Folios 1-10
Miscellaneous material, 1422-4

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

1-16

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'Folios 1-10 : Miscellaneous material, 1422-4', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: K: Henry VI (1911), pp. 1-16. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33707 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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LETTER-BOOK K.

Fly-leaf dors. Peticio Serviencium Camer' pro parte (?) denar' in process' tempor' h'end.

28 Oct., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422], petition of Thomas Donyngton and other Serjeants of the Chamber to the Mayor and Aldermen touching the sharing of fees for processions. (fn. 1)

Folio. 1.

Eleccio Will' Estfeld et Rob'ti Tatersalle vic'.

The Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422], in the presence of Robert Chichele, the Mayor, John Fray, the Recorder, Richard Whityngtone, William Crowmere, (Nicholas) Wottone, William Sevenoke, William Cauntbrigge, John Reinwelle, John Per(neys), Robert (Whityngham?), Robert Widyngtone, John Coventre, John Wellys, John Blakden, John Botiller, (Nicholas) James, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned for the election of Sheriffs, William Estfeld, mercer, was elected one of the Sheriffs (by the Mayor), and (Robert) Tatersalle was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day John Bederenden, draper, was elected Chamberlain; ...... [illegible] (fn. 2) John Trymnell, mercer, were elected Wardens of London Bridge; and John............................. Aldermen, Thomas Dufhous, Henry Frowyk, John Brokle, and John [Bacon?], Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the Chamberlain and Wardens aforesaid.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented and admitted before the Barons of the Exchequer.

The Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422], after celebration of Mass according to the ordinance made during the Mayoralty of John Wodecok, in the presence of Robert Chichele, the Mayor, the Prior of Christchurch, John Fray the Recorder, (Richard) Whityngtone, Thomas Knolles, William Waldern, William Crowmer, Thomas Fauconer, Nicholas (Wottone), William Sevenok, William Cauntbrigge, John Reinwelle, John Perneys, Robert (Whityngham?), John Michell, Ralph Bartone, Simon Seman, John Wellys, John Coventre, Robert (Widyngtone?), John Botiller, Nicholas James, and Robert Tatersalle, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, William Walderne was elected Mayor.

Afterwards, viz. on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted, &c. [sic], (fn. 3) before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio 1 b.

The provision made by William Walderne, the Mayor, and Aldermen for the reception of the corpse of the most illustrious and victorious Prince, the Lord Henry V., late King of England, &c., lately deceased at "Vyncent Boys," (fn. 4) in France, to be buried at Westminster, viz., that after the streets of the City and Borough of Suthwerk have been cleansed the Mayor, Sheriffs, Recorder, Aldermen, and officers, and the more sufficient persons of the whole City shall proceed on foot as far as St. George's Bar, clothed in black vestments, together with 300 torches borne by 300 persons clothed in white gowns and hoods, and there reverently salute the corpse, following it the first day as far as St. Paul's Church, where the funeral obsequies take place, and the second day to Westminster. It is likewise provided that throughout the street, from the posts or "stulps" (fn. 5) at the end of the Bridge towards Suthwerk as far as the corner of the cross-roads at Estchepe, shall stand on either side men of the Wards of Bridge, Billingsgate, and......[illegible], with lighted torches, and that the chaplains of the churches and chapels within the said Wards shall stand at the doors of the churches, habited in their richest vestments, and bearing in their hands censers of gold and silver, whilst they solemnly chant the venite, and incense the corpse as it passes. The like shall be done by men of the Wards of......[illegible], Langbourne, Algate, Portsoken, and Lymstrete, from the corner of the said cross-roads at Estchepe up to Cornhill; and by the Wards of Cornhill, Bradstrete, Walbroke, and Vintry, from the corner of......[illegible] up to "lestokkes"; and by the Wards of Colmanstrete, Bassieshawe, Bredstret, and Baynardescastel, from "lestokkes" up to the Great Conduit; and by the Wards of Chepe, Cordewanerstrete, Creplegate, and Aldrichegate from the Great Conduit to the West Gate of St. Paul's, &c. These are the names of the Misteries which provided the torches, the remains of which were returned to them, &c.:-

