Folios ci - cx
Aug 1362 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1905

Pages

140-154

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'Folios ci - cx: Aug 1362 -', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: G: 1352-1374 (1905), pp. 140-154. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33501 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Folio ci.

Pena ordinata sup' tellar' et tinctor'.

Ordinances for checking the malpractices of dyers and weavers. (fn. 1)

Processus ad exonerand' exec' test'i Joh' is fil' Joh' is de Glouc' de cs. legat' Joh' i de Boulton.

13 August, 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362], came Stephen de Longeneye and John de Graveneye, executors of John, son of John de Gloucestre, late fishmonger, before John Pecche, the Mayor, Thomas Lodelowe, John de Chychestre, John Lytle, and James de Thame, Aldermen, and declared that the said John had bequeathed to John de Boulton 100s., the same being under age and unable to give an acquittance. They therefore deliver the money into the keeping of John de Cauntebrigge, the Chamberlain, and pray the Mayor and Aldermen to dispose of it at their discretion. Thereupon came Cristina, wife of John de Boulton the father, and mother of the legatee, and prayed that the money might be committed to her, and it was granted, the said Cristina entering into a bond for the same.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster in the quinzaine of St Michael [29 Sept.]. (fn. 2) Witness the King at Wyndesore, 14 Aug., 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362].

Br'e pro parliamento.

Names of those elected, viz., Adam de Bury and John Little, Aldermen, and John Hiltoft and John Tornegold, Commoners.

Folio ci b.

ijs. vjd.

A general release by Nicholas Anketel, mercer, to Simon Lydyard, late his apprentice. Dated 9 Feb., 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1361-2].

ijs. vjd.

A similar release by Ralph Benet, mercer, to the same. Dated 24 Feb., 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1361-2].

ijs. vjd.

A similar release by William Olneye to Agnes Hakeneye and Sir Adam de Burdene, Rector of the church of St. Mary atte Hulle, executors of Richard de Hakeneye. Dated Friday before the Feast of the Assumption B. M. [15 Aug.], 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362].

Ordinacio Sellar'.

To the honourable and liege lords, the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of London, pray humbly the Saddlers in the same City that the points and ordinances under-written, ordained by the masters of the said mistery, may be granted to them for the common profit of the realm and the honour and preservation of their mistery.

First, that no saddle-bow (fust de selle) coming from the saddle-bow maker (fuster) be found rotten. And that each saddler make the saddle well strengthened (enervee) with good leather throughout the interior, and outside with good band (oue bon nerf) or with good canvas, under penalty beneath-written.

Also that no saddler cover or cause to be covered the bow (le fuist) of an old saddle to sell again for a new saddle, unless it be another's saddle (autriene sell) to repair or re-cover, under penalty beneath-written.

Also that no one make the covering or seat of any saddle of sheep-skin, and that no pannel of a saddle be made of sheepskin, white or red, called "purslether," under penalty beneathwritten.

Also that no saddle-bow be housed (houwcie) with "past," (fn. 3) unless it be of cloth or velvet, under the penalty.

Also that no pannel be lined otherwise than with "velt" or other material that is good and trustworthy, under the same penalty.

Also that no harness be made for new unless it be good and sufficient and not lined with old leather, under the same penalty.

Also that no seat of a saddle be nailed with nails of "tyn," but only with nails of iron, under the same penalty.

Also that no stitching or skirts (nul courtre ne skirthes) be nailed with nails of "tyn" or "peautre" unless they be well and truly riveted with iron or latten, under the penalty beneathwritten.

Also that no saddle or harness be furnished with old cloth for new cloth, under the penalty aforesaid.

Also that no alien or foreigner coming to the said City be allowed to keep house or shop, but that he be first examined by the four masters of the said mistery who are elected and sworn, whether he be able and sufficient to work in the said mistery or not. And if he be able and sufficient that they cause him to come before you to see if he can be acknowledged as good and sufficient for the common people as the franchise of the City demands, under the same penalty.

