Folios 191-200
Sept 1440 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

248-269

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'Folios 191-200: Sept 1440 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: K: Henry VI (1911), pp. 248-269. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33725 Date accessed: 20 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Folio 191.

The Commons further pray that special Auditors may be appointed to audit the accounts of William Wetnale, late one of the Wardens of London Bridge, "for it is supposed verraily by the grete part of us Comones þat of thilke dxixli: vs: vid which þe seyd Wetnale and Badby axen of the brigge shuld be founde but litell due to hem or nought."

Pursuant to the above petition, the following Auditors were appointed, viz., Walter Chertesey, John Higham, John Abbot, William Chapman, Nicholas Wyfold, Thomas Bataille, John Derby, Thomas Davy, and Christofer Warter.

Folio 191 b.

Friday, 23 Sept., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440], came Thomas Beamond, John Legge, Henry Belle, William Petevyle, William atte Welle, and Master Thomas Tristram, before Robert Large, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond for the payment of £40 to Thomas, son of Thomas Burnage, late Salter, on his coming of age.

Pulteris.

Proclamation to be made regulating the sale of poultry in the City to the following effect, viz.:-

That all foreign "pulters" entering the City by Neugate and Aldrichgate sell their poultry on the pavement before the Friars Minors "besyde the welle" and not elsewhere, under penalty prescribed; that "pulters deynseyns" stand and sell in their appointed places, and meddle not with "foreyns"; that no "foreyn pulter" dwelling within the franchise or within seven miles of London sell within London any poultry bought by him of any other "foreyn pulter" within seven miles of the City, under penalty prescribed; also that no "foreyn pulter" sell poultry after 11 o'clock in the summer and 12 in winter, and that all their dead poultry not then sold be forfeited; that no "foreyn pulter" sell poultry within the franchise to any one "but in pleyne market," under penalty prescribed; that every "comyne pulter foreyn" bring with him, when he comes, all the poultry he has to sell "within his hoste," and that no "pulter deynseyn" buy poultry of any "foreyn" dwelling within the franchise or without before 9 o'clock, on pain of forfeiture.

Lethirsillers.

Wednesday, 5 Oct., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440], ordinances touching the Leathersellers approved by the Mayor and Aldermen. (fn. 1)

Folio 192.

Consi'lis billa missa fuit cuilibet Aldermanno.

Form of precept sent to the Aldermen to cause a certain sum to be raised in their respective Wards towards a moiety of 1,000 marks granted by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Commonalty on the 7th Sept. last for the work of the new conduit; (fn. 2) and further, to cause assayers of ale to be elected according to the custom of the City. Dated under the Mayoralty seal, 4 Oct., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440].

Consimilis billa missa fuit cuilibet Aldermanno.

Form of precept to the same to cause good men to be elected for assessment of a half of a fifteenth, and to levy the money so assessed and bring it to the Guildhall by the 24th Oct. next. Dated under the Mayoralty seal, 8 Oct., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440].

Concessio fact' ad Joh'em Croxtone.

Saturday, 7 Oct., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440], came John Croxtone, mason, to the Mayor and Aldermen, and prayed that, in consideration of his long service of 29 years as mason of the "comyn Yeldhalle" of the City and of his great age, he might have "an olde shedde stondyng next with oute þe newe yate that ledeth in to þe Selde of lethir atte þe Yeldhal on the northside of þe same yate, and the newe housyng over the same yate and ageynst the seyd Shedde þat is of two stages geteed w t þe grounde undirnethe þe seyd two stages on þe northside of þe same yate duryng the brede of þe same shedde & with free entre & issue to and fro þ e strete"-to hold the same to himself and "Anneys" his wife, and to the longest liver, and to the executors and assigns of his said wife for one year after her decease.

His prayer granted.

Afterwards, viz., on Wednesday, the 2nd May, 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1442], the above prayer was granted by Robert Cloptone, the Mayor, John Welles, Thomas Wandesford, John Paddesle, William Milrede, Thomas Chaltone, William Gregory, John Olney, John Suttone, Nicholas Yeo, William Combys, William Wetenhale, John Norman, Aldermen, and the whole Commonalty of the City.

Folio 192 b.

Eleccio Joh' "Paddesle" Maioris.

Thursday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440], in the presence of Robert Large, the Mayor, John Sevenoke the Prior of Christchurch, John Bowes the Recorder, William Estfeld, Knt., Nicholas Wottone, John Reynwelle, John Gedney, John Welles, John Brokle, Henry Frowyk, Stephen Broun, Thomas Wannesford, John Pattesle, William Milreth, John Hathirle, Robert Cloptone, Ralph Holand, Thomas Chaltone, John Olney, William Gregory, Nicholas Yeo, John Suttone, and William Wetnale, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, John Pattesle was so elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Custod'.