Mercers, 12 torches; Grocers, 12; Drapers, 12; Pelters, 12; Vintners, 12; Fishmongers, 12; Tailors, 12; Ironmongers, 8; Goldsmiths, 8; Saddlers, 8; Brewers, 8; Butchers, 8; Cordwainers, 8; Waxchandlers, 6; Chandlers, 6; Flecchers and Bowyers, 6; Pewterers, 6; Dyers, 6; Armourers, 6; Shearmen, 4; Salters, 4; Girdlers, 4; Haberdashers, 4; Curriers (?), 4; Barbers, 4; Glovers, 4; Founders, 4; "Brasyers," 3; Hatters, 2; Painters, 3; Fullers, 3.

Total, 211 torches.

And note that the Chamberlain, at the cost of the Commonalty, gave to each torch-bearer a gown and hood of blanket, (fn. 6) &c.

Delib'ac' Rog'i Denford fingentis se captorem Regis.

The eve of All Saints [1 Nov.], Roger Denford, of Potenhethe, (fn. 7) who had been arrested for pretending to be one of the King's takers (captor domini Regis), (fn. 8) was released from prison, inasmuch as no one appeared in evidence against him, and as a mark of respect for the said Feast, the said Roger having first pledged his oath for good behaviour. (fn. 9)

Folio. 2.

L'ra duc' Bed' missa Maiori Aldr' et co'itati

Letter from the Duke of Bedford to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty, notifying them that, on account of the decease of the late King, the government of the realm, by the laws, ancient usage, and custom of the said realm, had fallen to him, as being the late King's eldest brother. Dated at Rouen, 26 Oct. [A.D. 1422]. (fn. 10)

L'ra prepositi m'cator' Scabin' et inhabitancium Paris' directa Maiori et civib' London.

Letter from the Provost of merchants, Echevins, and burgesses, residing in Paris, to the Mayor, burgesses, and inhabitants of the City of London, touching the death of Henry [V.], Regent of France, asking them to use their influence with the powers that be, for the protection of France against her enemies, and assuring them of the allegiance of the writers to Henry [VI.], who was King both of France and England. Written at "Parys." [No date.] (fn. 11)

Folio. 2 b.

Custodia Joh'is et Lucie pueror' Thome Hunte.

14 Nov., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422], the guardianship of John and Lucy, children of Thomas Hunte, late "fruyterer," together with their property, committed by William Walderne, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, to Marion their mother. Sureties, viz., William Rustone, attorney, &c., and Thomas Warwyk, "wodemonger."

Custodia corporis Tho'e filii Ric'i Merlawe.

10 Dec., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422], the guardianship of Thomas, son of Richard Merlawe, late "irmonger," and one of the Aldermen of the City, committed by William Walderne, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederendene, the Chamberlain, to Robert Chichele, grocer, and Agnes his wife, the orphan's mother. (fn. 12) Sureties, viz., William Michel and Thomas Catworth, grocer.

3 Dec., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422], came John, son of John Frensshe, late goldsmith, before the Mayor and Aldermen, and received from John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, a sum of money accruing to him during his minority.

Admissio et sacr'm Will'i Horn in s'vientem ad canell'.

Wednesday, 11 Nov., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422], William Horn admitted and sworn a Serjeant of the City for cleansing of streets, lanes, the banks of the Thames, &c.

De venella vocat' Grenewichelane deobturanda.

12 Dec., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422], an ordinance made by the Mayor and Aldermen that the lane called "Grenewich lane," which had been unlawfully obstructed (fn. 13) for eight years by inhabitants of the Ward of Dowgate, as appears by records of this court, temp. Thomas Fauconer, shall be reopened.

Folio. 3.

Consi'le mandatum miss' fuit cuil't Aldermanno pro levacione mediet' unius xv e.

Precept to the Aldermen to cause a sum amounting to half a fifteenth to be levied in their several Wards on all inhabitants (including ecclesiastics for lands and tenements purchased since the twentieth year of King Edward I. (fn. 14) ), and to bring the money to the Guildhall by a certain day. Written under the Mayoralty Seal, 12 Oct. [A.D. 1422].

Consi'le mandatum miss' fuit cuil't Aldermanno.

