certain houses (formerly belonging to Sir William de Witheresfeld, a chaplain) in the said parish, and certain rents belonging to John Dode in the parish of [St. Michael] de Bassieshawe, to Hervey his cook, charged with the maintenance of such a chantry for the good of the souls of the testator, Bartholomew de Castello, and others.

Breve Regis de arestando mercatores de Societate Friscobaldorum.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to seize the bodies and the property of the merchants of the Society of the Friscobaldi of Florence, to whom the King had recently committed the issues of the custom on wools, skins, and woolfells in England, Ireland, and Scotland, as well as the custody of the King's Exchange in London and at Canterbury, inasmuch as the said merchants were understood to be about to leave the country without rendering their account to the King. Dated Westminster [sic] on Tweed, 6 July, 4 Edward II. [A.D. 1311].

By virtue of the above writ all merchants of the Society of the Friscobaldi found in the City of London were attached, viz., on Sunday before the Feast of St. Margaret [20 July], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311].

The writ remains in possession of the Sheriffs.

Afterwards, viz., on Tuesday after the Feast of St. Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.], the aforesaid merchants came into the Chamber of the Guildhall and brought the following writs:-

Folio cxxxv.

Brevia ad dearestandum mercator' de.

Soc' Friscobald' et omma bona sua.

Writ of Privy Seal to the Mayor and Sheriffs of London expressing the King's surprise at having heard that they have arrested the companions and goods of Betyn and of Emeryk de Friscobaud (fn. 5) and of their Society, and bidding the said Mayor and Sheriffs forthwith to release them. Dated Alnewik, 27 July, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311].

The writ remains in possession of the Mayor.

Similar writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs ordering the release of all merchants of the Society of the Friscobaldi of Florence who had been arrested pursuant to his former writ, inasmuch as the King had received assurance that a true account would be rendered by the merchants on a day assigned. Dated Berwick on Tweed, 28 July, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311].

The writ remains in possession of the Mayor.

By virtue of the above two writs the said merchants, formerly attached, were released, together with their goods and chattels.

Recogn' Matild' de Salle facta Joh'i Est, mercer.

Thursday after the Feast of St. Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], came Matilda de Salle before Richer de Refham, Mayor, and Simon de Paris, Alderman, and Luke de Haverynge, the Chamberlain, in the presence of Robert de Keleseye and Hugh de Waltham, clerk, and acknowledged she had received from John Est, mercer, 60s. in part payment of £11 in which the said John stood bound to her by virtue of an agreement made by William de Gartone and Matilda his wife and the aforesaid Matilda de Salle for the benefit of the said John touching a shop in "la Brodeselde," now tenanted by Ralph Balle, and demised by the said Matilda de Salle to the said John Est for a term of years.

Folio cxxxv b.

Account of the citizens of London rendered before the Treasurer and Barons of the Exchequer, anno 4 Edward II., by Richer de Refham, Mayor, John de Wengrave, William de Leire, and Nicholas Pikot, Aldermen, and Hugh de Waltham, clerk, who rendered the said account on behalf of the whole Commonalty, touching ancient debts and purprestures, as appears below.

The citizens of London render account of [inter alia] £20 for John Adrian and Walter Hervy; (fn. 6) of £1,000 fine for remission and pardon of arrears of 20,000 marks and for pardon of £100 for contempt; and of £1,049 13s. 11d. received of divers Sheriffs for payment of certain Gascon creditors. (fn. 7)

In the Treasury [inter alia], £234 10s. 11d. for Robert de Rokesle and Martin de Aumbresbury (fn. 8) in three tallies; 53s. 4d. for Gerin le Lyndraper; £10 for Stephen de Oystregate for the escape of William Criol; £10 for Henry Wale, his share for the escape of the said William; £29 18s. 3d. by the citizens for Elyas Russel; 67s. 4d. by Robert de Clamorgan for Martin de Aumbresbury; also divers sums in respect of Luke de Batencourt for escapes, &c., for which the citizens claim not to be liable. Also in the Treasury, £16 by Thomas de Suffolk and his fellows in the Ward of Walebroke; £10 by Walter de Finchingfeld of the Ward of William le Mazerer. (fn. 9)

Folio cxxxvi.

