Folios 161 - 172
June 1481 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

178-190

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'Folios 161 - 172: June 1481 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: L: Edward IV-Henry VII (1912), pp. 178-190. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33655 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Folio 161.

Custod' Rob'ti Sympson fil' Rob'ti Symp son draper.

18 June, 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], came John Hungerford, William Capell, John Saunder, and John Beauchamp, drapers, and entered into bond in the sum of £1,000 for payment into the Chamber by the said John Hungerford of a like sum to the use of Robert, son of Robert Sympson, late draper, when he comes of age.

Custod' Kat'ine fil' Will'i Draiton Paisteler.

19 June, 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], came Thomas Cole, William Marteyn, and George Grenested, skinners, and entered into bond in the sum of £40 for payment into the Chamber by the said Thomas of a like sum to the use of Katherine, daughter of William Draiton, late "pastiller," when she comes of age or marries.

Folio 161 b.

Custod' pueror' Rob'ti "Middilton" cissor'.

19 June, 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], came William White, draper, Roger Barlowe, tailor, William Holme and [blank], drapers, and entered into bond in the sum of £126 13s. 4d. for payment into the Chamber by the said William White of divers sums to the use of Johanna, Anne, Margaret, Katherine, Thomas, and James, children of Robert Middelton, late tailor, when they come of age or marry. (fn. 1)

Folio 162.

De portatorib' Torchiar' in Vigiliis Sc'i Joh'is Baptiste etc.

26 June, 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], ordinance by John Broune, the Mayor, and the Aldermen that in future the Chamberlain shall provide four torch-bearers on the eves of St John Bapt [24 June] and SS. Peter and Paul [29 June] (fn. 2) at the expense of the Chamber, the same to be clothed in "jaketes" to match the torch-bearers provided by the Mayor for the time being.

Custod' Joh'is Crosby filii Joh'is Crosby.

5 July, 21 Edward IV. [A D. 1481], came John Benyngton, John Smert, John Broke, and Robert Halle, grocers, and entered into bond in the sum of £1,000 for payment into the Chamber by the said John Benyngton of a like sum to the use of John, son of John Crosby, Knt. and Alderman, and late grocer, on his coming of age.

Folio 162 b.

Custod' Ric'i Langley fil' Ric'i Langley draper.

The same day came William Cowper, Simon Hogan, drapers, Everard Newchirch, "peautrer," and [blank], and entered into bond in the sum of 10 marks for payment into the Chamber by the said William of a like sum to the use of Richard, son of Richard Langley, late draper, when he comes of age.

Folio 163.

Custod' pueror' Joh'is Crosse.

10 July, same year came Thomas Bell, "wexchaundiller," John Wyngare, Thomas Crosse, grocers, and John Frere, "bruer," and entered into bond in the sum of £23 6s. 10d. for payment into the Chamber by the said Thomas Bell of a like sum to the use of Peter, Johanna, and Margaret, children of John Crosse, when they come of age or marry.

Concessio fo'a armurar' de quodam solo.

Friday, 27 July, 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], petition presented to the Common Council by Richard Ferne, John Bride and Richard Michell, the Master and Wardens of the Mistery of "Armurers," praying that they may be allowed to enlarge their wharf in the parish of St. Peter near Paul's Wharf by the space of 10 feet, so that it might be made even towards the Thames with the other wharves next adjoining, inasmuch as at every ebb of the river the soil was covered with entrails of beasts and other filth, to the great annoyance of the petitioners and of those using a common stair adjoining the said wharf.

Petition granted.

Folio 163 b.

Ordinacio fc'a pro conservac' Pont' London'.

