Folios cclxxxi - ccxc
Sept 1371 -

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1905

Pages

288-295

Citation Show another format:

'Folios cclxxxi - ccxc: Sept 1371 -', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: G: 1352-1374 (1905), pp. 288-295. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33519 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Folio cclxxxi - ccxc.

Proclamacio de mactacione grossar' bestiar' extra civitatem faciend' etc.

Writ pluries to the Mayor and Sheriffs that they make proclamation for the observance of an ordinance forbidding the slaughtering of beasts within the City. Witness the King at Westminster, 26 Sept., 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371]. (fn. 1)

Proclamation made accordingly, Saturday before the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], the same year.

Folio cclxxxi b.

Br'e pro mactacionegrossar' bestiar' per carnifices de Estchepe et del Stockes fac' etc.

Another writ to the same to the effect that the above ordinance was not intended to apply to the Butchers of Estchepe or "les Stokkes." Witness the King at Westminster, 26 Oct., 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371].

Folio cclxxxii.

Br'e ad eligend' certas personas ad colligend' et recipiend' subsidium in eodem [sic] etc.

Writ to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Commonalty for their assent to the subsidy granted by the last Parliament for the defence of the realm, viz., 2s. on every tun of wine and 6d. on every pound of merchandise coming into and going out of the Port of London, except wool, leather, and woolfells, (fn. 2) and for the appointment of collectors of the same. Witness the King at Westminster, 15 Oct., 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371].

Return to the above by John Bernes, the Mayor, and Adam Stable and Robert Hatfeld, the Sheriffs, to the effect that with the assent of the Commonalty they had deputed John Southam, "stokfisshmongere," and John Organ, mercer, to collect the subsidy and answer for the same, as Thomas Pykenham and Thomas Cornerche had formerly answered for a similar subsidy.

The above return made to Chancery on Thursday after the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], the same year.

Folio cclxxxii b.

Exon'acio custodie Simonis fil' Thom' Leggy.

Monday before the Feast of St. Martin [11 Nov.], 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371], came Simon, son of Thomas Leggy, who had been placed under the guardianship of Adam Fraunceys, as appears supra, fo. cl [b], and claimed his property, as being of full age. An account being taken before William Welde, Walter Forster, and William Walworth, the said Adam delivered up the sum of money found due and was declared quit.

Folio cclxxxiii.

Thursday after the Feast of St. Martin [11 Nov.], 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371], came good men of the mistery of Waxchandlers and presented for approval certain articles (fn. 3) for the better government of the mistery.

Folio cclxxxiii b.

The following day the said articles were approved, and thereupon Walter Rede and John Pope were elected to survey the mistery, present defects, &c.

Magr' Zonar'.

Friday after the Feast of St. Edmund the King [20 Nov.], 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371], Thomas Charlewode, John Herry, Henry Pleystowe, and John Reynold elected Masters of the mistery of Girdlers, and sworn, &c.

Ball'i Telar' Flandr'.

The same day, John van Heveryngham and Dederic Jorys elected Bailiffs of the Weavers of Flanders, and sworn, &c.

Ball'i Telar' Anglic'.

Saturday after the Feast of St. Edmund [20 Nov.], the same year, Richard atte Sole, "webbe," and Robert Bolle, "webbe," elected Bailiffs of the English Weavers, and sworn, &c.

Ball'i Brabanc'.

The same day, Peter Yonge and Peter Hegele elected Bailiffs of the Weavers of Brabant, and sworn, &c.

Folio cclxxxiv.

Ordinacio Fustar'.

Friday after the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.], 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371], came good men of the mistery of Fusters and submitted for approval certain penalties for transgressors of the articles of the mistery, the said articles being disregarded for want of such penalties. The penalties approved, and thereupon Laurence Westone and Richard Broke were elected and sworn to regulate the mistery, &c. (fn. 4)

Articuli de Pouchemakers de novo.

Thursday after the Feast of the Conception of B. M. [8 Dec.], 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371], came good men of the mistery of "Pouchemakers," submitting further articles for regulating the mistery, for approval and enrolment. (fn. 5)

Folio cclxxxiv b.

