Folios xiv - xxix
Oct 1401 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

15-30

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'Folios xiv - xxix: Oct 1401 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: I: 1400-1422 (1909), pp. 15-30. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33675 Date accessed: 30 September 2014.


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Folio xiv.

Eleccio Johannis Shad worth Maior'.

Thursday the Feast of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1401], in the presence of John Fraunceys, the Mayor, William Venour and William Framelyngham, the Sheriffs, John Hadlee, William Staundone, Richard Whityngtone, Drew Barantyn, Thomas Knolles, William Parker, John Wodecok, William Askham, William Bramptone, William Walderne, John Walcote, Geoffrey Brook, John "Wakeles," William Reynwelle, Thomas Polle, and Thomas Wilford, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty, John Shadworth was elected Mayor for the year ensuing. Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Admissio Will' Coventre in mister' de Mercers.

1 Dec., 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1401], came William de Coventre, "pynner," son of Thomas de Coventre, before John Shadworth, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, having been admitted to the freedom of the City and sworn on the 14th October, anno 41 Edward III. [A.D. 1367], when John Lovekyn was Mayor and John de Cauntbrigge was Chamberlain, and he declared that for a long time past he had been using, and still used, the mistery of Mercers, and not the mistery of Pynners, as the Masters of the mistery of Mercers testify. He prayed, therefore, that he might be admitted to the freedom of the City in the mistery of Mercers. His prayer granted at the instance of many good men of the said mistery He gives for his admission 20s.

Br'e pro par liament'.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster on Monday before the Feast of the Purification [2 Feb.]. (fn. 1) No Sheriff to be returned .Witness the King at Westminster, 2 Dec., 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1401].

Exoneracio Johannis Page pannarii.

24 Feb, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1401-2], John, son of William Page, of Clifton, co Oxon, citizen and draper, discharged by John Shadworthe, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exoneracio Thome "Fel ton" fourbour.

The same day, Thomas "Melton," "fourbour," similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio xiv b.

Custodia pueror' Nich'i Exton etc.

20 Nov., 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1401], the guardianship of Elizabeth and Agnes, children of Nicholas Extone, (fn. 2) together with their property, committed by John Shadworth, the Mayor, and Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, with the assent of John Wade, fishmonger, executor of the said Nicholas, to John Cokayn, Chief Baron of the Exchequer. Sureties, viz., John Warner, "irmonger," Richard Forster, Henry Pountfreyt, William Tristour, and John Lambourn, saddlers (cellarii).

Admissio Rob'ti "Arnold" in mister' Grossar'.

13 March, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1401-2], came Robert "Arnald," "haberdassher," before John Shadworth, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, having been admitted to the freedom of the City on the 14th December, 8 Richard II. [A.D. 1384], when Nicholas Brembre was Mayor and Richard Odyham was Chamberlain, and he declared that for a long time past he had been using, and still used, the mistery of Grocers, and not the mistery of Haberdashers, as the Masters of the former mistery testify. He prayed therefore that he might be admitted to the freedom of the City in the mistery of Grocers. His prayer granted at the instance of many good men of the said mistery. He gives for admission 13s. 4d.

Exon'acio bon' et cat' Will'o Horne pertinen'.

5 May, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, delivered in court to William, son of William Horn, late citizen and skinner, now of full age, the sum of 10 marks and a girdle of silver, harnessed, kept in trust for him.

Folio xv.

Recogn' Joh'ne que fuit ux' Joh' Shiryng de £x.

31 March, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], came Johanna, late wife of John Shiryng, girdler, before the Mayor and Aldermen, and covenanted under bond to pay the sum of £10 to Agnes and Isabella her daughters, as marriage portion. Sureties, viz., John London and Thomas Pernell, girdlers.

Custod' pueror' Joh'is Godard auri fabri.

31 Jan., 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1401-2], came Martin Godard, "cutler," one of the executors of John Godard, (fn. 3) late goldsmith, and delivered to Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, a sum of money belonging to Katherine and Anne, daughters of the said John; and the same day the guardianship of the said daughters and of their property was committed by John Shadworth, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and the said Chamberlain, with theassent of the said Martin, to William Sudbury, draper, who married Cecilia, widow of the said John Godard. Sureties, viz., Thomas Weylond, John Boteler, draper, John Pound, "pouchemaker."

