Folios xxx - xl
Jan 1403-4 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

30-42

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'Folios xxx - xl: Jan 1403-4 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: I: 1400-1422 (1909), pp. 30-42. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33676 Date accessed: 30 August 2014.


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Folio xxx-xxxi.

Statute made at the Parliament held at Westminster on the morrow of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1403-4]. (fn. 1)

Folio xxxi b.

Br'e d' m Regis direct' Maior' et Vic' London' pro execuc' judicii Will'i Serle.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to execute the judgment passed by William Gascoigne, the Chief Justice, upon William Serle for treason. (fn. 2) Witness the King at Leycestre, 5 Aug., 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404].

Item aliud br'e direct' Maiori et Vic' London' super eadem exec' judicii p'dicti exequenda.

Another writ to the same, to the effect that whereas the above William Serle had been convicted at York on the 26th July last of divers treasons, and had been condemned to be drawn through divers cities and boroughs to the City of London, and from the Tower of London to the gallows of Tyburn, there to be hanged, decapitated, drawn, and quartered —the said judgment is to be carried into execution by them when required by the King. Witness the King at Leycestre, 5 Aug., 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404].

Custodia Simonis filii Joh'is Pays nuper civis et Braciatoris London'.

1 Aug., 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404], the guardianship of Simon, son of John Pays, late brewer, together with his patrimony, committed by William Askham, the Mayor, and Stephen Speleman, the Chamberlain, to Robert Marchall, brewer, who married the mother of the said Simon. Sureties, viz., Robert Salman, draper, Thomas Panter, scrivener, and John Sidyngbourne.

Exon'ac' cus tod' predict'.

10 March, 5 Henry V. [A. D. 1417-18], came the executors of the above Robert Marchall and paid to John Hille, the Chamberlain, the money due to the above Simon.

Acquietanc' facta per Maiorem et Aldr'os Lon don' Steph'no Speleman Cam'ar Gui hald' ejusdem civitatis.

Acquittance by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty to Stephen Speleman, citizen and mercer, and late Chamberlain (fn. 3) of the Guildhall, on his account. Dated in the Chamber of the Guildhall, the morrow of St. Michael [29 Sept.], 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404].

Folio xxxii.

Custodia Joh'is filii Will'i Evote.

3 Sept., 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404], the sum of £20 delivered to John Prentout in trust for his apprentice John, an illegitimate son of William Evote, late draper. Sureties, viz., Robert Lutone and Henry Permestede, drapers.

Ordinacio quod nullus Vic' habeatnisi octo servient'.

Friday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 4 Henry IV. [A. D. 1403], ordinance made by John Walcote, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty, upon petition, to the effect that in future no Sheriff should have more than six Serjeants, and that both Sheriffs should have one Serjeant in common for the county of Middlesex.

Afterwards, viz., on Saturday the Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1403], the above ordinance was confirmed.

Afterwards, viz., on the 9th Nov., 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1403], it was ordained that no Sheriff should have more than eight Serjeants, with an additional Serjeant in common for both Sheriffs for the county of Middlesex. (fn. 4)

Folio xxxii b.

Eleccio Vic'.

Sunday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404], in the presence of William Askham, the Mayor, Thomas Thornburgh, the Recorder, John Hadlee, John Shadworth, Drew Barentyn, Thomas Knolles, John Walcote, John Warner, Richard Merlowe, William Venour, William Walderne, Henry Pountfreit, John Wodecok, and William Crowmere, Aldermen, Thomas Polle and Thomas Fauconer, the Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty summoned for the election of Sheriffs at the Guildhall, William Louthe, goldsmith, was elected Sheriff by the Mayor, and Stephen Speleman by the Commonalty.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on Tuesday after the Feast of St. Michael were presented and sworn (fn. 5) before the Barons of the Exchequer.

The same day the ordinance made by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council to the effect that no Sheriff should have more than eight Serjeants, under penalty of £20, as appears on the preceding folio, was affirmed.

Writ for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Coventry on the 6th Oct. next. No Sheriff to be returned, nor any apprentice or other person at law (aut apprenticius sive aliquis alius homo ad legem. (fn. 6) ) Witness the King at Lichefeld, 25 Aug., 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404].

Pursuant to the above there were elected John Wodecok and William Bramptone, Aldermen, and Alan Everard and Robert Haxtone, Commoners.