20 Oct., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440], the guardianship of Thomas, son of John Frankyssh, called "Bostone," late mercer, committed by Robert Large, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Chichele, the Chamberlain, together with his patrimony of £1,000, to Thomas Onhand, mercer, one of the executors of the orphan's father, on condition that he pay one moiety of the said £1,000 to the said orphan on his coming of age, and the other when he arrives at the age of 26 years, or earlier if it can be profitably employed.

The same day came into the Court of the lord the King, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before the aforesaid Mayor and Aldermen, Thomas Bataille, Eborard Flete, Elias Davy, Hugh Whiche, and John Derham, mercers, and became sureties for the above Thomas Onhand.

Folio 192.*

Letter from John Bowes, Recorder of the City, to the Prioress and Convent of St. Helen, London, presenting Thomas Sherman, of the diocese of Norwich, chaplain, to the chantry founded in the church of St. Michael upon Cornhill (fn. 3) by Walter de Billyngham, vacant by the death of John Cook, and charging them to pay the said chaplain the sum of 7 marks pursuant to the will of the said Walter, proved and enrolled in the Husting. (fn. 4) Dated 20 Nov., A.D. 1440.

3 Jan., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440-1], came John Chichele, the Chamberlain, and acknowledged that he had received from Margery Dommer, William Andrewe, clerk, and Thomas Colman, chandler, executors of John Dommer, late mercer, plate, &c., to the value of £20, in trust for William, son of the said John Dommer.

Friday, 2 Oct., 23 Henry VI. [A.D. 1444], there came into the Court of the lord the King, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Thomas Catworth, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, Robert Eldrebek and Margery his wife, late wife of John Dommer, mercer, Matthew Halle, goldsmith, John Goodson, mercer, and William Thornhill, mercer, and bound themselves to pay the sum of £20 to John Chichele, the Chamberlain.

The same day the guardianship of William, son of John Dommer, late mercer, together with plate to the value of £20, was committed by the said Mayor and Aldermen to the above Robert Eldrebek and Margery his wife.

Folio 192*b.

12 Jan., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440-1], William Downe, "talough chaundeller," discharged by John Pattesley, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

The same day came Richard Pierson, girdler, before the said Mayor and Aldermen, and showed that whereas he had been admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art of "Girdelers" temp. William Estfeld, Mayor, and John Chichele, Chamberlain, viz., on the 5th August, 17 Henry VI. [A.D. 1439], he had long used, and was still using, the mistery or art of Hurers, and not the art of "Girdelers." He prayed, therefore, to be admitted into the freedom of the City in the said Art of Hurers. His prayer granted at the instance of good men of the said Art.

21 Jan., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440-1], the guardianship of John, son of John Bacheler, late salter, and of Alice, daughter of the same, together with their patrimony, committed by John Pattesley, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Chichele, the Chamberlain, to John Renkyn. Sureties, viz., Richard Riche, mercer, John Roo, and John Cook.

Folio 193.

Writ to the Mayor and Sheriffs notifying that the dispute between them and the merchants of Janua touching the exaction of scavage (skuuagii) on their merchandise (fn. 5) had been referred to the Chief Justices of both Benches and the Chief Baron of the Exchequer to hear and determine. The said Mayor and Sheriffs are bidden to attend with all evidence, when required, and in the meantime to cease exacting the said toll. Witness the King at Westminster, 12 Dec., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440].

Return made to the above by John Pattesley, the Mayor, and William Wetenhale and John Suttone, the Sheriffs, to the effect that since the receipt of the above and two other writs no demand had been made for scavage from merchants of Janua trading with the City.

Another writ to the same to similar effect, and forbidding the exaction of scavage (escuagii) from merchants of Janua until the matter had been decided by the Justices, under penalty of £1,000. Witness the King at Westminster, 14 Feb., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440-1].

Return to the above to the effect that since the receipt of the King's orders the said merchants had not been molested for payment of scavage.

Folio 193 b.

Saturday, 17 December, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440], William Estfeld and John Welles, Aldermen, appointed to superintend the work of the conduit. Afterwards John Paddesle was appointed in place of John Welles.

The same day Robert Cloptone, John Olney, Aldermen, Simon Eyre, William Chapman, Thomas Knolles, and John Norman, Commoners, were deputed to receive and expend the money for the conduit and to audit the accounts of William Cleve in respect of the work.

17 Feb., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440-1], there came certain "estraungers," using the occupation of linen and woollen weavers within the City and suburbs, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before John Pattesle, the Mayor, William Estfeld, Nicholas Wottone, John Reynwelle, John Welles, Henry Frowyk, Robert Large, Robert Cloptone, John Hatherle, Ralph Holand, Thomas Catworth, William Gregory, John Olney, and William Combes, Aldermen, and prayed that they might elect two persons yearly to search for inferior work, and that certain ordinances might be approved.

The said ordinances approved for the time being, the Mayor and Aldermen reserving the right to amend them.

Folio 194.

