Folios 292 - 300
March 1491-2 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1912

Pages

285-294

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'Folios 292 - 300: March 1491-2 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: L: Edward IV-Henry VII (1912), pp. 285-294. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33665 Date accessed: 26 July 2014.


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Folio 292.

Custodia Rogeri Skirwith filii Joh'is Skyrwith letherseller.

15 March, 7 Henry VII. [A. D. 1491-2], came Richard Hadley, grocer, Richard Bromale, "joynour," John Colet, mercer, and John Clement, goldsmith, and entered into bond in the sum of £125 8s. 8d. for payment into the Chamber by the said Richard Hadley of a like sum to the use of Roger, son of John Skirwith, late "letherseller," when he comes of age.

At a Common Council held on Thursday, 15 March, 7 Henry VII. [A. D. 1491-2], there being present the Mayor, the Recorder, [John] Broun, [Hugh] Brice, [Henry] Colet, [William] Horne, [William] White, [John] Mathewe, [William] Martyn, John Tate, [John] Percyvale, [John] Swanne, [John] Fenkell, [William] Capell, [Henry] Cote, [Hugh] Pemberton, and both Sheriffs, it was agreed that the matter concerning the profits of John Hert's office should be directed by the Court of the Mayor and Aldermen.

Folio 292 b.

Also that thenceforth all those who entered into bond for orphans' goods should be bound yearly in the Council Chamber of the Guildhall on Monday next after Mid-Lent Sunday, (fn. 1) to the intent that it may appear to the Mayor and Aldermen whether the persons so bound were alive or dead and were living within the City or not.

Custodia pueror' Joh'is Hervy carnificis.

29 March, 7 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], came William More, "bocher," William Hoppy, "bruer," William White, "foundour," and Thomas Rowlande, "tiler," and entered into bond in the sum of £30 for payment into the Chamber by the above William More of a like sum to the use of Thomas, Nicholas, and Elena, children of John Hervy, late butcher, when they come of age or marry. (fn. 2)

Folio 293.

Letter from Hugh Cloptone, the Mayor, (fn. 3) and Thomas Fitz William, Knt., the Recorder, to Richard [Hill], Bishop of London, presenting Thomas Forman, chaplain, for admission to a chantry in the Chapel of the Blessed Mary near the Guildhall for the soul of Roger Depeham, vacant by the death of Richard Spillesbury. Dated 18 May, 7 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492].

Ordinacio dez Surgeons.

28 Feb., 7 Henry VII. [A. D. 1491-2], came the Wardens and other good folk of the Fellowship of Surgeons enfranchised in the City, "not passyng in noumbre of viii persones," before the Mayor and Aldermen, and presented a petition praying that, in consideration of their small number, they might continue to be discharged from serving as Constables and from any office "beryng any armure," as well as from juries, &c., as they had been accustomed time out of mind, and further, to continue to have the search of all "foreyns" using the "feate of Surgery in the City." (fn. 4)

Petition granted.

Folio 293 b.

De officio clerici camere.

17 April, 7 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], ordinance by Hugh Cloptone, the Mayor, Sir Thomas Fitz William the Recorder, Sir John Broun, Knt., Sir William Horne, Knt., Robert Tate, John Mathewe, Richard Chawry, William Martyn, John Tate, Sir John Percivale, Knt., Sir William Capell, Knt., Sir John Fenkyll, Knt., William Remyngton, Rauf Tilney, John Broke, Henry Cote, and Hugh Pemberton, Aldermen, that John Hert, the Clerk of the Chamber, should thenceforth receive for his labour as follows, viz.: of every new freeman 12d.; for every translation 2s.; for setting over of an apprentice 2s.; for every judgment 8d.; for every copy taken out for any freeman 6d.; and the sum of 46s. 8d. bequeathed to the Clerk of the Chamber for the time being, viz., by Master Reynwell 40s., by Master Philpot 3s. 4d., and by Master Carpenter 3s. 4d.; and his liveries. Furthermore, that the said John Hert should have under him a clerk, who should have meat and drink with the Mayor for the time being, and 26s. 8d. for wages out of the Chamber, also his clothing and all profits for making searches in the Chamber.

Custodia pueror' Will'i Crompe pisc'.

19 July, 7 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], came James Smyth, Thomas Lighton, Richard Bur, and Philip Seman, fishmongers, and entered into bond in the sum of 50 marks for payment into the Chamber by the above James of a like sum to the use of Hugh, William, Margaret, and Margery, children of William Crompe, when they come of age or marry.