Also if any such be found to be not able or experienced in the said mistery, be he foreigner or alien, let him be compelled by the four masters aforesaid to serve other masters of the said mistery until he able and sufficient for the common weal and also [become] free in the City, under penalty aforesaid.

Folio cii.

Also if any master or vadlet or servant be at variance on account of some difference between them, no other master shall be so bold as to put or help the said vadlet to any work until the master and vadlet be brought to a reasonable agreement by the four masters of the said mistery, under the same penalty.

Also if any vadlet or servant of the said mistery has served any master in the said mistery for any fixed term by covenant between them made and no default be found in the vadlet or servant, and the master from malice or evil disposition (maltalent) will not pay the said vadlet or servant his wage for his service according to the agreement between them made, or the master wishes him to serve against his will after his agreement has been well and lawfully fulfilled, that then the master be in the same penalty.

Also if any vadlet or servant of the same mistery can be found in any default towards his master, whether it be by covin or enticement of another or by his own malice, let him be in the same penalty.

Also if anything of the said mistery in manner before mentioned be found defective secretly or openly, which can lawfully be found or proved by the four masters of the said mistery, let the same thing be destroyed by the order of the Mayor and discretion of the said masters, and let him in whose possession such thing be found be in the same penalty.

Also that it be permitted at any hour to the aforesaid four masters of the said mistery to search house, shop, and chamber within the franchise of the said City, wherever any saddles or harness appertaining thereto can be found, and lawfully examine them whether they be good and suitable in manner aforesaid or not. And whensoever any prove rebellious against the four, and will not allow them to search in manner aforesaid, that then they shall take a serjeant of the Chamber with them to any place where such things can be found, and that he who rebels be in the same penalty.

Also if any covin or assembly of the company be secretly made by the vadlets and servants of the said mistery for obtaining from their masters higher wage than they are worth in their mistery to the damage of the people, and it can be discovered or proved, that such be in the penalty under-written.

Also if any master, vadlet, or servant, alien or foreign, be found and by the four masters be proved in any default aforesaid, that he pay for his first offence to the Chamber of the City 6s. 8d.; for the second offence 13s. 4d.; for the third offence 20s.; and for the fourth that he abjure the mistery within the City of London, according to the ordinance of you and the four masters aforesaid.

The names of those elected before the Mayor and Aldermen for safeguarding the aforesaid articles, viz., William Lincolne, John Pountfreit, Roger Excestre, Gerard atte Nook, saddlers.

Acquittance by Thomas Brome for 10 marks received from Alice, widow and executrix of William Brome, his uncle. Dated 14 Aug., 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362].

Ordinances made temp. John Pecche, Mayor [A.D. 1361-2], (fn. 4) to the effect that chandlers ought to sell a pound of candle for 2d. and no more; that butchers ought not to sell tallow to strangers to take out of the City, but sell it to chandlers of the City, viz., a wey of "Roughtalwh" for 18s. and a wey of "Moltetalaugh" for 22s., and that a wey of tallow should contain 28 cloves (clavos), weighed by the balance and not by the auncer. (fn. 5)

Folio cii b.

Writ to the Mayor and the King's Escheator to inquire on oath as to what property Bartholomew de Stanlak, clerk, held in the City on Monday after the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June], 28 Edward III. [A.D. 1354], the day on which he stood outlawed in the Husting for failing to appear in the King's Court to answer for a contempt and trespass; also as to the property held by William Bykebury on Monday after the Feast of St. Barnabas [11 June], 25 Edward III. [A.D. 1351], on which day he stood outlawed in the Husting for not appearing to answer Guy Speke in a plea of trespass; also as to the property held by John de Harewell, clerk, on Monday after the Feast of All Saints [1 Nov.], 27 Edward III. [A.D. 1353], on which day he stood outlawed in the Husting for not appearing to answer a plea of contempt and trespass; also as to the property held by John Norice de Tetteworth on Monday after the Feast of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], 24 Edward III. [A.D. 1350-1], on which day he stood outlawed in the Husting for not appearing to answer John de Keteryngham, clerk. Witness Thomas de Ingelby at Westminster, 20 May, 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362].

