Folios cccxxiii - cccxxxi
Sept 1398 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1907

Pages

444-451

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'Folios cccxxiii - cccxxxi: Sept 1398 -', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: H: 1375-1399 (1907), pp. 444-451. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33487 Date accessed: 23 September 2014.


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Folio cccxxiii.

Eleccio Vic'.

Saturday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 22 Richard II. [A.D. 1398], in the presence of Richard Whityngtone, the Mayor, William Askham and John Wodecok, Sheriffs, John Hadlee, William Staundone, William More, John Walcote, Thomas Knolles, William Bramptone, John Shadworth, William Evote, John Fraunceys, William Venour, Hugh Short, John Warner, John Wade, and Thomas Neutone, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned for the election of Sheriffs at the Guildhall, John Warner was elected Sheriff for the year ensuing by the Mayor, and John Wade by the Commonalty.

Afterwards, viz., on Saturday the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], they were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the following Monday were presented before the Barons of the lord the King at Westminster.

Eleccio aud' Cam'arii et Custodum pont' London'.

Saturday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.] aforesaid, Thomas Knolles and William Askham, Aldermen, Walter Newentone, John Lane, Thomas Extone, and William Nortone, Commoners, were elected auditors of the accounts of the Chamberlain and Wardens of London Bridge.

Eleccio Maioris.

Sunday the Feast of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 22 Richard II. [A.D. 1398], in the presence of Richard Whityngtone, the Mayor, Matthew Southeworth, the Recorder, John Warner and John Wade, the Sheriffs, John Hadlee, John Hende, William Staundone, William More, John Walcote, Thomas Knolles, William Bramptone, John Shadworth, Thomas Neutone, John Fraunceys, William Evote, William Venour, Hugh Short, William Askham, and John Wodecok, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, Drew Barentyn was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn in the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Commissio d' ni Reg' pro gaola de Newgate delib' and'.

Letters patent appointing Drew Barentyn, the Mayor, Walter Cloptone, William Thirnynge, John Cassy, William Rykhille, and Matthew Southworthe, or any five, four, three, or two of them (the Mayor being one), to be Justices for gaol-delivery of Newgate. Witness the King at Westminster, 23 Jan., 22 Richard II. [A.D. 1398-9].

Folio cccxxiii b.

Commissio pro una xva et me dietate unius xve levand'.

Letters patent appointing Thomas Wilford, John Warner, Geoffrey Broke, and John Wakelee commissioners for levying in the City a fifteenth and half a fifteenth granted by the last Parliament. (fn. 1) Witness the King at Westminster, 28 May, 21 Richard II. [A.D. 1398].

Br' e pro Coronator' recipiend'.

Writ to Richard Whityngtone, the Mayor to admit Robert Newentone to execute the office of Coroner in the City until the return of John Michel, the Deputy-Coroner appointed by Thomas Brounflete, the King's Chief Butler and Coroner of the City. Witness the King at Westminster, 30 Aug., 22 Richard II. [A.D. 1398].

Exon'acio Will' i Randolf fabri.

18 Feb., 22 Richard II. [A.D. 1398-9], William Randolf, smith, discharged by Drew Barentyn, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing age.

Exon' acio Joh' is Hanfeld groceri.

25 Feb., the same year, John Hanfeld, grocer, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon' acio Joh' is Twyford.

The same day John Twyford, cutler, similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio cccxxiv.

Custodia Thome fil' et her' Joh' is Pynchoun.

Walter Pynchoun, mercer, who had been appointed guardian of Thomas, son of John Pynchoun, as appears supra, fo. cclxxxiv, having died suddenly, his sureties came before Richard Whityngtone, the Mayor, and Aldermen, and prayed that the goods of deceased might be seized for their relief. Thereupon divers goods, comprising jewels, &c., to the value of £600 3s. 1d., were brought into the Chamber by William Cressewyk, William Coupere, chaplain, and Bartholomew Neve, executors of the said Walter, and were valued by Drew Barentyn and John Doblere, goldsmiths. (fn. 2) The jewels were afterwards delivered to Richard Whityngtone by assent of the aforesaid Drew Barentyn, then Mayor, and the Aldermen, in trust for the orphan.