Br'e pro mercatorib' de Portynghale

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation against any offence being offered to Portuguese merchants Witness the King at Westminster, 3 Dec., 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371]. (fn. 6)

Proclamation made accordingly, Friday before the Feast of St. Lucia [13 Dec.], the same year.

Magistr' de Pynners.

Monday after the Feast of Epiphany [6 Jan.], 45 Edward III. [A.D. 1371-2], William Callere, William de Coventre, Benedict Mills, and Richard de Fletbrigge elected Masters of the mistery of Pynners to survey the mistery, &c.

Folio cclxxxv.

Articuli Fabrorum.

Monday after the Feast of the Conversion of St. Paul [25 Jan.], 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1371-2], came good men of the mistery of Smiths (Fabri) and submitted to the Mayor and Aldermen certain articles for their approval. (fn. 7)

Bartholomew atte Mersshe, Edward Sende, John Neuby, Richard Davener, William Albon, William Fryday, and Reginald Dawe elected Masters of the above mistery and sworn to present defaults, &c.

Folio cclxxxv b.

Eleccio Aldr' de Colmanstret.

Monday after the Feast of St. Peter in Cathedra [22 Feb.], 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1371-2], Adam Stable elected Alderman of the Ward of Colmanstret in the place of William de Welde.

L'ra Principisse Aquit' et Wall'.

Letter from the Princess of Aquitaine and Wales (fn. 8) to the Mayor and Aldermen, thanking them for their gifts, and recommending to them John de Chichestre and Sir Edward Chardestoke, Keepers of her Wardrobe. Dated at Berkhampstede, 23 Feb. [46 Edward III.].

Whereupon John de Cauntebrigge, the Chamberlain, delivered to the said Edward 500 marks by order of the Mayor and Aldermen for conveyance to the Princess. (fn. 9)

Scriptum indentatum Joh'is Philipot et Johanne ux'is sue per Maiorem Ald'ros et co'ita tem.

Licence granted by John Bernes, Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty to John Philipot and Johanna his wife to erect a building over (supra) the public lane at "le Quenehithe," opposite the common latrine (garderoba), of prescribed dimensions, provided that such building be not a nuisance to the Commonalty nor an obstruction of the highway. Dated in the Chamber of the Guildhall, 1 Nov., 44 Edward III. [A.D. 1370].

Folio cclxxxvi.

Br'e pro fimar' et aliis feditatib' apud le Tourhill amovend'.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs that they cause the filth which had been allowed to accumulate on "le Tourhill" to be removed, under a penalty of 100 marks. Witness the King at Westminster, 3 Feb., 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1371-2].

Pursuant to the above writ inquests were held as to who had caused the filth to be placed there, as appears in the Rolls temp. John de Bernes, Mayor, anno 46 [Edward III.]. (fn. 10)

Custodia fil' Ade de Glendone.

Wednesday after the Feast of St. Matthias [24 Feb.], 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1371-2], the guardianship of Walter, son of Adam de Glendone, aged six years, committed by John Bernes, the Mayor, and John de Cauntebrigge, the Chamberlain, to John Blakeneye, mercer, who had married the orphan's mother. Sureties, viz., John de Mitford, draper, Walter "Blankeneye," mercer, Richard Stable, mercer, John "Blakeneye," fishmonger, and John Stoke, mercer.

Afterwards, viz., on the 12th Jan., 7 Richard II. [A.D. 1383-4], temp. Nicholas Brembre, Knt., Mayor, came the above Walter, being of full age, and claimed his property. And inasmuch as the above John Blakeneye had died leaving no property, his sureties and the executors of Adam Stable, who had a portion of the orphan's estate, were called upon to satisfy the orphan's claim. Payments also made by John "Bas" or "Baas."

Folio cclxxxvi b.

Br'e pro mercatorib' et ho'ib' Flandr' et boms suis de arestand'.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation of the renewal of peace with Flanders, so that no offence be offered to Flemish merchants. Witness the King at Eltham, 28 March, 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372]. (fn. 11)

Proclamation made accordingly on Tuesday after the Feast of Annunciation B. M. [25 March].

Folio cclxxxvii.

Indentura int' Maiorem Aldr'os et co'itatem et Henr' Brode skynnere.

