Folios 21-30
July 1424 -

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

31-42

Citation Show another format:

'Folios 21-30: July 1424 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: K: Henry VI (1911), pp. 31-42. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33709 Date accessed: 21 November 2014.


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Folio. 21.

Acquitance fait par le Mair as merchantzdes villes Damieux Corby et Neel.

Acquittance under the Mayoralty seal for the sum of 50 marks received from John de Burneux, merchant of Amiens, pursuant to the "composition" made between the City of London and merchants of Amiens, Corby, and Neel. (fn. 1) Dated 25 Aug., A.D. 1424.

L'ra missa d'no Bedford per Maiorem et Aldr'os.

Letter from the Mayor and Aldermen to the Duke of Bedford congratulating him upon his "cronicable and victoriouse exploit" at "Vermeil on Perche." [No date.] (fn. 2)

Folio. 21 b.

Br'e de proclamacione pro Triinkes amovend'.

Writ to the Sheriff of Middlesex (fn. 3) that he cause the following statute made in the last Parliament to be proclaimed within his bailiwick. Witness the King at Westminster, 12 July, 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424].

Ordinacio pro Triinkes amovend'.

Ordinance for the removal of engines called "Triinkes" fastened or anchored in the Thames and other rivers, as they destroyed the fry of fish, but allowing the use of the same engines when drawn by hand, at suitable seasons, and not fixed.

Br'e pro aqua Thamisie.

Writ to the Mayor that he cause all nets called "Trynkes" and others with too small meshes, &c., to be removed from the Thames within the City's jurisdiction pursuant to an order made in the Parliament held anno 9 Henry V. (fn. 4) and the statute made anno 1 Henry VI. Witness the King at Westminster, 4 Sept., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424].

Folio. 22.

Eleccio Simonis Seman et Joh'is Bithewater in vic'.

Thursday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], in the presence of William Crowmere, the Mayor, John. Fray, the Recorder, Henry Bartone, William Sevenoke, William Cauntbrige, John Michell, John Reynwell, John Coventre, John Perneis, Ralph Bartone, John Welles, Robert Tatersalle, Simon Seman, William Estfeld, and Nicholas James, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs, Simon Seman, vintner, was elected one of the Sheriffs by the Mayor, and John Bithewater was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty for the year ensuing.

The same day John Bederendene, draper, was elected Chamberlain, and Robert Colbroke, "irmonger," and John Trimnell, mercer, were elected Wardens of London Bridge; also John Coventre and Robert Whitingham, Aldermen, John Bacon, grocer, Thomas Boteler, fishmonger, John Higham, draper, and William Milreth, mercer, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the said Chamberlain and Wardens.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented and admitted before the Barons of the Exchequer, &c.

Writ to the Mayor and Aldermen to search the City's records to see if there be any immemorial custom that if a citizen devise his tenement to be sold by his executors or their executors, the successive executors can sell the same and give a good estate therein to the purchasers, or otherwise; (fn. 5) and to make a return thereon to the Justices at Westminster within three weeks of Michaelmas, inasmuch as the question had arisen in a plea at Westminster between Margaret, late wife of John Philipot, Knt., John Boys, Knt., and Thomasia his wife, John Whattone and Agnes his wife, John Gray, Margaret St. Germayn, and Thomasia St. Germayn, plaintiffs, and William Brounyng of London, "skynner," for breaking into their house. Witness William Babyngtone (fn. 6) at Westminster, 9 Oct., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424].

Exon'acio Joh'is Hoke couper ab assisis.

19 Oct., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], John Hoke, "couper," discharged by William Crowmere, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

23 Oct., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], came John Essex, cordwainer, executor of William Jon, brewer, into the Chamber of the Guildhall and delivered to John Bederenden, the Chamber lain, the sum of 20 marks in trust for John and John, sons of the said William. (fn. 7)

Folio. 22 b.

Eleccio Joh'is Michell in officium Maioratus.