20 March, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440-1], came John Dagevyle and Johanna his wife, daughter of John Thomas, late citizen of London, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and acknowledged satisfaction for the sum of £8 4s. 7½d. bequeathed to the said Johanna by John her father and Margery her mother, which they had received from John Cosyn, executor of the said Margery.

4 April, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], came Henry Dene, Keeper of the Ludgate, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before John Pattesle, the Mayor, William Estfeld, John Welles, Henry Frowyk, Robert Large, John Olney, John Sutton, William Combes, and William Wetenhale, Aldermen, and presented the following petition:-

"To the full honurable Lord the Maire of the Cite of London and to alle the worthy Soverayns Aldremen of þe same Cite

Supplicacio custod' de Ludgate.

"Lowly compleyneth un to your wise discrec'ons your servaunt Henry Dene keper of the prison of ludgate that howe of olde tyme accustumed it hath be used for the esement of þe Kinges prisoners there to have the voidance & Issue of clensing of the prive of þe seid prison into the towne dyche on the north partie of the seid prison till nowe it is lette be oon Nicholas Clement, Joynour, dwelling next þe seid prison be his edificac'ons there set which wol nat suffre the seid voidance ther to be had Please hit your high wisdams tendrely to considre howe the seid prive most nedes be voided and clensed or els it wol destroye the Kinges prisoners to many a mannes hurt and howe there is noon othir place to have voidance by but if it shuld be taken in the Kinges high wey to noyance of al the Kinges people and dishonour of this Cite And þere upon to commaunde þe seid Nicholas in saving of the Kinges prisoners to make noon obstacle trowble ne let of the seid voidance but þat it be had and used in the seid place as of olde tyme it hath be accustumed And over this in recompence of the grete costages that wol be therof and othir notable chargys that it please your wisdams and goode grace to graunte your seid suppliant his seid office for the terme of x yere next suyng to have & to holde in like maner forme & condic'on as othir kepers and leuetenauntes there have hold hit before these dayes fyndyng suerte sufficiant to the Shirrefs of sure kepyng as it hath been accustumed before this tyme and in this doyng I trust to God alle the prisoners there shul have cause to pray for you."

Thereupon it was agreed that the above Nicholas should be examined by the Mayor and be made to act justly, and that the said Henry should continue in his place according to his petition.

Folio 194 b.

31 May, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], William Aleyn, "lorimer," discharged by John Pattesley, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

22 June, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], John Grene, skinner, similarly discharged for like cause.

8 July, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], Stephen Wyn', "breuer," similarly discharged for like cause.

19 July, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], William Bacon, "breuer," similarly discharged for like cause.

31 July, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], William May, "turner," similarly discharged for like cause.

16 Aug., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], John Long, "couper," similarly discharged for like cause.

29 Aug., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], John Salter, taverner (pandoxator), similarly discharged for like cause.

27 Sept., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], William Bremble, "pynner," similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio 195.

12 Aug., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], the guardianship of Elena and Johanna, daughters of [Thomas] Coterell, (fn. 6) together with the sum of £70, committed by John Pattesley, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Chichele, the Chamberlain, to [record imperfect].

Names of Masters of divers Misteries sworn anno xix and xx Henry VI.

Armorers: John Cliftone, William Hamond, Richard Hathwey, sworn Wardens 3 Nov., anno 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440].

Pulters: John Leche, Richard Cok, James Mogon', John Warner, sworn Wardens 4 Nov.

Tylers: John Mersshe, senior, Thomas Mannyng, Walter Spenser, sworn Wardens 15 Nov.

Skinners: John Uphaveryng, Thomas Holgreve, Thomas Astone, William Leycestre, sworn Masters 23 Nov.

Peintours: Henry Mase, Guy Lincoln, sworn Wardens 2 Dec.

Fullers: John Lane, Henry Brice, Simon Potyn, sworn Wardens 12 Dec.

Lynnen and Woollenwevers, foreign: John Borham, Geoffrey Petersson, sworn Wardens 20 Feb., anno 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1440-1].

Brasiers: Moises Gerveys, Robert Snell, sworn Wardens 16 March.

Masons: John Hardy, William Goodburgh, sworn Wardens 5 May [A.D. 1441].

Shethers: John Clerk, William Pais, sworn Wardens 27 June.

Cotelers: Richard Asser, John Marchall, John Amell, sworn Wardens 27 June.

Cordeweners: John Saunson, Walter Lucas, Thomas Melyard, John Gererdesson, sworn Wardens 28 June.

Coupers: Thomas Pleystowe, Henry Langeshote, sworn Wardens 4 July.

Lynnenwevers: Henry Venkyll, Thomas Chirche, sworn Wardens 26 July.

Lorymers: Richard Fuller, Thomas Gore, sworn Wardens 31 July.

Brouderers: John Lambe, Henry Wyche, sworn Wardens 31 July.

Bladsmythis: John Layner, William Huberd, sworn Wardens 29 August.