Ordinacio Cam'ar' et Custodum Pontis London'.

Tuesday the 23rd Sept., 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404], it was ordained by William Askham, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and the Common Council assembled in the Upper Chamber of the Guildhall, that thenceforth on the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.] in each year, after the Sheriff of the City has been elected by the Commonalty of the same, the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council for the time being shall elect some good and discreet citizen to be Chamberlain for the year ensuing, and two good and discreet citizens to be Masters or Wardens of London Bridge for the year ensuing, and that the said Chamberlain and Wardens so elected shall, on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], when the new Sheriffs are sworn to their offices in the Guildhall, be also sworn. And just as the outgoing Sheriffs cease to hold office yearly at noon on the eve of St. Michael and the new Sheriffs enter into office immediately afterwards, so the outgoing Chamberlain and Wardens shall cease from office on St. Michael's day and the new Chamberlain and Wardens shall enter upon their duties on the morrow of St. Michael; and the outgoing Chamberlain and Wardens shall render their accounts within a month of Michaelmas (citramensem Michaelis) next ensuing. Further, that it shall be lawful for the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council to re-elect the same Chamberlain and Wardens on the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.] next ensuing, provided that no Chamberlain or Warden of the Bridge shall remain in office more than two consecutive years, (fn. 7) and when any of them shall have been removed from office, they shall not be elected again for two years.

Folio xxxiii.

The same day, with the assent of the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, John Proffyt, fishmonger, was elected Chamberlain, and William Sevenok, grocer, and John Whatelee, mercer, were elected Wardens of the said bridge for the year ensuing.

The same day, inasmuch as at the election of Sheriffs on the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.] last an excessive number of apprentices and servants had raised such a tumult in the Guildhall as to disturb the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, who had been summoned there, it was ordained that thencefor that elections of a Mayor, Sheriffs, or other officers no one should presume to enter the Guildhall unless specially summoned by the Serjeants of the Mayor, Sheriffs, or Chamberlain for the time being, and that none should be so summoned unless they be of the more sufficient men of the City, or be of the Common Council. (fn. 8)

Joh'es "Prophite" Cam'ar'.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 7 Henry IV. [A. D. 1406], it was ordained by John Wodecok, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and the Common Council that the Chamberlain and Wardens of London Bridge should be removable as above written, but it should be lawful for the Mayor and Aldermen for the time being to re-elect the same although they may have remained in office two years, if they are found able and discreet for the profit of the City, the above ordinance notwithstanding. Thereupon John Proffyt was elected Chamberlain, and John Whatele and Henry Julyan were elected Wardens of the Bridge.

Exon'acio Thome Dylles vynter.

5 March, 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1403-4], Thomas Dylkes, vintner, discharged by William Askham, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio xxxiii b-xxxv.

Proclamac'on faite encountre gentz Wale rantz hors covenable temps apres cov' fiewes p'sones come piert enicell' procla mac'on sils ne soient de bone fame.

A proclamation for keeping the peace in the City; regulating divers trades; prescribing what foreigners may and may not do; fixing the price of poultry, wines, &c., forbidding forestalling, begging in the streets, and obstructing the streets with rubbish and authorizing any inhabitant of the City, being of good character and estate, to arrest rioters and misdoers, in the absence of the City's officers, and to commit them to the Compters until trial, &c. (fn. 9)

Folio xxxi.

Br'e d'm Regis direct' Justiciar' suis prodelib' acione prisonn' ad Gaolam suam de Neugate.

Writ appointing William Askham, the Mayor, William Gascoigne, William Thirnyng, John Cokayn, William Rikhill, and Thomas Thornburgh, or any five, four, three, or two (the Mayor being one), to be Commissioners for gaol-delivery of Newgate. Witness the King at Westminster, 12 November, 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1403].

Folio xxxi b.

Writ notifying the Sheriffs that the Parliament which had been summoned to meet at Coventre on the 3rd Dec. next was to meet instead at Westminster on the morrow of St. Hillary [13 Jan.], (fn. 10) and bidding them see that four citizens be elected to attend the same. Witness the King at Westminster, 24 Nov., 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1403].

Pursuant to the above writ, there were elected William Staundon and Drew Barantyn, Aldermen; William Marchefford and John Profyt, Commoners.

Exon'acio Ric'i Abell civis et stok fisshmonger London'.

11 Feb., 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1403-4], Richard Abell, "stokfisshmonger," discharged by William Askham, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'ac' Rob'ti Waryn de Bereford.

