Folios 11-20
Sept 1462 -

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

20-39

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'Folios 11-20: Sept 1462 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: L: Edward IV-Henry VII (1912), pp. 20-39. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33641 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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Folio 11.

Eleccio Vicecomitum.

Tuesday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 2 Edward IV. [A.D. 1462], in the presence of Hugh Wyche, the Mayor, John Norman, William Marowe, Thomas Scot, William Hulyn, Richard Lee, Matthew Philip, John Waldeyn, Thomas Cook, Thomas Oulegreve, John Stokker, Richard Flemyng, John Lambard, John Walshawe, John Stoktone, and George Irlond, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs for the year ensuing, Bartholomew James, draper, was elected one of the Sheriffs by the Mayor, and William Hamptone, the other Sheriff, by the Commonalty.

The same day, Thomas Thorndone, draper, was elected Chamberlain; Peter Alfold and Peter Calcot, Wardens of London Bridge; Thomas Oulegreve and John Stokker, Aldermen, and William Redknap, mercer, Thomas Danyel, dyer, William Corbet, and Robert Scranynham, Commoners, elected Auditors of the account of the Chamberlain and Wardens.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the Feast were presented and admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Eleccio Maioris.

Thursday, the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 2 Edward IV. [A.D. 1462], in the presence of Hugh Wyche, the Mayor, John Norman, William Marowe, Thomas Scot, William Hulyn, Richard Lee, Matthew Philip, Thomas Cook, Ralph Josselyn, Thomas Oulegreve, William Taillour, John Stokker, Richard Flemmyng, George Irlond, Robert Basset, John Walsawe, John Stokton, and William Hamptone, Aldermen, Bartholomew James, one of the Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, Thomas Cook was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Nota de Assess' selde de Blakwelhalle.

23 Nov., 2 Edward IV. [A.D. 1462], ordinance by the Mayor and Aldermen that the Assessors of the Ward of Bassyngshawe pay 28s., the amount at which the seld of Blakwelhall was assessed by them for the last loan of 2,000 marks to the King, inasmuch as they unjustly assessed the said seld and Richard Norman, the City's tenant.

Br' e pro parliamento.

Writ to the Sheriffs notifying that Parliament would meet at Leicester on the 7th March next, instead of at York on the 5th of February, as directed by a former writ. Witness the King at Westminster, 10 Jan., 2 Edward IV. [A.D. 1462-3].

Folio 11 b.

Br' e pro parliamento.

Another writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster on the 29th April next. (fn. 1) No Sheriff to be returned. Witness the King at Westminster, 20 Feb., 2 Edward IV. [A.D. 1462-3].

Cives pro parliam'.

Pursuant to the above writ there were elected William Marowe, Alderman, Thomas Ursewyk, the Recorder, Thomas Wynselowe, draper, John Bromer, fishmonger.

At a Common Council held on Saturday, 11 March, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1462-3], there being present Thomas Cook, the Mayor, John Norman, William Marowe, William Hulyn, Hugh Wyche, John Walden, Richard Flemmyng, John Walshae, Robert Basset, Matthew Philippe, Ralph Josselyn, [George] Irland, John Stokdone, William Hamptone, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty, it was ordained :—

De latrinis sup' fossat' de Walbroke.

That all latrines over the ditch of Walbroke should be abolished.

Nota de mundaco' e et reparaco' e fossat' de Walbroke.

Also that the owner of land on each side of the said ditch shall clean his portion of the same, and pave and vault it up to its middle line. If the owner should refuse to carry out this order, his land should go to any one who was willing to do so, to hold the same to him and his heirs.

Imprisonament' Rob' ti Bifeld.

4 March, 2 (fn. 2) Edward IV. [A.D. 1462-3], it was agreed by Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen that Robert Bifeld, girdler, should be committed to Neugate for saying that the Mayor was an unjust judge, and that Hugh Wyche, Alderman, was the same, in a dispute between the said Robert and John Lokesdeen, his late servant.

Ordinac' fact' de lez lighters in Thamisia.

At a Common Council held on Monday, the 2nd May, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], there being present Thomas Cook, the Mayor, Thomas Scot, William Hulyn, Hugh Wyche, Matthew Philippe, William Taillour, Thomas Oulegreve, John Stokker, John Lambard, "John" (fn. 3) Irlond, William Hamptone, John Stokdone, and Ralph Verney, Aldermen, it was ordained that no one should receive on his wharf the cargo of any ship unless discharged by batels and "lighters" of freemen of the City, or of others resident in the same and in lot and scot, under penalty of 20s.

Folio 12.

Ordinac'o fact' pro lez lighterssmen.

A schedule of charges to be made by "lightermen" for carriage of merchandise from various places on the river to the City, per "tonne tighte' (fn. 4) and "laste." (fn. 5)

At a Common Council held on Friday, 6 May, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], in the presence of Thomas Cook, the Mayor,.

