Folios cxliii - clx
Oct 1414 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1909

Pages

130-146

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'Folios cxliii - clx: Oct 1414 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: I: 1400-1422 (1909), pp. 130-146. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33687 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


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Folio cxliii.

Eleccio Thome Fauconer in Maiorem London'.

Saturday the Feast of st. Edward [13 Oct.], 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414], after Mass celebrated in the Guildhall Chapel, in the presence of William Crowmer, the Mayor, John de Prestone, the Recorder, Sir William Haryndone, Prior of the church of Holy Trinity, Richard Whitingtone, Thomas Knolles, Richard Merlawe, Robert Chichele, William Walderne, Thomas Fauconer, Nicholas Wottone, Henry Bartone, Stephen Speleman, William Nortone, William Louthe, Henry Haltone, John Lane, William Chichele, John Penne, Thomas Pyke, William Sevenok, and Ralph Lobenham, Aldermen, John Michell and Thomas Aleyn, the Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty summoned for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, Thomas Fauconer was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct], the said Thomas was sworn according to custom, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Proclamac' facta vii mo die Nov' pro honestat' et mundic' civi tatis Correctiers.

7 Nov., proclamation made forbidding servants, hostelers, and others to cast rubbish and dirt into the streets or the Thames. An informer to receive 2s. 4d. for giving information in each case, and 12 pence out of every fine of 4s. imposed upon such as break the ordinance. Also forbidding any one to act as broker until he has been approved and admitted to office by the Mayor and Aldermen, under penalty of £10 to be paid to the Chamber.

Consimiles bille misse fuer' cuilibet Aldro.

Precept to the Aldermen to elect a "Rakyer" in their several Wards to keep the streets clean, and instruct the Constables and Beadles to warn inhabitants not to throw water out of windows, &c. Dated s. Nov., 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414].

Folio cxliii b.

Exoneracio Thome atte Stone civis et cissor' Lond'.

12 Nov., 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414], Thomas atte Stone, tailor, discharged by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

L'rad'ni Regis Maiori et Aldris miss'.

Letter from the King to the Mayor and Aldermen announcing his arrival before the town of Harefleu on Saturday, the 17th August; the conditional surrender of the town on Wednesday, the 18th September, and its final surrender on the following Sunday .Dated at Harefleu, 22 Sept. [A.D. 1415]. (fn. 1)

Folio cxliv.

Consimiles bille misse fuer' cuilib't Aldr'o.

Precept to the Aldermen to hold their Wardmotes in their several Wards according to custom, and to make return of the names of defaulters in order that a fine of 4 pence may be levied on them for the work of the Guildhall; also to see that steps be taken for the proper lighting of the streets at Christmas, that a "Rakier" be elected for keeping the streets clean, and Alekonners for the assay of ale brewed in their Wards, &c. Dated 12 Dec., 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414].

Commissio pro delib'ac' gaole de Newgate.

Letters patent appointing Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, William Hankeford, Richard Nortone, William Lasyngby, Hugh Huls, Robert Hulle, Robert Tirwhit, John Cokayn, and John Prestone, or any eight, seven, six, five, four, three, or two (the Mayor being one), to be justices for gaol-delivery of Newgate. Witness the King at Westminster, 27 Nov., 2 Henry V [A.D. 1414].

Folio cxliv b.

Br'e collect' direct' pro decima levanda.

Letters patent appointing Stephen Speleman, Alderman, Thomas Pyke, Alderman, Robert Tatersall, draper, and William Bysmer, goldsmith, to be Commissioners for levying in the City the subsidy granted by the last Parliament. (fn. 2) Witness the King at Westminster, 22 Dec., 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414].

Consimiles bille missefuer' cuilib't Alder manno.

Precept to the Aldermen to elect good men in their several Wards to assess a sum equal to a fifteenth and levy the same on all inhabitants, both cleric and lay. (fn. 3) The money to be brought into the Guildhall on the Feast of the Conversion of St Paul [25 Jan.] next ensuing. Dated 8 Jan., 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15].

Folio cxlv.

Br'e de generali per donacione con cessa et proclamat.'

Writ to the Sheriffs to proclaim a general pardon granted by the King to all rebels, felons, &c., who severally sue for charters of pardon before Michaelmas Day next. Witness the King at Westminster, 9 Dec., 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414].

Folio cxlv b.

Judicium Thome May nelle proverbis oppro briosis dict' Will'o Sevenok.