The citizens of London owe £363 11s. 2d. for arrears of purprestures for the seventeenth year [Edward I.] and previous years for Sheriffs, but claim exemption from arrears in respect of two messuages which formerly belonged to William with the beard (cum barba (fn. 10) ) and became escheated to King Henry I., who granted the same to Walter de Brunwyche, the said tenements being severally situate in the parish of St. Nicholas Hakoun and in Estchepe, and sometime tenanted by Felicia Colnere, wife of Josce le Joefne, and Richard Russel.

Folio cxxxvi b.

Writ to the Treasurer and Barons of the Exchequer to inquire into the justice of the City's claim of exemption in respect of the tenement of Felicia Colnere, otherwise known as Felicia, wife of Josce le Joefne. Dated Berwick on Tweed, 20 Feb., 4 Edward II. [A.D. 1310-11].

Folio cxxxvii.

Similar writ to the same to inquire into the justice of the City's claim of exemption in respect of the tenement sometime held by Richard Russel in Estchepe. Dated Berwick on Tweed, 3 March, 4 Edward II. [A.D. 1310-11].

Record of proceedings thereon.

[Folio cxxxviii b blank.]

Folio cxxxix.

Common Memoranda, anno 5 Edward II.

Scriptum Joh'is [le] Mire.

Deed of assignment by Hugh de Asshebourne, cordwamer, to John le Mire, draper, of a bond in the sum of £10 due to the said Hugh from Stephen Ferebraz. Dated Thursday before the Feast of St. Laurence [10 Aug.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311].

De capellariis.

In the time of Sir Hugh Fitz Oto, late Warden of the City, viz., on Monday next before the Feast of SS. Perpetua and Felicitas [7 March], anno lij°, liij°, and liiij° [sic] Henry III., certain ordinances touching the craft of cappers and the manner of making caps in the City of London were published in the presence of the Aldermen, and with their unanimous assent and in full Husting were read and confirmed, (fn. 11) viz.:-

That no one make a cap except of good white or grey wool or black. And if any other be made, let it forthwith be condemned by the bailiffs of the City. Also that no one shall cause an old cap to be dyed black for selling again, because when he goes in the rain it falls to pieces and loses colour. Also if any one of the craft bring such a cap, both he and his goods are to be attached until the bailiff be found to whom to deliver him in order that justice may be done. (fn. 12) Also for keeping and maintaining the above articles six good men were sworn, who should give yearly to the Commonalty 6s. 8d.

Afterwards on Monday the Feast of St. Peter in Cathedra [22 Feb.], 4 Edward II. [A.D. 1310-11], there came good men of the craft of cappers before Richer de Refham, the Mayor, Nicholas Farendone, Thomas Romayn, John de Wengrave, William de Leire, Henry de Durham, Nicholas Pikot, Nigel Drury, William Cosyn, Simon de Paris, William de Coumbemartyn, William Servat, Richard de Gloucestre, and John de Lincoln, Aldermen, and complained that certain merchants of Alemaine and elsewhere frequently brought false caps mixed with "flockes" to the City from abroad, and sold them to divers merchants of the City, to the no small deception of the whole people of the realm and the manifest hurt of the aforesaid cappers. They therefore prayed the Mayor and Aldermen to provide a remedy. Thereupon came certain cap merchants and complained that the cappers of the City made caps of "flockes" mixed with wool, and caps made of white and grey wool they caused to be dyed black, and also caused old caps to be furbished (redubbare) for sale, contrary to the ordinances aforesaid. And the aforesaid Mayor and Aldermen, having heard the complaints thereon, ordained that merchant strangers bringing here false caps, as well as merchant denizens of the City buying such caps to sell again, should be warned not to bring nor cause to be brought hither such caps in future under penalty of having caps burnt that were found to be false. It was further ordered that cappers making caps in the City should in future make no false caps or mixed under penalty aforesaid, and that all false caps now in their possession should be taken out of the City before Easter next under penalty aforesaid. Also that no capper should cause his caps to be worked with chalk or "cole" under penalty, &c., because in such caps there is the greatest deception.

Folio cxxxix b.