At the same Common Council a petition was presented by the Wardens of London Bridge complaining of the damage done to the great Tower at drawbridge and other arches and piers of the bridge by the vibration caused by "shod carts" passing over, as well as by frequent drawing of the drawbridge, and praying that it may be ordained that in future "no shod cart laden be suffred to passe over the said Brigge (fn. 3) nor the said drawebrigge to be drawne but onely for grete necessite and defence" of the City; and, further, reminding the Council of "the grete and many inconvenientes that have come in tyme passed and daily come to the stadelinges (fn. 4) and grounde werks of the same brigge by Petir men (fn. 5) laiers of Wilchons (fn. 6) and oþere Fisshers liyng almost daily and tidely in tyme of yere atte said stadelinges to the grete hurt of the same," and praying that an act of Common Council recorded in a book marked with the letter I, fo. lvj, forbidding fishing within 20 fathoms of any "stadelyng" of the bridge, may be renewed and ratified; (fn. 7) and, lastly, praying that it may be enacted that no ship lying at Fresh Wharf or elsewhere on the east side of the Bridge shall cast any anchor in the "Goleis' and "Stadelynges" under the Bridge nor within 20 fathoms of the same.

Petition granted.

Folio 164.

Eleccio Vice com'.

Friday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], in the presence of John Broun, the Mayor, Humphrey Starky the Recorder, William Taillour, Knt., William Hamptone, Knt., Robert Drope, Robert Basset, Richard Gardyner, Thomas Stalbroke, William Heriot, Robert Billesdone, Edmund Shaa, Thomas Hille, Hugh Brice, Richard Rawson, John Warde, John Stokker, Robert Tate, William Bacon, William Horn, and William Wikyng, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs—Robert Tate, mercer, was elected one of the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex by the Mayor, and William Wikyng, skinner, was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day Milo Adys, goldsmith, was elected Chamberlain of the City for the year ensuing; William Galle, tailor, and Henry Bumpstede, mercer, were elected Wardens of London Bridge, Thomas Hille, Hugh Brice, Aldermen, William White draper, John Swan, "taillour," William Martin, "skynner," and William Spark, draper, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the Chamberlain and Wardens in arrear.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Q'd s'vientes nec valecti vic' vendant s'visiam ad Retall' etc.

Wednesday, 26 Sept., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], ordinance by the Common Council that the Sheriffs for the time being, and all future Sheriffs, shall not admit to office any serjeant-at-mace or valet, unless such serjeant or valet find surety before admission not to sell ale by retail, the Sheriffs being fined £5 every time they do to the contrary.

Custod' pueror' Joh'is Bodnam wex chaundeler.

28 Sept., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], came Robert Fletcher, "cowper," William Broun, draper, Richard Eryk, "upholder," and Robert Gowdby, draper, before the Mayor and Aldermen, and entered into bond in the sum of £55 9s. 2d. for the delivery into the Chamber by the said Robert Fletcher of the sum of £40 and certain jewels to the use of John and Isabella, children of John Bodnam, late "wexchaundiller," when they come of age or marry.

Folio 164 b.

Custod' Thome fil' Ric'i Grene scrivener.

The same day came John Thornton, John Hunter, Thomas Spence, and Thomas Welles, stockfishmongers, and entered into bond in the sum of 20 marks for the payment into the Chamber by the said John Thornton of a like sum to the use of Thomas, son of Richard Grene, late scrivener, when he comes of age.

Folio 165.

9 Oct., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], Sir [Thomas (fn. 8) ] Percy, Prior of Christchurch, sworn before John Broun, the Mayor, and the Aldermen as Alderman of the Ward of Portsokne, and made oath such as other Aldermen are accustomed to make, &c.

Eleccio Maioris.

Saturday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], in the presence of John Broun, the Mayor, the Prior of Christchurch, Humphrey Starky the Recorder, William Taillour, Knt., William Hamptone, Knt., Robert Drope, Richard Gardyner, Thomas Stalbroke, Knt., William "Hariot," Robert Billesdone, William Stokker, Knt., Edmund Shaa, Thomas Hille, Richard Rawson, Hugh Brice, John Warde, John Stokker, William Horn, and Robert Tate, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing— William "Haryot" was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio 165-7.

Ordinacio Lathamorum.

15 Oct., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], came good men of the Art or Mistery of Masons of the City of London into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before the Mayor and Aldermen, and prayed that certain articles for the better regulation of the Mistery might be approved, which articles were to the following effect:—

That freemen of the said craft, mistery, or science shall, on the Feast of Holy Trinity or within ten days of the same, assemble together in some suitable place within the City and choose two of themselves, being householders, to be Wardens of the Craft for the two years next ensuing, the said new Wardens being presented by the old Wardens and 4 or 6 other honest persons of the Craft for approval and sworn in the Chamber of the Guildhall.