Afterwards, viz., on the 4th October, 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], came Peter Wymondham, draper, who, with the assent of John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, had married the above Katherine, and acknowledged satisfaction for his wife's portion.

Afterwards, viz., on the 2nd April, 9 Henry IV. [A.D. 1408], came Thomas Wysshe, draper, who, with the assent of William Staundone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, had married the above Anne, and acknowledged similar satisfaction.

Folio xv b.

Provisio facta contra caristiam Bladi.

Precept, under the Mayoralty Seal, to the Aldermen that they cause the inhabitants of their several Wards to lay in a store of corn, &c., in view of the threatened scarcity. (fn. 4) Dated 31 March, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402].

Custod' Thome fil' Joh'is Kentoys peautrer.

12 May, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], the guardianship of Thomas, son of John Kentoys, late "peautrer," committed to Thomas Fulham, who married Margaret his mother. Sureties, viz., John Mapelisdene, senior, and Simon Ingram, "lyndraper."

Afterwards, viz., on the 5th May, 6 Henry IV. [A.D. 1405], came the above Thomas, being of full age, and acknowledged satisfaction for his patrimony.

Folio xvi.

Securitas pro quatuor mille libr' [sic] d'no Regi prestitis et mutuatis.

Letters Patent under the Great Seal granting to the Mayor and Commonalty the custom and subsidy issuing from wool, woolfells, and leather leaving the Port of London, by way of repayment of two several loans to the King of 2,000 marks. Dated at Westminster, 11 April, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402].

Folio xvi b.

Obligacion des diverses seigneurs pur les deux [sic] mill' marcz.

Recognizance by Edmund [Stafford], Bishop of Exeter, Henry [Bowet], Bishop of Bath, Henry [Percy], Earl of Northumberland, and Thomas Langeley, clerks, for payment of the sum of 4,000 marks to the Mayor and Commonalty by Christmas next Dated 12 April, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402].

Defesaunces sur la obligacion avaunt dicte.

Indenture of defeasance of the above recognizance on condition that the Mayor and Commonalty be allowed to recover the debt of 4,000 marks from the customs of the Port of London Dated 13 April, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402].

NotA.D.e qua tuor person' in eleccion' Aldr' nominand'.

20 Sept., 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], agreed and ordained by the Mayor and Aldermen that in elections of Aldermen thenceforth to be made there should be named and chosen four (fn. 5) of themore honest and sufficient citizens of the City, of whom the one most fit to support the honour and charge of the City, according to the discretion and sound consciences of the Mayor and Aldermen for the time being, should be admitted and sworn to execute the same office, as is more fully contained in the ordinance thereon lately made in the time of Richard Whityngtone, as in book H, fo. cccxiiij, it appears. (fn. 6)

Folio xvii.

Acquitaunce de quatre mill' marcz resceux par les Mair et Audermans.

Acquittance by the Mayor and Commonalty for the sum of 4,000 marks formerly lent to the King, and surrender of the "foille" of the seal called "Coket," which had been delivered to them upon the customs of the Port of London being granted to them as security.

Abjudicacio lib'tatis Ric'i Coggeshale pro eo quod ipse lib' civit' im pl'it' alium lib' extra civit in com' forins' licenc' non optent' etc.

23 Nov., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], in a congregation of the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council in the Upper Chamber of the Guildhall, John Weston, Common Pleader, showed on behalf of the City and of a certain John Bourere, "turnour, "that whereas, according to the customs of the City hitherto used and approved, one citizen was not allowed to implead another citizen outside the City, for causes arising within the City, without permission of the Mayor or Warden: nevertheless, a certain Richard Coggeshale, saddler, who had for a long time been in litigation with the said John Bourere in the King's Courts of the City, had, on the 13th May, 1 Henry IV. [A.D. 1400], under the assumed name of Richard Wasp, fraudulently prosecuted the said John in the City of York, so that he was made an outlaw. The said Common Pleader prayed that the said Richard might be examined on the matter.