21 March, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15], Thomas Mayneld, or Maynelle, grocer, living in Tower Ward, charged before the Mayor and Aldermen with insolently threatening William Sevenok, Alderman of Tower Ward, with Brembre's fate, if he did not conduct himself well and honestly. He confesses his guilt, and is committed to Neugate for a year and a day, but, at the earnest request of William Sevenok, the punishment is commuted for a bond for good behaviour in the sum of £200 Sureties, viz., John Wyldene, merchant, John Wokkyng, tailor, Thomas Bosse, grocer, and Richard Stowell, "wodemonger." (fn. 4)

Folio cxlvi.

L'ra missa pro sermone in Septimana pasche.

Letter under the Mayoralty seal to Richard Alkirtone, Canon of Chichester, asking him to preach a sermon on Easter Monday, and expressing a hope that his language may be temperate. (fn. 5) Dated 27 Feb., 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15].

Custodia Will'i filii Ph'i Bangor nup' civis et pannar'.

6 March, 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15], the guardianship of William, son of Philip Bangor, (fn. 6) late draper, together with his patrimony, committed by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, to John Bokenham, draper, who married Margery, the orphan's mother. Sureties, viz., Walter Chartesey, Robert Bamborugh, John Beterinden, draper, and John Cloos.

Folio cxlvi b.

Exon'c' theo lon' et aliar' exace' fact' tenent' resident' et aliis resident' in villa de Hadlee.

8 March, 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15], came John Talbot, Robert Hillory, Thomas Greyve, and Augustine Dunton, of the vill of Hadle, co. Suffolk, before Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and claimed on behalf of themselves and other tenants of the Archbishop of Canterbury in the same vill to be quit of all toll, &c., to the City by virtue of royal charters granted to the Archbishops and Church of Canterbury. (fn. 7) Their claim allowed.

Exoneracio Joh'nis Liberd civiset Bracia tor' London'.

6 March, 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15], John Lyberd, of co. Surrey, brewer, discharged by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Custodia pueror' Alani Coterell civis et lethirdier.

13 March, 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15], the guardianship of Robert, Elena, and Emma, children of Alan Coterell, late "letherdyer," together with their property, committed by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, to William Young, haberdasher, who married Johanna, the mother of the said orphans. Sureties, viz., John Amour, mercer, and John Walker, "steynour."

Folio cxlvii.

Br'e perdonac' Joh'is Oldecas tell Chivaler.

Writ to the Sheriffs to the effect that whereas John Oldecastell, of Coulyng, co. Kent, knight, had not availed himself of the King's offer of pardon already promulgated, (fn. 8) they were now to make proclamation that unless he came and made submission by the quinzaine of Easter next the pardon would be void. Witness the King at Westminster, 18 Feb, 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15].

Br'e procla n' q'd omnes de retinenc' d'ni Regis appro pinquent.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation for all knights, esquires, valets, and others in the pay of Edward III, Richard II., Edward, late Prince of Wales, John, Duke of Lancaster, the King's grandfather, or the King's late father, to hasten to London by the octave of Easter next to receive and execute the King's orders. Witness the King at Westminster, 22 March, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15].

Aliud bre de prorogand' diem in br'i supradicto contentum.

Another writ to the same for proclamation to be made changing the day named in the above writ to the morrow of St. George's Day [23 April]. Witness the King at Westminster, 22 March, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15].

Folio cxlvii b.

Proclam' facta xiii die Marc' a° r' r' H quinti sc'do.

Proclamation to be made to the effect that (1) no Sheriff's officer or other person take any toll or custom except those set up (en les tables assis) at Byllingesgate and Quenhithe; (2) that no officer connected with the water of the Thames take any custom for executing his office other than that ordained by the King's advice; (3) that no such officer keep a hostel.

Proclam' facta die Jovis xxi die marc' a° r' r' H quintitercio.

Proclamation to be made for every man or woman having apprentices that have not been enrolled during their first year, according to the ordinance, (fn. 9) to cause the same to be enrolled within twenty days of Easter next [31 March], without paying any fine for their negligence, under penalty of losing their apprentices.

Proclam' facta xv die Junii anno r' r' Henr' quinti iii cio.

Proclamation to be made for regulating the conduct of vintners, taverners, brewers, hostelers, hucksters, cooks, and pie-bakers.

17 Feb., 7 Henry VI. [A.D. 1428-9], came Robert Coterell, then of full age, and received from John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, a sum of money which John Amour, mercer, one of the sureties of William Yonge, brought into Court.