Also at the request of the aforesaid cappers and merchants of the City buying and selling caps it was ordained that immediately after Easter next diligent search should be made by three or four honest men of each craft throughout the City for false caps, and that they should bring all false caps they could find to the Guildhall before the Mayor and Aldermen to be examined and adjudged upon, &c. And for this purpose there were elected on the part of the cappers, viz., Henry de Amondesham, (fn. 13) capper, William de Ponte, (fn. 14) and John de Baddeburgham, (fn. 15) capper. And on the part of the said merchants, Aubyn de Caustone, Henry de Schefeld, (fn. 16) Elyas de Salle, and James, son of Thomas le Paumer, were likewise elected and sworn. (fn. 17)

Afterwards, viz., on Wednesday the morrow of St. Laurence [10 Aug.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], the said scrutineers brought to the Guildhall before the Mayor and Aldermen certain white, black, and grey caps which they had found upon divers "haberdasshers" and cappers. And the said caps were examined by John de Staundon, John Prest, Stephen de Herford, and Bartholomew le Hattere in the presence of Richer de Refham, the Mayor, Thomas Romayn, John de Wengrave, Richard de Gloucestre, William de Leire, John de Wyndesore, Nicholas Pikot, Simon de Paris, and Simon Bolet, and forty grey and white caps and fifteen black caps were found on their oath to be of false work and a mixture of "flockes" and wool. They were therefore ordered to be burnt in Chepe, &c. And as to certain other caps not yet examined owing to certain difficulties, as the examiner says, they are respited.

Finis factus per Ric'm But proari' que debuit de diversis tallagiis.

Be it remembered that on Wednesday the Feast of St. Edward, K. [13 Oct.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], came Richard But, mercer, and made fine before Richer de Refham, the Mayor, John de Wengrave, Nicholas Pikot, John de Lincoln, John de Wyndesore, and Henry de Durham, and other Aldermen [not named] for arrears of divers tallages, viz., 40s., which he forthwith paid to the Chamberlain, for which sum he was pardoned by the said Mayor and Aldermen; 12s. of the Queen's Gold issuing out of the fifteenth of the twenty-ninth year of K. Edward I.; 100s. due for the tallage of £1,000; and 5s. 6½d. of twopence in the pound issuing from the twenty-fifth (xxvta) of 3 Edward II. (fn. 18)

Proclamccro facta de continuacione Parliamenti apud London a°, r' E. v to.

It is agreed by our lord the King and his Council that the Parliament that was recently summoned to London should be continued at Westminster until Friday next after the [Feast of] All Saints next ensuing, and that the "continuance" shall be made by certain commissioners appointed for that purpose by the King, and all other folk that are here come for the said Parliament can go home or remain elsewhere as they will until the aforesaid Friday, so that any way the Knights of the Shires, citizens, burgesses, and others that were summoned to the said Parliament return to Westminster, and be there the morrow of St. Martin [11 Nov.] to continue the same Parliament according to the summons previously made. And those of the clergy be there on the octave of St. Martin for the same Parliament. (fn. 19)

Folio cxl.

Acquietancia facta executor' Joh'is de Don staplequondam Camerar' London'.

Deed of acquittance by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty of London to William de Medelane, William Lenfant, and Thomas de Wyntertone, tailor, executors of John de Donstaple, (fn. 20) late Chamberlain of the Guildhall, on his accounts during his term of office. Dated 30 July, 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311].

For the above acquittance the executors gave to the Commonalty the sum of 40s.

Scriptum Hamon' Godchep.

Lease by John "Stormy" de Dromundby, co. York, to Hamo Godchep, mercer, of a parcel of land in the great seld of Roysia de Coventre in Westchepe, (fn. 21) which land formerly belonged to John de Meddelburgh, mercer. To hold the same for a term of six years from Christmas next. Witnesses, Richard But, Richard de Paris, William de Caustone, Hugh de Gartone, Walter de Cavendisshe, Richard Pymne [?], mercers, Roger le Clerk, and others [not named]. Dated Wednesday after the Feast of St. Luke [18 Oct.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311]. (fn. 22)

The above deed was acknowledged before Luke de Haverynge, the Chamberlain, in the presence of William de Hakford, Geoffrey de Brandone, Ralph le Balancer, Richard "de la Chaumbier," mercer, Laurence le Botoner, and John de Dallyng, &c. For enrolment 2s. 6d.

Folio cxl b.

Memoranda temp. John de Gysors, Mayor, anno 5 Edward II.

Elecciones facte per co'itatem de diversis officiar' London'.

Be it remembered that on Saturday before the Feast of St. Clement [23 Nov.], 5 Edward II. [A.D. 1311], in the presence of Sirs John de Gysors, the Mayor, Richer de Refham, John de Wengrave, William de Coumbemartyn, John de Wyndesore, John de Lincoln, Richard de Wyrhale, Henry de Gloucestre, and Nicholas Picot, Aldermen, the following were elected officers of the City by the election of good men of the Commonalty and by the assent of the said Mayor and Aldermen, viz.:-

To the office of Chamberlain of the Guildhall-John le Mazeliner, and sworn, &c.