Thereupon the said Richard Coggeshale declared that Thomas Knolles, when he was Mayor, had given him permission to prosecute the said John Bourere at common law outside the City, as could be proved by testimony of John Marchaunt, the Common Clerk of the City, and William Est and Richard "Jarpenvylle," Serjeants to the Mayor. These, however, being examined, testified to the contrary. He was, therefore, condemned to lose the franchise of the City and to be committed, as a foreigner, to the King's prison of Newgate, and Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, was instructed not to allow him to keep open shop within the liberty of the City.

Folio xvii b.

De eleccione Aldremannor'.

23 Nov., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], the ordinance touching the form of election of Aldermen recorded supra [folios. xvi b] approved by the Common Council.

Custodia Alicie filie Will'i Bowyer civis et cissor' London'.

6 May, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], Richard Statham, Thomas Tykhille, and Thomas Nekton, tailor, administrators of the goods of William Bowyer, tailor, delivered to Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, divers sums of money in trust for Alice, daughter of the said William. The guardianship of the said Alice and ofher property committed by John Shadworth, the Mayor, and Aldermen, and the aforesaid Chamberlain, to William Pountfreyt, skinner. Sureties, viz., William Tristour, saddler, and Henry Barton, skinner.

Custodia filior' Steph'i Maplisdene civis et aur' Lond'.

5 May, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], the guardianship of John and William, sons of Stephen Maplisdene, late goldsmith, committed to Reymund Standelf, goldsmith, who married their mother. Sureties, viz., John Standelf and Gregory Cressy, goldsmiths.

Folio xviii.

Afterwards, viz., on the 26th Feb., 12 Henry IV. [A.D. 1410-11], the above John Standelf delivered to John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, a sum of money bequeathed to the said orphans.

Compotus Joh'is Tyddes bury civis et pellipar' London'.

10 June, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], account rendered by John Tyddesbury, skinner, before John Walcote and William Walderne, Aldermen, and William Marchesford and Robert Chichely, Commoners, auditors appointed by John Shadworth, the Mayor, for the time that he was guardian of Johanna the elder, and Johanna the younger, his daughters, and of the money left to them by John Leycestre, their uncle. (fn. 7)

Exon'acio Henrici Porter civis et Pye baker' London'.

25 Aug., 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], Henry Porter, "pibaker," discharged by John Shadworth, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Thome Cotoun Bowyer.

13 Sept., the same year, Thomas Cotoun, bowyer, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Johannis Bur nell civis et allutar'.

16 Sept., the same year, John Burnel of co. Suffolk, cordwainer, similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio xviii b.

Exon'acio Joh'is Lakford civis et capper London'.

18 March, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1401-2], John Lakford, "capper," similarly discharged for like cause.

Br'e d'm Regis direct' vic' London' pro parliamento tenend' apud Westm'.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster on the morrow of the Exaltation of H. Cross [14 Sept.]. No Sheriff to be returned. Witness the King at Westminster, 19 June, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402].

Item aliud br'e direct' vic' London' super con tinuacione par liamenti p'dicti.

Another writ, notifying the prorogation of Parliament until the morrow of St. Michael [29 Sept.]. (fn. 8) Witness the King at Westminster, 14 Aug., 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402].

Pursuant to the above writ, John Hadlee and William Parker, Aldermen, and John Prophete and William Nortone, Commoners, were elected to attend the Parliament.

Br'ed'ni Regis 'direct' Maiori et vic' London' pro admissione Thome Chaucer [sic] adofficium Coronatoris London'.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to the effect that whereas Thomas Chaucer, (fn. 9) the King's Chief Butler, to whom appertains the exercise of the office of Coroner in the City, is concerned with matters in divers parts of the realm by the King's command, so that he has no leisure to execute the duties of Coroner, the King therefore bids them to admit John Ballye, whom the said Thomas had appointed as his substitute Witness the King at Westminster, 9 Nov., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402].

Bre d'ni Reg' Maiori et vic' London' direct' pro dec' et quintA.D.ecima levand.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs touching subsidies granted by the last Parliament [ends abruptly].

Folio xix.

Custoa' iec libr' pertin' Will' filio Will'i Hyde Grocer'.