Thomas Scot, William Hulyn, Hugh Wyche, William Taillour, Richard Flemmyng, George Irland, John Stokdon, Thomas Oulegreve, John Stokker, John Walsawe, Robert Basset, John Locke, and William Hamptone, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty, it was agreed :—

De custuma m'cand' extraneor' intrant' et exeunt' per portas etc.

That strangers bringing wool or other merchandise into the City or without the gates shall pay the custom of old due; and if such merchandise be coloured (colorentur) by the "Wolpakkers" or others, a fine shall be imposed at the discretion of the Mayor and Aldermen.

De gravello et zabulo que fodiuntur in fossat' Civit'.

That no one living within the liberty of the City shall buy sand or gravel of any denizen or foreigner except sand and gravel from the ditches of the City, and bought on the spot, paying the same as they would to others, under penalty of 20 pence for every cartload bought otherwise; and that the penalty should be applied for the benefit of the ditches.

Alloc' carte Barbitons'.

That the letters patent granted by the King to the Barbers of the City using the faculty of Surgery and shown to this Court be entered of record; provided that if anything in future be found therein contrary to the liberties of the City the same shall be annulled.

Concess' fact' Marie Okam de vill' Calis'.

Also that Mary Okam of Calais shall have a lease of her dwelling-house in that town for a term of 50 years, at an annual rent of 5 marks 6 shillings and 8 pence; for which grant the said Mary gave 12 cushions (pulvinaria) for the decoration of the inner Chamber of the Guildhall.

Also that the ordinances of the Hurers entered in LetterBook H, fo. xlix [b], and in Letter-Book K, fo. clxxii, touching the fulling of hats and caps, (fn. 6) shall thenceforth be strictly observed.

Folio 12 b.

Carta Burgens' de Maudon'.

Inspeximus Charter of Edward IV. to the town of "Maudone" [Maldon, co Essex]. Dated at Westminster, 13 May, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463]. (fn. 7)

Be it remembered that the above charter was allowed by Thomas Cooke, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, the 20th May, the same year.

Folio 13.

Carta Barbitons'.

Charter of incorporation of the Barbers of London using the faculty of Surgery granted by Edward IV., 24 Feb., in the first year of his reign [A.D. 1461-2]. (fn. 8)

The charter is subscribed as being granted under Privy Seal, with the authority of Parliament, and for £10 paid into the hanaper.

Folio 13 b.

De lege non vadianda.

Be it remembered that on the 24th May, 3 Fdward IV. [A.D. 1463], it was declared by Thomas Cook, the Mayor, John Norman, William Hulyn, Richard Lee, Thomas Scot, Hugh Wych, William Taillour, Richard Flemmyng, Robert Basset, Ralph Verney, William Hamptone, and George Irland, Aldermen, assembled for business in the Court of the lord the King in the inner Chamber of the Guildhall, (fn. 9) that according to ancient custom of the City a debtor is barred from waging his law in any City Court by the plaintiff producing a written acknowledgment by the defendant of the debt.

Folio 14.

Proclamation for keeping the Midsummer watch Dated 12 June, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463].

Ordinacio de tractu pontis London.

Be it remembered that on the 6th June, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], it was agreed by Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen that the drawbridge of London Bridge should be raised for all ships wanting to pass through, as was agreed in the Common Council held on the 5th May last past; (fn. 10) and that the Bridge-masters shall take for every draw (tractu) 6 pence and no more; and if the Bridge-masters refuse to draw the bridge for 6 pence when desired, they shall forfeit 3s. 4d. of their own goods to the use of the Chamber.

Com' issio pro pecuniis de Alienigen' levand'.

Letters patent appointing the Keepers of the peace within the City and Sheriffs of the same to be Commissioners for levying the subsidy imposed on foreigners by the last Parliament held at Redyng. (fn. 11) Witness the King at Westminster, 8 March, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1462-3].

Folio 14 b-15 b.

Ordinacio de Bladesmythes.

30 July, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], came the Wardens and many others of the Mistery of Bladesmythes into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and presented a petition to the Mayor and Aldermen as follows :—

"Mekely besechen' the Wardeins and Felisship of the Crafte of Bladesmythes of the seide Citee That where as divers Foreyns Bladesmythes aswele of foreyn townes as of places nygh the subarbes of the seide Citee comyng and repayryng to the seide Citee usen to selle in Innes and other privat and unlefull places theire chaffaire that they bryng to the Citee to sell and not to places therto assigned by the ordinance of the seid Citee, and for to eschue suche untrew and disseyvable chaffare so brought and solde to the hurt of the comon' people Please it youre goode lordeship and wise discrec'ons to graunt and ordeign that al suche foreyns that from hensforward comen and usen the seide Citee shall bryng theire almanere Chaffare to Ledenhall there to be solde opynly on merkate dayes there accustumed and in non' other places upon payne of forfaiture of all suche chaffare so solde in eny other place within the Fraunchese of the seide Citee And that all other actees and ordinances a fore this tyme graunted by youre noble p'decessours for the wele of the seide Crafte entred in the Chambre of the Yeldehall of London (fn. 12) be goode and effectuell accordyng to the seide grauntes.