16 Feb., 5 Henry IV. [A. D. 1403-4], Robert Waryn of Bereford, co. Beds, formerly apprentice of John Davy, painter, of London, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Will'i Sud bury draper.

18 Feb., same year, William Sudbury, "draper," similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'ac' Nich'i Loche civis et allutar'.

The same day, Nicholas Loche, cordwainer, similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio xxxvi.

Eleccio Vaioris.

Monday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404], in the presence of William Askham, the Mayor, Thomas Thornburgh, the Recorder, Robert the Prior of Holy Trinity, John Hadle, Richard Whityngtone, Thomas Knolles, John Fraunceys, John Shadworth, John Walcote, William Walderne, John Warner, William Venour, Robert Chichely, William Framelyngham, Thomas Fauconer, Thomas Polle, Geoffrey Broke, William Crowmere, Nicholas Wottone, Henry Pountfreyt and William Radewelle, Aldermen, William Louthe and Stephen Speleman, Commoners and Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty summoned for the election of a Mayor, John Hende, Commoner (fn. 11) (co'arius), was elected Mayor for the year ensuing.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Commissio d'm Regis pro duab' quintis decimis et duab decimis levand.

Letters patent appointing William Walderne, William Venour, John Oxeneye and Thomas Aleyn to levy two fifteenths and two tenths in the City, and to pay the same to Thomas de Furnevalle, Knt., and John Pelham, Knt., the Treasurers of War (fn. 12) Witness the King at Westminster, 19 Nov., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404].

Folio xxxvi b.

Consimiles bille misse fuc runt cuilibet Aldro.

Precept under the Mayoralty seal to the Aldermen to assess in their several Wards a sum equal to a fifteenth, and to bring the money into the Guildhall by the Feast of St. Thomas [21 Dec.] next, and further to hold their Wardmotes, and to present such defects as they may find by inquest and are not themselves able to correct to the Mayor's General Court to be held on Monday after the Feast of Epiphany (fn. 13) [6 Jan.], &c. Dated 9 Dec., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404].

Commissio d'm Regis pro quodam subsidio a d'nis temporalib' concesso levand.

Letters patent appointing William Walderne, William Venour, John Oxeneye, Thomas Aleyn, and the Sheriffs to be Commissioners for inquiring as to what lords and ladies temporal and other temporal persons were liable to the land tax granted by the last Parliament—viz., 20s on every £20 of land and on rents of the yearly value of 500 marks and more (fn. 14) —and to levy the money and deliver the same to Thomas [Nevil] lord de Furnivall (fn. 15) (domino de Furnivall) and John Pelham, Knt., the Treasurers of War. Witness the King at Westminster, 19 Nov., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404].

Folio xxxvii.

Commissio pro rescussu castri de Coytyf.

Letters patent granting that the sum of £733 6s. 8d. advanced to the King by the Mayor and Commonalty for raising the siege of the Castle of Coityf (fn. 16) in Wales shall be repaid out of the tenth granted by the last Parliament and due at Christmas next. Witness the King at Coventre, 18 Nov., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404].

Proclamacio facta de apprenticiis tam masculis quam feminis irro tuland'.

Proclamation to be made for every free man or woman of the City who has an apprentice, man or woman, not enrolled, to enrol him or her before the Chamberlain of the Guildhall by Christmas next, under penalty of losing their apprentice and of payment of a fine to the Chamber at the discretion of the Mayor and Aldermen, and that any one thenceforth taking an apprentice shall cause the same to be enrolled within the first year of the term, (fn. 17) under penalty aforesaid; also that no merchant stranger or alien to the liberties and franchises of the City shall sell any manner of merchandise that ought to be weighed unless the same be weighed at the Common Balance of the City, on pain of forfeiture, that no one wander about the City after 8 o'clock at night unless he be of good character and carry a light; that no one wear mask or vizor at Christmas, and that every house be lighted with a candle and lantern during the same festival, under penalty of a fine of 4 pence. [No date].

Commissio d'm Regis progaola de Newegate delib'and'.

Letters patent appointing John Hende, the Mayor, William Gascoigne, William Thirnyng, John Cokayn, William Rikhill, Hugh Huls [Holes], and Thomas Thornburgh, or any six, five, four, three, or two (the Mayor being one), to be Commissioners for gaol-delivery of Neugate. Witness the King at Westminster, 22 Nov., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404].