That all money, jewels, goods and necessaries belonging to the Fellowship be delivered to the new Wardens, and an account rendered.

That a freeman who has been duly elected Warden and refuses to take office be brought before the Mayor or the Chamberlain as a rebel against his fellowship and forfeit the sum of 40s. for his disobedience.

That once in every three years the members be clad in a livery at the discretion of 6 honest persons or more of the said Craft, such as the Wardens and Fellowship shall appoint thereto, and that every one admitted to the livery, and able to bear the charge thereof, refusing to take it or wear it, be liable to forfeit the sum of 6s. 8d.

That once in every two years they attend Mass at Christchurch within Aldgate, clad in their livery, and each make offering of one penny; and afterwards go to their dinner or recreation at a place appointed, accompanied by their wives if they will. Each member to pay 12 pence for his own dinner, and 8 pence for his wife's dinner if present. Any one absenting himself from the said Mass, offering, or dinner, without reasonable cause, to forfeit 3s. 4d.

Provided always that the dinner be kept the year of the election of the new Wardens, and the "clothyng" given the following year.

That every freeman of the Craft shall attend at Christchurch on the Feast of Quatuor Coronati (fn. 9) [8 Nov.] to hear Mass, under penalty of 12 pence.

That certain days be kept for payment of quarterages, viz., 3 pence a quarter, an extra payment of 2 pence being made towards any recreation provided on those days by the Wardens. Those absenting themselves without reasonable excuse to be liable to a forfeiture of 12 pence.

No one to be admitted into the freedom of the Craft by the Wardens until examined and proved "connyng" therein, under penalty of 40s. Servants and apprentices not to be enticed away from their masters. Brothers of the Craft not to rebuke or revile the Wardens or each other. Lastly, the Wardens to have a right of search, and the oversight and correction of all manner of work appertaining to the science of Masons within the City and suburbs, in conjunction with an officer of the Mayor assigned to them for the purpose.

Petition granted.

Folio 167.

Ordinacio de Brounbakers.

15 Oct., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], came likewise good men of the Mistery of Brounbakers before the Mayor and Aldermen, complaining that persons of divers other crafts use the Craft of Brounbakers to a greater extent than freemen of the Craft, and refuse to obey the Wardens of the Craft in assize and "past." pay no quarterage, neither bear lot nor scot. They therefore prayed that certain articles for the regulation of the Craft might be approved and recorded to the following effect:—

That every one occupying the Craft of Brounbakers in the City shall obey the Wardens in their search and observe the rules touching the assize and paste, under penalty of paying 6s. 8d.

That every brother or occupier of the Craft pay every quarter day 6d., besides 13d. to the Beadle, and every journeyman 2d.

That bakers of horsbrede (fn. 10) shall not entice customers by giving any advantage to them, but only "xviii caste of horsbrede for the doseyn" whilst keeping the assize and paste, under penalty of 20s.

And that no one of the Craft sell thenceforth any "horsbrede" to hucksters to retail, but only to innholders and such as desire it for their own use, under penalty of 6s. 8d.

Petition granted.

Folios 167b-8b.

Ordinacio de Wyremongers.

The same day came the Wardens and Fellowship of the Mistery of Wyremongers (fn. 11) and prayed that certain articles for the regulation of the Craft might be approved and enrolled, (fn. 12) to the following effect (inter alia) :—

That no one of the Craft work anything pertaining to the same upon Saturday nor on the vigil of any double Feast after the last "pele" of evensong rung in the parish church, under penalty of forfeiting 2 pounds of wax or 8 pence for the pound.

That none work on the Feast of St. Clement the Pope [23 Nov.], "but that it be kept and halowed as it is kept and halowed among oþere craftes of the same citee that in their werk occupie fire and water in eschewyng the hurtes that myght come thereby," (fn. 13) under penalty of 3s. 4d.