Carpenters and Fremasons: John Croxton, John Broun, Richard Brid, Richard Bryght, sworn Masters......August.

Haberdasshers: Walter Peryn, John Polhill, Richard Denman, William Mercaunt, Wardens, 5 Sept., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441].

Girdelers: Richard Lye (?), Thomas Hacche, William Punchon, Wardens, 6 Sept.

Stacioners: Robert Chirch, John Pye, Wardens, 22 Sept.

Joynours: John Lynde, William Holt, Wardens, 28 Sept.

Steynours: Thomas Bee, Simon Scarlet, 28 Sept.

Diers: John Ludford, William Palmer, 29 Sept.

Horners: John Webbe, William Wylkeshire, 4 Oct.

Tapicers: Ralph Spayn, Richard Pope, William Ferthyng, Stephen Parker, 5 Oct.

Brewers: Henry Trebolaunce, John Ryver, William Harry, Thomas Russell, 5 Oct.

Pynners: Geoffrey Wade, William Stodell, John Couper, 11 Oct.

Flecchers: John Frampton, John Hamond, 25 Oct.

Folio 195 b.

Writ of certiorari to the Mayor and Aldermen touching an action brought by John Wakeryng, Master of the House or Hospital of St. Bartholomew in Westsmythfeld, in the Court of the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall. Witness the King at Westminster, 2 July, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441].

Return made to the above to the following effect, viz., that according to the ancient liberties and customs of the City existing from time immemorial, and confirmed by divers charters and the authority of Parliament, all plaints and processes begun in the King's courts of the City must there be determined. Moreover that plaints in other courts of the City should not be removed to be heard by the King's Justices, unless something foreign be pleaded or alleged which those courts are unable to recognize, and that proceedings in error in such cases are by custom taken at St. Martin le Grand and not elsewhere.

De Subvic' annuatim non essend' removibil' etc.

Thursday, 20 July, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], ordinance of the Common Council that henceforth Under-Sheriffs should not be removable, but remain in office during good behaviour, frequent removals having caused great expense and inconvenience.

Folio 196.

Ordinance of Bakers.

"Un to the full Worshipfull and Governor the Maior of the Cite of London and all your Worshipfull Bretherne Aldermen of the same Cite

"Plese hit to youre wyse discrecions to have knowlech of the old reule usid by tuene the Whit Bakers and the broune Bakers of the seid Cite be which rewle and use the Whit bakers may knowe her part of their occupacion by hem selfe and the broune bakers by hem selfe That is to say the White by [sic] shall bake all maner of brede that thei can make of whete that is to wete white loofe brede wastell bunnys and all maner of whyte brede that hath be used of old tyme Also the seid Whit bakers mow bake whete brede that was called sum tyme cribill brede, (fn. 7) and also basket brede such as is sold in chepe for pore men Bote the seid White bakers shall bake no hors brede of no assise nother of her owne nother of none other mennys for to sell

"The rewle of the broune bakers is this and theire occupacioun that is for to sey the seid broune bakers shall bake whete brede as it comyth grounde fro the mylle w toute ony bultyng of the same Also the seid broune bakers shall bake hors brede of clene benys and pesyn And also brede that is called housholdersbrede and they shall take jd. for every busshell bakyng But the said broune bakers shall bake no whit brede of ony assise nother of there owne nor of other mennys for to sell Besechyng your gracious lordship that this maner of gouvernauns and reule may be kept as well in whit bakers as in broune bakers as hit hath be of old tyme.

"Also hit is fully acordid that what persone that brekith ony of thes artiklis aforeseid shall pay vjs. viijd. half to the use of the chaumbir of London and halfe to the use of Mister' of broun Bakers."

Letters patent appointing the Mayor, the Aldermen, the Justices of the Peace, and Sheriffs of the City to be Commissioners for levying the tax imposed by the last Parliament on foreigners, householders in the City, and not householders, respectively. (fn. 8) Witness the King at Westminster, 27 July, 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441].

Saturday, 28 Oct., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], came Henry Coventre, an orphan, before John Paddisley, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, in the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and acknowledged that he had received his patrimony from Sir William Estfeld, Knt.

Folio 196 b.

Pannar'.

Monday, 14 Aug., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], came the Master and Wardens and good men of the Mistery of Drapers into the inner Chamber of the Guildhall before John Pattesley, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and complained that whereas, in times past, the Master and Wardens of the said Mistery in conjunction with a Serjeant-at-mace of the Chamber of the Guildhall were accustomed to have the search of all woollen cloth and of the measures called "metyerdes" brought to the City for sale, they had recently been prevented in such search by men of the Mistery of Tailors, on the ground that the right had been vested in them by the Mayor; the said Drapers, therefore, prayed a remedy. Therefore, taking into consideration that the science and knowledge of measures and the defect and sufficiency of cloths appertain to Drapers, but the fitting and sewing together of cloth are best known to Tailors, the two sciences being essentially different, and necessitating a different mode of instructing their apprentices, the said Mayor and Aldermen decreed that the Master and Wardens of the Drapers should continue their search as before, but for the purpose of peace, until the Tailors shall have come and put in their reply, the Mayor took again into his own hands the search of woollen cloth exposed for sale by tailors at St. Bartholomew's Fair, and appointed as his deputies for the purpose John Chichele, the Chamberlain, in conjunction with two sworn men, viz., one from the Mistery of Shermen and the other from the Mistery of Fullers, to assist as experts.