Exon'acio Joh'is Flemyng nup' civis et horner London'..

26 April, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], John Flemyng, of Bixle, co. Kent, "horner," discharged by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio cxlviii-cxlix.

Statute passed by the Parliament held at Westminster on Monday after the octave of st. Martin [11 Nov], 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414]. (fn. 10)

Folio cxlix.

Precept to the Aldermen for an armed watch to be kept by night up to the Feast of st. Michael and also on the nights and eves of the Feasts of st. John Bapt. [24 June] and SS. Peter and Paul [29 June]; also for taking the usual precautions against fire. Dated 7 May, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415].

Folio cxlix b.

Ordinacio facta sup' scrutinio barbitonsorum.

6 May, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], Simon Rolf and Richard Wellys, barbers, appointed and sworn by the Mayor and Aldermen to be Surveyors of those exercising the faculty of surgery in the City.

Afterwards, viz., on the 4th July, 4 Henry V. [A.D. 1416], ordinance made forbidding barbers practising the faculty of surgery in the City to tend serious cases of illness without showing the patients to the Surveyors appointed for the purpose, under penalty of a fine. (fn. 11)

Folio cl.

Maior optinuit medium locum sessionis non obstante q'd duo f'res Reg' ib'm sedebant apud Guyhald.

10 March, 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15], Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen summoned to the Tower, when the King informed them of his intention to cross the sea to reconquer the possessions of the Crown, and of his need of money Whereupon, on the 14th March, there came to the Guildhall the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Bishop of Winchester, the Dukes of Bedford and Gloucester, the King's brothers, and the Duke of York, to consider the matter; and the question arising as to the order of precedence in their sitting, the Lords agreed that the Mayor, as the King's representative in the City, should sit in the middle, with the Archbishop and Bishop on his right hand and the Dukes on his left. (fn. 12)

Exon'acio £iiii iiij s. v d. Emme filie Alani Coterell p'tin' etc.

1 March, 7 Henry VI. [A.D. 1428-9], came William Stout, who married Emma, daughter of Alan Coterell, late "letherdier," before Henry Bartone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and received his wife's patrimony from John Bederendene, the Chamberlain.

Exon'acio v marc' et x s Elene filie Alani Coterell p'tin' etc.

17 Jan., 8 Henry VI [A.D. 1429-30], came John Mortemer, who married Elena, daughter of the above Alan Coterell, before William Estfeld, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and likewise received his wife's patrimony.

Folio cl b.

Carta perdon aco'is Thome Fauconer et co'itat' civitat'.

Letters patent granting a general pardon to the Mayor and Commonalty for offences committed before the 8th December last, with the exception of any murders for which they may stand indicted since the 19th November (fn. 13) last. Witness the King at Westminster, 1 May, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415].

Folio cli.

Ordinacio q'd valetti cissor' non utantur liberata seu fraternitate inter se.

19 April, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], complaint made before Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen that servants and journeymen (allocati) of Tailors of the City, called "yomen taillours," (fn. 14) consorted together in dwelling-houses and behaved in an unruly manner, having assaulted (among others) Thomas Tropenell, one of the Masters of the mistery. Thereupon the Mayor and Aldermen summoned Thomas Whityngham, the then Master, and the Wardens of the said mistery to appear before them on the 25th April to answer for their want of control over their servants and journeymen. The said Master and Wardens duly appeared, and expressed both their regret at the state of affairs and their inability to put a stop to it. They pray the Mayor and Aldermen to summon before them David Brekenhok, John Stanbury, and others [not named] who were then dwelling together in a certain house in Garlykhythe. They were accordingly summoned by Otho Bris, one of the Mayor's Serjeants, and appeared before the Mayor and Aldermen on the 29th April, when they were ordered to quit the said house or again appear on the 2nd May to receive sentence On that day they again appeared, when the Mayor and Aldermen ordained that henceforth the servants of the said mistery should be under the rule and governance of the Masters and Wardens, like servants of other misteries, and that they should cease to use a livery or clothing at their unlawful assemblies, and further, they were to cease to live together on pain of imprisonment and fine. (fn. 15)

Folio cli b.

15 July, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], came John Shadworth, Thomas Aleyn, and Peter Givayn, executors of John Wodecok, (fn. 16) mercer, and delivered to John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, a sum of money to the use of Johanna, daughter of the said John Wodecok.

Folio clii clii b.

Ordinacio de la More et defimis evacu and'.