That no freeman of the Craft "sett any persone awerk nor werk opynly in his shop in the occupacion of wyndyng of Bokils, cuttyng of stones for muldes, (fn. 14) scoryng of the same, gravyng of muldes, castyng of metall, or colowryng of the same metall, by the which any persone not enfraunchesed in the same Craft straungier or other not connyng in the same Craft myght lerne it, but if the same persone not connyng aggree wt the Wardeyns of the same Craft for the tyme being Except onely the wiffe son doughter or covenaunt servaunte that hath been apprentice in the same Craft," under penalty.

Also that henceforth no person work in the Craft after 9 P. M., to the annoyance of his neighbours with knocking or filing, under penalty of paying one pound of wax to the Guildhall Chapel and one pound to the use of the Craft, or 8 pence for the pound.

Petition granted.

Folio 168 b.

Vicecom' mortuus et alter loco ejus electus etc.

Be it remembered that on Saturday, 20 Oct., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], in the presence of John Broun, the Mayor, the Aldermen, the Common Council, the Wardens, and other good men of all the Misteries of the City summoned to the Great Hall of the Guildhall, Richard Chawry, salter, was elected one of the Sheriffs of the City [sic] loco William Wykyng, who died the previous day. The same day the said Richard Chawry received the oath according to custom. On the following Monday, viz., 22 Oct., he was presented at Westminster with the pageant of all the barges (cum apparatu omnium Bargiarum), according to ancient custom in presentations of the City's Sheriffs on the morrow of St. Michael.

Folio 169.

Disgysyng et pageons prohibit qn' Maior recepit suum sacr'm etc.

"Be it Remembred that the xxiijth day of October the xxjth yere of the Reign of Kyng Edward the iiijth [A. D. 1481] It is accordet by John Broun Maire and the Aldremen of the Citee of London that from hensfurth in the Goyng and Commyng of the Maire to or from Westmynster when he shall take his Othe there shall no disguysyng nor pageoun be used or hadde from the Maires house to the water nor from the water to the Maires house like as it hath been used nowe of late afore this tyme uppon payn of xx li to be lost by the Feolashippe that shall hapne to do the contrary hereunto to thuse of the Chambre etc."

P'sentacio Mag'ri Thoe Aleyn ad quandam Can tar' v cantar' in Capella b'te Marie juxta Guyhald' London'.

Letter from John Broun, the Mayor, and Milo Adys, the Chamberlain, to Thomas [Kempe], Bishop of London, presenting Master Thomas Aleyn for admission to one of the five chantries founded in the Guildhall Chapel by Adam Fraunceys and Henry Frowyk. vacant by the resignation of Sir Thomas Praty, the last chaplain. Dated 15 Oct., 1481.

Exon'acio Thome Lud bury ab assis'.

27 Oct., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], Thomas Ludbury, "lorymer," discharged by the Mayor and Aldermen from serving on juries, owing to his infirmities.

Exon'acio Joh'is Pierson ab assis'.

The same day John Pierson, mercer, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Will i Dolfynby ab assisis etc.

The same day William Dolfynby, "letherseller," similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio 169 b.

L'ra Reg' Edwardi iiij ti q'd Maior et Aldr'i lib'am li'erent elecc'suor' officiariorum.

Letter from the King to the Mayor and Aldermen thanking them for having acceded to his request to appoint Nicholas Suthworth to the office of "Garbelershipe' (fn. 15) within the City, and, further, for having made him a freeman without charge. The King promises that this appointment to the office of Garbler shall not be drawn into precedent Dated at Windsor Castle, 16 Nov. [A. D. 1481].

Custod' Mar garete fil' Will i Gardyner draper.

13 Nov., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], came Robert Fletcher, "cowper," William White, Thomas Risby, drapers, and John Plonket, "sherman," before William "Hariot," the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond in the sum of £60 16s. 2a for the delivery into the Chamber by the said Robert Fletcher of a sum of money [amount not recorded] and certain goods in trust for Margaret, daughter of William Gardyner, late draper, when she comes of age or marries. (fn. 16)

Folio 170.