Inquisition accordingly held before John Pecche, Mayor and the King's Escheator, Wednesday after the Feast of St. Petronilla [31 May], 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362], by the oath of Richard Chesham, John Copere, William West, Stephen Chaundeler, Laurence Skynnere, John Herlawe, John Mareschal, William de Dalby, John Englysshe, Roger Norhamptone, John Proude, and John Cambres, who say that the above Bartholomew de Stanlake, William "de" Bykebury, John de Harewelle, and John Norice had no property in the City on the days specified.

Endorsement of the bill for cities and boroughs in Parliament, viz.: Let those come who feel themselves aggrieved and show specially their grievance, and right shall be done them.

Folio ciii.

Writ of Privy Seal in favour of Symon de Benyngtone, sometime one of the Sheriffs of London, to whom the King had formerly granted divers immunities Witness the King at Westminster, 10 Dec., 34 Edward III. [A.D. 1360].

Temp. Stephen de Cavendisshe, Mayor.

Proclamation made 8 Nov., 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362], for regulating the sale of wine by vintners and taverners, and for cleansing the streets, &c.

Folio ciii b.

Commissio pro gaola de Neugate.

Letters patent appointing Henry Grene, Robert de Thorpe, Stephen Cavendisshe, the Mayor, and John Knyvet, or any three or two of them (the Mayor being one), to be commissioners for gaol-delivery of Neugate. Witness the King at Westminster, 29 Oct., 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362].

Deliberacio denar' Joh'is de Thorneye Cam'ario £viij: viijd.

22 Dec. [36 Edward III.], Thomas de Thorney, "grosser," delivered to the Chamberlain the sum of £8 and 8d.—being a part of a sum due from the said Thomas to John de Gonewardby, and seized in the hands of the said Thomas by the Mayor and Aldermen—to the use of John, son of William de Thorneye.

28 April, 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362], the aforesaid [sic] Isabella, (fn. 6) being of full age, came before John Pecche, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John de Cauntebrigge, the Chamberlain, and acknowledged satisfaction to Thomas de "Stauntone" for all that was due to her.

Ordinances touching foreign weavers. (fn. 7)

Folio civ.

Acquietanc' Ade Fraunceys facta per Thom' fil' Rog'i Carpenter.

A general release by Thomas, son of Roger Carpenter, "spicer," to Adam Fraunceys, mercer. Dated 20 Jan., 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362-3].

A general release by the same to Thomas de Brandone, mercer, Sir Richard Vyncent, rector of the church of St. Benedict de Shorhog, and Adam Fraunceys, mercer. Dated ut supra.

Carta Aurifabr' London' facta per d'um Regem.

Letters patent granting privileges to the Goldsmiths of London pursuant to a petition presented by them to the Parliament held at Westminster after the Feast of the Purification [2 Feb.] last. Dated at Westminster, 13 March, 1 Edward III. [A.D. 1326-7]. (fn. 8)

Folio civ b.

Custodia Sarre fil' Joh' Martyn.

31 Jan., 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1362-3], the guardianship of Sarah, daughter of John Martyn, aged five years, committed by Stephen Cavendisshe, the Mayor, John de Stodeye and Thomas de Lodelowe, Aldermen, and John [de] Cantebrigge, the Chamberlain, to Peter Sterre, together with divers chattels. Sureties, viz., Andrew Turk, fishmonger, and Matthew Broun, woolmonger.

Afterwards, viz., on Friday after the Feast of St. Luke [18 Oct.], 42 Edward III. [A.D. 1368], it was testified to James Andreu, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John de Cauntebrigge, the Chamberlain, that the above Sarah was dead, and the above Peter came and asked that he, as one of the executors of John Martyn, might dispose of her property for pious and charitable uses according to the terms of the will of the said John His prayer granted and his sureties discharged.

Folio cv-cvi.

Statute made at Westminster in the quinzaine of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362]. (fn. 9)

Folio cvi.

Statute "de perdonacione facta communitati Angliæ." Dated at Westminster, 13 Oct., 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362]. (fn. 10)

Folio cvi b.