Exon'acio custod' pueror' Joh'is Poy naunt.

28 Jan., 1 Henry V. [A. D. 1413-14], John and Katherine, children of John Poynant, late fishmonger, having died under age, their property was delivered by Walter Palmer, fishmonger, their guardian, to their father's executors. (fn. 18)

Folio xxxvii b.

Statute enacted by the Parliament which commenced to sit at Coventry on the 6th Oct., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404] (fn. 19)

Folio xxxviii.

Exon'acio Henrici Kyng civis et corsour London'.

20 Jan., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404-5], Henry Kyng, "corsour," discharged by John Hende, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Will'i Craft civis et pouchemaker.

28 Jan., the same year, William Craft, "pouchemaker," similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon' acio Ricar di Wyche telarii.

6 Feb., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404-5], Richard Wyche, weaver, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon' acio Joh'is Barry civis et pellipar' London'.

18 Nov., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404], John Barry, skinner, similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio xxxviii b.

Custodia Joh'is filii Ric'i Blomville nup' civis et Stokfisshmonger London.

20 Nov., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404], the guardianship of John, son of Richard Blomville, late "stokfisshmongere," together with his patrimony, committed by John Hende, the Mayor, and John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, to William Bryan, "stokfisshemonger," with whom the said orphan had been placed as apprentice, and John Pellycan, "stokfisshmongere." Sureties,viz., Richard Radewelle, Edmund Bys, Robert Mersk, Henry Prestone, and John Burgeys, "stokfisshmongers".

Custodia xx marc' Ed'i filii Thome filii Ed'i Olyver nup' civi et piscenar' Lond'.

26 Nov., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404], came John Yonge, fishmonger, who married the widow of Edmund Olyver, "stokfisshmonger," and delivered to John Proffyt, the Chamberlain of the Guildhall, the sum of 20 marks, bequeathed by the said Edmund to Edmund, son of Thomas, son of the aforesaid Edmund.

Afterwards, viz., on the 26th April, 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1405], the above money was delivered by the Chamberlain to the above John Yonge, (fn. 20) in trust for the said orphan. Sureties, viz., Nicholas Turk and William Russell, fishmongers.

Afterwards, viz., on the 1st Dec., 1 Henry V. [A. D. 1413], the above orphan having died under age, the money was delivered to the above John Yonge and Johanna his wife to dispose of according to the will of the orphan's grandfather.

Custodia Joh'is et Kat'ine filior' Joh'is Poynant nup' piscenar' London'.

1 Dec., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404], William Chambre, fishmonger, executor of John Poynant, late fishmonger, delivered to John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, the sum of £20 in trust for John and Katherine, children of the aforesaid John Poynant.

Afterwards, viz., on the 30th Jan., 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404-5], the guardianship of the said John and Katherine, together with their chattels and a piece of silver plate with covercle belonging to Nicholas, another son of the aforesaid John Poynant, was committed by John Hende, the Mayor, and the Chamberlain, to Walter Palmer, fishmonger. Sureties, viz., Richard Style, junior, and John Stachisden, fishmongers. (fn. 21)

Folio xxxix.

Custodia Alicie et Isabelle filiar' Joh'is "Hardewyk" civis et hab' dassher London'.

10 March, 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404-5], the guardianship of Alice, daughter of John "Hardewyk," late haberdasher, and of Isabella, (fn. 22) bastard daughter of the same, together with their money and chattels, committed to John Frensshe, goldsmith, who married Katherine, widow and executrix of John Hardewyk. Sureties, viz., William Pevere and John Mapelisdene, senior, goldsmiths.

Articuli mister'de Drapers.

Monday, 9 March, 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1404-5], in the presence of John Hende, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Common Council, certain articles were submitted for approval on behalf of the Commonalty by John Weston, the Common Serjeant of the City, to the following effect :—

Folio xxxix b.

That no merchant strange to the franchise of the City sell any goods within the franchise to another merchant stranger, nor shall such merchant stranger buy goods of another merchant stranger under penalty of forfeiture of such goods, saving the privileges of the King's lieges of Guyene; so that such purchase and sale be always made between merchant and merchant, any ordinance made by the City to the contrary notwithstanding.