Proclamacio cont a Provisores victualium pro hospicio Regis.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation for all persons who have suffered at the hands of the King's Takers and Purveyors in taking wheat, wood, &c., to lay their complaint before the Lords of the Council or the Steward of the King's Household, the King's will being that none should be prevented bringing wheat and wood to the City, and that any wheat or other grain taken by the said Purveyors should be paid for. No Purveyor to be accepted as such unless he produce his commission under the Great Seal. (fn. 17) Witness the King at Westminster, 16 Nov., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481].

Exon'acio Joh'is Oterto i ab assis'.

27 Nov., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], John Oterton, "bowyer," discharged by the Mayor and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to old age.

Custod' pueror' Ric'i Sturges piscenar'.

1 Dec., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], came Richard Suthewell, esquire, fishmonger, William Purchas, mercer, and Robert Darlyngton, fishmonger, and entered into bond in the sum of 400 marks for payment into the Chamber by the said Richard of 250 marks to the use of John, son of Richard Sturges, late fishmonger, and £100 to the use of Richard, son of the same, when they respectively come of age.

Folio 170 b.

Recogn' pro exon'acione xv me in Ward' de "Bassieshawe'.

11 Dec., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481], came John Olston, Rector of the church of St. Michael in "Bassyngeshawe," John Materdale, Thomas Shelley, and Ralph Urmestone, churchwardens, Richard Haynes, Henry Davers, Robert Yarome, William Rollesley, William Estone, John Benname, John Martyn, Hervey Stephens, Nicholas Duraunt, and John Baker, parishioners of the same, and entered into bond in the sum of £18 for the payment of a sum of £3 out of every whole fifteenth granted by Parliament to the King, towards the relief of the poorest parishioners, until such sum of £18 be expended.

Folios 171-2.

Ordinacio de lez lether sellers etc.

5 Feb., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481-2], came good men of the Art or Mistery of Lethersellers into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before the Mayor and Aldermen, and prayed that certain articles for the regulation of the Mistery (fn. 18) might be approved, to the following effect (inter alia) :—

That no member "tawe" any leather for any one not a freeman of the City and "reciaunt" within the City and suburbs, under penalty prescribed, except that if "any gentilman or any other honest man willyng to have a skynne or ij or iij or half a doseyn tawed for his owne use no man say nay as the Tawier and he may aggree and accorde takyng for the werkmanship Þ'eof."

Also that no "foreyn" shall be put to "tawyng of leder," nor to "diyng of leder," nor to "flotyng of brasill," nor to 'drawyng out of leder," nor "kepyng stewe to dry lether in when it is died," nor to "wtthyng," "paryng," "pollyng," nor "cuttyng of poyntes," under penalty.

Also that no one of the Craft thenceforth "sett on, put on, wynde on, nor perse no maner throwes otherwise called aglettes upon any poyntes or laces, that is to say of leder thredde or silk of what colour soever it be, by no candelight."

Petition granted.

Br'e protenentib' ville de Southwold et Returnum ejusdem.

Writ alias to the Mayor and Sheriffs forbidding the exaction of toll from the men of the vill of Southwold, co. Suff., the said vill having been formerly held by Gilbert de Clare, late Earl of Gloucester and Hereford, as part of the Earldom of Gloucester, and its tenants free of toll Witness the King at Westminster, 11 May, 20 Edward IV. [A. D. 1480].

Folio 172 b.

Return made to the above writ to the effect that the Mayor and Sheriffs had always taken toll of men of Southwold coming to the City with merchandise, and that they could not cease from so doing without prejudice to the City's liberties and customs.

Exon'acio Joh'is Seman ab assisis.

14 Feb., 21 Edward IV. [A. D. 1481-2], John Seman, "taloughchaundler," discharged from serving on juries, &c., owing to his infirmities.

Custod' Thome fil' Walteri Milson curriour.