Custodia Will'i fil' Will'i Chyvyngtone.

5 Dec., 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362], came William Randolf, "mareschall," into the Chamber of the Guildhall and delivered to John de Cauntebrugge, the Chamberlain, the sum of £10 to be kept for the use of William, son of William Chyvyngtone, aged six years.

Afterwards, on the same day, the Mayor, Aldermen, and Chamberlain committed the guardianship of the said William to Peter Richeman and Beatrix his wife, mother of the said William, as being his next friends. Sureties, viz., Thomas Blode and Ralph Prote.

20 Jan., 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362-3], Geoffrey Boner, "paternostrer," delivered to John de Cauntebrugge, the Chamberlain, the sum of £9 for the use of John Aleyn, apprentice to John de Stokyngbury.

10 Feb., 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1362-3], the guardianship of Emmota, daughter of Robert Foundour, aged ten years, committed by the Mayor, Aldermen, and John de Cauntebrugge, the Chamberlain, to Adam Sprot, "batour," together with certain chattels, &c., bequeathed to her by her father. Sureties, viz., John Essex, William Godrigh[t], "foundour," and Thomas atte Shoppe.

Afterwards, viz., on the 2nd April, 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371], came the above Emmota before John Bernes, the Mayor, William Haldene, the Recorder, and the aforesaid Chamberlain, and asked for delivery of her goods; and as she appeared to be capable (habilis) the same were delivered to her, and Adam Sprot and his sureties were discharged.

Folio cvii.

Proclamation made temp. Stephen Cavendisshe, Mayor, anno 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1362-3], to amend and redress the damages and grievances which good folk of the City both rich and poor have suffered and received for a year past owing to masons, carpenters, plasterers, tilers (teelers), and all kind of labourers taking exceedingly (a demesure) more than they ought, to the following effect: (fn. 11) —

That masons, between Easter and Michaelmas, shall take for a day's work 6d.; and from Michaelmas to Easter 5d.; and for Saturday, if they work by the week, a whole day's pay; and for Festivals, when they do not work, nothing.

That carpenters and plasterers shall take in the same manner.

That tilers, from Easter to Michaelmas, shall take 5½d., and from Michaelmas to Easter 4½d.; and their men (garsouns) for one-half of the year 3½d., and for the other half 3d.

That master-daubers, between Easter and Michaelmas, take 5d., and for the other half-year 4d., and their men as above.

That no one pay more to the aforesaid workmen under penalty of 40s. to the Commonalty, and he who receives more to be imprisoned forty days.

That a thousand of tiles (tieeles) be sold for 8s. at the most, and a hundred [sacks ?] of lime (caue (fn. 12) ) for 6s.

That a cart of sand (sabulon) and of clay (taye) from Algate to the Conduit take 3d., and beyond the Conduit 3½d. That carts from Crepulgate to Chepe take 3d., and beyond 3½d. That a cart of sand or lime not coming into the City, but serving the folk in the suburb, take 2d., and the cart should hold one quarter well heaped up.

That carts bringing merchandise from abroad (de par de la) take from "Wellewarf" (fn. 13) to Chepe 4d.

That a cart bringing "Buche Talwode" (fn. 14) take for the hundred at Crepulgate 6d. and for the hundred of "fagat" 4d.

That porters take no more than anciently accustomed, under pain of imprisonment.

That no vintner, taverner, nor other person of any kind be so bold as to sell a gallon of "vernage " wine for more than 2s., of wine of "cret," wine of "la rivere," "piement," "clarre," and "malveisyn" for more than 16d.; nor a gallon of wine of Gascony or Rochel, red or white, for more than 8d.

That skinners make their furs according to ancient ordinance and the terms of their charter, under penalty of forfeiture.

That no one go to meet those bringing victuals or other merchandise by land or by water, to buy of or bargain with them before they come to certain places appointed for sale, under penalty of forfeiture and imprisonment, at the discretion of the Mayor and Aldermen.

