Folios 173 - 180
March 1481-2 -

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

190-199

Citation Show another format:

'Folios 173 - 180: March 1481-2 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: L: Edward IV-Henry VII (1912), pp. 190-199. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33656 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Folio 173.

Custod' Isabell' fil' Will'i Leche.

1 March, 21 Edward IV. [A.D. 1481-2], came Thomas Hiot, John Lokton, John Benet, and Percyvall Wodehous, drapers, and entered into bond in the sum of £20 for payment into the Chamber by the said Thomas of a like sum to the use of Isabella, daughter of William Leche, when she comes of age or marries, the said money having been bequeathed to her by Thomas Hoye, late "joynour".

Custod' Alicie fil' Will'i Leche.

The same day came John Chalk, goldsmith, William Chalk, "peauterer," Robert Panteley, goldsmith, and Thomas Awty, cordwainer, and entered into bond in the sum of £20 for payment into the Chamber by the said John Chalk of a like sum to the use of Alice, daughter of William Leche, when she comes of age or marries, the said money having been bequeathed by the above Thomas Hoye.

Folio 173 b.

P'sentacio Laurenc' Botiller Capell'i ad se'dam cantar' trium cantar' in Eccl'ia Cathedral' Sc'i Pauli London'.

Letter from William "Haryot," Knt. and Mayor, to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, presenting Laurence Botiller for admission to the second of the three chantries founded in the said church for the souls of Sir John Pulteney, Knt., and Sirs William Milford and John Plesseys, former Archdeacons of Colchester. Dated 7 March, [A.D. 1481-2].

Custod' bueror' Tho'e Santone draper.

11 March, 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1481-2], came Alianora Santone, widow, Roger Barlowe, tailor, Stephen Smyth, haberdasher, and Robert Gawdeby, draper, and entered into bond in the sum of £200 for payment into the Chamber by the said Alianora of a like sum to the use of Robert and William, sons of Thomas Santone, late draper, when they come of age.

Folio 174.

Q'd nemo cligatur in svient' Maioris ad clavam nisi prius extit'it s'viens vic' etc.

16 April, 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], ordinance by the Mayor and Aldermen that in future no one should be elected or admitted Serjeant-at-Mace to the Mayor for the time being unless he has previously served as Serjeant-at-Mace with one of the Sheriffs.

Afterwards it was ordained by Edmund Shaa, the Mayor [A.D. 1482-3], and the Aldermen that no one should be elected Serjeant-at-Mace to a Mayor unless he had been two consecutive years as Serjeant-at-Mace with one of the Sheriffs.

Ordinacio Barbitonsor' etc.

16 April, 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], came good men of the Art or Mistery of Barbers of the City into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before William Haryot, Knt. and Mayor, and the Aldermen, and prayed that certain articles might be approved. (fn. 1)

Petition granted.

Folio 174 b.

Exon'acio Joh'is Greves ab assis'.

23 May, 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], John Greves, leatherseller, discharged by the Mayor and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to his infirmities.

Exon'acio Johannis Awndernesse ab assis' etc.

25 May, 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], John Awndernesse, skinner, similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio 175.

Custod' Ed mundi Ed ward fil' Will'i Ed ward Aldr'i.

10 June, 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], came William Horn, Richard Chawry, Aldermen, Thomas Breteyn, "irmonger," and William Graunt, salter, and entered into bond in the sum of 450 marks for payment into the Chamber by the said William Horn of a like sum to the use of Edmund, son of William Edward, late Alderman, when he comes of age.

Br'e et Re turn' declarens consuetudinem etc pro teri et ten' legat' ad manum mortuam vel alio modo etc.

Writ to the Mayor and Aldermen touching a plea at Westminster between John Penford, plaintiff, and Richard Sparowe, defendant, for unlawful entry into certain messuages contrary to the statute 5 Richard II. [cap. viii.], and commanding the said Mayor and Aldermen to make a return as to whether, by the custom of the City, a freeman can devise lands and tenements within the City in mortmain or otherwise, as well by his written testament as by his last will made without writing, whether it be reduced to writing after the death of the devisor and proved, like a nuncupative testament, by ecclesiastical law or not Witness W[illiam] "Huse" (fn. 2) at Westminster, 8 May, 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482].

Folio 175 b.