Folio 294.

Presentacio dn'i Thome Addyngham capell'i ad secundam cantariam trium cantariar' in eccl'ia Sc'i Pauli London'.

Letter from Hugh Cloptone, the Mayor, to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, presenting Thomas Addyngham, chaplain, for admission to the second of the three chantries founded in the said church for the souls of Sir John Pulteney and of William Milford and John Plesseys, late Archdeacons of Colchester, vacant by the resignation of Sir William Tande, the last chaplain. Dated 26 July, A. D. 1492.

Folio 294 b.

Presentacio Edwardi Champflour capell'i ad cantariam sanctar' Katherine et Margarete in cccl'ia Sc'i Suthini [sic].

Letter from the same to Richard [Hill], Bishop of London, presenting Edward Champflour for admission to a chantry founded at the altar of SS. Katherine and Margaret in the church of St. "Swithun" for the soul of Roger Depeham, vacant by the removal of Sir Robert Simond, the last chaplain. Dated ...... 7 Henry VII.

Ordinance by a Common Council held on Thursday, 6 Sept., 8 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], that every freeman brewing beer or ale without the franchise of the City may sell the same to retailers or otherwise, any ordinance to the contrary (fn. 5) notwithstanding.

Eleccio Vice com' Civitatis London'.

Friday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 8 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], in the presence of Hugh Cloptone, the Mayor, Thomas Fitz William, Knt., the Recorder, John Broun, Knt., Hugh Brice, Knt., William Horne, Knt., Robert Tate, William White, William Martyn, John Tate, John Percyvalle, Knt., William Remyngtone, William Isaac, Ralph Tilney, John Broke, Henry Cote, Hugh Pemberton, and William Purches, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs—William Purches, Alderman and mercer, was elected one of the Sheriffs of the City of London and Middlesex by the Mayor, and William Welbeke (or Welbeck), Alderman (fn. 6) and haberdasher, was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day William Melborne, "peyntour," was elected Chamberlain of the City; Thomas Bullesdone, skinner, and Robert Weston, mercer, were elected Wardens of London Bridge; John Tate and William Remyngtone, Aldermen, Bartholomew Rede, goldsmith, Richard Wither, haberdasher, William Sparke, draper, and William Hert, tailor, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the Chamber and Wardens in arrear.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio 295-296 b.

Ordinacio dez Englisshe Wevers.

24 July, 7 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], came the Wardens and other good men of the Mistery of English "Wevers" before the Mayor and Aldermen, and prayed that certain articles might be approved and placed on record, to the following effect :—

That no member revile or rebuke any of the Bailiffs of the Craft, under penalty of fine and imprisonment.

That every member of the Craft attend on summons at a place prescribed on certain quarter-days and bring in and deliver to the Bailiffs their "lome fermes" for the King's duty, (fn. 7) or otherwise agree with the Bailiff for the same, under penalty of forfeiting 3s. 4d. every quarter, one half to the Chamber and the other to the Craft; and, further, pay quarterage of 2d., or make agreement, under penalty of 12d.

That on the decease of a brother every person in the livery being warned to come to his burial, Dirige, and Mass and comes not, without reasonable excuse, shall forfeit 8d.

That every person of the livery who disobeys a summons to attend general processions shall forfeit 12d.

That the Bailiffs of the Craft and the Wardens of the Guild make search, every six weeks, of all manner of workmanship appertaining to the Craft, as of the "heldes" (fn. 8) and "slaies" or "slayes" (fn. 9) occupied in the same, and notify any default they find to the workers and owners of the same, so that it be rectified by the time of the next search; and if not rectified, that then the said Bailiffs, by the advice of the said Wardens and of six or eight of the Fellowship who have been Bailiffs, shall impose a fine upon such workers and owners at their discretion.

That the Bailiffs be experienced in the craft, and that one be a woollen weaver and the other a linen weaver, according to ancient ordinance, and that the Wardens of the Craft be elected by the Bailiffs for the time being, with the advice of former Bailiffs.

That every three years the Fellowship shall have a new livery or clothing; that the Bailiffs for the time being, together with six or eight of the Fellowship who have served as Bailiffs, shall buy a whole cloth or more for the livery; and that every one of the livery shall go and fetch of the same a gown cloth at a reasonable price, and, if he like not the cloth, that he take a "scantlon" (fn. 10) thereof and pay a fine of 12d., and buy his gown at his pleasure.