That corn and malt (broys) coming to the City by land or water for sale come entire to the markets, to be there sold by the hands of those who bring the same to every one for their sustenance and to bakers for the service of the people, and that no hosteler claim any victuals except only for the maintenance of his hostel, and that they pay for the same like other folk.

That valets of serjeants who undertake carriage take no more carts and horses than be necessary, and then only from "traventers," &c.

That hostelers be good folk, &c.

That if any man or woman dwelling in a Ward be notoriously known as of bad repute, &c.

That a pair of shoes of "cordwan" be sold for 6d., &c.

Folio cvii b.

That a pair of spurs be sold for 6d., &c.

That the shearmen (toundours) take no more than they were wont, &c.

That farriers take no more than they were wont, &c.

If any workman or labourer will not work or labour as is ordained let him, &c.

That servants of the hostels of good folk take no more than they were wont to take before the pestilence, &c.

That no cook take more for putting a capon or rabbit into a pasty than 1d., &c.

That a quarter of "bran" be sold according to the value of a pound of corn.

That no "cordwan" or "baseyn" be carried out of the City, &c. (fn. 15)

That a hundred of "talwod" of "beche" and oak be sold at 7s.

A hundred of short "fagot" at 4s.

A hundred of "buche" from Kent of a length of 8 ft, the best at 8s.

A quarter of charcoal at 12d.

That a tailor take for making a robe for a man 18d., for a coat and hood 12d., and for making a long robe for a woman 2s. 6d.

That a gallon of the best ale be sold for 2d. at the most, and another gallon at 1½d. and another at 1d., and this by sealed measure......[and any one selling to the contrary shall for the first time pay 40d., for the second half a mark, and the third time 10s.; to wit brewsters and female retailers 2s. (fn. 16) ].

[Here follows the price at which various kinds of fowl, game, beef, mutton, &c., are to be sold. (fn. 17) ]

That no one wander in the City and suburbs after curfew rung at our Lady of the Arches (nostre dame des Arches) unless he be of good character, and his servants for good cause and with a light, under pain of imprisonment.

Folio cviii.

That no Fleming, Brabanter, or "Selander" carry arms or a knife, small or large, with a point, secretly or openly, under penalty of forfeiture.

That no victualler conceal victuals or keep them until they are bad, &c. (fn. 18)

Soluciones facte diversis domit' Rehgiosorum per Adam Fraunceys.

Grant by Adam Fraunceys of divers sums of money to certain religious houses on condition they maintain chantries for the soul of John de Oxon', the money being the residue of a sum of £100 bequeathed by the said John for the purpose; and the said Adam being unable to dispose of it in any other way, owing to an order passed by the Prelates and Clergy of England to the effect that no Chaplain shall take more than 5 marks a year for celebrating Mass for the good of souls, and a statute passed in the Parliament held at Westminster in the quinzame of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362], (fn. 19) forbidding any one giving more to such Chaplains. (fn. 20)

Folio cviii b.

ijs. vjd.

Lease by Thomas Dolsely to Robert de Couen, skinner, of a house called "þe lyoun atte Dore" in Watlyngstret, in the parish of All Hallows de Bredstrete, with shops, &c., adjoining, occupied by Walter de Elmbrigge, "taillour," William de Thyndone, "pouchemakere," and John le Yonge, "glovere." To hold the same for a term of sixty years, at an annual rent of 100s. Witnesses, John Glendale, Walter Bachiler, William Boyville, and others [not named]. Dated the eve of the Nativity [25 Dec.], 36 Edward III. [A.D. 1362].

Be it remembered that on the 8th April, 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1363], Brother Raphael de Luca, of the Order of Hermits of St. Augustine, came and delivered to John de Cauntebrigge, the Chamberlain, two writings and two indentures under seal, one being under the seal of the Master and Brethren of the Hospital of St. Thomas de Suthwerk, to the use of John "Falcoun," son of Janin Falk de Luca, for safe custody until, &c.

Folio cix.

Allocacio libertatis Abb'is Westmonast' per br'e Regis.