Folio 15.

"And over that forasmoche as divers Foreyns dwellyng in ferre contrees of this Reaume counterfeten the markes of Bladesmythes of this Citee and sellen theire blades to divers persones of this Citee and by the same persones aren solde ayen for London blades to grete disclaunder of the seide Craft and disceyte of the Kynges people It like unto youre full wise discrecions to ordeign and graunte that all suche blades so retailled and solde from hensforward in whos handes ther been founde of the seide Citee bi due serche therof made by the Wardeins of the seide Craft of Bladesmythes for the tyme beyng to gider wt an officer of youres may be utterly forfette.

"Also forasmoche as oftentymes by divers unkonnyng Grynders of the seide Citee many good blades and sufficient aren' sore appeired (fn. 13) to grete disclaunder of the London blades That it please unto your full wise discrecions to ordeign and graunte that from henssforward no maner foreyn take upon him to use the occupacion of Gryndyng of Blades within the seide Citee and fraunchise therof on lesse than that persone so sette a werke be traunchesed and proved within the seide Citee upon payn of paying at every tyme founden' defectif xiid.

"Also forasmoche as divers persons enfraunchesed in the seide Crafte have custumably used to goo sende and offre untreu and disseyvable Chaffare to sell in divers Covert and privy places for light chepe to the grete disceyte of the Com'on people Please it youre right sadde and wise discrec'ons to graunte and ordeign that no personne enfraunchesed of the seide Crafte in the same Citee by him self nor by noon other persone in no wise shall bere no manere chaffare of the seide Craft out of his house to offre to eny persone to sell unto suche tyme that the saide Chaffare be duely serched by the Wardeins of the same Crafte for the tyme beyng and founde bv the seide Wardeins able upon payn of forfeiture of the same and to make fyne at every tyme that he therof be founde defectyf and duely convicte upon the same vjs viijd Whereof that oon' halff to the seide yeldehall and that other halff to the Comon' Boxe of the seide Crafte.

"Also forasmoche as often tymes divers unkonnyng Grynders of sheres and blades of the seide Citee goyng a boute in the same Cite and desiren to have the gryndyng of mennes sheres and blades for right litle value For the covetisenes of the which men taken them there sheres and blades to grynde and thanne they been evill grounde and some tyme in stede of gryndyng but whette by the which the comon people been gretely disceyved and withoute remedy Wherefore please it youre saide discrecions to ordeyn and graunte that noo persone enfraunchesed in the seide Crafte take upon him to grynde eny mennes sheres except Shermensherys that is to say clothesheris or blades (fn. 14) withoute he do it sufficiently and werkmanly And if any manne be founde defectif in that poynt by complaynt made of any persone that thanne the party so hurte to be restored to his hurtes by the discrecion of the Wardeins of the same Crafte for the tyme beyng and to make fyn to the Comon' Boxe of the seide Craft accordyng to the seide defence [sic] nor that no personne enfraunchesed in the seide Crafte shall not goo oute of his house to praye desire nor fecche eny ware or Chaffare to make or grynde nor that noo personne of the seide Crafte shall not bere nor send his marke to eny foreyn to be sette upon eny werke by the foreyn to be made wtoute that there be noo man enfraunchesed of the seide Crafte of sufficient konnyng to make the same upon paynne to pay at every tyme that eny of the personnes enfraunchesed of the seide Crafte be founde defectif in eny of the poyntes aforeseid xxd. wherof that oone halff to the yeldehall aforeseid and that other balff to the comon' boxe of the seide Crafte.

"And where as the co'ialtee of the seide Crafte to the honure of God and of oure blissed lady his moder of long tyme passed have founde used and kept certeyn lyghtes bernyng bifore the ymages of oure lady aswell in the Cathedrall Chirche of Seynt Poule, as in the Chirche of the Freres Menours, dyvers persones of the seide Crafte been obstynat and woll not bere there parte to the sustinance of the seide lightes nor obey the somons of there Wardeins for suche Correccions and necessaries as long to the seide Crafte to the grete trouble and hurte of the same Craft Please it therfore youre lordship' and wise discrecions to graunte and ordeign that every persone of the seid Craft disobeyng to pay his parte duly sette upon him to the sustinaunce of the seide lightes or that disobeyeth eny somons made unto him by the Wardeins of the seide Crafte for the tyme beyng make fyne of iiijd or ellys to losse at every tyme a pownde a [sic] wexe Whereof that oone halff to the yeldehall aforeseid and that other halff to the Comon' Boxe of the seide Crafte.

Folio 15 b.