Precept to the Aldermen to hold Wardmotes in their several Wards and make return to the Mayor's General Court to be held on Monday after the Feast of Epiphany [6 Jan.], and further, to keep an armed watch at Christmas time, appoint a "Rakier" for each Ward for keeping the streets clean, and see that a light be kept burning before each house, &c. Written under the seal of the Mayoralty, 12 Dec. [A.D. 1422].

Delib'acio Rogeri Denford extra prisonam.

The eve of All Saints [1 Nov.], Roger Denford of "Potenethe" discharged from prison, to which he had been committed for pretending to be one of the King's takers. (fn. 15)

Exon'acio Hugonis Hachon' ab assisis.

15 Jan., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422-3], Hugh Hachoun of Berkyng, co. Essex, skinner, discharged by William Walderne, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., except on urgent occasions, owing to increasing old age.

Folio. 3 b.

Br'e d'ni Regis ad certiorari sup' ordinacione facta pro retibus vocatis Triinkes.

Writ of certiorari touching the regulations of assize of nets called "Trynkes" in the Thames and the season for taking lamprons. (fn. 16) Witness the King at Westminster, 10 Dec., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422].

Returnum sup' br'i predicto quo ad Trinkas.

Return made to the above writ to the effect that there is a certain net called "Tryinke" for catching fish in the Thames between the Feast of St. James, Ap. [25 July], and the Annunciation B. Mary [25 March], which ought to be, according to the assize and custom of the City, of the breadth of two inches in each mesh in the first half (in medietate anteriori), and one and a half inches and not less in each mesh in the hinder half (in medietate posteriori). (fn. 17)

It' de eodem return' capc'oem lampronum [sic].

Lamprons ought by custom to be taken between the Feast of St. Michael [29 Sept.] and Easter Day, or a little before or after the said Feasts, according as it may seem seasonable and advantageous to the Mayor or Warden of the City for the time being. (fn. 18)

Ordinacio q'd recia voc' Triinkes non figantur nec stent set tractenlur.

Recital of an ordinance (fn. 19) having been made on the 14th Nov., 9 Henry V. [A.D. 1421], by William Cauntbrigge, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty forbidding the fixing of "Tryinkes" in the river as being too destructive of fish, but allowing the inhabitants of Wolwich, Berkyng, and Erhithe, and all other fishermen, to use such nets at seasonable times, provided they be of reasonable assize and be not fixed in any one place, but be drawn like other nets through the water as of old accustomed. (fn. 20)

Exon'ac' Cur' de den' p'tin' Will'o fil' Ric'i Wodecok Salter.

25 Feb., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422-3], came William, son of Richard Wodecok, late salter, and received from John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, a sum of money in full satisfaction of his patrimony.

Carbon' Joh' Serle colyer jam primo forisfact'.

Saturday, 21 Nov., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422], John Serle of Croydon, "colyere," arrested with three sacks of coal which were deficient in measure, and because it was his first conviction the coal was confiscated, and he was committed to prison until he paid the fine, &c.

Folio. 4.

Will'mus Edrich exon'at' ab assisis.

7 Feb., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422-3], William Edrych, brewer, discharged by William Walderne, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age, &c.

Joh'es Lagage exon'at' ab assisis.

16 Jan., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422-3], John Lagage, goldsmith, similarly discharged for like cause.

Commissio pro delib' acione Gaole de Newgate.

Letters patent appointing William Walderne, the Mayor, (fn. 21) William Hankeford, William Babyngtone, Robert Hulle, Robert Tirwhit, Roger Hortone, William Cheyne, John Cokayn, John Martyn, John Prestone, and John Fray, or any ten, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, or two (the Mayor being one), to be justices for gaol-delivery of Newgate. Witness the King at Westminster, 14 Jan., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422-3].

Transmutacio Joh'is Elsy a mistera de Hornyers in misteram de Bruers.

27 Feb., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422-3], came John, son of Thomas Elsey, of "Iskham," (fn. 22) co. Kent, before William Walderne, the Mayor, and Aldermen, and showed that whereas he had been admitted to the freedom of the City in the Mistery of "Hornyers" temp. Robert Merlawe, Mayor, and John Proffyt, Chamberlain, viz., on the 23rd June, 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1410], he had long used, and was now using, the Mistery of "Bruers," as good men of the latter Mistery testified; he therefore prayed to be admitted to the freedom in that Mistery. His prayer granted.