Recital of a codicil to the will of William Hide, late grocer, touching a bequest of £500 in trust for William his son, and of the guardianship of his said son and his property having been committed on the 20th Sept., 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], by John Shadworth, the Mayor, and Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, to William Pycard, John Drewe, and William Symmes, grocers, executors of the testator; Nicholas Wottone, woolmonger, William Sevenoke and Robert Fitz Robert, grocers, being sureties. Mention made of Aubrey, the testator's wife.

Afterwards, viz. on the 5th June, 1 Henry V. [A.D. 1413], came the above orphan, and acknowledged that he had received the above sum of £500 from William Pycard and William Symmes.

Recognicio Will'i Pycard Joh'is Drew et Will'i Symmes cives et Groceri London' [sic].

22 Sept., 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], bond of indemnity entered into by the above executors in favour of the above sureties.

Folio xix b.

Grant by John Shadworth, the Mayor, the Aldermen and Commonalty to John Brounesbury, Thomas Sampsone, Thomas Martyn, junior, Henry Edward, Elias Broun, Robert Edward, Laurence Bold, and Richard Langeford, butchers of Estchepe, and their successors, butchers of the same, of a certain Lane called "Bethereslane," (fn. 10) situate in the parishes of St. Magnus and St. Botolph, near the tenements of Gilbert Maughfeld and Henry Boseworth, with licence to build a bridge (pontem) over the Thames with houses thereon, whence they may cast offal, &c., into the Thames at ebb-tide according to a Statute promulgated at Winchester, temp. Richard the Second. (fn. 11) To hold the same at an annual rent of 13s. 4d .to be paid to the Chamberlain of the City. Dated in the Chamber of the Guildhall, 12 May, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402].

Eleccio Maioris.

28 Oct., (fn. 12) 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], in the presence of John Shadworth, the Mayor, Matthew Southeworth, the Recorder, John Hende, Thomas Knolles, John Fraunceys, Robert Chichele [and] Richard Merlowe, the Sheriffs, John Wodecok, William Venour, John Wakelee, Thomas Polle, William Askham, William Bramptone, William Fremelyngham, Thomas Fauconer, John Warner, William Waldern, Geoffrey Brook, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty [summoned] for the election of a Mayor, John Walcote was elected Mayor for the year ensuing. Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio xx-xxiii.

Statute passed by the Parliament which met at Westminster on the morrow of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402] (fn. 13) .

Folio xxiii.

Stall' subtus murum eccl re Sancti Petri de Westechepe.

Indenture of lease by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty to John Halle, goldsmith, Simon Sewalle, saddler, and Geoffrey Wovere, Churchwardens of St. Peter's in Westchepe, and the parishioners of the same, of two plots of land belonging to the Commonalty, near the wall of the said church, for a term of 50 years, at an annual rent of 13s. 4d. Dated in the Chamber of the Guildhall, 1 Sept., 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402].

Admissio Thome Dufhous in mister' Piscenarior'.

17 Nov., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], came Thomas Dufhous, brewer, before John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, having been admitted to the freedom of the City when Edward Dalyngrugge was Warden and Stephen Speleman was Chamberlain, on the 13th July, 16 Richard II. [A.D. 1392], and he declared that he had long used, and was now using, the mistery of Fishmonger and not that of Brewer, as the Masters of the said mistery of Fishmongers testified. He therefore prayed to be admitted to the freedom of the City in the said mistery of Fishmongers. His prayer granted. (fn. 14)

Folio xxiii b.

Admissio Will'i Reynold in mister' Vinetarior'.

18 Dec., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], came William Reynold of Bordeaux, fuller, before the same, having been admitted to the freedom of the City when John Hadlee was Mayor and Stephen Speleman was Chamberlain, in full Husting, on Monday after the Feast of St. Andrew [30 Nov.], 17 Richard II. [A.D. 1393], and he declared that he had long used and was now using, the mistery of Vintner and not that of Fuller, as the Masters of the mistery of Fullers [sic] testified. He therefore prayed to be admitted to the freedom of the City in the said mistery of Vintners. His prayer granted.

Exon'acio Ricardi Gilbert, dyer.

1 Feb., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402-3], Richard "Gilberd," dyer, discharged by John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, from serving on juries, &c., owing to bodily infirmities.