Writ to John Paddesley, the Mayor, bidding him to allow the Master and Wardens of the Fraternity and Mistery of Tailors and Linen Armourers of St. John the Baptist to make search and remedy defects found in those misteries and all engaged in them, pursuant to the King's letters patent granted to the said Master and Wardens. Witness the King at Dogmersfeld, (fn. 9) 14 Aug., 19 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441].

Folio 197.

Letters patent addressed to Robert Cloptone, the Mayor, confirming to the Mayor for the time being the right of supervision and search in respect of victuals and all misteries in the City, according to the City's ancient liberties and customs, notwithstanding the opposition of certain men of the Mistery of Tailors and others. Witness the King at Westminster, 21 Aug., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1442].

The King "to the Maister and Wardeins of þe mestiere of Taillours oþ'wise called Taillours Craft & oþ' of þe fraternite of Seint John þe Baptiste with Inne oure Citee of London'"

"Trusti and welbeloved we have under stonde by the humble supplicacion of oure right trusty and welbeloved the Maire of our citee of London how that ye have purchased of us & of oure graunt by our l'res patentes under our greet seal among other thynges to have serch and correccion of the mestier of Taillours (fn. 10) otherwyse called Taillours craft and of other of the Fraternite of seint John the baptiste within our Citee of London into the hurt and prejudice of the libertees and privileges by oure noble progenitours & predecessours Kynges of England graunted unto our seid Citee the whiche we by oure l'res patentes have confermyd and that ye wythin short tyme dispose yow to put in execucion oure seid l'res soo to yow grauntid as touchyng the serche of the seid Taillours Crafte and of other after the tenure of the same oure l'res And we wyllyng the seid libertes and privilages by oure seid progenitours and predecessours to the seid Citee grauntid and by us confermed to by kept unhurt and unblemisshed in alle their pointis wol therfore and charge yow straitli that anon after the sight of thes alle excusac'ons cessyng ye cesse & make noo serche of the seid taillours crafte ne of non other by force & vertu of our seid l'res patentes to yow graunted as above the contenne (?) of hem notwithstondyng And that ye obeie to suche serches as that the seid Mair or hys deputees by vertu of his office & of the seid libertees and privileges shal make and that ye be before us & oure counsail at oure Paleys of Westm' at the xv of Seint Michel next comyng bringyng with yow the said l'res patentes so by us graunted unto yow and we wil that no wise ye faille this upon peyne &c. Yeven at Shene the xxj day of August anno xx [A.D. 1442]." (fn. 11)

Folio 197 b.

Eleccio vic.

Thursday the Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], in the presence of John Pattesley, Mayor, John Bowes, the Recorder, William Estfeld, Knt., John Reynwelle, John Welles, Henry Frowyk, Stephen Broun, William Myldreth, John Hatherle, Ralph Holond, William Gregory, John Olney, John Suttone, and William Wetenhale, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs, William Combys was elected one of the Sheriffs by the Mayor, and Richard Ryche was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day John Chichele, grocer, was elected Chamberlain for the year ensuing; Thomas Cook, senior, draper, and John Herst, skinner, were elected Wardens of London Bridge; Thomas Chaltone and William Combys, Aldermen, John Norman, John Sturgeon, Geoffrey Feldyng, and Stephen "Forster," Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the said Chamberlain and Wardens.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said feast were presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Wednesday, 11 Oct., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], John Norman, Nicholas Wyfold, Stephen "Foster," and William Chapman nominated for Aldermen of the Ward of Castelbaynard, of whom John Norman, draper, was elected. (fn. 12)

Folio 198.

Friday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], in the presence of John Pattesley, Mayor, John Sevenok the Prior of Christchurch, John Bowes, the Recorder, William Estfeld, Knt., Nicholas Wottone, John Reynwelle, John Gedeney, John Welles, John Brokle, Henry Frowik, Stephen Broun, Thomas Wannesford, William Milreth, Thomas Chaltone, John Hathirle, Robert Cloptone, William Gregory, John Olney, John Suttone, Nicholas Yoo, and William Wetenhale, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, Robert Cloptone was elected. (fn. 13)

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted before the Barons of the Exchequer at Westminster.

Folio 198 b.