14 Nov., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422], Nicholas John de Lucha, "brocour," committed to prison by William Walderne, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, for having charged the scrutineers appointed for surveying and assaying wines with unfairness to him and his wines, and for alleging that they would have been amenable to a bribe.

Folio. 4 b.

Exon'acio Will'i Spark cissoris ab assisis.

2 March, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422-3], William Spark, tailor, discharged by William Walderne, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Br'e d'ni Regis de admittendo Ric'm Alfeld in coronatorem Civitatis London' etc.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs to admit Richard Alfeld as deputy-coroner to Thomas "Chaucier," (fn. 23) the King's Chief Butler, to whom the office of Coroner appertains, but who has no leisure to execute its duties. Witness the King at Westminster, 11 Dec., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422].

Exon'acio Ric'i atte Pippe fleccher abassisis.

17 March, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422-3], Richard atte Pyppe, "fleccher," discharged by William Walderne, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Joh'is Canoun ab assisis.

12 March, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422-3], John Canoun, brewer, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Joh'is Westyerd vinetar' ab assisis.

9 March, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422-3], John Westyerd, vintner, similarly discharged for like cause.

Novum opus Guyhalde etc.

Saturday the eve of Palm Sunday [28 March], 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], ordinance by William Walderne, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty, that all fines and fees for incoming and outgoing of apprentices, male and female, as well as fines and fees for enrolment of deeds, wills, and writings under the seal of the Mayoralty, fines and amercements of brewers, hucksters, hostelers, and victuallers infringing ordi nances, be continued and levied to the use of the Guildhall up to Michaelmas next, &c. (fn. 24)

Afterwards, viz. on Monday, 26 Sept., the year aforesaid, the time was extended to Christmas next, &c.

Folio. 5.

Transmutacio David Turbelvyle a mistera de Brouderers in misteram de Vynters.

15 April, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], came David Turbelvyle of co. Glouc., "brouderer," before William Walderne, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and showed that whereas he had been admitted to the freedom of the City in the Mistery of "Brouderers" temp. Drew Barentyn, Mayor, and John Proffyt, Chamberlain, viz., on the 19th July, 10 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], he had long used, and was now using, the Mistery of "Vinters." He prayed, therefore, that he might be admitted to the freedom in the latter mistery. His prayer granted at the instance of Geoffrey Dallyng, John Crouchier, William Reynold, John Neve, William Scardeborgh, and Guy Sholdham, and others of the Mistery of "Vynters."

Custodia corporum Joh'is et Alicie pueror' Simonis Herward.

19 May, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], the guardianship of John and Alice, children of Simon Herward, late mercer, together with their patrimony, committed by William Walderne, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederenden, the Chamberlain (with the assent of John Talbot, mercer, to whom the guardianship had been assigned by the aforesaid Simon), to John Admond, mercer, who had married Johanna, widow of the said Simon. Sureties, viz., John Fauntleroy and John Pydmell, mercers.

Afterwards, viz., on the 19th August, 17 Henry VI. [A.D. 1439], it was adjudged by the Mayor and Aldermen that the money belonging to the above Alice, who had died under the age of twenty-one years (as proved by inquest) on the 17th Sept., 17 Henry VI. [A.D. 1438], should be delivered to her surviving brother John.

Exon'acio Joh'is Wynne ab assisis juratis etc.

15 June, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], John Wynne, draper, discharged by William Walderne, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age, &c.

Exon'acio Ric'i Russell cissoris ab assisis etc.

16 July, the same year, Richard Russell, tailor, similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio. 5 b.

Ordinacio carnificum.

7 May, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], ordinances submitted by the Masters and good men of the Mistery of Butchers to the Mayor and Aldermen for governing the mistery, and approved. Among the ordinances are the following, viz.:-

(a) That no butcher keep his shop open, or expose meat for sale, after 10 o'clock in the morning on any Sunday, under penalty of 40d.

(b) That no bull be killed for sale before it has been hunted and baited (nisi taurus ille prius fugatur et baytetur).