Lease by John Bernes, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty to Henry Brode, "skynnere," of two shops in St Swithin's Lane, near the great gate of the tenement formerly held by Roger de Depham, and now held under the Chamberlain by Copin Seland; to hold the same for a term of twenty years at an annual rent of 20s. Dated at the Chamber of the Guildhall, 9 Feb., 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1371-2].

Folio cclxxxvii b.

Indentur' int' Maiorem Alder'os et co'itatemet Thomam de Lynne plasterer.

Lease by the same to Thomas de Lynne, "plasterer," of a house and shops outside Aldresgate, situate near Houndesdiche, between the tenement of Hugh de Waltham and shops held under the Chamberlain by Richard Strengere; to hold the same for a term of twenty years at an annual rent of 20s. Dated at the Chamber of the Guildhall, 8 June, 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372].

Folio cclxxxviii.

Judicium collistrig' pro circulis de latone deaurat' et vendit' pro argent' deaurat'.

Friday the Feast of St. Gregory [12 March], 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1371-2], Thomas Lauleye (Lanleye ?), "chapman," brought before the Mayor, the Recorder, and Adam Fraunceys, Stephen Cavendisshe, John Litle, John Aubrey, and Adam Stable, Aldermen, by the Sheriffs, on the charge of selling to William de Stoke, tailor, circlets of latten gilded for silver gilt circlets, and for pledging two cups bound with circlets of latten as if they were silver. The said Thomas and John atte Wyche, "latoner," who had manufactured the circlets, condemned to the pillory. (fn. 12)

Folio cclxxxviii b.

Articuli pro lether sellers ac tinctorib' eisdem mesteris deservientib' ordinat'.

Monday before the Feast of St. Alphege [19 April], 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372], a petition presented to the Mayor and Aldermen by good folks of the "Lethersellers" and Pouchmakers (Bursar'), praying that the same restriction might be placed upon working calf-leather so as to counterfeit roe-leather as had been placed in the first year of the King's reign upon the manufacture of sheep-leather to counterfeit roe-leather, and further that Dyers might be prevented from cheating their customers.

The petition granted, and the following were elected and sworn to present defaults, viz., William Belhomme and John Swantone, junior, "lethersellers" of Chepe, and Thomas Gandre and John de Leye, "bursers" of Bridge.

Thereupon the following dyers of leather were sworn to see the above ordinances observed, viz., John Blakthorne and Agnes his wife, Robert Whitynge and Lucy his wife, and Richard Westone, "dier," and Katherine his wife. (fn. 13)

Folio cclxxxix.

Mayn leprosus.

Monday before the Feast of St. Barnabas [11 June], 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372], John Mayn, "bakere," a leper, sworn before the Mayor and Aldermen in the Husting to quit the City forthwith, under pain of the pillory. (fn. 14)

Br'e pro bladis educend' ad partes exteras.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation to the effect that all kinds of grain might be freely exported to countries at peace with England. Witness the King at Westminster, 8 June, 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372]. (fn. 15)

Proclamation made accordingly, Thursday before the Feast of St. Barnabas [11 June], the same year.

Folio cclxxxix b.

Br'e pro vinis ad partes exteras non educend'.

Writ to the same to make proclamation forbidding the exportation of any kind of wine. Witness the King at Westminster, 8 June, 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372]. (fn. 16)

Proclamation made accordingly, Thursday before the Feast of St. Barnabas [11 June], the same year.

Br'e pro sagit tar' balistar' volentib' capere vadia Reg' eund' supra mare supervidend'.

Writ of Privy Seal to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation for all archers and crossbow-men who were willing to take service across the sea to assemble at "Horseydoune," (fn. 17) near Suthwerk, by Saturday next, for inspection by Commissioners. Dated at Westminster, 20 June, 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372].

Proclamation made accordingly, Friday the morrow of St. John Bapt. [24 June].

Proclamacio de armis et cultell' non portand' in civitate nec suburbio facta per preceptum consilii d'ni Reg'.

Monday the eve of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June], 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372], proclamation made against carrying weapons in the City except by servants of lords and knights carrying their masters' swords, and commanding every hosteler to warn his hosts at their first coming to lay aside their arms. (fn. 18)

Folio ccxc.

Ordinacio quantum tinctores deservientes bur sar' et leth'sellers cap' pro tincta unius libre de brasill'.