Tuesday, (fn. 14) 4 Dec., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], inquisition held before Robert Cloptone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Sheriffs, in the Chamber of the Guildhall within the Ward of Chepe by oath of John Bolle, Hugh Wiche, John Bale, Robert Horne, John Waldene, John Berstone, John Bracy, John Humbre, Thomas Holme, Edward Warmyngton, John Vache, Richard Lumley, Richard Horne, and William Berkyng, who say that John Gedney, draper and Alderman, was using and occupying merchandise of woollen cloth and other merchandise, which merchandise Mark Justinian and his foreign associates were also using and occupying, contrary to the statute thereon.

Pro clerico capelle Sc'i Thome supra pontem.

5 Dec., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], ordinance by Robert Cloptone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Commonalty, with the assent of John Herste and Thomas Cooke, the Masters of the work of London Bridge for the time being, that John Seyntjohn, late clerk of the chapel of St. Thomas on London Bridge, who had received an injury whilst engaged elsewhere in the service of the City, which incapacitated him for his work, should receive a weekly pension of 12 pence for life, so that he pray for the City's welfare and laudable prosperity of the Bridge.

Ordinacio Pistor.'

Wednesday, 8 Oct., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441], came the Bakers, householders in the City, before Robert Cloptone, the Mayor, (fn. 15) and the Aldermen, and presented the following petition:-

"Besekith mekely William Pynder', John Barkeby, Richard Alford, Richard Clarence, William Page, and Richard White, Wardeyns of the Crafte of Bakers, and hem compleyneth of grete defawtes of the servauntis of the Crafte that is to wite that they have on holy dayes a revelyng hall & a drynkyng their by the whych many of hem be not able to do no good werk a daye aftre whereby the howsholders ben gretely hyndryd of here werk Also they have a brotherhode & clothyng theroffe & meny that ben of that clothyng will not werke of lasse than they have gretter wages than they were woned to have of old tyme the which is grete hyndryng to the Crafte Also alle that ben of that clothynge will not come to here Maistoureshows fro satirday after noon till sonday after noon viij or ix of the clokke but if hit be they that ben hyrid to bere bred but for to do no thyng for here Maystirs haue they never so grete nede where as they be hired for the quarter of the yeere for the half yeere or for the hool yeere to do that that longeth to the Craft of Bakers Also if ther be iij or iiij or mo of that clothyng dwellyng with on bakere if eny of hem trespace & the Maister speke to hym theroffe or bidde hym mende hit alle they fortyfieth hym ayenst his Maistir that it may not be amendyd or els sodeynly they partyth out of his service Also they seyen that they will ordeyne that noon of hem shal werke by nyghtis time but for to go to werke by daye & leve by day The which defawtis lith not in the correccion of the said suppliantis Wherfore they besechyn yow of correcc'on of the said defautes after yowre good discrecion."

Thereupon all servants of Bakers were summoned to appear on the 22nd Nov., when they defended their action as follows:-

"Unto right worshipfull & graciouses lordes & soveraignes the Maire and Aldermen of the Cite of London Full mekely & in the most humble wyse shewen & besechen yowre povere servitours Robert Morteyn, Nicholas Rabet, Henry Serche, John Breteyn, William Emylyn, Thomas Clyff, John Bordy, Thomas Mathew, Richard Hille, and alle the company of the servantes Bakeres of the said Citee where as the Wardeyns of the Crafte of Bakeres with ynne the said Citee now late of their evill will to thentente for to hurte youre said besechers han made a suggestion unto you full gracious lordes to the whiche youre said besechers will with youre licence answere from pointe to pointe as here after may appere":-

First, as to Revelyng Hall, &c., they say that it is nothing new, but that time out of mind the custom had continued on certain days.

Folio 199.

Secondly, as to their brotherhood and clothing and refusal to work except for higher wages, they say that such brotherhood with "hodyng there of" had been used for long time "to the worship of God and engendring of love and for no maner of confederacie ne to no harme of the Crafte in no wise," and few of the Masters had not been members of it at the time they were servants, and that no change had been made in the amount of their wages.

Thirdly, as to servants absenting themselves from their masters' house, they say that "there is noo servaunt of the seid Crafte that shall be suffrid in eny wise to departe homward out of his Maisteres hous in to [sic] it be ix or x of the clokke with ynne nyght on the Satirday have thei never so grete nede."

Fourthly, as regards a servant being "fortified" in a trespass by his fellow servants, &c., they say that "if there be eny suche servauntes trespassyng to his Maister it is reasoun that he that so trespassith abye his gilte but not for to disclaundre alle servauntes for the foly of oo mysdoer," for that would be a conspiracy such as they disavow.

Fifthly, as to their alleged intention to refuse to work by night, they desire that those who refuse to work as well by night as by day, as of old accustomed, may be punished, for they had never as a body entertained such an idea.