(c) That no butcher sell fragments of meat on Saturday that have been left over from the previous Thursday.

(d) That no butcher find fault with a stranger for demanding pence (fn. 25) for victuals sold to him.

Ordinacio pistor'.

8 May, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], petition to the Mayor and Aldermen by Thomas Grymmesby, Thomas Twygge, John atte Water, William Lardener, John Page, and John Southfolk, Masters and Governors, and all the good folk of the Mistery of Bakers, that an ordinance may be made forbidding any baker to bake bread for sale on Sunday except in case of great necessity or by special order from the Crown. Their petition granted.

Folio. 6.

Exon'acio Joh'is Hese cissoris ab assisis.

28 July, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], John Hese, tailor, discharged by William Walderne, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Ric'i Isaak sellarii ab assisis.

3 Aug., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], Richard Isaak, saddler, similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Joh'is Belamy ab assisis.

25 Sept., 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], John Belamy de Caunterbury similarly discharged for like cause.

Ordinacio mistere "Flechers."

8 May, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], petition to the Mayor and Aldermen by the Wardens and good folk of the Mistery of "Flecchers" for an ordinance to be made forbidding any one of the Mistery to keep open shop on Sundays, or any Festival having a double vigil (dont la veigle est jemynee). (fn. 26) Their prayer granted.

10 May, 6 Henry VI. [A.D. 1428], came John Admond and brought into Court certain sums of money belonging to John and Alice, children of Simon Herward. Also there came William Maltby, who had been guardian of Margaret, another daughter of the said Simon, and brought her property into Court (she having died under age), to be divided between the aforesaid John and Alice.

Fos. 6b-7 b.

The ordenaunce and Articles of Phisicions withinne þ e Cite of London and Surgeons of þ e same.

15 May, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], petition presented by Master Gilbert Kymer, Doctor of "Medicyns" and Rector of "Medicyns" in the City of London, (fn. 27) Master John Suntbreshete, "Comensour" in "Medicyns," and Master Thomas Southwell, "Bachiler" in "Medicyns," being the two Surveyors of the Faculty of Physic in the said City, together with Thomas Morstede (fn. 28) and John Harowe, the two Masters of the Craft of Surgery, and all other surgeons, to the Mayor and Aldermen, for authority to found a joint College for the better education and control of physicians and surgeons practising in the City and its liberties. The petition approved, and its articles sanctioned. (fn. 29)

Folio. 8.

Concessio cujusdam domus situat' infra Aldrichgate Rad'o Vernoun s'vient' Maioris ad clavam etc.

20 July, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], grant by William Walderne, the Mayor, and the Aldermen to Ralph Vernoun, one of the Mayor's Serjeants, of a house or mansion situate near Aldrichegate, lately held by Alexander Boner, late Serjeant-at-mace of the City.

Br'e d'ni Regis pro parliamento.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election at the next Husting of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster on the 20th Oct. next; and to make a return of the names of those so elected in an indenture between the said Sheriffs and those present at the election, according to the statute thereon provided. (fn. 30) No Sheriff to be returned. Witness the King at Westminster, 1 Sept., 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423].

Pursuant to the above writ there were elected at the Husting for Common Pleas, held on Monday before the Feast of St. Edward [13 Oct.], Thomas Fauconer and John Wellys' Aldermen, Henry Frowyk, mercer, and Thomas Boteler, fishmonger.

Exon'acio Joh'is Welles merceri ab assisis.

25 Oct., 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], John Welles, mercer, discharged by William Walderne, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio. 8 b.

Custodia Katerine filie Will'i Est sergeaunt.

15 April, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], the guardianship of Katherine, daughter of William Est, (fn. 31) late citizen and "Sergeant" of London, together with her property, committed by William Waldern, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, to Alice her mother. Sureties, viz., John St. John, "lynge armorer," Ralph Spayne, William Bullok, "tapicer," and John Gratele, tailor.

Afterwards, viz., on the 9th Aug., 14 Henry VI. [A.D. 1436], came the above Katherine, being of full age, and received her property.