Afterwards, viz., on the 31st July, 7 Henry IV. [A.D. 1406], the above orphan, being of full age, came before John Wodecok, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and acknowledged satisfaction for his property.

Folio cccxxiv b.

Admissio Will' i Reynewelle in lib'tatem mistere Ferionum.

15 March, 22 Richard II. [A.D. 1398-9], came William, son of Thomas Reynwelle, of Brommeleye, co. Kent, who had been apprenticed to Henry Sampsone, girdler, and been admitted to the freedom of the City on the 3rd Feb., 40 Edward III. [A.D. 1365-6], when John Lovekyn was Mayor and John de Cauntebrugge was Chamberlain, and declared that for a long time past he had been using the Mistery of Ironmongers, and not that of Girdlers. He therefore prayed to be admitted to the freedom of the City in the Mistery of Ironmongers. His prayer granted at the instance of good men of that mistery then present. He did not pay a fine to the Chamber, as other citizens ought to do, being at the time an Alderman. (fn. 3)

Acquietanc' m'cator' Damyas Corby et Neel.

Acquittance under the Mayoralty seal by "Drugh" Barentyn, the Mayor, for the sum of 25 marks received from John Liese, "Provost" of the merchants of Amyens, by the hands of John de Breveux his attorney, being part of the sum of 50 marks yearly due to the City of London from the merchants of the towns of Amyens, Corbie, and Neele. Dated 20 March, A.D. 1398[-9].

Exon' acio executor' Will' i Bys et alior' tenencium Ric' i Toky orpham.

5 Feb., 22 Richard II. [A.D. 1398-9], account rendered by John More, "brewer," John Lord, "pyebaker," Thomas Loche, and other executors of William Bys, Edmund Bys, and John Borham, tenants of tenements belonging to Richard, son of Richard Toky, an orphan, now of full age, before William Bramptone and William Askham, Aldermen, William Radewelle and William Kelshill, Commoners, auditors appointed by the court.

5 June, 22 Richard II. [A.D. 1399], the said orphan received his patrimony from Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain.

[Folioss cccxxv blank].

Folio cccxxv b.

Officium Ball' ville de Southwerk concessum Will' mo Est.

Wednesday before the Feast of Assumption [15 Aug.], 23 Richard II. [A.D. 1399], the office of Bailiff of Suthwerk granted by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council assembled in the Upper Chamber of the Guildhall, to William Est, Serjeant of the Mayor; to hold the same for life on payment of £10 yearly to the Chamberlain and 2s. yearly to the officers of the King's Exchequer for besants (pro bisanciis). (fn. 4)

Concessio porte super pontem London' cum suis pertin' facta Will' o Est etc.

Grant by Drew Barantyn, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty to William Est, Serjeant and citizen of the City, of the gate on London Bridge for life, reserving the right of retaking possession in time of war, &c. Dated Wednesday before the Feast of Assumption [15 Aug.], 23 Richard II. [A.D. 1399].

Folio cccxxvi.

L're d' ni Regis pro Piscenar' London' etc.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation of letters patent granting to the Fishmongers of the City and their successors that no foreigner shall be allowed to sell fish within the City by retail, but only wholesale, as in the time of the King's grandfather; that no foreigner shall sell fish to another foreigner within the City to be sold again; that all fresh fish shall be sold either at Bridge Street, Old Fish Street, or the Stocks; that all fish coming to the City by water shall be discharged between Billingsgate and Queenhithe, and not else where, and shall be warehoused in open day and not by night; and further, that the said Fishmongers of the City may hold their "leyhalmod" twice a year, as of old accustomed, (fn. 5) and elect yearly six persons of their mistery, viz., two from Briggestrete, two from Oldefisshstrete, and two from Stokfisshmongerowe, who shall be sworn in the said "leyhalmod," in the presence of the Mayor or Sheriffs, to superintend the buying and selling of fish and govern their mistery. Witness the King at Coubrigge, (fn. 6) 9 May, 22 Richard II. [A.D. 1399]. (fn. 7)

L' red' ni Regis pro Piscenar' et de locis ubi piscis vendetur.

Letters patent referred to supra. Witness the King at Coubrigge, 9 May, 22 Richard II. [A.D. 1399].

Folio cccxxvi b.

Letter of Privy Seal to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Aldermen touching the due execution of the above. Dated at the Abbey of Morgan in Wales, 11 May [A.D. 1399].