Return' br'is predict'.

Return made to the above writ by Humphrey Starky the Recorder oretenus, according to the custom of the City, to the following effect :—

By the custom of the City every freeman can, and could, devise lands and tenements within the City in mortmain (fn. 3) or otherwise, as well by written testament as by his last will without writing, whether such a will be reduced to writing after the decease of the devisor, and be proved by ecclesiastical law like a nuncupative testament, or not reduced to writing and not proved by ecclesiastical law like a nuncupative testament. (fn. 4)

Consuetud' sup' attach'm forincec' reci tat' per br'e.

Writ to the Mayor and Aldermen reciting that a plea had been moved in the King's Court at Westminster between Roger Bourghchier, mercer, plaintiff, and John Colyns, mercer, defendant, for the recovery of a debt of £100, and that a question had arisen whether there existed in the City an immemorial custom to the effect that if any plaint of debt be levied or affirmed by any one in the Court of the lord the King, before the Mayor and Aldermen of the City for the time being, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, so that precept be issued to a Serjeant-at-mace of the Mayor and officer of that Court to summon the defendant to appear before the Mayor and Aldermen at the next Court to answer the plaintiff in the said plaint, and the said Serjeant testifies by word of mouth at the next Court that the defendant had nothing in the City whereby he could be summoned, and then the defendant makes default, that thereupon the said Mayor and Aldermen being informed that some other person for some reason was indebted to the defendant to the extent of the sum specified in the plaint or parcel thereof, precept issues to the Serjeant to attach such sum in the hands of the other person, and if the defendant, being summoned to appear at the next Court and three other Courts, makes default, whilst the plaintiff always appears; that at the last of the said four Courts the said Serjeant summons the person in whose hands the money lies to appear at a further Court to show cause why the money should not be delivered to the plaintiff, and that delivery eventually takes place. (fn. 5) The Mayor and Aldermen are enjoined to make a return by the mouth of the Recorder, certifying the King as to the existence of such a custom. Witness T[homas] Bryan (fn. 6) at Westminster, 13 June, 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482].

Folios 176-6b.

Return' br'is p'dict' et cons' p'dict' declarat'.

Return made to the above certifying the custom as above recited.

Folio 177.

Carta Tinctorum.

Writ of Privy Seal, by authority of Parliament, granting licence to Thomas Danyell, John Belde, John Lewesson, Henry Reynold, Thomas Rede, Thomas Grene, Thomas Warfeld, William Michell, William Hoode, Nicholas Sewall, William Body, Robert Bromptone, and Stephen Ingram, freemen of the Mistery of Dyers of the City, to found and establish a perpetual Fraternity or Guild (fn. 7) with two Wardens and a Commonalty of freemen of the Mistery residing within the City, and with the brethren and sisters of freemen of the same Mistery and others who desire to join the said Fraternity or Guild; and the said Wardens and Commonalty to be one body and Commonalty incorporate in fact and name, capable of acquiring lands, rents, &c., having a common seal, &c. Witnesses, Thomas [Bourchier], Cardinal Archbishop of Canterbury; R[obert Stillington], Bishop of Bath and Wells and Chancellor; Thomas [Scott alias Rotherham], Bishop of Lincoln and Keeper of the Privy Seall; George, Duke of Clarence; Richard, Duke of Gloucester; Henry Essex, Treasurer of England; John Wiltes', the Chief Butler; Thomas Stanley de Staneley, Steward of the King's Household; William Hastynges de Hastynges, the King's Chamberlain, &c. Dated at Westminster, 2 December, 12 Edward IV. [A.D. 1472].

Folio 177b-178.

Ordinacio Tinctor'..

9 July, 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], came the Wardens and good men of the Art of Dyers of the City before the Mayor and Aldermen, and prayed that certain articles for the regulation of the Craft might be approved.

Among the articles are the following :—

That if any freeman of the Craft leave the City and teach his craft to strangers and then return, he shall be reputed as a "foreyn" and as no freeman, until he agree with the Fellowship of the Craft and buy his freedom through the Chamber of the City.

That the ordinance touching buying and "departing" of woad and receiving of servants recorded in Letter-Book K, fo. cxxxiii[b], temp. John Brokley, Mayor, be strictly observed.

Petition granted.

Folio 178.