10 Aug., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], William Sevenoke, Robert Colbroke, and other parishioners of the church of St. Dunstan "Est," delivered to John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, 100 marks in trust for John and Nicholas, sons of Thomas Petwardyn, late fishmonger (piscenarii).

Custodia Joh'is filie Tho'e Petwardyn nup' civis et Groceri [sic] London'.

Afterwards, viz., on the 14th Oct., 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], the guardianship of the above John, together with the sum of 50 marks, was committed to John Maldone, grocer. Sureties, viz., Stephen Broun, John Olyve, John Asshwelle, and Ralph Hogman, grocers.

Concessio facta Joh'i Haukeslowe h'end' feod' et vestitumde Camera.

14 April, 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], in a congregation of William Crowmere, Mayor, William Walderne, Thomas Fauconer, Nicholas Wottone, William Sevenok, Henry Bartone, William Cauntbrigge, John Reynwelle, John Michell, John Gedney, Ralph Bartone, Robert "Tatersale," Robert Widyngtone, John Wellys, John Coventre, Simon Seman, Richard Gosselyn, and John Bythewater, Aldermen, Nicholas Jamys and Thomas Wandesford, the Sheriffs, it was agreed by the said Aldermen and Sheriffs that John Haukeslowe, valet of William Talworth, Bailiff of the Thames, should receive yearly, during good behaviour, the fee and clothing of the Chamber, as other valets were accustomed to have.

Folio. 9.

Eleccio Thome Wandesford et Nich'i James vic' London'.

Tuesday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], in the presence of William Walderne, the Mayor, John Fray, the Recorder, Thomas Knolles, Robert Chichele, William Crowmer, Nicholas Wottone, Henry Bartone, William Sevenok, William Cauntbrigge, John Coventre, John Reynwell, Ralph Bartone, Robert "Tatersalle," Robert Widyngtone, John Welles, Simon Seman, Richard Gosselyn, and William Estfeld, Aldermen, and very many Commoners, summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs, Thomas Wandesford, mercer, was elected one of the Sheriffs by the Mayor, and Nicholas James, "irmonger," was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day John Bederenden, draper, was elected Chamberlain of the City; Robert Colbroke, "irmonger," and John Trymnell, mercer, were elected Wardens of London Bridge; and John Coventre and John Welles, Aldermen, Henry Frowyk, mercer, John Brokle, draper, John Bacon, grocer, and Thomas Boteler, fishmonger, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the said Chamberlain and Wardens.

On the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.] the above Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the same Feast were presented and admitted before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Eleccio Will'mi Crowmer in Maiorem.

Wednesday the Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423], in the presence of William Walderne, the Mayor, the Prior of Christchurch, John Fray, the Recorder, Thomas Knolles, Robert Chichele, William Crowmer, Thomas Fauconer, Nicholas Wottone, Henry Bartone, William Sevenok, William Cauntbrig, John Michell, John Reinwell, John Perneys, Robert Whityngham, John Coventre, Robert Tatersall, Ralph Bartone, John Welles, Simon Seman, Robert Widyngtone, John Bythewater, Nicholas James, Richard Gosselyn, and William Estfeld, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty, summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, William Crowmer was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio. 9 b.

Masters of Misteries sworn.

Cordewaners: Hugh Crispe, Richard Bemond, Richard Hariot, John Horald, sworn 28 June, 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423].

Lorimers: Richard Fuller, William Aleyn, William atte Noven, sworn 2 July, the same year.

Coupers: John Hoke, William Boterfeld, sworn 2 July, the same year.

Sporiers: John Parker, Richard Fyge, sworn 13 July, the same year.

Physicians: Master Gilbert Kymer sworn Rector of the Faculty. [No date.]

Surgeons: Thomas Morestede, John Harwe, sworn Surveyors of Surgery, 28 May, the same year.

Haberdasshers: John Olyver, John Langle, Richard Plate, Richard Segrym', sworn 17 July, the same year.

Limners and Text-writers: Thomas Marleburgh, Thomas Fysshe, sworn 24 July, the same year.

Shermen: John Bret, Robert Capone, William Gylam, sworn 5 Aug., the same year.

Gyrdelers: Richard Kenarton, John Colyon, John Ley, sworn 23 Aug., the same year.

Botellers: William Shene, Robert Colegere.