Friday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], after mass in the chapel of the Guildhall, in the presence of William Croumere, the Mayor, the Prior of Christchurch, John Fray, the Recorder, Thomas Knolles, Robert Chicheley, Nicholas Wotton, Henry Barton, William Sevenoke, William Cauntbrigge, John Michell, John Reynwelle, John Gedney, John Coventre, Ralph Bartone, John Perneys, Robert Tatersall, John Wellis, Richard Gosselyn, Robert Wydyngtone, William Estfeld, Simon Seman, Nicholas James, John Bithewater, and Henry Frowyk, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, John Michell was elected. Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted, &c. [sic], before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Un ordeignaunce fait sur Brocours aliens.

8 Oct., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], ordinance by William Crowmere, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty that the former ordinances regulating alien brokers made during the Mayoralty of Robert Chichele, and entered in Letter-Book I, fos. cclxxv-cclxxvi, be duly observed, with the addition that at Michaelmas in every year there shall be elected by the Mayor and Aldermen twelve free and loyal men of the City, more or less, to be admitted as Brokers and sworn, they giving surety to the Chamberlain of the City for the time being, and that no one except those elected shall meddle with brokerage.

Ordinacio q'd nullus qui extitit Maior resumatur infra septem annos ad officium Maioratus.

The Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], in consideration of the great and increasing expenses incurred by the Mayors of that time in comparison with Mayors of former days, it was ordained by William Crowmere, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty, in their Common Council assembled for the election of a Mayor, that no one who had been, or thenceforth should have been, Mayor of the City should be again admitted to the office of Mayor until after the lapse of full seven years from his last Mayoralty. (fn. 8)

Exon'acio Thome Broun civis et groceri London' ab assisis.

5 April, 4 Henry VI. [A.D. 1426], Thomas Broun, grocer, discharged by John Coventre, Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Folio. 23.

Remembraunce et declaracioun fait en parlement pur ceux qui sount enfraunchisez deins Loundres par p'er ou redempcioun.

Recital of a petition [hereunto annexed], having been presented in the Parliament held at Westminster, anno 11 Henry IV., (fn. 9) touching certain prises and customs of wine of which the King was being defrauded, and of the Mayor, Sheriffs, and Aldermen having been summoned before the said Parliament and made to show their liberty and franchise, whereby they claimed that every Mayor during his year of office could make six men free of the City, (fn. 10) by which liberty, as also by the fact that many others became freemen by redemption, the King was deprived of his prises and customs. Whereupon it had been ordained that thenceforth all those who were enfranchised by the Mayor by prayer (par prier) or redemption should pay the prises and customs due to the King for their wine just as though they had not been enfranchised, under penalty of forfeiture, and that the Mayor for the time being should be sworn at the Exchequer to maintain the said ordinance in all particulars. The said ordinance, however, not having been observed, the King and Parliament are desired to provide a remedy.

Q'd cives sint residentes infra Civitat' qui lib'tat' gaudere volunt.

Inspeximus of petition made by Thomas Chaucer, the King's Chief Butler, in the Parliament held at Westminster, anno 11 Henry IV., setting forth that from time immemorial the Kings of England had enjoyed their prises of wine in every English Port, saving the Port of London and the Cinque Ports, which were exempt, on the understanding that such exemption applied only to those who permanently resided therein; but that now, and for a long time past, any foreigner who wished to become a freeman of the City could obtain the freedom for a small sum by applying to the Mayor, the Chamberlain, or the Masters of some Mistery, as if he were a continual resident in the City, although he belong to some other town or borough of England, whereby the King is defrauded of his dues and customs-he prayed Parliament therefore to ask the King and his Council to send for the Mayor and Aldermen and command them and the Masters of the various Misteries to cease from granting the franchise to foreigners, under penalty of forfeiture of the City's franchise. To which the King had replied that he would send for the Mayor and Aldermen, and had further declared, by the advice of the lords of Parliament, that no one should enjoy the franchise unless he were a citizen resident within the City, and that all others resident in other cities, boroughs, and towns should have and enjoy the franchise granted to them. (fn. 11) Witness the King at Westminster, 20 Oct. 14 [Henry IV.].

Fos. 23 b-25b, 35 b.

The statute passed in the Parliament held at Westminster, 20 Oct., 2 Henry VI. [A.D. 1423]. (fn. 12)

[N.B. There is no folio numbered 26.]