16 Feb., 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1362-3], complaint made to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs of the City by John de Somertone, a monk, Chamberlain of the church of St. Peter, Westminster, on behalf of the Abbot and convent of the same, that John de Coggeshale and Thomas de Croydon, Wardens of the work of St. Margaret the Virgin in Bruggestrete, had distrained the said Abbot by his rent in the Ward of Bridge for the payment of a certain sum of money to the work of the church of St. Margaret aforesaid; whereas the said Abbot and monks of the church of St. Peter, Westminster, claimed to be exempt from all such customs, demands, &c., by charters of the King and his ancestors, and proffered the King's writ to that effect, dated at Westminster, 12 Feb., 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1362-3].

A day given for all parties to appear at the Husting, when the above John de Coggeshale and Thomas de Croydone failed to appear, and the charter of liberties of the Abbot and convent having been read, it was adjudged that the distress should be given up, and that the said Abbot and convent should in this matter be no way molested.

Folio cix b.

Processus de pueris Rob'i Westmelne orphanis et ille processus facit mencionem de Priorissa de Haliwell et de aliis puer' ejusdem Rob'i etc.

10 March, 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1362-3], John Madefrey, pepperer, executor of Robert Westmelne, tailor, appeared on summons in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Stephen Cavendysshe, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Cantebrigge, the Chamberlain, to answer for money bequeathed by the said Robert to Thomas, Richard, and Robert, sons of the aforesaid Robert, being under age, and to Margaret, daughter of the same, being of full age and married to John Mangel, mercer, and to Isabella, another daughter under age, being a nun of the House of St. John the Baptist de Haliwell.

On the day appointed the said John Madfrey appeared and rendered account, declaring (inter alia) that he had paid to Dame Elena, the Prioress of the said House of Haliwell, the sum of £46 13s. 4d.—whereof £40 were bequeathed to the above Isabella, daughter of the said Robert Westmelne, and 10 marks formed the residue of money accrued to her on the death of Robert her brother—on condition that if at the age of fourteen the said Isabella desired to leave the House the money should be returned less reasonable expenses, and if she died in the meanwhile one-half was to be returned and expended for the good of her father's soul, and the other half to be paid into the Chamber for distribution among the other children of the said Robert.

On the 22nd March, 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1362-3], the Prioress aforesaid appeared on summons and acknowledged the above statement to be true, and bound herself and her House to carry out the terms. At the same time John Madefrey asked for a further day to enable him to collect the money due to the orphans, which was granted. On the day appointed the said John came and rendered account, and afterwards gave bond for money due to Thomas, son of the said Robert Westmelne, his sureties being John Reyner, cornmonger, and John Bryan, fishmonger.

Folio cx.

Custod' Ric'i fil' Rob'i Westmelne tradita Joh'i Mangel.

27 April, 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1363], the guardianship of Richard, son of Robert Westmelne, aged nine years, committed by Stephen Cavendisshe, the Mayor, Thomas Lodelowe, the Recorder, and John [de] Cantebrige, the Chamberlain, to John Mangel, mercer. Sureties, viz., John Wantilburgh, "pouchemakere," and John Gravesende, draper.

Afterwards, viz., on Saturday after the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.], 49 Edward III. [A.D. 1375], the above Richard, son of Robert "Westmulle," being of full age, came into court before John Warde, Mayor, William Haldene, the Recorder, and William Eynesham, the Chamberlain, and acknowledged satisfaction for money due to him, and the above John Mangel and his sureties were discharged.

Folio cx b.

Exon' acio Joh' is Madefrey de l libris.

1 May, 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1363], came John Madefrey, pepperer, executor of Robert "de" Westmelne, before Stephen Cavendysshe, Mayor, Thomas Lodelowe, Alderman and Recorder, and John de Cantebrigge, the Chamberlain, and was discharged of a bond in £50 in favour of Thomas, son of the above Robert, because John Brian, fishmonger, has the guardianship of the said Robert (Thomas ?) until he come of age, by grant of the said Mayor, Recorder, and Chamberlain; and therefore the said John Madefrey and his sureties, viz., John Reyner and John Bryan, are discharged.

Custodia Thome fil' Rob' ti de Westmelne cum quinquaginta libr' tra lita Joh'i Bryan piscenar'.