Br'e pro parliamento.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster on the morrow of St. Michael [29 Sept.]. No Sheriff to be returned. Witness the King at Chester, 19 Aug., 23 Richard II. [A.D. 1399]. (fn. 8)

Pursuant to the above writ there were elected John Shaddeworth and William Bramptone, Aldermen, William Sonyngwelle and Richard Merlawe, Commoners.

Eleccio Vic'.

Sunday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 23 Richard II. [A.D. 1399], in the presence of Drew Barentyn, the Mayor, John Warner and John Wade, the Sheriffs, Matthew Southworthe, the Recorder, William Staundone, Richard Whityngtone, John Walcote, William Bramptone, William Askham, John Wodcok, John Fraunceys, Thomas Knolles, John Shadworth, Thomas Wilford, and Thomas Polle, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned for the election of Sheriffs at the Guildhall, William Walderne was elected Sheriff for the ensuing year by the Mayor, and William Hyde by the Commonalty.

Afterwards, viz., on Sunday the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the following Tuesday were presented before the Barons of the Exchequer at Westminster.

Auditores.

Sunday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.] aforesaid, John Walcote and John Wodecok, Aldermen, and Alan Everard, William Sevenoke, John Profete, and William Crowmere, Commoners, were elected auditors of the accounts of the Chamberlain and Wardens of London Bridge.

Exon' acio Will' i Fungry civis et fondour.

7 Oct., 1 Henry IV. [A.D. 1399], William Fungry, "foundour," discharged by Drew Barentyn, the Mayor, and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing age.

Folio cccxxvii.

Ordinacio de Bakwelhalle.

Ordinance to the effect that no foreigner or stranger shall warehouse woollen cloth brought to the City for sale elsewhere than at Bakwellehalle, (fn. 9) on pain of forfeiture; and that no foreigner or stranger shall sell such cloth at Bakwellehalle except between 11 A.M. on Thursday and 11 A.M. on Saturday in each week. [No date].

Bakwelhalle.

Ordinance made by Richard Whityngtone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, with the assent of the Commons of the City, restricting the sale of cloth at Bakwellehalle to the hours between midday Thursday and midday Saturday in each week. This ordinance to take effect on Thursday after the Feast of St. Bartholomew [24 Aug.] next, anno 23 Richard II. [A.D. 1399]. (fn. 10)

8 Oct., 1 Henry IV. [A.D. 1399], the executors of John Pays, late brewer, delivered to Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain the sum of £30 in trust for Simon his son, aged three years.

[The Folioss of the rest of the Letter-Book are not numbered, with the exception of fo. cccxxxi. Of the folios immediately preceding fo. cccxxxi two have been wholly cut out, whilst onehalf of the other, cut vertically, has been removed Several of the Folioss are blank whilst the writing on others is almost, or quite, illegible.—Editor.]

[Folios cccxxvii b et seq].

The terms of a truce between England and France, to continue for twenty-eight years (fn. 11) from Michaelmas, A.D. 1398, when the existing truce comes to an end. Dated at Paris, the 9th March, A.D. 1395 [-6], and at Westminster, 9 May, A.D. 1396.

Monday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], [1 Henry IV., A.D. 1399], Thomas Knolles elected Mayor.

17 Nov. [1 Henry IV., A.D. 1399], a certain citizen and tyler discharged by Thomas Knolles, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing age.

Writ for the admission of Nicholas Symcok to act as Deputy-Coroner for John Payn, the King's Chief Butler. Witness the King at Westminster.

1 Dec. [1 Henry IV., A.D. 1399], petition by Thomas, late apprentice to John Kyng, "tymbermongere," that he may be admitted to the freedom of the City in the Mistery of Vint ners, as he had always used that mistery and not that of "Tymbermongere." His prayer granted.

5 Dec. [1 Henry IV., A.D. 1399], petition by John Bysshop, late apprentice to a weaver, that he may be admitted to the freedom of the City in the Mistery of Vintners, as he had always used that mistery and not that of Weaver.

11 March, 1 Henry IV. [A.D. 1399-1400], the reversion of William Est's place as Serjeant to the Mayor granted to.

6 Dec., 1 Henry IV. [A.D. 1399], confirmation of privileges enjoyed by merchants of Alemaine.

1 Henry IV., Peter Blake discharged from serving on juries, &c.

Folio cccxxxi.