Also if any forfeitures be espied or taken by the Masters of any mistery of the City which appertains to the same mistery, that then one-fourth of the fine made for such forfeiture shall remain to the use of the said Masters who have espied or taken such forfeiture for their trouble, and the remainder of the fine shall go to the Chamber of the Guildhall to the use of the Commonalty.

"Blal ewelle" Halle.

Also that the Masters of the mistery of Drapers and their successors shall have power to elect an able, wise, and sufficient person, for whom they are willing to answer, to provide and see that all kinds of woollen cloth brought by merchants foreign or strange to the seld of Bakwelhalle for sale be there surely and safely guarded, sold, and bought according to the franchise and liberties of the City, and to present the said person to the Mayor and Aldermen for the time being, to be by them accepted and sworn to faithfully observe the oath which he shall take And if such person fail in his duties he shall be removed from office by the Mayor and Aldermen for the time being, who shall charge the Masters of the said mistery of Drapers to elect another in his place; so that the election and presentation of a Keeper of Bakwellhalle shall always be by the said Masters and their successors, and his admission, confirmation, and removal be in the power and disposition of the Mayor and Aldermen.

Sacrm cus todis de Bak welhalle.

The oath of the Keeper of the Seld of Bakwelhalle. (French. (fn. 23) )

Folio xl.

Proclamacio super ordina cione p'dicta.

Tuesday the eve of the Assumption B. M. [15 Aug.], 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1405], proclamation made, with the assent of the Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, to the effect that no foreigner or stranger bringing woollen cloth to the City for sale shall warehouse, expose, or sell it anywhere except at Bakwelhalle under penalty of forfeiture; that no foreigner or stranger shall sell or put to sale such cloth at Bakwelhalle, except between 11 A. M. on Thursday in each week, and 11 A. M. on Saturday, under penalty of forfeiture; and that foreign and strange drapers only bring to the said Hall entire cloths, and half-cloths, listed at both ends, under penalty of forfeiture. (fn. 24)

Also that no one enfranchised of the City shall cover (coevere) the goods or merchandise of any foreigner or stranger, (fn. 25) nor buy any manner of merchandise within the franchise of the City to the use and profit of any foreigner or stranger, under penalty of forfeiture of the merchandise and disfranchisement.

Recognicio Pannarior'.

27 March, 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1405], a bond in the sum of £1,000 entered into before the Mayor and Aldermen by Henry Hert, draper, as well as by William Crowmere, William Nortone, Philip Bangor, Richard Eltone, Thomas Coleworth, John Somer, Robert Twyer, Roger Colneye, Thomas Symond, Richard Coroner, Robert Bamburgh, John Longele, John Davy, John Wyott, and Stephen Bugge, drapers, for the due execution of the office of Keeper of the Seld at Bakwelhalle, to which the said Henry Hert had been elected by the Mistery of Drapers, and been admitted and sworn by the Mayor and Aldermen. (fn. 26)

Folio xl b.

Concimiles [sic] bille misse fueruntcuilib't Aldr'o.

Precept to the Aldermen to assess and levy in their several Wards a sum equal to half a fifteenth on all inhabitants, lay and ecclesiastical, and to bring the money to the Guildhall on the eve of Pentecost [7 June]. Dated 14 May, 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1405].

Concordia facta int' Hu gonem Clerk ex parte una et Thomam Charleton ex parte altera.

28 April, 6 Henry IV. [A. D. 1405], the sum of £200 which Hugh Clerk, mercer, had formerly delivered to John Profyt, the Chamberlain, in trust for his son Thomas, was re-delivered to the said Hugh to hold under similar trust. Sureties, viz., John Crowchere, vintner, and Robert Brendewode, salter. At the same time the guardianship of the person of the said Thomas was committed to Thomas Charletone.