16 Feb. the same year came Thomas Hobersty, Thomas Mower, John Cole, curriers, and entered into bond in the sum of £10 for payment into the Chamber by the said Thomas Hobersty of a like sum to the use of Thomas, son of Walter Milson, late currier, when he comes of age. (fn. 19)

Footnotes

1 Margin. 7 April, 22 Edward IV. [A. D. 1482], came William Fox, "taillour," who had married the above Johanna, and acknowledged satisfaction for his wife's patrimony, as well as for money accruing by the decease of Scolastica her aunt and Elizabeth [sic] her sister; 18 June, 14 Henry VII. [A. D. 1499], came Thomas Hunt, draper, who married the above Anne, and acknowledged satisfaction for his wife's patrimony, as well as for money accruing by the decease of Margaret and Elizabeth [sic] her sisters; 7 Oct., 10 Henry VII. [A. D. 1494], came Thomas Wood ward, who married the above Kathe rine, and acknowledged satisfaction for her patrimony, and on the 6th Nov. of the same year the said Thomas acknowledged satisfaction for money accruing to his said wife by the de cease of Margaret and Elizabeth [sic] her sisters.
2 When the Midsummer Watch was held, and the City was given up to bonfires and carousing. See Stow's 'Survey' (ed Kingsford), i. 101-3.
3 Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book K,' p. 38.
4 Foundations or starlings. See 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 186; 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 278 n.
5 Or "Peters"—fishermen using nets called "peteresnets." Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 186 n.
6 Wilks, Cf. A. -S. weaican.
7 Among the ordinances proclaimed by Richard Whityngton on entering upon the office of Mayor in 1406, and recorded on fo. 56 of Letter-Book I, is the following "Item qe nulle pesche en Thamise pres nulle Wharf de Pount de Temple tanque alle Toure de Loundres ne del autre coste du Thamyse par le space de vynt vadme." London Bridge does not appear to be mentioned.
8 Supplied by Rev. A. B. Beaven ('Aldermen of the City of London,' p. 181). This appears to be the first instance recorded in the Letter-Books of a Prior of Christchurch being sworn as Alderman of Port soken Ward.
9 Or "Four Crowned Martyrs," a title bestowed on four working masons or sculptors who are said to have suffered death at Rome in the reign of Diocletian [A. D. 284-303] rather than make a statue to a heathen god. In consequence of that Emperor's persecution of Christians, the chronological era known as the "Era of Diocletian' was also called the "Era of Martyrs." A lodge of Freemasons exists in London at the present day known as that of the Quatuor Coronati (No. 2076) — Conder, 'The Hole Craft and Fellowship of Masons,' p. 44.
10 Horse bread was the common artificial food for horses in the Middle Ages The modern dog biscuit and oil cake for cattle are its nearest equivalent.
11 A fellowship formed in 1479 by the union of the Chapemakers with the Wyredrawers. See supra, p. 168, and note there.
12 Compare similar ordinances of the Wyresellers (an association of Pynners and Wyremongers) in 1497. Infra, fos. 329 et seq.
13 Pope Clement, having suffered martyidom by drowning with an anchor attached to his neck, was chosen patron of metal workers. A writer in Notes and Queries, 2 Sept., 1911, on the connexion between St. Clement the Pope and the Wyre drawers, states that at one time it was the custom to celebrate St. Clement's Day in Woolwich Dock vard "by a procession in which honour was done to an apprentice got up to represent 'Old Clem,' much begging, drinking, and speechifying being connected with the observ ance."
14 Moulds.
15 The garbelage of groceries and other commodities. The duty of the Garbler was to see that all drugs and groceries were duly garbled (i. e., picked), and cleansed before sale.
16 Margin. 30 July, 14 Henry VII. [A. D. 1499], came John Gardyner, scrivener, who married the above Margaret, and acknowledged satis faction for his wife's property.
17 For various statutes regulating Purveyance, see 'Calendar LetterBook I,' pp. 288-98; 'Cal. Letter- Book K,' p. 269.
18 The articles are fully set out in Black's 'History of the Leather-sellers' (pp. 39-41), but the date is there given as 5 January.
19 Margin. 17 Oct., 4 Henry VII. [A. D. 1488], came Alice, wife of Thomas Pelham, alias Butter, and daughter of the said Walter Milson, and acknowledged satisfaction of the above sum of £10 accruing to her by the death of her brother Thomas, the orphan.