Exon' acio Thome Bristow fustour.

18 March, 2 Henry IV. [A.D. 1400-1], Thomas Bristow, "fustour," discharged by John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing age.

Ordinacio misteri des Joynours.

18 March, 2 Henry IV. [A.D. 1400-1], petition to the Mayor and Aldermen by good men of the Mistery of Joynours that they may elect two Wardens to govern the mistery and submit defects to the said Mayor and Aldermen to be remedied; and further, that certain ordinances for regulating the mistery may be approved and enrolled. Their petition granted.

Exon' acio Joh' is Berfaire civis et armourer London'.

The same day John Berfaire, armourer, discharged by John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing age.

Ordinacio mister' des Steynours.

The same day a petition was presented to the Mayor and Aldermen by good men of the Mistery of Steynours for certain ordinances [illegible] to be approved and enrolled.

Exon' acio Simonis Godriche lanar'.

16, 2 Henry IV. [A.D.], Simon Godriche, woolmonger, discharged by John Fraunceys, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing age.

L' ra pro cantaria.

Letter from John Fraunceys, Mayor, &c., to Robert [Braybrook], Bishop of London, touching a chantry, A.D. 1401.

Footnotes

1 Granted on the 31st Jan. by the Parliament which had been adjourned from Westminster to Shrewsbury 'Rot. Parl.,' iii. 368.
2 Particulars of the jewels are set out in 'Memorials,' p. 550.
3 "Aldermanni etiam nihil solvere solebant pro irrotulationibus chartarum sive factorum ad ipsos pertinentium qualitercumque, sicut pluries patet, et specialiter Libro C, Folios cxxiiii°."—'Liber Albus,' i. 35.
4 This yearly payment to officers of the Exchequer "for besants" by the Bailiff of Southwark for the time being appears here for the first time. It occurs again in the grant of the bailiwick to John Combe, the City's Common Serjeant-at-arms, in 1421 (Letter-Book I, fo. cclxvii). It may be noted that a besant of gold, or two shillings (un besand d' or u ii sol.), was the customary fee to be paid on the conveyance of land in the City to the Alderman of the Ward wherein such land was situate. See 'Borough Customs' (Selden Soc.), vol. i. p. 271. Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' pp. 205-6.
5 At the well-known Iter held at the Tower in 1320-1. certain fishmongers (among them being Hamo de Chigwell, who had recently been Mayor) were charged with unlawfully holding a Court, which they called "le Halimot," and making regulations for the sale of fish without consulting the King. Hamo and his fellow-fishmongers denied that they held such a Court, but admitted that the Sheriffs held yearly two Great Courts for settling disputes among fishmongers (one being held before Christmas and the other before Lent) and that these were called "Halimot.' 'Liber Custumarum,' i. 397-403.
6 Glamorgan.
7 These letters patent were rendered ineffective by Stat. 1 Hen. IV. cap. xvii.
8 The day before Parliament met Richard formally resigned the crown. Thereupon the estates proceeded to pass a sentence of deposition, and to acknowledge the claim of Henry of Lancaster to the throne.
9 Afterwards known as Blackwell Hall, a building situate next to the Guildhall Chapel on the east side of Guildhall Yard, on the site of a tenement belonging at one time to Sir Roger de Clifford, and later to John de Bacquelle (or Banquelle), an Alderman. See 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 227n.; 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' pp. 12-13. The oath of the Keeper of Blackwell Hall is set out in 'Cal. Letter-Book D,' p. 200.
10 The editor of the 'Memorials' (where this and the preceding ordinance are set out) draws attention to the fact that the regnal year has been recorded over an erasure, and is probably an error, as Whityngton was not Mayor in any part of the year 23 Richard II. On the other hand, it may well be that the ordinance was made before Whityngton's year of Mayoralty terminated in Oct., 1398, and that a twelvemonth or so was allowed to elapse before it should commence to take effect.
11 Twenty-five years, according to a passage in Stubbs's 'Const. Hist.' (ii. 483), referred to supra, p. 342n., whilst the term named elsewhere is thirty years ('Ann. Ricardi. II.,' Rolls Series, No. 28, p. 201).