2 July, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], ordinances by the Common Council to the effect (1) that the little postern built of old in the City Wall and leading to the Moor should be pulled down, and a new and larger one built to the westward of it, with a gate to be shut at night and other fitting times; (fn. 17) (2) that the Moor be laid out for garden purposes; (3) that a common latrine outside the City Wall be removed, and a new one built within the wall upon the foss of the Walbrook, where a "scluys" or "speye" was to be constructed for the purpose of carrying off the filth; (fn. 18) (4) that those living on the margin of the Walbrook near the Thames cause the banks of the same to be piled or walled; (5) that another latrine situate in the City Wall between the Church of All Hallows and Bishopsgate be abolished; and lastly, (6) that the course of a certain gutter called "Swolne," near st. Magnus Church, which had been diverted, by way of experiment, by Thomas Falconer, the Mayor, so as to discharge itself into the Thames at Ebgate, alias Oystergate, should continue so to discharge itself.

Folio cliii.

Ordinacio de lib'at' vestur' et capicior' omittend.

13 May, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], ordinance by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, to the effect that whereas the custom of rulers and officers of the City receiving either a hood or clothing every year from the different crafts of the City had given offence, no Mayor, Alderman, Sheriff, or other officer or servant of the City shall henceforth take any livery or clothing from any craft or fraternity, save only the particular craft of which he has been made free, under penalty of a fine. (fn. 19)

Br'e pro conservacione pacis in London'.

Writ to the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Aldermen for all notable persons necessary for the good government of the City to return to, and remain within the City during the King's absence abroad. Dated at Westminster, 20 June, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415]. (fn. 20)

Folio cliii b.

De conserva cione pacis.

Precept under the Mayoralty seal to each Alderman enjoining him to take steps for the preservation of peace in his Ward during the King's absence abroad. Dated 24 July, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415].

Similar precepts (mutatis mutandis) were sent to the Masters of sixteen principal misteries.

Br'e q'd tenentes de North Mymmes sint quieti de custum'.

Writ to all Sheriffs, &c., notifying that tenants of the vill of Northmymmes, (fn. 21) which is of the honour of Gloucester, as is said, are quit of toll throughout the realm. Witness the King at Westminster, 4 Nov., 4 Henry V. [A.D. 1416].

Exon'acio Edmundi Grymstone civis et vine tar' London'.

5 Aug., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], Edmund Grymstone, vintner, discharged by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to bodily infirmity, and more particularly deafness.

Folio cliv.

Judicium Joh'is Cleydone heretici.

Judgment by Henry [Chichele], Archbishop of Canterbury, proclaiming John Cleydone to be a lapsed heretic and handing him over to the secular power. (fn. 22) [No date.]

Ordinacio conductus.

21 Aug., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], ordinance by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen forbidding brewers who rent the fountains and the great upper pipe of the Great Conduit in Chepe thenceforth to draw water from the small pipes below the said Conduit under penalty of paying 6s. 8d. to the Chamber on each conviction. (fn. 23)

Br'e pro parliamento.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster on Monday after the Feast of st. Luke [18 Oct.] No Sheriff to be returned. Witness John, Duke of Bedford, Warden of England, at Westminster, 12 Aug., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415]. (fn. 24)

Folio cliv b.

On a certain day [not recorded], 3 Henry V., came Alice, late wife of John Randolf, late "tymbermonger," and William Bradwey, carpenter, executors of the said John Randolf, who was executor of Thomas Oxenford, of whose son John Oxenford the said John Randolf had been appointed guardian by Drew Barantyn, late Mayor, and John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, and rendered account of the property of the said orphan, who had died during his apprenticeship, before William Sevenoke and Nicholas Aghton, Aldermen, John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, and John Westone, the Common Pleader, as Auditors.

Custodia Agnetis filie Will'i Box sone nup' civis et peautrer London'.

6 Sept., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], came Richard Grove, armourer, Thomas Clerk, "taillour," and John Chadde, "cotiller," executors of William Boxsone, late "peautrer," and paid into court before the Mayor and Aldermen the sum of 50 marks to the use of Agnes, daughter of the said William Boxsone.

12 Sept., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], the guardianship of the above Agnes committed by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, to Robert Trenerth, mercer, and Petronilla his wife, widow of the above William Boxsone, the orphan's mother Sureties, viz., Thomas Whitingham and Thomas Suttone, tailors, John Trethewy, skinner, and Roger Wryngesworth, mercer.

Folio clv.

L'ra missa d'no Reg' per Maiorem et Aldr'os.