"Also that no man enfraunchesed in the seide Crafte of Bladesmythes shall take upon him forhensforward to make no manere of ware aperteynyng to the same Crafte unto suche tyme that he have chosen him a merk and it shewed unto the Wardeins of the seide Crafte for the tyme beyng and to iiij of the same Craft suche as the same Wardeyns woll calle unto them (fn. 15) and by theym admitted and enrolled in the yeldehall of London in avoidance of the prejudice that might therby growe to eny other persone of the same crafte so as every mannys werk therby may be knowen upon payn to pay at every tyme that he is founde defectif in this articule xiijs. iiijd. that oone half to the Yeldehall of London and that other half to the comon' Boxe of the seid Crafte".

Their petition granted.

Folio 15 b-16 b.

Comissio direct' Collectorib' pro auxilio levando.

Letters patent appointing Richard Raulyns, John Brown, merchant, Robert Drope, draper, John Ades, goldsmith, John Maresshall, mercer, William Overay, fishmonger, William Redeknap, mercer, Nicholas Marchall, "irmonger," Peter Draper, "irmonger," William Porter, goldsmith, and John Forster, skinner, to be Commissioners for levying the City's portion of the sum of £31,000—part of an aid of £37,000 granted by Parliament for the defence of the realm, the balance of £6,000 being devoted to the relief of impoverished towns (fn. 16) —in accordance with the terms of an indenture made between the said Commissioners on the one part, and Richard Lee, Hugh Wiche, Ralph Verney, and William "Taillard" (Taillour), Aldermen, William Edward, grocer, and John Steward, (fn. 17) chandler, on the other part. Witness the King at Westminster, 1 July, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463].

Comissio pro parte auxilii vocat' deducciones assidend'.

Letters patent appointing the above Richard Lee, Hugh Wych, Ralph Verney, and William "Taillard," Aldermen, William Edward, and John Steward to apportion the relief allowed the inhabitants of the City in levying the above aid. Witness the King at Westminster, 1 July, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463].

Folio 17.

Warantum pro auxilio levand'.

Precept to the Aldermen in respect of a moiety of the above, and to cause the amount to be levied for which their several Wards were liable, on all persons having lands, tenements, or rents of the yearly value of 10s. or goods and chattels of the value of 5 marks. Dated 27 July, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463].

Exon' acio custod' Edithe Asshewell.

1 July, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], came John Asshewell, draper, and Edith his wife, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and acknowledged they had received from John Worshop, draper, a sum of money and jewels bequeathed to the said Edith by Robert Colby her father.

Exoneracio Will' i York piscinar' ab omnib' officiis.

15 Dec., 2 Edward IV. [A.D. 1462], licence given by John Norman, Thomas Scot, William Hulyn, William Taillour, John Oulegreve, Ralph Verney, John Stokker, Ralph Josselyn, John Lambard, Richard Flemmyng, George Irlond, Robert Basset, and William Hamptone, Aldermen, to Thomas Cook, the Mayor, to discharge William York, fishmonger, from serving any office, on his paying a sum of money, at the discretion of the said Mayor, for the repair of the City's ditches. On the following 19th March the said William York was accordingly discharged on payment of 100 marks.

Afterwards, viz., on the 20th Sept., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], it was agreed by Thomas Cook, the Mayor, William Marowe, Hugh Wyche, John Walden, John Stokker, William Taillour, Thomas Oulegreve, Richard Flemmyng, John Stokdon, Robert Basset, John Walsawe, William Hamptone, William Constantyn, and John Tate, Aldermen, that the above discharge should hold good.

A deed under the Mayoralty seal discharging the above William York as recorded Dated 19 March, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1462-3].

Folio 17 b.

Exon' acio Joh' is Burton ab assisis etc.

4 Oct., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], John Burton, tailor, discharged by Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to his infirmities.

Custod' pueror' Edwardi Benet.

30 August, 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], came Thomas Brewes and John Stone, tailors, and William Redknape, mercer, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Thomas Thorndone, the Chamberlain, in the sum of 200 marks for the payment of 100 marks to John and Thomas, sons of Edward Benet, late tailor, respectively on their reaching the age of 24 years.

Admissio Thome Acton in officium attorn' in Cur' Vic'.

21 Oct., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], Thomas Acton, junior, "gentilman," admitted and sworn an attorney in the Court of the lord the King in the City. (fn. 18)

Folio 18.

Ordinacio de Fruterers.