Lastly, as to the wages taken by them, they are the same as of old, that is to say:-"The Fourner (fn. 16) takith be the weke werkyng daye & nyght xvjd. For whiche his charge is to. sesoun the bred & bake it and if it be lost in his defaute the Maister will sende it into Chepe & to selle iij loves for oo peny which losse the Fournere shal make good to his Maister The Whitehew (fn. 17) takith be the weke werkyng day & nyght xiijd. For whiche his charge he must weye alle the bred & if it happe of necligence the bred to lak of his weighte The same bred afterward weyen and founde fawty thanne that bred shall be sente into Chepe & ther solde to losse which losse the seid Whitehewe shall answere to his Maister The Sowreour (fn. 18) of whete bred takith be the weke werking daye & night xijd. For whiche he shall see the bred sesond and if it be to sad or to lighte it shall be sent in to Chepe & there solde to losse which losse shall renne only upon the seid Sowreour whiche losses & happes casuelly fallen ofte tymes unto grete hyndryng of yowre seid suppleantes Also everi journey manne is alowed every day & night jd. for his drinke & no more Notwithstandyng alle this yitte the Wardeyns of the seid Crafte of Bakeres han' ordeigned that if eny maner servaunt Bakere goo hoome to his wif eny nyght he shalle paye on the morwe to his Maister xd. with oute eny redempcion Also thei have ordeigned that if eny servaunt happen to displease his Maister They will sodenly putte hym oute of service though he have not fully be with his Maister ij wekes with oute eny warnyng where thorough the servaunt shall lose oo quarter service and the servaunt shall yeve a half quarter warnyng to the Maister afore his departyng Also full gracious lordes it is to be considerid that the most partie or many of the seid servauntes Bakeres bene Weddid men and for eny nede that ever hem happith they shall not be suffrid to goo to the market eny day ne to be absente oone owre but oonly on the sonday." The petitioners thereon pray a remedy.

The petition having been duly considered, as well as the scandals and inconveniences that had arisen from such private and unlawful Fraternities, established under colour of piety or other fiction, the Mayor and Aldermen decreed that such servants should thenceforth be under the rule and governance of their Masters and of the Wardens of the Mistery of Bakers, and that they should have no clothing or livery.

Folio 199 b.

Writ to the Sheriffs for the election of four citizens to attend a Parliament to be held at Westminster on the day of the Conversion of St. Paul [25 Jan.] next. Witness the King at his Manor of Shene, 3 Dec., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441]. (fn. 19)

Writ to John Pattesley, late Mayor, to make a return to the Barons of the Exchequer of the names of all merchants, alien and strangers, who have resided in the City during the year ending on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude last past [28 Oct.], the names of their hosts and other particulars, pursuant to the late statute. (fn. 20) Witness J[ohn] Fray (fn. 21) at Westminster, 11 Dec., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441].

7 February, 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441-2], came John Gerveys, "iremongere," before Robert Cloptone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, and showed that, whereas he had been admitted into the freedom of the City in the Mistery of "Iremongere" temp. William Cambridge, Mayor, and John "Bedrenden," Chamberlain, viz., on the 14th August, anno 9 Henry V. [A.D. 1421], he had long used, and was now using, the mistery or art of Drapers and not that of "Iremongers." He prayed, therefore, to be admitted into the freedom of the City in the Mistery of Drapers. His prayer granted at the instance of the Masters and good men of the said Mistery.

Folio 200.

15 Feb., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441-2], John Huett, "joynour," discharged by Robert Cloptone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

23 Feb., 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441-2], Richard, son of Simon Astone, late fleccher, admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art of Flecchers and sworn temp. Robert Otle, Mayor, and John Chichele, Chamberlain, had long been using, and was now using, the mistery or art of "Talughchandlers," and not the art of Flecchers. He prayed, therefore, to be admitted into the freedom of the City in the Art or Mistery of "Talughchandlers." His prayer granted at the instance of the Masters and good men of the said Art.

5 March, 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441-2], ordinances by the Common Council that the Mayor should take with him four Aldermen and four Commoners and the Masters of the Bridge to treat with the Rector and parishioners of the Church of Wolchirche lest in building their church they should obstruct the light of the City's house called "le Stokkys," and to compensate the said Rector and parishioners in some way in respect of the said building. (fn. 22)

10 March, 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1441-2], the custody of £7 belonging to John, son of Adam Coif, apprentice of William Heyden, "hatter," committed by Robert Cloptone, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and John Chichele, the Chamberlain, to the said William Heyden, until the end of his apprentice's term of service, viz., seven years. Sureties, viz., Thomas Gresham, "hatter," John Chateris, "haberdassher," William Reynold, "wexchaundeler," and Thomas Garnam, "hurer."

Afterwards, viz., on the 3rd Nov., 24 Henry VI. [A.D. 1445], came the above orphan, now of age, before Simon Eyre, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and acknowledged satisfaction for the above patrimony.

Folio 200 b.