Letter [from the Mayor and Aldermen] to the King thanking him for his letter of the 31st July informing them of the discovery of a treacherous plot against him, (fn. 25) and assuring him that the City would be safeguarded on his behalf. Dated 2 Aug. [A.D. 1415].

Alia l'ra directa d'no Regi per Maiorem et Aldr'os etc.

Letter from the Mayor and Aldermen to the King touching the proceedings that had been taken against John Cleydone, who had been condemned by the Ecclesiastical Court as a lapsed heretic, and handed over to the secular authorities for punishment. Dated 22 August [A.D. 1415]. (fn. 26)

Folio clv b.

Ordinacio Gardianor' mistere de Corryours.

13 Sept., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], came good men of the Mistery of Corriours before Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and prayed that certain "points" for the government of the said mistery might be sanctioned. Their prayer granted, and ordered to be placed on record.

Folio clvi clvi b.

Judicium Rob'ti [sic] Hurlebat et al' pro maritag' orph'e licencia Maior' et Aldr' non obtenta.

31 July, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], proceedings taken, at the instance of John Westone, the Common Pleader, against John Hurlebatte for having married Johanna, a daughter of Nicholas Aghton, (fn. 27) late an Alderman, and an orphan, without the licence of the Mayor and Aldermen. The said John Hurlebatte, being questioned as to his marriage, acknowledged that he contracted matrimony with the said orphan in the presence of Nicholas Jamys, a merchant, and Master Peter Chirche, a notary public, but the marriage had not yet been solemnized. The Court, wishing to consider the validity of the marriage, postponed the further hearing until the 6th July [sic], (fn. 28) and committed John Hurlebatte to prison for contempt. In the meanwhile the Sheriffs were ordered to summon twelve good men from the four nearest Wards to the place where the said Nicholas died, to attend on the 6th July [sic], to discover the true value of the marriage; and the aforesaid Nicholas Jamys and Peter Chirche, having acknowledged the part they had taken in the matter, were, after due deliberation, committed to prison until they should pay a fine at the discretion of the Mayor and Aldermen, and condemned to lose the freedom of the City The punishment in the case of Master Peter, however, was commuted for a fine of £20 (eventually reduced to 20s.) on his pleading ignorance of the greatness of his offence, whilst in the case of Nicholas Jamys it was carried out, owing to his contumacy.

Afterwards, viz., on the 6th August [sic], the jurors came, viz., Robert Whaplode, William Beneriche, William Lyle of the Ward of Bridge, Walter Haselee, John Canowne, Geoffrey Dallynge of the Ward of Billynggesgate, Robert Smythe, John Tetford, Richard Balman of the Ward of Dowgate, and John Sesingham, Salamon Oxney, Martin Godard of the Ward of Langborn, who declared the marriage of the said orphan to be worth £40. Thereupon the said John Hurlebatte was adjudged to forfeit that amount, and was committed to prison until, &c.

The same day the aforesaid Nicholas Jamys made submission, and his punishment was commuted for a fine of £40 (afterwards reduced to 40s.).

Folio clvii.

Exon'ac' Ric'i Osmer civis et Braciator' London' ab assis' etc.

7 Oct, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], Richard Osmer, brewer, discharged by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Pai' pro securitate decem mille marc' d'no Regi mutuatar'.

Letters patent touching the security on the customs on wool, &c., granted for the repayment of a City loan of 10,000 marks to the King. Dated at Westminster, 1 Aug., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415]. (fn. 29)

Folio clvii b.

Imprisonament' Joh'is Gedeney quia recusavit officium Aldermanr'.

17 Jan., 2 Henry V. [A.D. 1414-15], John Gedeney, who had been elected Alderman of the Ward of Farndone Without, loco Ralph Lobenham, being summoned to take the oath of office, refused to do so on the ground of inability; although, as a freeman of the City, he was bound by oath to be a partaker in lot, i.e.; to hold office, and in scot, i e, contribute to taxes and other charges. (fn. 30) He was thereupon committed to prison and his property confiscated until the Court of Aldermen should be better advised thereon. Afterwards, viz., on the 18th [Jan.], he made submission and was sworn. (fn. 31)

Folio clviii.

Custod' Thome fil' Joh'is Oxney nuper civis et grocer' London'.

10 Sept., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], the guardianship of Thomas, son of John Oxneye, late grocer, together with the sum of £56 13s 4d due to him by the death of Dionisia his sister, and also his patrimony, committed by Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and John Proffyt, the Chamberlain, to Thomas "Knollys," senior, grocer. Surety, viz., Thomas "Knolles," junior, grocer.