Folio. 27.

Exon'acio Galfridi Cook Webbe ab assisis.

7 Nov., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], Geoffrey Cook, "webbe," discharged by John Michell, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, owing to increasing old age.

Custodia filior' Will'i "John" cum xx marc'.

The guardianship of John and John, sons of [William "John"] together with their patrimony, committed by John Michell, the Mayor, and the Aldermen to John Essex, cordwainer, who married Alice, the orphans' mother, for a term of ten years. (fn. 13) Sureties, viz., Simon Sewale, saddler, William Rauf, gent., and William Belle, brewer (pandoxator). [No date.]

Exon'acio Roberti Pellican ab assisis.

14 Nov., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], Robert Pellican, "stokfisshmonger," discharged by John Michell, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Consi'le mandatum miss' fuit cuil't Aldermanno.

Precept to the Aldermen to hold their several Wardmotes, and to make a return of such matters as they themselves are unable to correct to the Mayor's General Court, to be held on Monday after the Epiphany [6 Jan.]; also to cause a certain number of persons to be elected to the Common Council, armed watches to be set, &c. Dated 12 Dec.

Folio. 27 b.

Friday, 10 Nov., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], ordinance by John Michell, the Mayor, Thomas Knolles, Robert Chichele, William Crowmere, Nicholas Wottone, Henry Bartone, William Sevenoke, William Cauntbrigge, John Reynwelle, Robert Tatersalle, Ralph Bartone, John Perneys, John Coventre, John Gedney, John Welles, Nicholas James, William Estfeld, Richard Gosselyn, and Henry Frowyk, Aldermen, and Simon Seman and John Bithewater, Sheriffs, to the effect that Masters of the faculty of Surgery in the Mistery of Barbers of the City shall exercise the said faculty as fully as they did in the days of Thomas Fauconer, late Mayor, and other Mayors, notwithstanding the claim (calumpnia) which the Rector and Surveyors of Physicians and the Masters of Surgery now newly impose upon the said Barbers by virtue of a certain ordinance made during the Mayoralty of William Walderne, and entered supra, folios. 6 [b]. (fn. 14)

Ordinacio Fuistarior'

Friday, 10 Nov., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], ordinance by John Michell, the Mayor, Thomas Knolles, Robert Chichele, William Crowmere, Nicholas Wottone, Henry Bartone, William Sevenoke, William Cauntbrigge, John Reinwelle, Robert Tatersall, Ralph Bartone, John Perneis, John Coventre, John Gedney, John Wellis, Nicholas James, Richard Gosselyn, William Estfeld, and Henry Frowyk, Aldermen, and Simon Seman and John Bithewater, Sheriffs, to the effect that thenceforth the men of the Mistery of Fusters should exercise the scrutiny of all fusts or wood for saddles (omnium fustorum sive lignorum pro sellis ordinatorum), by six men of the Mistery elected for that purpose and sworn in Court, in accordance with the form and equity of a certain ordinance recorded in Letter-Book C, folios. ccii (fn. 15) (notwithstanding any claim imposed upon them by the Saddlers of London by virtue of a certain royal charter touching the using of saddlery throughout the realm), and entered in the Husting for Common Pleas held on Monday after the Feast of St. Peter in Cathedra [22 Feb.], 47 Edward III. [A.D. 1372-3]. (fn. 16) Provided always that the said six persons shall not make their scrutiny without the Serjeant of the Mayor or Chamber specially assigned for the purpose. The Masters and good men of the Mistery of Saddlers are forbidden to bring foreign fusters to make fusts (fuistas) into the City, &c.

Transmutacio Joh'is Salman ab mistera de Malemakers in Misteram de Lethersellers.

14 Jan., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424-5], came John Salman, "malemaker," (fn. 17) before John Michell, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and showed that whereas he had been admitted to the freedom of the City in the Mistery of Malemakers temp. Drew Barantyn, Mayor, viz., on the 7th Oct., 11 Henry IV. [A.D. 1409], he had long since used, and was still using, the Mistery of Lethersellers and not that of Malemakers. He therefore prayed to be admitted to the freedom of the City in the Mistery of Lethersellers. His prayer granted at the instance of the Masters and good men of the said Mistery.