20 Oct., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], came into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, the Warders, and many other men of the mistery of Fruiterers, and presented a petition in the following terms:—

"Full mekely shewen alle the persones enfranchesed in the Mistiere and occupacion of Fruterers of the saide Citee Howe that they of tyme oute of mynde at their grete cost charge and aventure have used and yet daily usen aswel to the grete pleasir of the King the Lordes and other gentils and straungiers resortyng unto this Citee as of the governours and other enhabitantes bothe riche and poore of the same to provide and ordeyn for al maner dentee frutes and other aswel of the growing of straunge contrees as of this land after that the saisons of the yeer requiren to the grete honour and wele of all this saide Citee as wele is knowen And howe also your saide besechers at all tymes have bene like as they yet ben as redy and welwilled after their simple powers to be contributorie to the charges of this saide Citee for the seurte saufgard and honour therof as any other Conciteseyns of like haveour or power within the same and so entend with goddis mercy and your goode supportacions and favours to contynue Yet nowe is it so what for the inordinate behaving and demeanyng of Foreins in grete nombre daily repairyng unto this Citee with their frutes which comonly and namely nowe of late be suffred to uttre and sille almanere suche frutes as they bryng at all seasons and tymes of the wike and in alle places of this Citee at their owne willes and pleasirs keping neither the comon market dayes nor places therto ordeyned and assigned contrary to alle goode and politiq' reules of this Citee in that behalf of tyme oute of mynde used and accustumed And no correcion theruppon doone but rather by their hostes and other of this Citee favoured supported and coloured to the comon deceipt and hurt of the saide Citee and to the disclaundre hinderaunce and empoverissyng of youre saide besechers in sundry wises Please it therfore your grete wisdoms of youre blessed disposicions in tender considerac'on of the premisses and howe also newe ordenaunce or reules in certeyn concernyng the seid mistier or occupacion of Fruterers as yet ben established made and entred of Record in the Chambre of the Guihald of the Citee forseid (?) For lacke whereof diverse and many defaultes bene oftentymes fonde among youre saide besechers not duely corrected to ordeyn enact and establissh for the Comon Wele of this Citee and for the goode reule of the saide Crafte thise ordenaunces folowing fro this tyme forward to be observed and putte in due execucion in the saide crafte and to be auctorised of Recorde perpetuely in the seide Chambre And youre saide besechers shall ever devoutely pray to god for you.

"First that every persone enfraunchesed in the saide mistier and occupying the same within the Franchise therof shall be redy at all manere resonable somons and warnyng of the Wardeins of the same occupacion for the tyme beyng that is to sey for matiers touching or in any maner wise concernyng the goode reules and guydyng of the saide occupacion for the honeur of this Citee And if any persone so enfranchesed absent him after any suche somons withoute cause resonable and therof be duly convict Pay to þe Chambre of this Citee vjs. viijd. half therof to the same Chambre and that other half to the comon boxe of the said mystier.

"Also that no persone enfranchesed in the saide occupac'on from hensforth take into his service any stranger or foreyn for less terme then a yeere ne that any suche personne enfranchised in any wise procure any mannys servaunt oute of his service nor take any servaunt that hath been or is in service with a nother fruterer enfranchised before he knou wel that the same servaunt hath complete his covenauntes and is aggreed with his former maister upon peyne of forfaiture and lesyng at every tyme that he is founde defectif in eny of thise poyntes vjs. viijd. that one moite therof to the said Chambre and that oþer moite to the comon boxe aforesaide.

Folio 18 b.

"Also for asmyche as divers foreins of the Cuntrey that bringen frute into this Citee to be solde usen to leve their best frutes in their ynnes where they be loigged bothe within þis Citee and the Suburbes therof and there prively sille them in grete to the forein fruterers and hulsters [huksters ?] of this Citee at theire owne prices and with the werst frute therof gone hokkyng (fn. 19) a boute from strete to strete and from place to place within the said Cite at al tymes of the wike And nether kepen the seasoun nor place of the market of the same to te [sic] grete disceit and hurt of the comons therof wich as it is conceved and it were duely kept as it oweth to be and like as of olde tyme it hath been shulde cause them to sille unto the comons better penyworthes then they nowe doon It is ordeyned that all maner foreyns of the Cuntrey that bringen frute by lond to this Citee to be solde stande and sille their frute in the comon and opyn market place of this Citee therto ordeyned and assigned that is to sey on the pament [sic] of Westchepe from þe standard there toward the grete conduyt at Greschirch and at the Fryers Meynours and in no nother place within the frauncheis of the seid Citee And that the seide foreyns from hensforth bryngyng frute be londe to the Citee to be solde as is a foresaid stande in the seide places to selle their frutes iij dayes in the wike oonely (fn. 20) that is to say Monday Wendisday and Friday unto the oure of xij of the clocke a fore noon from the fest of Alhalowen until Whitsontyde upon peyne of forfaiture of all suche frutes solde and founde in any other tyme or place within the saide Citee to be solde And that this Article extende also and be executorie to and upon all suche foreyn Fruterers as have served within this Citee And nowe to thentent as it is demed that they woll not be enfranchesed nor be under correccion ne reule neither cotributorie to the charges of this Cite dwellen in the Suburbes therof And ageyns all ordre and goode reules of the same by long tyme have used like as they daily usen to com unto the same Citee with theire frutes and with them in all places within þe Fraunchise therof when and as often as them liketh standen and goon to sille them more liberaly then any freman of the same.