To the office of Common Clerk of London-Hugh de Waltham, clerk.

To the office of Comptroller against (versus) the Chamberlain-David de Cotesbrok.

To audit and determine the accounts of divers Chamberlains and other officers of the Commonalty for the time past, viz., Nicholas de Farendone, Richard de Gloucestre, Simon de Paris, Henry de Gloucestre, Simon "de" Corp, Elyas de Suffolk, Stephen de Abyndone, Roger de Arcubus, Roger le Paumer, Matthew de Essex.

To collect and receive the murage-Roger le Paumer, Roger Hosebonde.

To be Wardens of London Bridge-John de Wymondeham, Thomas Prentice.

To survey each week or as often as need be the expenditure and receipts of the Wardens of London Bridge-Nicholas de Farndone, William de Leire.

Saturday after the Feast of St. Nicholas [6 Dec.], 6 Edward II. [A.D. 1312], there were assembled at the Guildhall J[ohn] de Gysors, the Mayor, Nicholas de Farendone, John de Wengrave, Richard de Gloucestre, Henry de Durham, William de Coumbemartyn, Richard de Wyrhale, Nigel Drury, Anketyn de Gysors, and Roger de Paris, Aldermen, and of every craft of the City six or four good men to regulate and execute the affairs of the City, &c.

The same day John le Mazelyner, who had been Chamberlain the past year, was re-elected Chamberlain for the year to come, &c.

The same day David de Cotesbrok was re-elected Comptroller to do such things as appertain to that office.

And the following were elected auditors of the accounts of the aforesaid John, viz., William de Coumbemartyn, Henry de Durham, Richard de Wyrhale, Richard de Meldeburne, Stephen de Abyndone, John de Paris, corder, Simon de Abyndone.

Footnotes

1 'Memorials,' p. 86, where the editor misreads "Elmer" for Oliver.
2 Prout intendunt: translated by the editor of the 'Memorials' "as he pretends to have," an interpretation which the words clearly cannot bear.
3 A female breadmonger.
4 See 'Cal. of Wills, Court of Husting, London,' i. 221.
5 The banishment of Emeric de Friscobaldi and other members of the Society who had acted as the King's foreign agents had been urged by the Ordainers. Vide supra, p. 227, note. Stubbs, 'Const. Hist.,' ii. 323, 329, 330.
6 Bailiffs of the City (in place of Sheriffs), temp. Sir Hugh Fitz-Oto, Warden, in 1265-6.
7 See 'Cal. Letter-Book B,' p. 181.
8 Bailiffs 1293-4.
9 Aldersgate.
10 Or "William od la Barbe." Not to be confounded with William Fitz-Osbert or "Longbeard," who put himself at the head of a popular movement in the City against the extortions of Richard I., for which he paid the penalty of his life, and his property became escheated to the King.
11 The substance of the ordinances which follow is also recorded in the 'Liber Custumarum,' i. 101-4.
12 This paragraph is imperfectly recorded, but its sense appears from a paragraph in the 'Liber Custumarum.'
13 "Eumondesham," 'Liber Cust.,' i. 103-4.
14 "De ponte Londoniarum," id., p. 104.
15 "Badburham," id. ibid.
16 "Sothefeld." 'Liber Cust.,' i. 104.
17 A translation of the above proceedings, as well as those immediately following, is printed in 'Memorials,' pp. 90, 91.
18 Vide supra, p. 223n.
19 See Palgrave's 'Parl. Writs,' vol. ii. pt. i. p. 72; id., vol. ii. pt. ii. p. 58. This proclamation of the prorogation of Parliament bears no date, but the prorogation is known to have taken place soon after 5 October, the day on which the royal assent was given to the ordinances forced upon the King by the Ordainers. The clergy took offence at the shortness of the notice, and the time for them was extended to 2 December. Stubbs, 'Const. Hist.,' ii. 331n.
20 His will enrolled in 1307 in the Husting (see 'Cal. of Wills,' i. 190), where his executors are described as William de Medelane, dyer, William de Camerwelle, "felmongere," and Thomas de Wyntertone, tailor.
21 Situate near the "Mercery" of Chepe, probably near the Hospital of St. Thomas of Acon. See 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' p. 87.
22 This lease appears to have been renewed in 1317. Letter-Book E, folio lxxiii; 'Memorials,' p. 134.


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