Custodia Joh is fil' Joh'is Oxneye nuper civis et groceri London'.

30 Sept., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], the guardianship of John, son of John Oxneye, and his property similarly committed to Salamon Oxneye, (fn. 32) goldsmith. Sureties, viz., William Fitz Hugh, goldsmith, and Martin Godard, "cotiller".

Folio clviii b.

Indentur' divers' jocal' invadiat'.

Indenture between Richard Courtenay, Bishop of Norwich, and Treasurer of the King's Chamber, of the one part, and Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, and Commonalty of the City, of the other part, witnessing the delivery of a great collar of gold, composed of crowns and antelopes richly enamelled and bejewelled, to the Mayor as security for the repayment of a loan of 10,000 marks made by the City to the King The same to be redeemed by the Feast of Circumcision [1 Jan.], A.D. 1416 [-17]. Dated 16 June, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415]. (fn. 33)

Eleccio Vicecomitum.

Saturday the Feast of st. Matthew [21 Sept], 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], in the presence of Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, John Bartone, the Recorder, Richard Whitingtone, Thomas Knolles, Richard Merlawe, Robert Chichele, William Nortone, Nicholas Wottone, William Louthe, Henry Haltone, William Chichele, John Penne, William Sevenok, and Thomas Pyke, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs-William Cauntbrigge, Alderman (fn. 34) and grocer, was elected one of the Sheriffs by the Mayor, and Alan Everard, Alderman (fn. 34) and mercer, was elected the other Sheriff for the year ensuing by the Commonalty. Afterwards, viz., on Saturday the eve of st. Michael [29 Sept.], they were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the following Monday were presented and accepted before the Barons of the Exchequer at Westminster.

Folio clix.

Eleccio Nich'i Wottone in Maiorem civitatis London'.

Record of the election on Sunday the Feast of st. Edward [13 Oct], 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], of Nicholas Wottone to be Mayor for the year ensuing, and of the solemn procession to Westminster made on the morrow of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.] by the Mayor, Aldermen, and an immense number of the Commonalty, on foot like pilgrims, (fn. 35) to return thanks for the joyous news that had arrived of the King's victory at Agincourt, (fn. 36) before the new Mayor was admitted and sworn before the Barons of the Exchequer. (fn. 37)

Masters of Misteries sworn.

Armourers 25 Aug., 4 Henry V. [A.D. 1416], Thomas White, Thomas Robelard.

Haberdasshers same day, William Sewall, John Corby, John Chambre, John Langlee.

Foundours 29 Aug., same year, John Baroun, Richard Hille.

Bladsmythes 4 Sept., same year, Richard Ryngwode, John Leyne.

Strengers (fn. 38) 5 Sept., same year, Ralph Eryot, Henry Yonge.

Tilers 12 Sept., same year, Thomas White, John Grace, Geoffrey Powes.

Folio clix b.

Record' et rudic' pro rebell' fact' contra Aldr'm Warde de Bradstret.

5 Dec., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], William Grantham, grocer, Richard Sutton, draper, and Henry Anketill, "sherman," charged before the Mayor and Aldermen with having falsely accused Thomas Pyke, Alderman of the Ward of Bradstret, with having levied a larger sum than was due from them towards the loan of 10,000 marks recently made to the King (fn. 39) for his voyage to Harflew. They confessed their guilt, and thereupon were committed to Newgate for a year and a day, but the punishment was afterwards remitted on their entering into bond for good behaviour.

Folio clx.

Consiles bille misse fuerunt cuilibet Aldermanno London'.

Precept to the several Aldermen to hold their Wardmotes and to make return of such matters as they are unable themselves to remedy to the Mayor's General Court to be held on Monday after the Feast of Epiphany [6 Jan.], and further to set watches at Christmas, take precautions against fire, &c. Dated 13 Nov., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415].

Commissio pro delib'acione Gaol' de Neugate facienda.

Letters patent appointing Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, William Hankeford, Richard Nortone, William Lasyngby, Robert Hulle, Robert Tirwhit, John Cokayne, William Cheyne, William Lodyngtone, John Prestone, and John Bartone, senior, or any ten, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, or two (the Mayor being one), to be Commissioners for gaol-delivery of Newgate. Witness John, Duke of Bedford, Warden of England, (fn. 40) at Westminster, 4 Nov., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415].