"And over this that all persones enfraunchised in that occupacion by them self and their servantes stande and walke with their frutes to sille them in all places of this Citee and the Franchise þ'of when and wheresom ever it shall like them except it shall not be lefull to ony suche fruterer to stond emongys the saide foreyns nor in any wise medle with foreyn fruterers in beyng or silling at the saide place and tyme of market upon peyne of forfaiture aswel of all suche frute of their owne as is founde beyng emonges suche foreyn Fruterers to be solde as of all other frute duely proved bought or solde ageyns this ordenaunce And over that to lese at every tyme vjs. viijd. halff therof to the use of the saide Chambre and that oþer half to the comon boxe of the seide mistier of Fruterers." (fn. 21)

Their petition granted.

Custodia Rob' ti Manfelde filii Joh' is Manfelde.

9 Sept., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], came William Ware, "sporiour," living in St. John's Street, and John Forster of Sevenok, co. Kent, "husbondman," into the Court of the lord the King, before Thomas Cooke, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and acknowledged themselves bound to Thomas Thorndone, the Chamberlain, in the sum of 100s.

The above recognizance to be void on condition the said John Forster maintain and clothe Robert, son of John Manfelde, until he come of age, and then deliver to him two mazers, a set of prayer-beads (fn. 22) of silver, and a gold ring of the value of 33s. 4d.

Folio 19.

Eleccio Vicecomit'.

Wednesday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], in the presence of Thomas Cook, the Mayor, John Norman, William Marowe, William Hulyn, Richard Lee, Hugh Wyche, John Walden, William Taillour, Thomas Oulegreve, Richard Flemmyng, John Walshaw, George Irlond, John Stokdon, William Costantyn, John Tate, William Hamptone, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs, Thomas Muschamp was elected one of the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex by the Mayor, and Robert Basset was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day, Robert Colwych, (fn. 23) tailor, was elected Chamberlain for the year ensuing; Peter Alfold and Peter Calcot were elected Wardens of London Bridge; John Stokker and Richard Flemmyng, Aldermen, and William Redknap, mercer, Thomas Danyell, dyer, John Stone, tailor, and Richard Frome, skinner, Commoners, were elected Wardens of the accounts of the Chamberlain and Wardens in arrear.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, and accepted before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Custodia pueror' Ade Thurkyld.

22 Sept., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], came John Mortymer, Thomas Peersson, John Ulffe, and John Scowe, fishmongers, and William Neelle, vintner, into the Court of the lord the King, before Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Thomas Thorndone, the Chamberlain, (fn. 24) in the sum of £50 for payment into the Chamber, by the said John Mortymer, of the patrimony respectively due to Thomas, Alice, and Rose, children of Adam Thurkyld, late fishmonger, on their coming of age or marrying.

Folio 19 b.

Eleccio Thome Burgoyne et Joh' Rygby subvic'.

At a Common Council held on Monday, the 26th Sept., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], in the presence of Thomas Cook the Mayor, Thomas Ursewyck, the Recorder, William Marowe, William Hulyn, Richard Lee, Hugh Wiche, John Walden, William Taillour, Thomas Oulegreve, John Stokker, John Walshawe, Richard Flemmyng, John Lambard, George Irlond, John Stokdon, Robert Basset, William Costantyn, John Tate, William Hamptone, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty, Thomas Burgoyne and John "Rigkeby," gentlemen, were elected and admitted to the office of Under-sheriffs of the City for the year ensuing. (fn. 25)

Eleccio Joh' nis Stokker in co' em venatorem.

The same day, John Stokker, gentleman, was admitted by the said Mayor and Aldermen, with the assent of the Commonalty, to the office of Common Hunt (fn. 26) of the City loco William Sudbury, he receiving yearly his livery and £10 for fee and rewards during good behaviour.

Eleccio Joh' is Baldwyn in co' em servient' ad legem.

The same day, John Baldewyn was elected Serjeant-at-law loco Thomas Bryan.

Q' d plumbum clavi et Worstede hospitentur et vendant' apud Ledenhall.

The same day, it was ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen, with the assent of the Commonalty, that lead, nails, and cloth called "worstedes," which hitherto had been housed in "Bosomysyn" (fn. 27) and there privately sold as well to freemen as to foreigners, contrary to the liberty of the City, should thenceforth be housed and sold at the "Ledenhall," (fn. 28) and nowhere else, under penalty of forfeiture, the owner of lead so housed paying to the Chamberlain one penny per piece until sold.

Consi' lis billa miss' fuit cuilibet Aldr'o.

"We charge and com'aunde you that a noon' after the sight of this ye do due serche to be made wtin your Warde of all maner suspecte persones logged and harboured wtin youre saide Warde And of al other of whom the cause of their beyng there is unknowen And that ye in al goodely hast have afore us the names of al theym So that we maye have knoulege of their rule and demeanyng And to make provision for the goode guydyng of theym in kepyng of the peas within youre saide Ward. Wreten &c." [No date].

Folio 20.