Quadraginta marc' pu'is Nich' Exton' part' delib'at' Steph'o Spele man etc.

10 Feb., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402-3], John Cokayn, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and John Warner, "irmonger," Richard Forster, Henry Pountfreyt, William Tristour and John Lamburne, saddlers, sureties for the said John Cokayn, delivered to Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, 40 marks in part payment of 400 marks, in trust for the children of Nicholas Extone, and on the 23rd April following they delivered another sum of 20 marks.

Custodia pueror' Johannis Cowlynge.

1 March, 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402-3], the guardianship of Geoffrey and Johanna, children of John Cowlyngge, late grocer, together with their property, committed to Robert Downe, grocer, who married Catherine, widow of the said John Sureties, viz., Thomas Sibsey, tailor, Gilbert Wodeway, skinner, William Fynch, "wexchaundeler," and Thomas Thomekyn.

Folio xxiv.

Exon'ac' Elie Broun civis et carnific' London'.

2 March, 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402-3], Elias Broun, butcher, discharged by John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Br'e pro Coronatore.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to admit John de Pokelyngtone to the office of Deputy-Coroner, inasmuch as Thomas Chaucer, the King's Chief Butler, to whom the office of Coroner of the City appertains, was engaged on the King's business in divers parts of the realm.

Exon acio Will'i Cham berleyn civis et Scissoris London'.

29 March, 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], William Chamberleyn, tailor, discharged by John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasin gold age.

Admissio Joh'is Denever in mister' Ferronun etc.

9 April, 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], came John "de" Denever, merchant, son of John Withe de Denever, co. Norfolk, and apprentice to Robert Virly, merchant, who had been admitted into the freedom of the City (fn. 15) when John Warde was Mayor and William Eynsham was Chamberlain, on the 11th July, 50 Edward III. [A.D. 1376], and he declared before John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen that he had long been using, and was now using, the mistery of Ironmonger. He therefore prayed that he might be admitted into the freedom of the City in the said mistery of Ironmongers. His prayer granted, at the instance of many good men of that mistery.

Exon'acio Rob'ti de Bedyngtone2 civis et couper.

16 May, 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], Thomas Couper, brother of Robert de Bedyngtone, co. Surrey, sometime an apprentice to Richard Wyddene, "couper," discharged by John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio xxiv b.

Br'e d'ni Regis direct' pro dec' et quintadec' levand' infra Wardas Lond'.

Letters patent appointing John Warner, Thomas Fauconer, William Sevenoke, and Thomas Extone to be commissioners for levying the subsidy granted by the last Parliament in the several Wards of the City. Witness the King at Westminster, 5 Dec., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402].

Ordinacio mister' de Flecchers.

16 June, 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], ordinances of the mistery of Flecchers made by John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, (fn. 17) permitting [inter alia] the election of Wardens to survey the mistery, and forbidding the sale of anything appertaining to the mistery to any alien without the King's special permission. (fn. 18)

Folio xxv.

Ordinacio mistere Scriptor' l're text Illuminator' et alior utencium ligare et ven dere libros.

12 July, 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], ordinances submitted to John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen by good men of the mistery of Writers of Text-letter (litere text), commonly called "Illuminators," (fn. 19) and other good men who are wont to bind and sell books, to the effect [inter alia] that they may yearly elect two reputable men, one a "lymenour" and the other a text-writer (escriveyn text), to be Wardens of the mistery, who may punish those who rebel according to the general ordinance recorded in Letter-Book C, fo cxxxv. The ordinancesapproved. (fn. 20)

Folio xxv b.

Custodia pueror' Nich'i Extone nuper civis Lond'.

4 Aug., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], the guardianship of Agnes, daughter of Nicholas Extone, committed by John Walcote, the Mayor, and Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, with the assent of John Cokayn, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, to John Wade, fishmonger. Sureties, viz., Thomas Extone, goldsmith, John Stachesdene, fishmonger, Richard Style, junior, William Wodeward, "foundour," and William Chaumbre, clerk.

Exon'acio Will'i Gyffard civis et pellipar' London'.

7 Sept., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], William Gyffard, skinner, discharged by John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Joh' Willyam civis et pellipar' London'.