Exon'ac' Will'i Rybode civis et pelli parii London'.

20 Jan, 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415-16], William Rybode, skinner, discharged by Nicholas Wottone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio clx b.

Bre pro parliamento.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster on the 16th March next [A.D. 1415-16]. No Sheriff to be returned. Witness the King at Westminster, 21 Jan., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415-16].

Nomina civium electorum.

Afterwards, at a Husting for Common Pleas, held on Monday the Feast of st. Scolastica [10 Feb.], there were elected Richard Merlawe and Thomas Fauconer, Aldermen, William Westone, draper, and Nicholas Jamys, fishmonger, Commoners, to attend the Parliament pursuant to the above writ.

Proclamacio facta super statuto de Galeyhalpens.

Writ to the Sheriffs to take steps to secure the due observance of the statute passed in the Parliament held at Westminster on Monday after the Feast of All Saints [1 Nov], 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415], forbidding the use of "Galihalpens" (fn. 41) and money called "Seskyn" (fn. 42) and "Dodekyn," (fn. 43) and all Scottish silver money, as currency in England. Witness the King at Westminster, 3 Dec., 3 Henry V. [A.D. 1415].

Footnotes

1 'Memorials,' p. 619 The letter is set out by Jules Delpit ('Documents Français,' p. 217), but he incorrectly dates the letter as the 12th Sept.
2 The Parliament which com menced to sit at Westminster on the 19th Nov. had granted two tenths and two fifteenths for the defence of the realm 'Rot. Parl.,' iv. 35.
3 The precept is in similar form to that recorded supra, p. 117.
4 'Memorials,' pp. 605-6.
5 The suggestion is thus quaintly put: "Quia sapiencie vestre pauca sufficiunt et nimium proluxcius in formare non oportet Rex universe potestatis et supercelestis scriba linguam vestram ut calamum obtemperet et sermonem compositum tribuat ori vestro." Possibly the civic autho rities were afraid lest the preacher should press too heavily on the Lol lards, who for the most part found favour in the City.
6 His will (dated 3 Jan., 1409-10) proved and enrolled in the Husting in the following November. 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 387.
7 Cf. 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 289.
8 See p. 132.
9 In 1300 an ordinance was passed for the names of apprentices not "entered on the paper" within their first year to be published at the next Husting, so that two Aldermen might be associated with the Chamberlain in receiving the fines imposed at their discretion 'Cal. Letter Book C,' p 78; 'Liber Cust.,' i. 93-4 Cf. Ordinance of 1393, 'Cal. LetterBook H,' p. 391.
10 'Statutes at Large' (ed. 1758), i. 502-4.
11 'Memorials,' pp. 606-9.
12 Id, pp. 603-5.
13 The day when the last Parliament met.
14 John Creek, a tailor, left by will dated 12th Feb., 1414, a sum of 20s towards the maintenance of the alms of the "Fraternity" of the valet tailors. 'Cal. of Wills, Court of Hust.,' ii 403.
15 'Memorials,' pp. 609 12.
16 His will, dated 29 Nov., 1408, was proved and enrolled in the Hus ting in Feb., 1413. 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 397-9.
17 The editor of the 'Memorials' (where the record is set out, pp. 614 616) identifies this postern with "Aldermanbury Postern" in Cripple gate Ward, whereas it clearly refers to the postern of Moorgate, in the neighbourhood of the Walbrook. It is to this ordinance that Stow doubt less refers when he writes: "Touching the next postern, called Moregate, I find that Thomas Falconer, Mayor, about the year 1415, the third of Henry V., caused the wall of the City to be broken near unto Coleman Streete, and there built a postern, now called Moregate, upon the moor side, where was never gate before" ('Survey,' ed Thoms, p. 13) The little old postern apparently had no gate ! The new postern was erected to the westward of it (occidentali parte), and not to the south, as re lated in the 'Memorials.' Cf. Nicolas, 'Chron.,' p. 99.
18 It is noteworthy that at the famous Iter held at the Tower in 1321 the Prior of Holy Trinity undertook to repair a bridge over Walbrook near the Moor and near the church of All Hallows, London Wall. 'Liber Cust.,' i. 409.
19 'Memorials,' p. 612.