Friday, 13 April, 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1442], came Humphrey Hayford, goldsmith, before Robert Cloptone, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, having married, with the consent of John Paddesley, the late Mayor, and the Aldermen, Agnes, daughter of John Admonde, late mercer, and acknowledged that he had received from John Chichele, the Chamberlain, the sum of £200 belonging to his wife, which had been brought into Court by John Asshe. (fn. 23)

Wednesday, 18 April, 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1442], came Roger Heysaunt, draper, who had married in like manner Johanna, another daughter of the said John Admonde, and acknowledged satisfaction for a similar sum.

Wednesday, 2 May, 20 Henry VI. [A.D. 1442], a petition to the Common Council by Thomas Cooke and John Herst, Masters of the Bridge, setting forth that divers persons who had "gersoned" (fn. 24) certain tenements and mansions belonging to the Bridge at a low price had recently disposed of the same, without licence or assent of the said Wardens, to others, "takyng grete availe þ'of yeerly to hem self & netheles levyng alle þe reparacions þ'of on the seid brigge to grete coste & charge to þe same brigge and grete amenusyng of þe commoditees þ'of and also ayenst þe custume of þe same brigge," and praying that it may be ordained that thenceforth no such alienations may be made without the licence of the said Wardens, under penalty of forfeiture of title; but rather that composition should be made with the Wardens for the time being in order that "the availe or encrece þ'of might turne to the use & reeleevyng of the grete nede of the seid brigge that contynnuelly axeth eide and attendaunce withouten which it is like to fall to grete myschief that god defende." Their prayer granted.

In the same Common Council it was agreed that all constables of the City should thenceforth be guaranteed any expenses incurred in the execution of their office.

Footnotes

1 Set out in Black's History of the Company, pp. 24, 25. Immediately following these ordinances (fo. 192) there is recorded an ordinance (undated, but evidently of the same date as the ordinances that precede), almost in the same words as that recorded supra, p. 227, but with an additional clause, enjoining that all manner of "nayles, arowhedes and all other hardware" shall also be brought to the Seld "ordeyned therfor" on the North side of the Guildhall.
2 Cf. supra, pp. 233, 243.
3 A similar presentation is recorded in Letter-Book I ('Cal.,' p. 220), where the editor has inadvertently named the church of St. Helen instead of the church of St. Michael Cornhill.
4 'Cal. of Wills,' i. 581.
5 Cf. supra, pp. 167, 174-6.
6 See the will of John Body, son of Johanna Body, daughter of Thomas Coterell, late mercer. 'Cal. of Wills, Court of Hust.,' ii. 420-1.
7 A bread of inferior leaven, which, by an order circa 1378, had to be boulted, or passed through a sieve (crybre). 'Cal. Letter-Book H,' p. 107. Cf. "panem cribro (cribre) scinceratum (ecclersy)." Neckham (Wright's Vocab.), p. 97.
8 Vide supra, p. 236.
9 Co. Hants.
10 Alluding to the charter of 1439, which is said to have been obtained "at the grete coste" of £71 5s. 3d. See Clode's 'Early Hist. of the Merchant Taylors Company,' p. 36.
11 From a minute in Journal 3 of the City's Records (fo. 153 b), we learn that on Saturday, 20 Oct., 1442, the Recorder of the City was dispatched to the King to repeal the charter granted to the Tailors, as being prejudicial to the City's liberties.
12 Sworn the following day. Journal 3, fo. 97.
13 It is said that Clopton's election was stoutly opposed by the Tailors in favour of Ralph Holland, a member of their own fraternity; that a riot ensued, and that the ringleaders were committed to Newgate. It has also been suggested that it was owing to the opposition he met with on this occasion that at the close of his year of office he and his brother Aldermen objected to the new charter granted to the Tailors by the King, as being prejudicial to the franchises of the City. Vide supra, p. 261 n.; Clode's 'Memorials,' pp. 5, 242-3.
14 A clerical error for Monday.
15 Cf. supra, p. 238.
16 There appears to be some mistake here, for Clopton was not elected Mayor until the 13th Oct.
17 The man who takes charge of the oven (fourn).
18 Or "white hewe," probably so called from his cutting up the dough for white ?) for making loaves of the required weight.
19 The man who adds the requisite amount of yeast or leaven ("sour") to render the bread of the proper quality ("sesond"). "Seasonyng the ovyn" by the Fourner is a term found in the Liber Niger Domus Regis Edw. IV. For the explanation of these bakers' terms, as well as of other difficulties which have presented themselves in this Calendar, the Editor is indebted to the kind services and extensive knowledge of Mr. J. Hodgkin, F.L.S.
20 Thereupon there were elected as Knights (in milites) for the City, William Estfeld, Knt., and John Bowys, the Recorder, and for the Commonalty, Philip Malpas, draper, and William Cottisbroke, grocer (Journal 3, fo. 108 b). The return is not recorded in the Letter-Book.
21 Vide supra, p. 238.
22 Chief Baron of the Exchequer formerly the City's Recorder.
23 An agreement between the parties was arrived at, and is recorded infra, p. 272.
24 Cf. supra, p. 212.
25 Acquired by payment of a fine (Gersuma).