1 May, 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1363], the guardianship of Thomas, son of Robert de Westmelne, aged six years, committed to John Bryan, fishmonger. Sureties, viz., John Reyner, cornmonger, and Walter Parker, cornmonger.

Afterwards, viz., on the 18th Feb., 3 Richard II. [A.D. 1379-1380], came the above Thomas, being of full age, and acknowledged satisfaction for money due to him, and the above John Bryan was discharged.

A power of attorney granted by Henry Chadesdene to Henry Anger, "esquier," of the county of Kent, John de Perewyche, tailor, and John de Bradeleye, tailor, to receive a sum of money due to him from William de St. Albon, chandler, John Burgeys, John Bonmarche, and William de Draycote, drapers. Dated Friday the Feast of St. Dunstan [19 May], 37 Edward III. [A.D. 1363].

Footnotes

1 Set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 309-10.
2 Sat from 13 Oct. to 17 Nov.
3 Any extraneous matter superimposed. Among the ordinances of the Painters and Saddlers of Paris there is the following remark: "Li sellers apèle chose emprainte ou embastée ou ieteteiche d'estain, quant aucuns fet euvre par molles, de quelque molles que ce soit, chose que li molles soit faiz, et puis celle chose mollée attaché à colle seur l'arçon" ('Réglements sur les Arts et Métiers de Paris rédigés au XIIIe Siècle,' ed. G. Depping, Paris, 1837, p. 209).
4 Cf. ordinances to similar effect made in April and December, 1373. 'Pleas and Memoranda,' Roll A 18, membr. 5; Roll A 19, membr. 2 dors.
5 By statute 25 Edward III. cap. ix. ('Statute of Purveyors,' 1352) the weighing machine known as the "auncel" was ruled out of use and made to give place to the "balance." This provision was confirmed in 1360 by statute 34 Edward III. cap. v.
6 Referring to Isabella, daughter of John de Mymmes, who had been committed to the custody of Thomas de "Staundone" in 1353. Vide supra, p. 8.
7 Imperfect and unintelligible.
8 Commonly known as the first charter granted to the Goldsmiths. It is also recorded among 'Pleas and Memoranda,' Roll A 1, membr. 25, where, however, the date is given as the 16th March. Very incorrectly printed in Herbert's 'Livery Companies,' ii. 287-9.
9 See 'Statutes at Large' (ed. 1758), i. 320-4. A statute with farreaching effects, one of its chief enactments (cap. xi.) being that thenceforth no subsidy should be set on wool without the assent of Parliament, an important limitation of the royal power of taxation which was renewed in 1371. Another of its provisions (cap. ii.) placed restrictions on the right of purveyance, changed the hated name of purveyor to buyer, and declared that all payments should be made in ready money; whilst a third (cap. xv.) ordained that in future all pleas in courts of law should be pleaded in English instead of the French tongue.
10 Ibid., i. 324-5.
11 Many of the ordinances which follow are similar to, if not identical with, those mentioned in 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 184, and 'Cal. Letter-Book F,' p. 212, and are for the most part printed in 'Liber Cust.,' i. 99-100, and 'Memorials,' pp. 253-8.
12 Spelt "caus" or "cans" (?) in Letter-Book E, fo. cxcvii, and Letter-Book F, fo. clxxxi.
13 Probably the Wool-wharf, known also as "Customers' key," in Tower Ward. Stow, 'Survey' (Thoms's ed., 1876), pp. 17, 51.
14 The editor of the 'Memorials' translates a similar ordinance of 1350 thus: "That the cart which brings firewood [for] talwode shall take for the hundred," &c. ('Memorials,' p. 255).
15 From this point the ordinances of 1350 and those here recorded proceed differently.
16 Added by a different hand.
17 Set out in 'Memorials,' p. 312.
18 'Memorials,' pp. 312-13.
19 Sat from 13 Oct. to 17 Nov.
20 Stat. 36 Edward III. cap. viii. ('Statutes at Large,' i. 321). The payments are set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 310-12.