Folio. 28.

The ordenaunce for masons carpenters and othir what thei schul take be the day.

Ordinance of the Mayor and Aldermen prescribing the amount of wages to be paid to masons, carpenters, plasterers, shipwrights, and other journeymen, under penalty of fine and imprisonment. [No date.]

Folio. 28 b.

Proclamacio.

Proclamation for all persons aggrieved by any contract of false "chevesaunce" or usury to lay the matter before the Mayor and Aldermen.

Ordinacio Pontis London'.

Ordinance forbidding any one to drive a cart or car shod with iron over London Bridge, on pain of imprisonment and fine, inasmuch as the bridge had become weak. [No date.]

Exon'acio Joh'is Duffehous civis et piscenarii London' ab assisis.

26 Jan., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424-5], John Duffehous, fishmonger, discharged by John Mychell, the Mayor, and Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Exon'acio Joh'is Cappe civis et Founder London' ab assisis etc.

9 Feb., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424-5], John Cappe, "foundour," similarly discharged for like cause.

Exon'acio Gilberti Devenishe civis et pelliparii London' ab assisis etc.

14 Feb., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424-5], Gylbert Devenishe, skinner, similarly discharged for like cause.

Feod' concess' Thome Botiller servienti.

16 Dec., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], ordinance by John Michell, the Mayor, Robert Chichele, William Crowmere, Nicholas Wottone, William Sevenok, John Reynwell, John Coventre, John Gedney, Ralph Bartone, Robert Tatersale, John Welles, Nicholas Jamys, William Estfeld, Simon Seman, and Henry Frowyk [Aldermen], that Thomas Botiller, one of the Mayor's Serjeants, shall receive yearly the same fee as other of the Mayor's Serjeants, so long as he behave himself well in that office.

Folio. 29.

Judicium acquietacionis Rob'ti Leversegge et Joh'is Spark de diversis falsitat' et decepcionib' eis impositis.

6 Nov., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424], Robert Leversegge and John Sparke, "taillour," attached to answer a charge brought against them by Alexander Anne, the Common Serjeant-at-law of the City, of having forged an assignment called Debentur, similar to a true assignment which John Grymesbi had received in respect of money due to him out of the Wardrobe (fn. 18) of the late King Henry IV. for divers furs. The defendants said they were not guilty, and put themselves on the country for good or evil. A jury sworn, who find them not guilty. Therefore let them go quit, &c.

Br'e d'ni Regis ad delib' and' prison'.

Letters patent reciting a grant made by the King to John Coventre, John Carpenter, John White, and William Grove, executors of Richard Whityngtone, late citizen and mercer, allowing them to pull down the gaol and gate of Neugate and to build another gaol with the goods of the said Richard, and also to remove the prisoners therein to some other fitting place in the meanwhile, which prisoners had accordingly been removed to the Sheriffs' Compters-and nominating John Michell, the Mayor, William "Cheine," William Babyngtone, John Juyn, Robert Tirwhit, John Hals, John Cokayn, John Prestone, John Martyn, and John Fray, or any nine, eight, seven, six, five, four, three, or two (the Mayor being one), to be Commissioners for delivery of such prisons. Witness the King at Westminster, 26 Jan., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424-5].

Folio. 29 b.

Transmutacio Joh'is Saint John ab Mistera de Lynge armurers ad Misteram de Drapers.

6 March, 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424-5], came John St. John, "lynge armurer," before John Michell, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and showed that whereas he had been admitted to the freedom of the City in the art of "Lynge Armurers" (fn. 19) on the 17th July, 3 Henry IV. [A.D. 1402], he had long since been using the mistery or art of Drapers, as the Masters and other good men of the Mistery of "Lynge Armurers" testified. He therefore prayed to be admitted to the freedom of the City in the art of Drapers. His prayer granted.

Cappe forisfacte etc.