Q'd latrine apud Brydeswell destruantur.

At a Common Council held on Wednesday, the 12th Oct., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], in the presence of Thomas Cook, the Mayor, Thomas Ursewyk, the Recorder, John Norman, William Marowe, William Hulyn, Richard Lee, Hugh Wyche, Matthew Philip, Ralph Josselyn, William Taillour, John Lambard, Richard Flemmyng, John Irlond, John Stokdon, William Costantyn, John Tate, Nicholas Marchall, Robert Basset, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty, it was ordained that all latrines near "lez gitties" at Bridewell be destroyed before the Feast of All Saints [1 Nov.] next ensuing, under penalty of 100s.; and that those who had been charged with throwing filth into the Fleet ditch shall cleanse that part of the ditch adjacent to their premises before Christmas next, under penalty of £10.

Q'd lez Basketmakers et alii forincici [ sic] tenentes shopas com' orent' apud Blancheappelton'.

The same day, it was ordained that the Basketmakers, Goldewiredrawers, and many other foreigners holding open shops in divers parts of the City, contrary to the liberty of the same, shall thenceforth cease to hold such shops within the liberty of the City, but live at Blancheappilton (fn. 29) so long as there are tenements enough there; provided always that if a foreign [shopholder] shall then be inhabiting a house of the yearly value of 40s. or more, he shall reside at Blancheappilton before Easter next, if he wishes to remain in the City, and if the house be of lesser value, before Christmas next [if he wish to hold a shop and to remain in the City]. (fn. 30)

Eleccio Maioris.

The Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], in the presence of Thomas Cook, the Mayor, the Prior of Christechurch, John Norman, William Marowe, William Hulyn, Richard Lee, Hugh Wiche, Matthew Philip, Ralph Josselyn, Thomas Oulegreve, William Taillour, Ralph Verney, John Stokker, Richard Flemmyng, John Lambard, John Walshae, George Irlond, John Stokton, William Costantyn, John Tate, William Hamptone, Nicholas Marchall, Robert Basset, Aldermen, Thomas Muschamp, one of the Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty, summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing—Matthew Philip was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Nota de Amerciament' Cur' Maioris.

Friday, 14 Oct., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], ordinance made by Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, that amercements of the Mayor's Court shall thenceforth be duly and faithfully levied, so that the Mayor for the time being shall receive yearly of the same the sum of 10 marks, in compensation for the money each Mayor had been accustomed to receive from foreign brokers practising in the City; (fn. 31) and that the rest shall go to the Chamber to satisfy the Aldermen in such things (de rebus suis) as they were accustomed yearly to receive from the Mayor. It was further ordained that the Common Clerk (fn. 32) for the time being shall deliver to the Serjeant [of the Chamber ?] extracts of such amercements, and shall receive the issues of the same, rendering account thereof to the Mayor and Auditors of the Chamber for the time being.

At a Common Council held on the 15th Oct., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], it was ordained by Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, with the assent of the Commonalty, inasmuch as many actions heretofore had been commenced in the Mayor's Court, some of them long pending and some not prosecuted to the end, with the intention that the prosecutor in such cases should take the opportunity of the absence of a defendant to recover judgment, that thenceforth any one commencing an action in the said Court, and not prosecuting his bill within a quarter of a year, should be amerced.

Folio 20 b.

Custod' Will' i pueri Joh' is Lok.

22 Oct., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], came John Alburgh, Robert Twygge, John Broun, Richard Syffe, mercers, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Robert Colwych, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £308 for the delivery of a certain sum of money and jewels to the Chamberlain for the time being, to the use of William, son of John Lock, the same having been bequeathed to the said William by his father or accrued to him by the death of John his brother.

Custod' Rose e Anne pueror Joh' is Lok.

25 Oct., 3 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463], came Elizabeth, widow of John Locke, late mercer, William Redknap, John Alburgh, and William Alburgh, mercers, into the Court of the lord the King, before Thomas Cook, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Robert Colwych, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £349 6s. 8d. for the delivery by the said Elizabeth of a certain sum of money and jewels to the Chamberlain for the time being, to the use of Rose and Anne, daughters of John Lock, on their marriage, the same having been bequeathed to them by their father, or accrued to them by the death of John their brother. (fn. 33)