17 Sept., the same year, John Willyam of Cornwall, citizen and skinner, similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio xxvi.

Custodia Will'i filii Joh'is Osbarn stokfysshmonger.

28 Sept., 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], the guardianship of William, son of John Osbarn, "stokfysshmonger," together with the sum of 200 marks given to him by Margery his mother pursuant to the will of the said John, committed by John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen to Henry Haltone, grocer, who married the aforesaid Margery. Sureties, viz., John Creek, tailor, and Robert Haxstone, grocer.

Afterwards, viz., on the 14th Dec., 4 Henry VI. [A.D. 1425], came the aforesaid orphan, being of full age, and received his property from John Bederenden, the Chamberlain.

Custod' pueror' Gilb'ti Piry man sporyer London.

10 March, 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402-3], the guardianship of Alice, Margery, Thomas, and Walter, children of Gilbert Piryman, late "sporyer," together with their patrimony, committed by John Walcote, the Mayor, and Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, to Ralph Burwell, "wolpakker," who married Matilda their mother Sureties, viz., John Horold and Thomas Colshulle, "wolpakkers".

Folio xxvi b.

Exon'acio Joh'is Ald richessay civis et carnific' London'.

27 Oct., 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], John Aldrychessay, otherwise called "Clerk," butcher, discharged by John Walcote, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Eleccio vice comitum.

Thursday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 4 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], in the presence of John Walcote, the Mayor, John Hadlee, Richard Whityngtone, Thomas Knolles, John Fraunceys, William Venour, William Walderne, John Wodecok, Richard Merlawe, Henry Pountfreyt, and William Crowmer, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty at the Guildhall, Thomas Polle was elected Sheriff for the year ensuing by the Mayor, and Thomas Fauconer by the Commonalty.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on Monday next after the said eve were presented before the Barons of the Exchequer at Westminster.

Eleccio Maioris.

The eve (fn. 21) of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], in the presence of John Walcote, the Mayor, Matthew Southworth, the Recorder, John Hadlee, Thomas Knolles, John Fraunceys, John Shadworth, the Prior of Holy Trinity, Thomas Polle and Thomas Fauconer, the Sheriffs, Richard Merlawe, William Framelyngham, William Venour, Geoffrey Brook, John Wakele, William Bramptone, Robert Chichelee, William Waldern, William Crowmer, and Henry Pountfreyt, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty at the Guildhall, William Askham was elected Mayor for the year ensuing.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio xxvii-xxviii.

Commissio sup' diversis subsid' d'no R' concess' in parliamento.

Letters patent reciting particulars of a subsidy (fn. 22) granted to the King for military purposes by the Parliament which commenced to sit at Westminster on the morrow of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403-4], (fn. 23) and appointing the Sheriffs of London, together with John Warner, Alderman, Nicholas Wottone, Alderman, William Nortone, William Louthe, John Whatelee, and Henry Haltone, to be commissioners for inquiring as to the names of those liable to contribute to the subsidy, whilst the said John Warner, Nicholas Wottone, William Nortone, and William "de" Louthe were appointed to levy the money and pay it over to John Oudeby, clerk, John Hadeley, Thomas Knolles, and Richard Merlowe, Treasurers of the King's Wars (Thesaurariis guerrarum nostrarum). Witness the King at Westminster, 24 March, 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403-4].

Folio xxviii.

Exon'acro Rob'ti Sudbury civis et allutar' London'.

28 April, 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1404], Robert Sudbury, cordwainer, discharged by William Askham, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Will'i Comb'ton civis et pellipar' London'.

30 April, 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1404], William Combertone, skinner, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Will'i Mortone civis et cissoris London'.

4 June, 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1404], William Mortone, tailor, similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio xxviii b.

Securitas duar'mill' libr' [sic] d'no R' prestit'.

Letters patent for the repayment of a loan of £2,000 made by the Mayor and Commonalty to the King for putting down the rebellion in Wales, out of a moiety of the tenth granted by the Clergy in Convocation last held in St. Paul's. (fn. 24) Witness the King at Westminster, 26 Oct., 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403].

Seurte faite pur deux mill' marcz [sic] grauntez au Roy.