Richard Segrym, "hurer," attached to answer a charge of having caused 32 caps called "nyghtcappes" to be fulled at a mill contrary to the ordinance. The said Richard denied the charge and claimed a jury. On Friday the 9th Feb. [3 Henry VI.] the jurors, viz., Stephen Roo, Richard Flete, Thomas Kyng, John Smyth, John atte Wode, Simon Wayte, Robert Brantham, Simon Wastell, John Valentyn, Robert Billyngey, Thomas Lynne, Thomas Taillour, Richard Bernard, and Thomas Wottone, cappers, find that the said caps were unlawfully fulled at a mill. The Mayor and Aldermen thereupon adjudged the caps to be forfeited, and the said Richard to pay 6s. 8d. to the Commonalty.

Folio. 30.

Br'e d'ni Regis pro Parliamento.

Writ to the Sheriffs to make proclamation in the next Husting of a Parliament to be held at Westminster on the 30th April next, and to cause four discreet and sufficient citizens to be elected to attend the same; and further to return the names of the elected and the electors in indentures according to statute. No Sheriff to be returned. Witness the King at Westminster, 24 Feb., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424-5]. (fn. 20)

Consimilis billa miss' fuit cuilibet Aldermanno.

Precept to the Aldermen to set an armed watch in their several Wards on the nights and eves of St. John Bapt. [24 June] and SS. Peter and Paul [29 June], and take the usual precautions against fire. Dated 12 June, 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1425].

Concessio cujusdam parcelle terre Abbati Monasterii Sc'i Petri de Certesey etc.

16 May, 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1425], grant by John Michell, Mayor, and the Aldermen to John Hermondesworth, Abbot of the monastery of St. Peter de Certesey, (fn. 21) of a parcel of land of the common soil of the Thames, lying in the parish of St. Peter near Pouleswharf, near the river shore, whereon to build a wharf; to hold the same to his and his successors for ever on payment of 20s. to John Bederenden, the Chamberlain of the Guildhall, to the use of the Commonalty.

[Masters of Misteries sworn.]

Folio. 30 b.

Armurers: John Alfles, John Clifton, sworn 10 Oct., 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1424].

Physicians: Master Gilbert Kymer, Doctor of Medicines and Rector of Physicians (Medicorum), presented by Physicians (Phisicos) and Surgeons, and sworn 27 Sept., the same year.

Master John Sumbreshede, Master Thomas Suthwell, sworn Surveyors the same day, being presented by Physicians.

Tapicers: William Bullok, John Pyriel, Robert Heb, John Everyngham, sworn 1 Oct., the same year.

Wexchaundelers: John Broke, Richard de Bury, sworn 25 Oct., the same year.

Coriours: John Smyth, John Page, sworn the same day.

Foundours: Walter Adoon, Nicholas West, sworn 26 Oct., the same year.

Flecchers: Roger Daneneye, Walter Takeneswell, sworn the same day.

Wollenwevers: Richard Pattyn, Richard Raulyn, sworn 21 Nov., the same year.

Salters: Eustace Valdrian, Thomas Beawmond, sworn 12 Jan., the same year [A.D. 1424-5].

Custodia pueror' Baldewini Laurence.

10 June, 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1425], the guardianship of John, William, Alice, and Johanna, children of Baldwin Laurence, baker, together with their patrimony, committed by John Michell, the Mayor, and the Aldermen to Matilda, late wife of the said Baldwin and mother of the said orphans, for a term of five years. (fn. 22) Sureties, viz., John Melbourne, grocer, Robert Stratford, fishmonger, and John Hoke, "couper".

3 March, 24 Henry VI. [A.D. 1445-6], came the above William Laurence before Symon Eyre, the Mayor, and Aldermen, and acknowledged that he had received his portion from John Chichele, the Chamberlain.

Custodia pueror' Hugonis Birches nup' civis et pannar' London'.

10 July, 3 Henry VI. [A.D. 1425], the guardianship of William, Agnes, and Matilda, children of Hugh Birches, late draper, together with their patrimony, committed by John Michell, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Bederenden, the Chamberlain, to John Quyntone, grocer, who married Margery, late wife of the said Hugh, for a term of five years, if the said orphans so long live and are not married. Sureties, viz., Thomas Knolles, junior, Thomas Oxney, grocer, and John Goldhauk, draper.