Custod' pueror' Thome Clifford.

30 July, 22 Edward IV. [A D. 1482], came Thomas Clifford, scrivener, William Sandes, grocer, John Wylkynson and Walter Clifford, scriveners, and entered into bond in the sum of £11 3s. 4d. for payment into the Chamber by the said Thomas Clifford of a like sum to the use of John, Richard, Edward, William, and Idonea, children of the said Thomas Clifford, when they come of age or marry, the said money having been bequeathed to them by John Sutton, late mercer.

Folio 178 b.

Exon'acio Joh'is Eltryngham ab assis'.

3 July, 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], John Eltryngham, "sadler," discharged by the Mayor and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to his infirmities.

Exon'acio Thome Fraunceys Cowper ab assis' etc.

28 Sept., 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], Thomas Fraunceys, "cowper," similarly discharged for like cause.

Eleccio Vicecom'.

Saturday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], in the presence of William "Hariot," Knt., Mayor, Humphrey Starky the Recorder, Robert Basset, Richard Gardyner, John Broun, William Stokker, Knt., Edmund Shaa, Thomas Hille, Richard Rawson, John Warde, John Fissher, Thomas "Norlong," (fn. 8) Richard Nailer, John Mathewe, Robert Tate, and Richard Chawry, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs—William White, draper, was elected one of the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex by the Mayor, and John Mathewe, mercer, was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day Milo Adys, goldsmith, was elected Chamberlain of the City for the year ensuing; William Galle, tailor, and Humphrey Bumpstede, mercer, were elected Wardens of the City's Bridge; Hugh Brice, Richard Rawson, Aldermen, William Martyn, skinner, William Spark, draper, John Materdale, "taillour," and Nicholas Alwyn, mercer, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the Chamberlain and Wardens in arrear.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio 179.

Q'd subvic' Midd' expendat x marc' per annum etc.

Tuesday, 24 Sept., 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], ordinance by the Common Council that in future every Under-Sheriff of Middlesex appointed by the Sheriffs of London shall reside continually within the City or county of Middlesex, and hold property in fee within the said City or county of the annual value of 10 marks; and if no one can be found having these qualifications to serve the office of Under-Sheriff of Middlesex, then the Sheriffs of London for the time being shall retain the office in their own hands and execute the duties of the same. (fn. 9)

Folio 179-180.

Ordinacio contra falsitatem et decepc' pann' lan'.

The same day, a petition made to the Common Council by the Wardens and whole fellowships of the Misteries of Drapers and Taillours reminding the Council of "the grete untrueth falshode and deceite in late daies begonne and nowe daily used in the makyng fullyng drawyng or settyng of lengeth in the Teyntours Sheryng & powderyng wt Flokkes of wollen cloth in biyng and sellyng of the same aswell wtin this Citee or elswhere wtin the reame of England, the makers of the which clothes in thise daies for the more partie make theym full unperfite both in lengeth and in brede contrary to the goode and holesome Statutes of this lond thereof made, and so afterward when ther be bought, being so unperfite many of theym often tymes be shorn and not fully wette before and some of theym after ther be fully wet and shorn than ther be teyntred and drawen in lengeth, which afterward when ther Receive wete of verrey force must shrynk and beside this where some tyme the Shermen have hurte mennys clothes in their werkmanship as in sheryng to lowe and to nygh the threde than ther powdre theym wt Flokkes and thus by thise meanes been the clothes made wrought and handled to the grete hurt and deceite aswell of the King's true liege people as also of all straungiers which here and in oþere londes and contreis usen to bye of the same unto the grete Rebuke and dishonour of all this Realme and also to the full grevous disclaundre of yor saide suppliauntes"—they prayed therefore that certain articles for remedying such abuses might be approved.

They were to the effect (inter alia): That no woollen cloth shall in future be shorn, except "cancellyng," (fn. 10) unless it be previously wetted.

That no one dwelling within the City, free or foreign, give cloth to be "teyntered" or shorn to any one out of the franchise of the City.

That all cloth brought to the City for sale shall be sent to Blackwell Hall, and not be harboured elswhere.

That no freeman have or keep any "Teyntour" in his own place or elsewhere, under penalty of £20; that all such "Teyntours" as then existed in such places be removed by Thursday, night at the latest; and that no "Teyntour" be made unless, ordained at the discretion of the Mayor and Aldermen.