Folio. 10.

Br'e d'ni Regis pro solucione debitor' Regis H. iiij ti Avi sui.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation for all creditors of King Henry IV. who had not been repaid a moiety of the money due to them, to send in their claims to John Pelham, Knt., and John Leventhorp, Esq., two of the said King's executors, by Monday after the Feast of Nativity of St. John Baptist [24 June] next, at the Priory of St. Mary de Suthwerk. Witness the King at Westminster, 5 June, 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424]. (fn. 32)

Proclamacio q'd omnes soldarii se trahant ad portum de Wynchelse.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation for all soldiers in the King's service for securing the town and castle of Crotey (fn. 33) to be at the port of Wynchelse by Wednesday next. Witness the King at Westminster, 8 Feb., 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423-4].

Br'e d'ni Regis de proclamacione pro medietate unius decime et xv e levand'.

Writ to the Sheriffs to imprison those who refuse to contribute their assessment to the subsidy granted in the last Parliament of the late King. (fn. 34) Witness the King at Westminster, 26 Nov., 1 Henry VI. [A.D. 1422].

Folio. 10 b.

Proclamacio probona gubernacione civitatis.

Proclamation to be made forbidding any vintner, taverner, brewer, hosteler, huckster, "kiewe" or piebaker to keep his house open after 9 o'clock at night during the sitting of Parliament, and prescribing the price to be charged for hay, "litter" and oats, &c.

Proclamacio facta sup' Thomam Corbet positum sup' collistrigium.

Proclamation of the cause why Thomas Corbet stood on the pillory, viz., for having forged a deed purporting to be a conveyance by Richard Pavy, esquire, and Johanna, sometime his wife, and now the wife of John Kent, of a certain tenement for the purpose of ousting Henry Julyon, "irmonger," to whom the said tenement had been conveyed by the said Richard and Johanna by deed. [No date.]

Proclamacio facta pro vendicione vini.

Proclamation forbidding the sale of wine, white or red, of Rochelle or of Gascony for more than 6d. a gallon, and of sweet wine for more than 12d.

Proclamacio facta q'd omnes in vadiis retenti setrahant versus Crotey.

Writ for proclamation to be made for all knights, esquires, valets, as well as masters and mariners of vessels bound for foreign service to Crotey to make haste thither. Witness the King at Westminster, 22 Feb., 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423-4].

Proclamacio facta pro Marcellino de Flisco.

Writs to the Sheriffs to make proclamation for all persons having any claim against Marcellin de Flisco of "Janua," a prisoner in the hands of John Stourtone, senior, who had captured him in the county of Somerset, after he had escaped from the Tower (to which he had been committed together with Thomas Payn, late clerk to John Oldcastell, Knt., for divers rebellions and insurrections), to send in such claims within six months to the King's Council, and speedy justice should be done, and if no claims be sent in within that time the said Marcellin would be adjudged to be John Stourtone's own prisoner. Witness the King at Westminster, 3 Feb., 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423-4].