Letters patent certifying that the King had ordered his Treasurers of War to repay the above City loan out of the subsidy granted by the Parliament held at Westminster the morrow of St. Hillary [13 Jan.] last past, for the defence of the realm. Dated at Westminster, 2 May, 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1404].

Folio xxix.

Item seurte pur lez ditz deux mill' marcz [sic].

Writ of Privy Seal to John Oudeby, clerk, and to John Hadley, Thomas Knolles, and Richard Merlowe, Treasurers of War, that they repay the above City loan in manner prescribed. Dated at Westminster, 6 May, 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1404].

Ordinacio mister' de Cappers.

28 June, 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1404], ordinances for regulating the mistery of Hurers and Cappers submitted to William Askham, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and ordered to be recorded. Among the ordinances is one forbidding the fulling of "cappes, hures, and hattes" by mills or by the feet, or otherwise than by men's hands. (fn. 25)

Exon'acio Joh'is Grove civis et armurer London'.

11 Aug., 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1404], John Grove, "armurer," discharged by William Askham, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio xxix b.

Protect' Joh'is Bate maltman allocat'.

Letters of protection in favour of John Bate, "maltman," who was about to join the retinue of Sir Thomas Swynburn, Knt., Captain of the Castle of Hammes in Picardy. Witness the King at Westminster, 29 Feb., 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403-4].

23 Nov., 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403], John Cokayn and his sureties delivered to the Chamberlain a sum of 10 marks to the use of Elizabeth, one of the daughters of Nicholas Extone, so that the whole amount paid to the Chamberlain by the said John and his sureties was 230 marks. Out of this sum the Chamberlain delivered to John Wade, fishmonger, 110 marks together with the guardianship of Agnes (another daughter of the said Nicholas), as appears in the preceding folio [sic], (fn. 26) and John Cokayn delivered 90 marks; and so there remained in the hands of the Chamberlain to the use of the said Elizabeth 120 marks, and this sum the Chamberlain delivered to Robert, son of William Berdewell, Knt., on the 29th April, 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1404], when the said Robert married the said Elizabeth with the assent of the Mayor and Aldermen. The said John Cokayn and his sureties were therefore quit of this sum of 120 marks, parcel of the aforesaid sum of 200 marks delivered to the said Elizabeth. Afterwards, viz., on the 12th May, the same year, the said John and his sureties delivered to the said Robert the remaining 80 marks.

Br'e pro parliamento.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Coventre on the 3rd Dec. next. (fn. 27) No Sheriff to be returned. Witness the King at Westminster, 20 Oct., 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403].

Exon'acio Joh'is Cones burgh pulter' London'.

24 Jan., 5 Henry IV. [A.D. 1403-4], John Conesburgh, "pulter," discharged by William Askham, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasin gold age.