That if a Bailiff cause a freeman to be made "of the Chamber" or "of the Charter" for love or favour, he shall pay for the same freeman 6s. 8d. to the use of the Craft, and a silver spoon of the value of 4s., after the old custom and usage of the Craft. (fn. 11)

That if any householder of the Craft set on work or "colour any foreyn" as a free journeyman, and present him not within 14 days to the Bailiffs, nor pay the duties for him of old accustomed, viz., a penny a week, the same to lose 6s. 8d.

That any of the Craft convicted of purloining any manner of yarn, woollen or linen, or other goods, shall forfeit for the first time 13s. 4d., and for a second offence forfeit his looms to the behoof of the King's ferm.

That no householder of linen weavers take any woollen yarn to weave unless he can work it himself and have "gere" wherewith to work it, under penalty prescribed.

That no man of the Craft take any "chayne" (fn. 12) of another man's warping without leave of the Bailiffs.

That the whole Fellowship attend church on the Feast of the Assumption [15 Aug.] to hear Mass and make offering, and that those in the clothing shall attend a Requiem on the morrow for the Brethren and Sisters of the Craft who had "past to godde," under penalty in case of default.

That all of the livery, and householders out of the livery, shall come to the dinner at the place and hour assigned; and every Bailiff shall pay 16d., those in the clothing 12d., and every householder out of the clothing 8d.

That no Bailiff thenceforth "take no suyte ayenst any persone in the Guildhall of this Citie nor in any other Court of the Kyng with the godes of the said Crafte for myspendyng of the same" without the advice of 12 or 8 persons who have served as Bailiffs, under penalty of £10.

That the Bailiffs bring in their accounts at the time and in the manner prescribed, and that when in office they faithfully levy all fines and penalties, and distrain for the same when necessary.

Petition granted.

Folio 296 b.

At a Common Council held on Tuesday, 25 Sept., 8 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], Robert Harryson admitted by the Mayor and Aldermen to be General Attorney of the Commonalty of the City to answer for the citizens drawn into a plea in the county of Lancaster, he receiving yearly 26s. 8d. out of the Chamber, and a ray gown (togam stragulatam) at Christmas of the rank of a gentleman (ad sect' gen'os').

Folio 297.

Custodia pueror' Henr' Faryngdon.

2 Oct., 8 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], came William Bailly, Henry Chalender, Robert Levendale, and John Stokes, draper, and entered into bond in the sum of £15 for payment into the Chamber by the said William Bailly of a like sum to the use of John, Hugh, and Cristiana, children of Henry Faryngdon, late fuller, when they come of age or marry.

Folio 297 b-298 b.

Carta clericor' paroch' London'.

Letters of Privy Seal of King Edward IV. reciting letters patent dated 8 Feb., 27 Henry VI. [A. D. 1448-9], incorporating the Fraternity of Parish Clerks of the City, on condition that they maintained two chantry priests to pray for the good of his soul and others in the Chapel of St Mary near the Guildhall, a condition which the Fraternity, through poverty, being now unable to fulfil, it is hereby discharged from the maintenance of one of the two priests. Dated at Westminster, 10 July, 15 Edward IV. [A. D. 1475]. (fn. 13)

Folio 298 b.

Eleccio Maioris.

Saturday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 8 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], in the presence of Hugh Cloptone, the Mayor, Thomas Fitz William, Knt., the Recorder, John Broun, Knt., John Warde, William Horne, Knt., William White, John Mathewe, William Martyn, John Tate, William Remyngton, John Percyvale, Knt., William Isaac, John Fenkell, Knt., Henry Cote, John Broke, Hugh Pemberton [Aldermen], William Purches, and William Welbeke, the Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing—William Martyn was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio 299.

Custodia pueror' David Johnson cissoris.

23 Oct., 8 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], came John Clerke, tailor, John Draiton, grocer, John Wright, tailor, "Cutbert" Richardson, fuller, and Richard Hogekyns, fuller, and entered into bond in the sum of £30 for payment into the Chamber by the said John Clerke of a like sum to the use of John and Elizabeth, children of David Johnson, late tailor, when they come of age or marry.

Folio 299 b.

Custod' pueror' [sic] Joh'is Hardy cissoris.

20 Nov., 8 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], came William Fitz William, tailor, John Spryng, fuller, Richard Warham, tailor, and William Fouler, dyer, and entered into bond in the sum of £64 for payment into the Chamber by the said William Fitz William of a like sum to the use of John, son of John Hardy, late tailor, when he comes of age.