Footnotes

1 Almost illegible in parts.
2 The name probably is Robert Colbroke, ironmonger, he being recorded as a Warden of London Bridge in the following year in conjunction with John Trymnell (infra, folios. 9).
3 From the year 1418 and onwards the new Mayor, on his election, is not specifically recorded as having been sworn at the Exchequer, although as a matter of fact he was so sworn.
4 He had died at Bois de Vincennes on the 31st August, 1422.
5 Cf. Riley's 'Memorials,' p. xv. note.
6 De blanqueto, a white material.
7 Putney.
8 It is not clear whether captor here means captor vinorum, i.e., taker of the King's wine, or refers generally to purveyance, the practice of which for the King's benefit became in course of time so intolerable that in 1362 the hated name of purveyor was ordered by statute to be changed to that of "catour" or buyer (achatour). See 'Cal. Letter-Book I,' p. 294.
9 A similar entry is recorded infra, folios. 3.
10 Set out in Sharpe's London and the Kingdom,' vol. iii. pp. 367-8. Cf. Jules Delpit, 'Collection Générale des Documents Francais qui se trouvent en Angleterre (pp. 232-3). The Duke had accompanied the late King's corpse on its way home as far as Rouen, where it was transferred to the custody of Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter. The Parliament which met on the 9th Nov. resolved, after some hesitation, to appoint Bedford Protector as soon as he returned from France. In the meantime Gloucester, his younger brother, was to act for him. 'Rot. Parl.,' iv. 174, 175; Rymer, x. 261; Walsingham, ii. 346.
11 Set out by Delpit, op. cit., pp. 233- 234.
12 The guardianship of the body of the orphan was committed to his mother during minority, whilst his property was only committed to her for a term of five years, to be afterwards brought into court. In other cases of orphanage recorded in the Letter-Book the guardianship of the bodies as well as the goods of the orphans is frequently granted for a prescribed term, irrespective of the orphans still remaining under age.
13 In 1343 Greenwich Lane had been declared to be a public lane with free passage. 'Liber Cust.,' ii. 449.
14 In that year (A.D. 1291) the stringent valuation known as the Taxation of Pope Nicolas had been renewed. Rymer, 'Fodera,' i. 747; Stubbs, 'Const. Hist.,' ii. 119, 124.
15 The same entry is recorded supra, fo. 1 b.
16 Lamperns or river-lampreys (Riley).
17 Cf. 'Liber Cust.,' i. 117; 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' pp. 185, 187-8.
18 Cf. "E qe hom ne preigne nul lamproun apres la Pasche, avaunt quil soit devers la Seint Michel, qe lour sesoun viegne." Ordinance circa A.D. 1295. 'Lib. Cust.,' i. 117; 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' pp. 185, 186.
19 Not apparently recorded in LetterBook I.
20 The term "treink" etymologically means a draw or drag-net (Fr. treiner). A statute was passed in the Parliament of 1423 (Stat. 2 Hen. VI. cap. 15) forbidding the fixing of such nets to posts, boats, or anchors lest spawn or fry should continue to be destroyed.
21 The name of the Mayor continues to be placed at the head of the list of commissioners appointed for gaoldelivery at the present day.
22 Probably Ickham, near Canterbury.
23 See 'Cal. Letter-Book I,' p. 21n.
24 Cf. ordinance of 1425. Infra, folios. 31 b.
25 Probably meaning asking for his correct change.
26 As, for instance, the Vigilia vigiliæ Nativitatis, or the Eve of the Eve of the Nativity, i.e., the day before Christmas Eve. Cf. Prævigilia, Hampson, 'Medii Ævi Kalendarium, Glossary.
27 Physician to Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, on whose recommendation he was elected in 1446 Chancellor of the University of Oxford for the second time, the Duke having been a great benefactor to the University Library. Kymer subsequently took holy orders, and in 1449 was appointed Dean of Salisbury. (D'Arcy Power, 'Memorials of the Craft of Surgery,' p. 59.)
28 According to Stow ('Survey,' ed. Kingsford, i. 315) Thomas Morstede was surgeon to Kings Henry IV., V., and VI., and was instrumental in getting the Barber-Surgeons incorporated. At the same time he gives the date of Morstede's death as 1450, whereas the Barber-Surgeons do not appear to have obtained a charter of incorporation before 1462. Stow also states (i. 262) that he was one of the Sheriffs of London in 1436, but the Thomas Morstede who was elected one of the Sheriffs that year is recorded as being of the fraternity of the Mistery of Fishmongers (infra, folios. 162 b).
29 The petition is set out (transcribed -not without some misreadings- from the Letter-Book) by D'Arcy Power, op. cit., Appendix B.
30 See 'Cal. Letter-Book I,' p. 57n.
31 His will, dated 6 Sept., 1421, was proved and enrolled in the Husting in May, 1422. 'Cal. of Wills, Court of Hust.,' ii. 431. He was sometime Serjeant to the Mayor for the time being, and in 1399 had been appointed Bailiff of Southwark. 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' pp. 447, 451.
32 Cf. infra, fo. 18.
33 Crotoy, in Picardy. Terms had been arranged for the surrender of the town to the English in October, 1423, but it was not actually handed over until the following March (Monstrelet, 'Chron.,' Johnes' trans., i. 502-4, 506).
34 Met 1 Dec., 1421. 'Rot. Parl.,' iv. 150, 151.