Footnotes

1 The Parliament ought to have met on the 29th Jan., 1402, but no return of members is recorded in the Letter-Book, and if it ever sat, it has left no traces of its proceedings.
2 He married Johanna, widow of John Gille 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' pp. 160-1 Extone's will, dated October 24, 1393, was proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting in January, 1401 2 'Cal. of Wills, Court of Hust,' ii. 352.
3 From his will, dated 20 Feb., 1398-9, and proved and enrolled in the Court of Husting in June, 1399, it appears that Martin was a brother of the testator. 'Cal. of Wills, Court of Hust.,' ii. 339-40.
4 Wheat was selling at 16 shillings a quarter. Gregory's 'Chron.,' p. 103. This price is probably more correct than 16 pence, as recorded in MS. Julius B. ii. See Kingsford's 'Chronicles of London,' p. 63.
5 Cf. infra, fo. ccxlix.
6 Referring to the ordinance of 1397, which prescribed the return of at least two good and discreet men of the Ward that was destitute of an Alderman, either of whom (quorum alter) was to be fit as regards morals and property to be a judge and Alder man of the City ('Cal. Letter-Book H, 'p. 436). This ordinance of 1402 was formally repealed by Act of Common Council in 1711, which enacted (inter alia) that return should in future be made by the Ward of two persons, and no more, viz., one Alderman and one able and sufficient citizen and freeman of the City not being an Alderman. Journal 55, fo. 261 b.
7 See 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 410.
8 Sat from 30 Sept. to 25 Nov.
9 Recent discoveries by Dr. Scott (late Keeper of the Manuscripts in the British Museum) among the Sacrist's Rolls at Westminster Abbey leave little room for doubt that this Thomas Chaucer was son of the poet. He was a Member of Parliament, and was five times elected Speaker; ob. 14 March, 1434. See 'Life Records of Chaucer' (Chaucer Soc.), part iv. p. 330 n. The marginal note is clearly not correct.
10 Probably a mistake for "Retheres lane," so called from "rother," i. e., a horned beast. The cattle market at Stratford on Avon is known as the "Rother market." The lane is described by Stow as stretching from Thames Street to Little Eastcheap, and as being commonly known in his day as Pudding Lane, "because the butchers of Eastcheap have their scalding house for hogs there, and their puddings, with other filth of beasts, are voided down that way to their dung boats on the Thames." Stow, 'Survey' (Thoms's ed.), p. 79.
11 See 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 392.
12 Vicesimo octavo die Octobr'. The date of the Mayor's being sworn into office has been here substituted (apparently) for the date of his election. The 28th Oct. (the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude) had been the customary day of election down to1346, when an order was made for the election to take place on Oct. 13th (the Feast of the Translation of St. Edward) 'Cal. Letter-Book F,' p. 304. In 1365, however, an order was made to revert to the old day of election, but this order was only ob served for three years, after which the election continued to take place (with the exception apparently of the occa sion here recorded) on the 13th Oct. until 1546, when it was ordered that in future the election should take place on Michaelmas Day. See 'Cal. Letter-Book G,' p. 198.
13 See 'Statutes at Large' (ed. 1758), i. 453-64 The statute chiefly concerned the privileges of the clergy.
14 Set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 555-6. See also 'Cal. LetterBook H,' p. 390.
15 Possibly through the Mercers' Company, his master being a mer chant (mercator), a term synonymous with mercer.
16 Evidently a mistake.
17 Usually the ordinances of a mistery were formulated by the good folk of the mistery and submitted to the Mayor and Aldermen for approval.
18 Set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 556-7.
19 Or "Lymenours".
20 'Memorials,' pp. 557-8.
21 Why the election of a Mayor should have taken place on the 12th instead of the 13th Oct. —the latter day falling on Saturday—is not clear.
22 The particulars of this novel and extraordinary subsidy (taxa nova et exquisita, as one chronicler calls it; taxa insolita et incolis tricabilis et valde gravis, according to another) are set out in 'Annales Henrici Quarti' (Rolls Series, No. 28, pt iii. pp. 379-81). Walsingham refrained from recording them in his history, on the ground that those who were re sponsible for the grant were ashamed of it, and relates that it was only made on condition that it was not to become a precedent, and that all record of such a grant having been made should be destroyed ('Hist. Angl.,' ii. 260). The novelty of the grant lay in the proposal that a shilling should be paid on every pound's worth of land, and that the sum so raised (as well as that from other impositions) should be handed over to four Treasurers of War (three of whom were citizens of London), esp ecially appointed, instead of to the King's ministers. A sum of £12,000 out of the subsidy was, however, placed at the King's own disposal, with the promise of a further sum of £3,000 under certain conditions. Cf. Stubbs, 'Const. Hist.,' iii. 45.
23 A Parliament was originally sum moned to meet at Coventry on the 3rd Dec., 1403 (vide infra, fo. xxix b), but was afterwards ordered to meet at Westminster in January, 1404 (infra, fo. xxxv b).
24 Convocation had met in St. Paul's about the middle of April, and had granted the King a tenth on condition that he would publicly confirm the Church's ancient privileges. 'Annal. Hen. IV.,' p. 388. Walsingham, ii. 259.
25 The ordinances are set out in 'Memorials,' pp. 558-9. They were annulled in 1417 on the ground that too much authority was given into the hands of the mistery of Cappers, to the exclusion of the mistery of Hatters and Haberdashers. Vide infra, fos. cxcii cxcii b.
26 Referring to fo. xxv b.
27 This Parliament was afterwards ordered to meet at Westminster in the following January. Vide supra, p. 28, note.