That no cloth "roughed and shorn" within the realm be sold unless the seller deliver it wet and measured by the yard, and the buyer buy it "at wetyng and meatyng," and not otherwise.

That the Masters and Wardens of the Misteries of Drapers, Taillours, Shermen, and Fullers be granted authority to search for faults in their respective Fellowships, and present such faults as they may find to the Chamberlain for the time being.

Petition granted.

Folio 180.

Eleccio Maioris.

Sunday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], in the presence of William Haryot, Knt., Mayor, Humphrey Starky the Recorder William Taillour, Knt., Robert Drope, Robert Basset, Richard Gardyner, John Broun, Robert Billesdone, William Stokker, Knt., Edmund Shaa, Thomas Hille, Hugh Brice, John Warde, Richard Rawson, John Stokker, Robert Tate, William Horn, John Fissher, Richard Chawry, Thomas "Norlong," John Mathewe, and William White, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing—Edmund Shaa was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], the said Mayor was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio 180 b.

Exon'acio Joh'is Snothal' Kent skynner ab assis' etc.

21 Oct., 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], John Snoth, alias Kent, skinner, discharged by William Haryot, Knt., Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Ordinance by the Common Council, Tuesday, 22 Oct., 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], that thenceforth no freeman of the City sell any woollen cloth by retail or otherwise, except by one yard and one inch to the yard, without fraud, &c.

Also that no freeman occupy any tenters for planing woollen cloth (pro panno lan' equand') (fn. 11) without the liberty of the City, and that all tenters within the liberty should be destroyed after Christmas next except ten, five of which should be at Fullers' Hall and five at Leadenhall, and that such tenters should be under the management of discreet men chosen by the Mayor and Aldermen.

Also that every freeman have liberty until Christmas next, and no longer, to plane his cloth, notwithstanding an Act formerly made thereon, so that the said cloths be sealed with the seal assigned therefor. (fn. 12)

Exon'acio Will mi Olyver Tail lour ab assis' etc.

23 Oct., 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], William Olyver, tailor, discharged by the Mayor and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to his infirmities.

Exon'acio Laurencii Stokale sadler ab assis' etc.

28 Oct., the same year, Laurence Stokale, saddler, similarly discharged for like cause.

De offic' co'is Paccator'.

Sunday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 22 Edward IV. [A.D. 1482], ordinance by William "Heriot," the Mayor, and the Aldermen that Robert Fitzherbert, the Common Packer, thenceforth take for his labour for the package of every hundred calf-fells (he finding the cords for such packing) the sum of 8 pence. (fn. 13)

Footnotes

1 The articles, which relate to the taking of apprentices, are set out in Sidney Young's 'Annals of the Barber Surgeons' (pp. 61-2), but the date has been inadvertently given as 26 April.
2 "Husse" or "Hussey," Chief Justice of the King's Bench.
3 By charter 6 March, 1 Edw. III.
4 Except in the City of London and other places held like it in free burgage, a devise of lands and tene ments by a nuncupative will was void.
5 Further particulars of this case and of the custom of foreign attach ment in the City are set out in the records of the Court of Common Pleas, de Banco Roll, Michaelmas, 21 Edward IV., Roll 404. See Appendix (No. 29) to the late Maurice Hewlett's Report in re The London Joint Stock Banks v. the Mayor, &c., of London (March, 1878).
6 Chief Justice of Common Pleas.
7 From this one would surmise that the Dyers had not existed as a Fraternity or Guild before their actual incorporation as a Company by charter The same may be said of the charter granted to the Drapers in 1438. See 'Cal Letter Book K,' pp. 224-5.
8 Northland or Norland, elected Alderman of Bishopsgate Ward in Nov., 1481 (Beaven, 'Aldermen of the City of London,' i. 35).
9 The reason given for the above ordinance is the bad character and poverty of many of those who had been hitherto appointed Under Sheriffs cf Middlesex.
10 Vide supra, p. 105 n.
11 Cf. "to plane nor sette upon the Tayntours" Infra, fo. 266.
12 See Stat. 4 Edward IV. cap. i. Cf. supra, p. 105.
13 In 1474 the amount had been fixed at 4 pence. Supra, p. 117.