Footnotes

1 See 'Statutes at Large' (ed. 1758), pp. 464-9. Restrictions were again imposed upon merchant aliens and strangers. They were to dispose of their goods within a quarter of a year, and the money received was to be expended on commodities of the realm; they were not to sell to each other, and they were to stay with "hosts," &c. These restrictions were relaxed the following year by Stat. 6 Hen. IV. cap. 4, recorded infra, fos. xxxvii b-xxxviii.
2 The late King's chamberlain, or confidential servant, implicated in the murder of the Duke of Gloucester at Calais in 1397. "Also the same yeer [5 Hen. IV.] William Serle, that was oone of hem that murdred the goode Duk of Gloucestre at Caleys, was take in the Marche off Scotland and brouht to London. And ther he was y- drawe and y-hanged and y-heeded." Kingsford's 'Chronicles of London,' p. 64. Cf. 'Annal. Hen. IV.,' p. 390. With the execution of Serle all further rumour of Richard being still alive ceased. The rumour had been fostered by letters despatched by him bearing a forged seal of the late King. Walsingham, ii. 263.
3 He had been succeeded in office a few days before by John Proffyt.Infra, fo. xxxiii.
4 This last ordinance is printed in 'Liber Albus,' i. 527. In 1375 it had been ordained that each Sheriff should have three or four Serjeants at the most, and less if possible, in order that the citizens might not suffer from an excessive number. See 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 12.
5 This was unusual (although the Sheriffs elected in Sept., 1400, are similarly recorded as having been sworn before the Fxchequer, supra, p 10), for the Sheriffs had alway sclaimed exemption from being sworn into office before the Barons of the Exchequer. See 'Cal. Letter-Book D,' p. 20.
6 Hence this Parliament came to be known as the "Unlearned" or "Illiterate" Parliament. An ordinance had already been made in 1372, directing that no lawyers (as well as no Sheriff) should be returned to Parliament, for the reason that lawyers were in the habit of making Parliament a convenience for transacting the affairs of their clients to the neglect of public bustness, and that Sheriffs were public officers and ought to remain in their respective shires 'Rot. Parl.,' ii. 310. Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 98n.
7 It will be seen that this limitation was revoked in Sept., 1406, when Proffyt was again elected Chamberlam. Infra, p. 35.
8 Set out in 'Memorials,' p. 560. Compare an ordinance to similar effect made in 1346. 'Cal. Letter-Book F,' p. 304. A writ of Privy Seal to like effect is recorded in 1370 'Cal. Letter-Book G,' pp. 265-6.
9 This proclamation is again recorded infra, fos. xlii-xliii b, with the exception of the last clause, which forbids strangers and foreigners to sell cloth elsewhere than at Bakwel halle, and at certain specified times.
10 Vide supra, pp. 28 n., 30.
11 He had been elected Alderman of Walbrook Ward in March, 1393-4 ('Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 408), and there appears to be no record of his having ceased to represent that Ward.
12 This money had been granted by the "Unlearned Parliament" on the 12th Nov, and new Treasurers of War appointed in place of those previously named 'Rot. Parl.,' iii. 546.
13 Commonly known as "Plow Monday,' when a General Court of Wardmote is still held at the present day to receive Ward presentments and to swear in constables, &c.
14 The grant of the land tax is recorded as having been made by the lords temporal "pur eux et les dames temporelx et toutz autres person estemporelx" for the defence of the realm—an unusual form of grant. 'Rot. Parl.,' iii. 546.
15 "Thomas Sire de Furnyvall."Ibid.
16 Coity or Coyty in Glamorgan shire On the 26th Oct., the Commons had urged the King to rescue the "Sire de Coitif," who had long been besieged in his castle by the Welsh rebels, led by Owen Glendower 'Rot. Parl.,' iii. 547; Walsingham, ii. 262.
17 See 'Cal. Letter-Book D,'Introd., pp. ix-x.
18 For previous proceedings, vide infra, p. 40.
19 Printed in 'Statutes at Large' (ed. 1758), i. 469-71. It removed (cap iv) the restriction placed by the last Parliament as to the time (viz., a quarter of a year) within which merchant strangers and aliens were bound to dispose of their goods in England. Vide supra, p. 30, note.
20 A note follows to the effect that the money was not delivered to JohnYonge, but remained in the hands of the Chamberlain.
21 Further proceedings recordedsupra, p. 38.
22 She died in Sept., 1409. Vide infra, fo lxxxiv. b.
23 The same oath is recorded in English in 'Cal. Letter-Book D,' pp. 200-1, by a hand of the fifteenth century.
24 Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book H,'pp. 449-450; 'Memorials,' pp. 550 2.
25 Generally known as colouring or avowing goods. See the oath of a Freeman, 'Cal. Letter-Book D,' p. 195. Cf. 'Lib. Cust.,' i. 270.
26 A marginal note states that the bond was cancelled by order of William Waldern, Mayor [A. D. 1412 13], and the Aldermen, inasmuch as thesaid Henry Hert, who had quitted the said office, had fulfilled the conditions of the bond.