Monday after the Feast of St. Botolph [17 June], 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372], came good men of the misteries of "Lethersellers" and Pouchmakers (Bursar') and complained to the Mayor and Aldermen that whereas dyers of skins in the City used formerly to receive 7½ d. at the most for a pound of brasil dye, they by covine among themselves now receive 12d. or 14d. at their will, whereby the price is enhanced, and they prayed a remedy. Thereupon precept was issued to William Greyngham, Serjeant of the Chamber, to summon the dyers to appear on Saturday after the Feast of St. John Bapt. [24 June], when it was ordained that no dyer dyeing skins or leather for the said misteries should thenceforth receive for his labour and for one pound of brasil dye more than 10d., and any dyer, selling his own brasil for dyeing purposes, shall not receive more than 2d. profit for every pound so sold, under penalty of paying half a mark to the Chamber of the Guildhall for the first offence, a mark for the second, and 20s. for the third.

Proclamacio de vendicione armatur' vinor' et victualium.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation forbidding armourers, vintners, and victuallers enhancing the price of their goods by reason of the army mustering at Sandwich, whence the King was about to set sail for foreign parts. Witness the King at Westminster, 18 July, 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372].

Proclamation made accordingly, Saturday before the Feast of St. Margaret [20 July], the same year.

Folio ccxc b.

Proclamacio de pace et concordia int' d'um Regem et Com' Flandr'.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to make proclamation forbidding any offence being offered to merchants of Flanders. Witness the King at Westminster, 18 July, 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372]. (fn. 19)

Proclamation made accordingly, Wednesday after the Feast of St. Margaret [20 July], the same year.

Proclamacio quod omnes ho'ies ad arma et sagittar' se festinent versus Sandwycum.

Writ of Privy Seal to the same to make proclamation for all manner of men-at-arms and archers to hasten to Sandwich, as the enemy threatened to attack the navy assembled in that port. Dated at Westminster, 27 July, 46 Edward III. [A.D. 1372].

Proclamation made accordingly, Tuesday after the Feast of St. James [25 July].

Footnotes

1 'Memorials,' pp. 356-8.
2 The same Parliament had enacted that thenceforth no subsidy or charge should be made on wool without its consent. The next Parliament, which sat from the 3rd to the 24th Nov., 1372, making a virtue of necessity, gave its consent.
3 Set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 358-60.
4 See 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' pp. 167-168 In Letter-Book C the date is recorded as Thursday after the Feast of St. Andrew, and the Christian name of Broke is given as Walter.
5 The articles set out in 'Memo rials,' p. 360. Other articles of the "Tassemakers" (or Pouchmakers) had been approved and enrolled in 1349. See 'Cal. Letter-Book F,' pp. 197-8.
6 Rymer, 'Fœdera,' vol. iii. pt. ii p. 929.
7 Set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 361-2.
8 Johanna, the Fair Maid of Kent, wife of Edward the Black Prince, and granddaughter of Edward I., her father being Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent.
9 'Memorials,' p. 362.
10 Referring, no doubt, to 'Pleas and Memoranda,' Roll A 17, membr. 5 dors, where the above writ and inquests thereon are recorded, the latter setting out a long list of names of those who had been guilty of depositing filth and refuse on Tower Hill. Gardeners and carters appear to have been the worst offenders.
11 Rymer, 'Fœdera,' vol. iii. pt. ii. p. 938.
12 'Memorials,' p. 363.
13 The petition, &c., set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 364 5.
14 'Memorials,' p. 365.
15 Rymer, 'Fœdera,' vol. iii. pt. ii. p. 943.
16 Id. ibid.
17 Now known as "Horselydown," a district extending from the east and of Tooley Street to Dockhead, and from the Thames to the Tenter ground, Bermondsey. It was formerly a grazing ground for horses, whence the name. See Wheatley's 'London Past and Present'.
18 Shortly after this proclamation, viz., on Saturday after the Translation of St. Thomas the Martyr [7 July], Adam Grymmesby was committed to prison for not warning his host to lay aside his knife. The knife was confiscated, and when Adam was asked to redeem it he declined, and showed contempt for the Mayor's summons to appear. 'Pleas and Memoranda,' Roll A 17, membr. 8 dors.
19 Rymer, 'Fœdera,' vol. iii. pt. ii. p. 953.