Footnotes

1 See 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' p. 29n.
2 The victory was gained over a Franco-Scottish army, more numerous than the Duke's own force, at Verneuil, on the 17th Aug., 1424. Gregory's 'Chron.,' p. 157. Kingsford's 'Chronicles of London,' pp. 75, 129, 284. The letter is set out in 'London and the Kingdom,' vol. iii. pp. 369-70. Cf. Delpit, op. cit., p. 235, where, however, the French antiquary suggests July as the date of the letter.
3 Writs addressed to the Sheriff of Middlesex (as distinct from the Sheriff or Sheriffs of London) are not of frequent occurrence. See 'Cal. Letter-Book A,' p. 76n.; 'Cal. Letter-Book B,' p. 56; 'Cal. LetterBook C,' p. 160.
4 'Rot. Parl.,' iv. 132.
5 Cf. supra, p. 28.
6 Chief Baron of the Exchequer.
7 Cf. infra, p. 36.
8 This ordinance appears to have been strictly observed down to 1545, when another ordinance was made to the effect that, on account of the increased price of living, no one who had once served as Mayor should be eligible for another whole year's service, nor should he be forced or enticed to serve for any portion of a year. (Letter-Book Q, fo. 146.) Between 1424 and 1545 nine individuals served twice as Mayor, after an interval of seven years or more, viz., John Michell, 1424 and 1436; John Gedney, 1427 and 1447; William Estfeld, 1429 and 1437; Henry Frowyk, 1435 and 1444; Stephen Broun, 1438 and 1448; Richard Lee, 1460 and 1469; Ralph Josselyn, 1464 and 1476; Henry Colet, 1486 and 1495; and John Aleyn or Allen, 1525 and 1535. In 1389 an order had been made that no one should serve as Mayor for more than one year at a time, but might be reelected after an interval of five years. ('Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 347.) In 1435 it was ordained that no one who had twice served as Mayor should be elected a third time (infra, folios. 149).
9 Met 27 Jan., 1410.
10 In 1409 William Staundone, the Mayor, had declined to exercise this prerogative, and it was thereupon ordained that he and succeeding Mayors taking the same course should receive yearly two casks of wine. ('Cal. Letter-Book I,' p. 64.) In 1434 Mayors were forbidden to exercise the privilege of making freemen, and were to be allowed four casks of the best Gascony wine instead (infra, folios. 140 b).
11 The petition is set out in 'Rot. Parl.,' iii. 646.
12 The statute is loosely described in the margin as one dealing with badly tanned leather and other matters. See 'Statutes at Large,' i. 523- 531.
13 Cf. supra, pp. 32-3.
14 By that ordinance the scrutiny and supervision of those practising surgery were vested in a joint College of Surgery and Medicine without reference to the Mistery of BarberSurgeons. See D'Arcy Power's 'Memorials of the Craft of Surgery,' pp. 58-9, and also Appendix B. Cf. Sidney Young's 'Annals of the Barber-Surgeons,' pp. 42-3.
15 A mistake for folios. cii. See 'Cal. Letter-Book C,' pp. 167-8.
16 By charter dated 12 Oct., 3 Henry VI., the King had recently confirmed the charter granted to the Saddlers by Edward III., anno 37 of his reign, and enrolled ten years later. Husting Roll (Common Pleas), No. 97.
17 See 'Cal. Letter-Book D,' p. 74n.
18 Probably the Great Wardrobe in Castle Baynard Ward.
19 The Linen-armourers formed a company with the Tailors. The charter granted to them by Edward III. is recorded in Letter-Book F (see 'Cal.,' p. 52). Cf. 'Cal. LetterBook G,' p. 161.
20 The return not recorded in the Letter-Book, but in the City's Journal of the day (Journal 2, folios. 40) the names of those elected are given as Nicholas Wotton and John Welles, Aldermen; Everard Flete and Thomas Bernewell, Commoners.
21 Chertsey, co. Surrey, where there was a monastery of the Benedictine order.
22 Cf. infra, folios. 139 b.