Folio 300.

Custodia Roberti Hille filii Thome Hille militis.

11 Dec., 8 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], came Dame Elizabeth Hille, widow, Richard Hille, gentleman, John Storke and John Hille, grocers, and entered into bond in the sum of 500 marks for payment into the Chamber by the said Elizabeth of a like sum to the use of Robert, son of Thomas Hille, Knt., late grocer and Alderman of the City, (fn. 14) when he comes of age.

Folio 300 b.

Ordinacio de lez lether sellers.

20 Feb., 8 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492-3], came the Wardens and other good men of the Art or Mistery of "Lethersellers" before the Mayor and Aldermen, and prayed that it might be ordained that thenceforth every man and woman of the Craft keeping a "mansion" should be assessed by the Wardens at 12 pence a year for their quarterage, and every member not of the livery at 8 pence, for the relief of the poor and other charges of the Craft, under penalty in case of default.

Also that no freeman of the Craft or "occupiyng the ware perteynyng to the same Craft" place such ware in any inns, taverns, alehouses, or other place for sale, but sell it in open shop or in his house or in open standing in a convenient place, under penalty of forfeiture of all such ware. (fn. 15)

Their prayer granted.

Footnotes

1 The fourth Sunday after Shrove Tuesday, and the third Sunday before Easter. Otherwise known as "Mothering Sunday," from the custom of visiting one's parents on that day, a custom that arose from the procession to the Mother Cathedral Church for the purpose of making oblations.
2 Margin. 25 Sept., 8 Henry VII. [A. D. 1492], came John Flynt, who married the above Elena, and acknowledged satisfaction for his wife's patrimony, as well as for money ac- cruing to her by the decease of the above Nicholas her brother.
3 His election was probably recorded on folio 287, which has been torn out.
4 Set out at some length in D'Arcy Power's 'Memorials of the Craft of Surgery,' pp 79-81. In 1514 the Wardens, &c., of the Surgeons, "not passyng in nombre xij persones," petitioned Parliament to similar effect, and their petition was granted (Stat. 5 Henry VIII. cap. 6). By the Act of 1745 (Stat. 18 George II. c. 15), which made the Barbers and Surgeons of London two separate bodies, surgeons were specially exempted from the several offices of constable, scavenger, overseer of the poor, and all parish, ward and leet offices, as well as from serving on any jury or inquest. The Barbers were not thus exempted by the Act.
5 Cf. ordinances of 1360 and 1382, 'Cal Letter-Book G,' pp. 123-4, 'Cal Letter-Book H,' p. 184; 'Liber Albus,' i. 360.
6 Recently elected Alderman of Broad Street Ward, but the date of his election does not appear to be recorded (Beaven).
7 In 1422 the Woollen-Weavers claimed to have the survey of the work of all weavers by virtue of their paying a certain ferm to the King for every loom. 'Cal. Letter-Book I,' pp. 271-2. When the Weavers were summoned at the Iter of 1321 to show by what authority they claimed to have their Guild, they stated (inter alia), quod nullus habeat utensilium de officio inter eos nisi testificelur pro bono et fideli et habeat unde sustinere possit firmam Regis ('Liber Custumarum,' i. 416).
8 Probably identical with "healds," i e., small cords looped in the middle through which the yarns are drawn and separated. See 'N. E. D.,' s. v. 'Heddle'.
9 Combs "to divide the threads of the warp, and press close the west." —John James, 'Hist. of Worsted Manufacture in England' (1857), p. 14.
10 Fr. échantillon, a pattern.
11 See note supra, p. 274.
12 Technical term for the longitudinal threads in a woven fabric, otherwise the warp. 'N. E. D.,' s. v. 'Chain'.
13 In 1443 an arrangement had been come to between the Parish Clerks and the civic authorities by which, in return for certain concessions, the Clerks agreed to maintain one chantry priest in the Guildhall Chapel ('Cal. Letter-Book K,' pp. 290-1). Henry VI. (we are told) raised the number to two (see Stow, 'Survey,' ed. Kingsford, i. 170, 273-4), but these proved in course of time to be beyond the means of the Fraternity to keep up.
14 Alderman successively of Cordwainer and Cheap Wards; knighted 1484 or 1485; ob. 23 Sept., 1485. (Beaven.)
15 See Black's 'History of the Leathersellers,' p. 122.