Footnotes

1 This Parliament sat, by virtue of several prorogations, at Westminster and York until 1465 ('Rot. Parl.,' v. 496-570).
2 Clerical error for 3.
3 Clerical error for George.
4 Probably meaning casks tightly packed. The term appears to have been svnonymous with tun-weight. By a statute of 1472 (St. 12 Edward IV. cap. II.) merchant strangers trading with England were ordered to import four bow-staves for every tun weight (pois de toneaue) of other merchandise; whilst a petition to Parliament on the same subject, and about the same time, uses the term "tuntight" ('Rot. Parl.,' vi. 156). In a table of fees taken by packers and waterside porters of the City for shipping and landing merchandise of strangers appended to the charter to the City dated 5 September, 16 Charles I. [A.D. 1640], we find charges made for brimstone the ton loose, and for 100 reams of paper loose.
5 A last is a measure used for fish, hides, &c. A last of herring nominally = 10,000 fish, but is actually more.
6 To be fulled by hand and foot, and not sent to mills. 'Cal. Letter-Book K,' p. 220.
7 Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book K,' pp. 362-3.
8 The charter, with the Great Seal attached, is preserved among the archives of the Company of Barber-Surgeons, and is endorsed as having been enrolled in this Letter-Book. A transcript of the charter in the possession of the Company, together with translation, will be found printed in Sidney Young's 'Annals of the Barber Surgeons,' pp. 52-8.
9 This must undoubtedly be the Court of Aldermen, notwithstanding it being styled "the Court of the lord the King." Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book K,' pp. 228-9, where the editor expressed a different opinion.
10 Recorded supra, fo. 12, but marked in the margin, vacat quia postea. The date of the Common Council is there given as Friday the 6th (not the 5th) May.
11 In March, 1453. See 'Cal. Letter-Book K,' p. 368.
12 Cf. ordinances of 1408. Riley's 'Memorials,' pp. 569-70.
13 Impaired Apeire answers to a Low Lat. form adpeiorare, from peius, worse (Skeat), Old Fr. ampeirer, empeirer.
14 In 1423, when two or three individuals at the most appear to have enjoyed the monopoly of grinding shears for shermen, for which they were in the habit of making excessive charges, an ordinance was passed by the Mayor and Aldermen restrict ing their independence. See 'Cal. Letter-Book K,' pp. 22-4.
15 An embryo Court of Assistants.
16 'Rot. Parl.,' v. 497-8. The amount of relief accorded to the City of London was £115 3s. 3d.
17 A great benefactor to the Tallow chandlers' Company. See his will enrolled in the Court of Husting in 1473, where he describes himself as John "Stuward,' and as being Master of the Tallow-chandlers' Company at the time of making his will, viz., Dec., 1472 ('Cal. of Wills,' ii. 569).
18 See note 3 supra, p. 19.
19 Hawking.
20 Amended in 1465. Vide infra, fo. 35.
21 Another set of Ordinances of the Fruiterers were approved in 1486. Infra, fo. 220.
22 Unum par precum. Cf. une peire paternosters (Letter-Book G, fo. 153 b; 'Memorials,' pp. 327, 455). "Of smal coral aboute hir arm she bar A peire of bedes." Chaucer, Prol. 159. A "pair" (Lat. par) is often used of a set of things of equal size, e.g., "a pair of stairs" for a flight of stairs.
23 Alderman of Fairingdon Without, 1474-6; of Coleman Street Ward, 1476-80; Sheriff, 1475-6.
24 Notwithstanding Robert Colwvch having been elected Chamberlain the previous day.
25 At the present day Sheriffs appoint their own Under-sheriffs for their year of office. In 1441 it had been decreed by the Common Council that thenceforth Under-sheriffs should remain in office duringgood behaviour, their frequent removal having caused much inconvenience and expense. See 'Cal. Letter-Book K,' p. 257.
26 As to this office, see 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' pp. 122n., 132, 133.
27 Or more correctly "Blossoms" Inn in St. Laurence Lane, so called from the family of Blosme. See 'Cal. Letter-Book F,' p. 136n. In 1456 it appears as "Bosum is Inne" ('Cal. of Wills, Court of Husting,' ii. 540). The name survives in Blossom Inn Yard.
28 Stow ('Survey,' ed. Kingsford, i. 155-6) recites a petition of the Commonalty to the Common Council in 1503, praying that foreigners bringing lead, nails, ironwork, and "wolsteds," &c., to the City for sale may be compelled to bring the same to the open market of the Leadenhall, and not elsewhere, "like as of old time it hath beene used," under penalty of forfeiture. This petition does not appear to be recorded either in the City's Journal or Letter-Book of the day.
29 In 1582 a tenement is recorded as situate in "Blanchapelton vel Marcklane" Hust. Roll, 265 (73). It was a manor near Mark Lane, in part belonging to the family of Ros of Hamelake, and partly to the Bohuns, Earls of Hereford. See Stow's 'Survey' (ed. Kingsford), i. 149-50, ii. 294.
30 In the ordinance as recorded in Journal 7, fo. 43, the Latin equivalent for the words here placed in brackets are omitted.
31 See 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 350.
32 It has already been noted (supra, p. 15n.) that the Town Clerk for the time being was ex officio Registrar of the Mayor's Court, and so continued down to 1801, when the office of Registrar was made an independent one.
33 Margin: a note to the effect that the above recognizance became void 4 Sept., 16 Edward IV. [A.D. 1476], inasmuch as...... Cokkyn, gentleman, who married the above Elizabeth, received the money, &c., due to his wife by the hands of John Shelley, mercer.