20 This writ is recorded on fo clii as having been read before the Com mon Council of the 2nd July follow ing, when a resolution was passed to carry the same into effect Two days before the issue of this writ (18 June) Henry is recorded as having ridden through the City on his way to Southampton (Nicolas, 'Chron.,' pp 99-100, Kingsford's 'Chronicles,' p 70). On the other hand, Gregory ('Chron.,' pp. 108-9) records the King's visit to the City as having taken place on the 15th June, when the Mayor, Sheriffs, Aldermen, and Commons accompanied him as far as Blackheath, where they took leave.
21 North Mimms, co. Herts.
22 This handing over of a lapsed heretic by an ecclesiastical court to the secular power was pursuant to the Statute of Leicester, 2 Henry V., cap. vii. (vide sup., p. 130, note). John Cleydone, a currier by trade, was tried before the Archbishop and others in st. Paul's on the 17th Aug., 1415, Thomas Fauconer, the Mayor, giving evidence against him, and de claring that the books found in Cleydone's possession were "the worst and the most perverse that ever he did read or see." Both he and his books were burnt. (Foxe, 'Acts and Monuments,' iii. 531-4).
23 'Memorials,' p. 617.
24 The return to the writ is not re corded. The King had set sail the previous day, leaving the Duke of Bedford Warden of the realm during his absence. Parliament did not actually sit until the 4th Nov. 'Rot. Parl.,' iv. 62.
25 Whilst the King was at Southampton news was brought to him of a design to carry off the young Earl of March, as soon as Henry should have set sail, and to proclaim him heir to Richard II. The traitors- the Earl of Cambridge, Henry le Scrope of Masham, and Sir Thomas Grey of Heton-had been arrested on the 30th July, and were in due course executed. (Kingsford's 'Chronicles,' p 70; Walsingham, ii; 305-6). The letter is not recorded in the Letter-Book. On the 12th Aug. the King addressed another letter to the Mayor, acknowledging the City's reply, but drawing attention to the absence from the City of several Aldermen, and desiring that they might be recalled (Vide infra, fo. cxcviii., Rymer, 'Fodera,' ix. 306-7).
26 'Memorials,' pp. 617-18. Cf. supra, p. 139.
27 For a short time Alderman of Bridge Ward. His will, dated 4 June, 1415, was proved and enrolled in the Husting in March, 1417. 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 413.
28 A mistake for 6 August.
29 Rymer, 'Fodera,' ix 298 9.
30 Cum omnis liber in lotto quod est officio et scotto quod est con tribucione taxarum et aliorumonerum racione sacramenti predicti particeps existere tenetur. The distinction here drawn early in the fifteenth century between scot and lot, a distinction still upheld in the City of London, is noteworthy, inasmuch as the terms have been considered by some writers as synonymous, at least in the Middle Ages. See Gross, 'The Gild Merchant,' i. 53-6.
31 'Memorials,' pp. 601-3.
32 His will, dated 2 March, 1429-30, proved and enrolled in the Husting in Oct., 1433. 'Cal. of Wills,' ii. 466.
33 'Memorials,' p. 613.
34 It was not an uncommon occur rence for both Sheriffs to be Aldermen although not specifically recorded as such.
35 Peregre proficiscentes Westm' pedest' adierunt, the usual custom being to go to Westminster on horse back on the 29th Oct. for the Mayor to be sworn before the Exchequer.
36 On the 25th Oct.
37 'Memorials,' pp. 620-22.
38 Bow-string makers.
39 Cf. supra, pp. 142, 143.
40 The King did not return from France to London until the 23rd Nov., when he was welcomed at Black heath by the Mayor and Aldermen, who on the following day proceeded to Westminster, accompanied by 200 leading commoners, and presented the King with the sum of £1,000 in two basins of gold worth £500. Nicolas, 'Chron.,' p. 103. He had created his brother Duke of Bedford in the Parliament of 1414.
41 Galley halfpence; a small silver coin said to have been brought to London by Venetian merchants, whose galleys landed wine and other merchandise at "Galley Quay," in Thames Street (Stow, 'Survey,' Thoms's ed., p. 52). Ruding ('Annals of the Coinage,' i. 497) states that in 1414 writs were issued to William Crowmere, the Mayor, and the Searchers of the Port of London, to search the Venetian galleys for Galley halfpence imported into Eng land contrary to the Statute (vide supra, p. 100). It has been suggested that the coin may have been so called from being struck with the figure of a galley ('Liber Alb.,' Glos sary).
42 A Flemish coin of six "mites" (Ruding, i. 499n).
43 "Doydekyn," "Doitkine," or "Doit," the last term being still used to express a coin of very small value (ibid).
44 Stat. 3 Hen. V. cap. i.;, 'Statutes at Large,' i. 504.